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  • 1.
    Bergkvist, Max
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Assessment of microcirculation of the skin using Tissue Viability Imaging: A promising technique for detecting venous stasis in the skin2015In: Microvascular Research, ISSN 0026-2862, E-ISSN 1095-9319, Vol. 101, p. 20-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: : Venous occlusion in the skin is difficult to detect by existing measurement techniques. Our aim was to find out whether Tissue Viability Imaging (TiVi) was better at detecting venous occlusion by comparing it with results of laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) during graded arterial and venous stasis in human forearm skin. Methods: : Arterial and venous occlusions were simulated in 10 healthy volunteers by inflating a blood pressure cuff around the upper right arm. Changes in the concentration of red blood cells (RBC) were measured using TiVi, while skin perfusion and concentration of moving red blood cells (CMBC) were measured using static indices of LDF during exsanguination and subsequent arterial occlusion, postocclusive reactive hyperaemia, and graded increasing and decreasing venous stasis. Results: : During arterial occlusion there was a significant reduction in the mean concentration of RBC from baseline, as well as in perfusion and CMBC (p less than 0.008). Venous occlusion resulted in a significant 28% increase in the concentration of RBC (p = 0.002), but no significant change in perfusion (mean change -14%) while CMBC decreased significantly by 24% (p = 0.02). With stepwise increasing occlusion pressures there was a significant rise in the TiVi index and reduction in perfusion (p = 0.008), while the reverse was seen when venous flow was gradually restored. Conclusion: : The concentration of RBC measured with TiVi changes rapidly and consistently during both total and partial arterial and venous occlusions, while the changes in perfusion, measured by LDF, were less consistent This suggests that TiVi could be a more useful, non-invasive clinical monitoring tool for detecting venous stasis in the skin than LDF.

  • 2.
    Bergkvist, Max
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Zötterman, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Vascular Occlusion in a Porcine Flap Model: Effects on Blood Cell Concentration and Oxygenation.2017In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery. Global open, ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 5, no 11, article id e1531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Venous congestion in skin flaps is difficult to detect. This study evaluated the ability of tissue viability imaging (TiVi) to measure changes in the concentration of red blood cells (CRBC), oxygenation, and heterogeneity during vascular provocations in a porcine fasciocutaneous flap model.

    Methods: In 5 pigs, cranial gluteal artery perforator flaps were raised (8 flaps in 5 pigs). The arterial and venous blood flow was monitored with ultrasonic flow probes. CRBC, tissue oxygenation, and heterogeneity in the skin were monitored with TiVi during baseline, 50% and 100% venous occlusion, recovery, 100% arterial occlusion and final recovery, thereby simulating venous and arterial occlusion of a free fasciocutaneous flap. A laser Doppler probe was used as a reference for microvascular perfusion in the flap.

    Results: During partial and complete venous occlusion, increases in CRBC were seen in different regions of the flap. They were more pronounced in the distal part. During complete arterial occlusion, CRBC decreased in all but the most distal parts of the flap. There were also increases in tissue oxygenation and heterogeneity during venous occlusion.

    Conclusions: TiVi measures regional changes in CRBC in the skin of the flap during arterial and venous occlusion, as well as an increase in oxygenated hemoglobin during venous occlusion that may be the result of reduced metabolism and impaired delivery of oxygen to the tissue. TiVi may provide a promising method for measuring flap viability because it is hand-held, easy to-use, and provides spatial information on venous congestion.

  • 3.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Assessment of microvascular and metabolic responses in the skin2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The general aim of this project was to develop experimental in vivo models that allow for minimally invasive investigations of responses in the skin to microvascular and metabolic provocations. The cutaneous microvasculature has emerged as a valuable model and been proposed to mirror the microcirculation in other organs. Dysfunction in the cutaneous microcirculation has thus been linked to systemic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Models for investigating skin responses could facilitate the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms as well as effects of drugs.

