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  • 1.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Assessment of Support Interventions in Dementia: Methodological and Empirical Studies2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dementia means a continuous deterioration of abilities and has a large impact on the persons affected as well as on family members and others close to the persons with dementia. Interventions aimed at this population in order to support and alleviate the often straining situation may be of great importance. There is a need to increase the knowledge and understanding of the impact and consequences of these interventions, both at an individual level and at a societal level. The demand for information concerning, e.g., economic and medical impact of technologies and interventions within health care is increasing. Assessment of technologies and interventions in dementia is related to certain methodological issues. The overall aim of this thesis is to contribute to the development of methodological knowledge concerning assessment studies and understanding of support interventions in dementia.

    This thesis work includes four studies that examine methodological aspects of assessment of support interventions in dementia and also report empirical research on the perception of support interventions from the perspectives of family caregivers of persons with dementia. In study I, an assessment model for assistive technology (AT) interventions in dementia was developed. In study II, part of the assessment model is applied, and a process evaluation of the AT intervention is presented. Study III examines family caregivers’ perception of the importance of different types of support and services. In the final study, study IV, a well‐acknowledged methodological challenge within the field of assessment in dementia is addressed: measuring health‐related quality of life (HRQoL). The studies are based on different data materials.

    An assessment model of AT interventions was developed that includes health economic evaluation from a societal perspective as well as evaluation of the intervention process. The perspectives of both persons with dementia and their relatives were incorporated in the model. The process evaluation was applied in study II in order to study the relatives’ perception of an AT intervention process. Assistive technology interventions in dementia may be of great significance for the relatives. By performing the process evaluation, several important aspects that need to be acknowledged in AT intervention processes in dementia were identified.

    Family caregivers of persons with dementia perceived different types of support/services within the comprehensive areas of counselling, relief and information as very important. Knowledge of the caregivers’ preferences is significant so that more directed support interventions may be provided.

    One specific methodological issue was addressed in study IV. The results of study IV showed that there were large differences in the results of cost‐effectiveness analyses depending on whether patient self‐ratings or proxy ratings (ratings of persons close to the patient) of patient HRQoL were used for the same analysis. These differences in the results could ultimately have an important impact on decision making and resource allocation.

    Support interventions aimed at persons with dementia and their relatives may be of great value. Conducting assessment studies of technologies and interventions within health care is important in order to increase the knowledge concerning, e.g., economic and medical impact. Assessment studies of support interventions dementia entails methodological issues that need to be addressed. There is a need for increased knowledge within this field and suggestions on methodology are made.

  • 2.
    Alwin, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eckard, Nathalie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fixartjänster i Sveriges kommuner: Kartläggning och samhällsekonomisk analys. Regeringsuppdrag2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report deals with so called minor home help services. These services are primarily meant for older persons with the aim to prevent injuries caused by falling in domestic environments (ones home). The minor home help services are mostly provided by the municipalities in Sweden, although it is not mandatory to provide these services. The extent of the provision and use of minor home help services has previously not been studied on a national level. The aim of this study was to delineate the minor home help services run by the municipalities in Sweden and further to examine and estimate the societal costs and consequences of providing these services.

    Out of the 290 municipalities in Sweden, 191 (66 %) offer minor home help services to their citizens. The tasks carried out are primarily aimed at preventing falls from furniture such as step stools or ladders, removing items that may cause falls (cords, carpets etc.) and providing an overhaul of injury risks in the home. A few municipalities also offer outdoor services such as removing snow in wintertime. In the majority of the municipalities (58 %) the services are offered free of charge but the user has to pay for the materials, in 32 % the services are completely free of charge and in 9 % of the municipalities an amount is charged for the services. The minor home help services are organized in various ways in the municipalities: the services can be completely run by the municipality where the services are carried out by one or several employed persons, by persons with disabilities (involved in daily activity programmes in the municipality) or by persons involved in work programmes; or the minor home help services can be carried out by the community rescue service or companies paid by the municipality to offer these services to the citizens. There are also organizations with volunteers that carry out minor home help services, these are however not included in the main results since the focus in this report is on municipal minor home help services. Ninety nine municipalities do not offer minor home help services to their citizens. Reasons for this are e.g. economic restraints and low demand.

    Experienced gains with minor home help services from the perspectives of the municipalities are prevention of falls, facilitation of the possibility to remain living in one’s own home, contribution to social wellbeing and being able to offer meaningful work tasks for persons in work programmes or persons with disabilities. Problems that have been brought forward are low demand of the services, problems with providing the target group with information and difficulties to measure the effect on fall injuries.

    A socioeconomic model was constructed for the analysis of costs and consequences of fall injuries. The model includes the large cost items as well as outcomes such as mortality and loss of quality of life when affected by a fall injury. The total direct costs in Sweden for fall injuries has previously been calculated to approximately 5 billion SEK, which includes only the direct costs during the first year of the injury. A calculation exercise was performed and applied to a hypothetical municipality with 50 000 inhabitants. This calculation exercise shows that if only a small amount of falls that lead to serious injuries (fractures) can be prevented by minor home help services, then the costs saved are approximately equivalent to the mean budget of minor home help services with one employed person. Calculations using real data including both costs and effects need to be performed.

  • 3.
    Alwin, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eckard, Nathalie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sammanfattning. Fixartjänster i Sveriges kommuner: Kartläggning2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I föreliggande rapport redovisas ett delresultat från regeringsuppdraget ”Social innovation i vården och omsorgen om de mest sjuka äldre” som VINNOVA fick i mars 2012.