    In the first study, three optical measurement techniques (laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF), laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) and tissue viability imaging (TiVi)) were compared against each other and showed differences in their ability to detect microvascular responses to provocations in the skin. TiVi was found more sensitive for measurement of noradrenaline-induced vasoconstriction, while LSCI was more sensitive for measurement of vascular occlusion. In the second study, microvascular responses in the skin to iontophoresis of vasoactive drugs were found to depend on the drug delivery protocol. Perfusion half-life was defined and used to describe the decay in the microvascular response to a drug after iontophoresis. In the third study, the role of nitric oxide (NO) was assessed during iontophoresis of insulin. The results showed a NO-dependent vasodilation in the skin by insulin. In the fourth study the vasoactive and metabolic effects of insulin were studied after both local and endogenous administration. Local delivery of insulin increased skin blood flow, paralleled by increased skin concentrations of interstitial pyruvate and lactate, although no change in glucose concentration was observed. An oral glucose load resulted in an increased insulin concentration in the skin paralleled by an increase in blood flow, as measured using the microdialysis urea clearance technique, although no changes in perfusion was measured by LSCI.

    The thesis concludes that when studying skin microvascular responses, the choice of measurement technique and the drug delivery protocol has an impact on the measurement results, and should therefore be carefully considered. The thesis also concludes that insulin has metabolic and vasodilatory effects in the skin both when administered locally and as an endogenous response to an oral glucose load. The vasodilatory effect of insulin in the skin is mediated by nitric oxide.

  • 4.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Högstedt, Alexandra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Skin glucose metabolism and microvascular blood flow during local insulin delivery and after an oral glucose load2016In: Microcirculation, ISSN 1073-9688, E-ISSN 1549-8719, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 597-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin causes capillary recruitment in muscle and adipose tissue, but the metabolic and microvascular effects of insulin in the skin have not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to measure glucose metabolism and microvascular blood flow in the skin during local insulin delivery and after an oral glucose load.

    METHODS: Microdialysis catheters were inserted intracutanously in human subjects. In eight subjects two microdialysis catheters were inserted, one perfused with insulin and one with control solution. First the local effects of insulin was studied, followed by a systemic provocation by an oral glucose load. Additionally, as control experiment, six subjects did not recieve local delivery of insulin or the oral glucose load. During microdialysis the local blood flow was measured by urea clearance and by laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI).

    RESULTS: Within 15 minutes of local insulin delivery, microvascular blood flow in the skin increased (urea clearance: P=.047, LSCI: P=.002) paralleled by increases in pyruvate (P=.01) and lactate (P=.04), indicating an increase in glucose uptake. An oral glucose load increased urea clearance from the catheters, indicating an increase in skin perfusion, although no perfusion changes were detected with LSCI. The concentration of glucose, pyruvate and lactate increased in the skin after the oral glucose load.

    CONCLUSION: Insulin has metabolic and vasodilatory effects in the skin both when given locally and after systemic delivery through an oral glucose load.

  • 5.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Löfberg, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Non-Invasive Measurement of Skin Microvascular Response during Pharmacological and Physiological Provocations2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 1-15, article id e0133760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Microvascular changes in the skin due to pharmacological and physiological provocations can be used as a marker for vascular function. While laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) has been used extensively for measurement of skin microvascular responses, Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) and Tissue Viability Imaging (TiVi) are novel imaging techniques. TiVi measures red blood cell concentration, while LDF and LSCI measure perfusion. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare responses to provocations in the skin using these different techniques. Method Changes in skin microcirculation were measured in healthy subjects during (1) iontophoresis of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and noradrenaline (NA), (2) local heating and (3) post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) using LDF, LSCI and TiVi. Results Iontophoresis of SNP increased perfusion (LSCI: baseline 40.9 +/- 6.2 PU; 10-min 100 +/- 25 PU; pless than0.001) and RBC concentration (TiVi: baseline 119 +/- 18; 10-min 150 +/- 41 AU; p = 0.011). No change in perfusion (LSCI) was observed after iontophoresis of NA (baseline 38.0 +/- 4.4 PU; 10-min 38.9 +/- 5.0 PU; p = 0.64), while RBC concentration decreased (TiVi: baseline 59.6 +/- 11.8 AU; 10-min 54.4 +/- 13.3 AU; p = 0.021). Local heating increased perfusion (LDF: baseline 8.8 +/- 3.6 PU; max 112 +/- 55 PU; pless than0.001, LSCI: baseline 50.8 +/- 8.0 PU; max 151 +/- 22 PU; pless than0.001) and RBC concentration (TiVi: baseline 49.2 +/- 32.9 AU; max 99.3 +/- 28.3 AU; pless than0.001). After 5 minutes of forearm occlusion with prior exsanguination, a decrease was seen in perfusion (LDF: p = 0.027; LSCI: pless than0.001) and in RBC concentration (p = 0.045). Only LSCI showed a significant decrease in perfusion after 5 minutes of occlusion without prior exsanguination (pless than0.001). Coefficients of variation were lower for LSCI and TiVi compared to LDF for most responses. Conclusion LSCI is more sensitive than TiVi for measuring microvascular changes during SNP-induced vasodilatation and forearm occlusion. TiVi is more sensitive to noradrenaline-induced vasoconstriction. LSCI and TiVi show lower inter-subject variability than LDF. These findings are important to consider when choosing measurement techniques for studying skin microvascular responses.

  • 6.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sadda, Veeranjaneyulu
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Ward, Liam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Hackethal, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. University of Appl Science, Austria.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Modeling Perfusion Dynamics in the Skin During Iontophoresis of Vasoactive Drugs Using Single-Pulse and Multiple-Pulse Protocols2015In: Microcirculation, ISSN 1073-9688, E-ISSN 1549-8719, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 446-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: After iontophoresis of vasoactive drugs into the skin, a decrease in perfusion is commonly observed. We delivered vasoactive drugs by iontophoresis using different delivery protocols to study how these affect this decrease in perfusion as measured using LDF. Methods: We measured skin perfusion during iontophoresis of (ACh), MCh, andNAusing a single pulse or separate pulses at different skin sites, and during repeated delivery of ACh at the same site. Results: Perfusion half-life was 6.1 (5.6-6.6) minutes for ACh and 41 (29-69) minutes for MCh (p less than 0.001). The maximum response with multiple pulses of ACh iontophoresis was lower than with a single pulse, 30 (22-37) PU vs. 43 (36-50) PU, p less than 0.001. Vasoconstriction to NA was more rapid with a single pulse than with multiple pulses. The perfusion half-life of ACh decreased with repeated delivery of ACh at the same site-first 16 (14-18), second 5.9 (5.1-6-9) and third 3.2 (2.9-3.5) minutes, p less than 0.001. Conclusions: The drug delivery protocol affects microvascular responses to iontophoresis, possibly as a result of differences in the dynamics of local drug concentrations. Perfusion half-life may be used as a measure to quantify the rate of perfusion recovery after iontophoresis of vasoactive drugs.

  • 7.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sarker, Saikat
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    The Microvascular Response to Transdermal Iontophoresis of Insulin is Mediated by Nitric Oxide2013In: Microcirculation, ISSN 1073-9688, E-ISSN 1549-8719, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 717-723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveInsulin has direct effects on blood flow in various tissues, most likely due to endothelial NO production. We investigated whether insulin delivered to the skin by iontophoresis increases microvascular perfusion and whether this effect is partly or completely mediated by the release of NO. MethodsIn healthy subjects, regular insulin and monomeric insulin were delivered to the skin by cathodal iontophoresis. The skin was pretreated either with L-NAME or control solution (PBS) using anodal iontophoresis. Microvascular responses were measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. ResultsA dose-dependent increase in perfusion was observed during iontophoresis of regular and monomeric insulin. The maximum perfusion was significantly elevated compared with control after PBS (regular insulin 53.6 (12.7-95.6) PU vs. 4.2 (3.4-4.8) PU, p = 0.002; monomeric insulin 32.6 (8.9-92.6) PU vs. 5.9 (3.4-56.0) PU, p = 0.03). The microvascular response to insulin was abolished after L-NAME (regular insulin: 25.6 (11.6-54.4) PU vs. control: 4.7 (2.9-11.5) PU, p = 0.15; monomeric insulin 10.9 (5.4-56.8) PU vs. control: 4.7 (2.9-11.5) PU, p = 0.22). ConclusionsThe main finding is that iontophoresis of insulin induces a dose-dependent vasodilation in the skin, which could be suppressed after pretreatment with a NO synthase inhibitor. This suggests that vasodilation in the skin after iontophoresis of insulin is mediated by the NO pathway.

  • 8.
    Mirdell, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Microvascular blood flow in scalds in children and its relation to duration of wound healing: A study using laser speckle contrast imaging2016In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 648-654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Microvascular perfusion changes in scalds in children during the first weeks after injury is related to the outcome of healing, and measurements of perfusion, based on laser Doppler imaging, have been used successfully to predict the need for excision and grafting. However, the day-to-day changes in perfusion during the first weeks after injury have not to our knowledge been studied in detail. The aim of this study, based on a conservative treatment model where excision and grafting decisions were delayed to day 14 after injury, was to measure changes in perfusion in scalds using laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) during the first three weeks after injury. Methods: We measured perfusion with LSCI in 34 patients at regular intervals between 6 h after injury until complete reepithelialization or surgery. Duration of healing was defined as the time to complete reepithelialization. Results: Less perfusion, between 6 and 96 h after injury, was associated with longer duration of healing with the strongest association occurring between 72 and 96 h. Burns that healed within 14 days had relatively high initial perfusion, followed by a peak and subsequent slow decrease. Both the maximum perfusion and the time-to-peak were dependent on the severity of the burn. Burns that needed excision and grafting had less initial perfusion and a gradual reduction over time. Conclusion: The perfusion in scalds in children shows characteristic patterns during the first weeks after injury depending on the duration of wound healing, the greatest difference between wounds of different severity being on the 4th day. Perfusion should therefore preferably be measured on the fourth day if it is to be used in the assessment of burn depth. (c) 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 9.
    Zötterman, Johan
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences.
    Bergkvist, Max
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Monitoring of partial and full venous outflow obstruction in a porcine flap model using laser speckle contrast imaging2016In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, E-ISSN 1532-1959, Vol. 69, no 7, p. 936-943Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In microsurgery, there is a demand for more reliable methods of postoperative monitoring of free flaps, especially with regard to tissue-threatening obstructions of the feeding arteries and draining veins. In this study, we evaluated laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) and laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) to assess their possibilities to detect partial and full venous outflow obstruction, as well as full arterial occlusion, in a porcine flap model. Methods: Cranial gluteal artery perforator flaps (CGAPs) were raised, and arterial and venous blood flow to and from the flaps was monitored using ultrasonic flow probes. The venous flow was altered with an inflatable cuff to simulate partial and full (50% and 100%) venous obstruction, and arterial flow was completely obstructed using clamps. The flap microcirculation was monitored using LSCI and LDF. Results: Both LDF and the LSCI detected significant changes in flap perfusion. After partial (50%) venous occlusion, perfusion decreased from baseline, LSCI: 63.5 +/- 12.9 PU (p = 0.01), LDF 31.3 +/- 15.7 (p = 0.64). After 100% venous occlusion, a further decrease in perfusion was observed: LSCI 54.6 +/- 14.2 PU (p amp;lt; 0.001) and LDF 16.7 +/- 12.8 PU (p amp;lt; 0.001). After release of the venous cuff, LSCI detected a return of the perfusion to a level slightly, but not significantly, below the baseline level 70.1 +/- 11.5 PU (p=0.39), while the LDF signal returned to a level not significant from the baseline 36.1 +/- 17.9 PU (p amp;gt; 0.99). Perfusion during 100% arterial occlusion decreased significantly as measured with both methods, LSCI: 48.3 +/- 7.7 (PU, pamp;lt;0.001) and LDF: 8.5 +/- 4.0 PU (pamp;lt;0.001). During 50% and 100% venous occlusion, LSCI showed a 20% and 26% inter-subject variability (CV%), respectively, compared to 50% and 77% for LDF. Conclusions: LSCI offers sensitive and reproducible measurements of flap microcirculation and seems more reliable in detecting decreases in blood perfusion caused by venous obstruction. It also allows for perfusion measurements in a relatively large area of flap tissue. This may be useful in identifying areas of the flap with compromised microcirculation during and after surgery. (C) 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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