    Under 2012 fick VINNOVA ett regeringsuppdrag ”Social innovation i vården och omsorgen om de mest sjuka äldre”. Regeringen uppdrog åt VINNOVA att i samarbete med universitet och högskolor och i samråd med andra relevanta aktörer vidareutveckla goda exempel kring sociala innovationer. Mer specifikt innebar uppdraget att genomföra ett fördjupat utvecklingsarbete kring sociala innovationer inom boende, lättare servicetjänster, trygghetsskapande insatser och social samvaro. Social innovation är en viktig del av VINNOVAs nya fokus på att stärka innovationskraften i offentlig verksamhet för att underlätta spridning och användning av innovationer inom kommuner, landsting och statliga myndigheter.Social innovation är en åtgärd som syftar till att öka människors välbefinnande genom att identifiera och möta upp sociala behov.

  • 4.
    Alwin, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    ResearchTriangle Institute (RTI) Health Solutions, Lund.
    Could the choice of patient versus proxy ratings for assessing quality of life in dementia affect resource allocation in health care?2012In: Farmeconomia: Health economics and therapeutic pathways, ISSN 1721-6915, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 25-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how the choice of patient versus proxy ratings of patient health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in dementia, for use in cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs), could potentially affect resource allocation in health care.

    METHODS:A model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) based on cognitive ability was used to assess the consequences of using HRQoL ratings from either patients themselves or proxies if a new treatment was to be introduced. The model was based on previously published data on costs related to AD stages as well as HRQoL ratings from AD patients and from their caregivers as proxy raters.

    RESULTS:The results show that there can be large differences in the results of the CEAs depending on whether the ratings of patients’ HRQoL were made by the patients themselves or by the proxy. When patient self-ratings of HRQoL were used, the cost/quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained was much higher as compared to the scenario when proxy ratings were used for the same analysis.

    CONCLUSIONS: The choice of patient self-ratings compared to proxy ratings of patients’ HRQoL can have a substantial effect on the results of CEAs. These differences in results may have an important impact on decision making and, ultimately, on resource allocation. In order to critically appraise the results of CEA studies in dementia we advise that both patient and proxy ratings are used in the CEA. To decide on methodology it is of great importance that focus is directed towards determining the most valid way to measure HRQoL in AD.

  • 5.
    Alwin, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalkan, Almina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Preferenser och perspektiv vid beräkning av QALY2012In: QALY som effektmått inom vården: möjligheter och begränsningar / [ed] Lars Bernfort, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012, p. 15-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Alwin, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Johansson, Ulla
    Center for Research and Development Uppsala Universitet.
    Josephsson, Staffan
    Karolinska institutet.
    Haraldsson, Ulla
    Stockholms Sjukhem.
    Boström, Carina
    Primärvården Gästrikland.
    Rosshagen, Anna
    Primärvården Gästrikland.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    Health economic and process evaluation of AT interventions for persons with dementia and their relatives - A suggested assessment model2007In: Technology and Disability, ISSN 1055-4181, Vol. 19, no 2-3, p. 61-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is growing interest in assistive technology (AT) as a means of enabling participation in everyday activities for persons with dementia and their relatives. Health economic assessment of AT in dementia is of importance due to the consequences of the disease for both patients and relatives and to the high societal costs for dementia care. The aim of this article is to outline a model for assessment of AT interventions for persons with dementia. The model expands existing assessment models as it also includes evaluation of the intervention process. Methodological challenges and possibilities in making health economic assessments, including outcomes and costs, as well as process evaluation, are discussed in the article. © 2007 IOS Press. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Alwin, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Utvärdering av försöksverksamhet med service- och signalhundar2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport redovisar utvärderingen av en försöksverksamhet med ser-vice- och signalhundar som bedrevs mellan år 2009 och 2014. Utvärderingen inkluderar servicehundar, signalhundar samt alarmerande servicehundar (epilepsihundar och diabeteshundar). Totalt 56 ekipage (förare samt hund) ingick i utvärderingsstudien. Data i studien samlades in före samt efter genomgången service- och signalhundsutbildning. Syftet med utvärderingen är att studera hur certifierade service- och signalhundar påverkar förarnas behov av offentliga stödinsatser och de totala samhällskostnaderna. Dessutom studerades hur service- och signalhundar påverkar förarna med avseende på hälsorelaterad livskvalitet, välbefinnande, självförtroende och fysisk aktivitet samt om användningen av service- och signalhundar är kostnadseffektiv ur ett samhällsperspektiv.

      Resultat och slutsatser

    • Service- och signalhundar minskar i genomsnitt förarnas behov av offentliga stödinsatser med 197 000 kronor (6 procent) under en tioårsperiod.
    • Livskvaliteten för personer med behov av service- och signalhundar är låg jämfört med den allmänna populationen i Sverige. Studien visar på en förbättring i livskvaliteten och välbefinnandet för förare med en certifierad hund.
    • Förarnas grad av fysisk aktivitet ökade med en certifierad hund och majoriteten av dem angav att de ökat sin tid utanför hemmet samt att de även ökat sin tid för att delta i sociala aktiviteter tack vare hunden.
    • Förarnas negativa emotionella upplevelser minskar med en certifierad hund.
    • Förarna beskriver själva den certifierade hunden som ett viktigt verktyg för ökad självständighet och trygghet.
    • Den hälsoekonomiska modellen som analyserar kostnadseffektiviteten visar att ett innehav av en certifierad hund är ett dominant alternativ jämfört med att inte ha en certifierad hund. Detta innebär att kostnaderna ur ett samhällsperspektiv under en tioårsperiod är lägre (-103 000 kronor) samtidigt som effekterna i form av vunna QALY (kvalitetsjusterade levnadsår) är högre (+0,15).
    • Finansieringsanalysen visar att förare som har certifierade hundar sparar resurser åt alla aktörer (stat, kommun och landsting) men får själva ökade utgifter på grund av hunden.
    • Studien baseras på ett lågt antal observationer (56 ekipage). Det i kombination med att det är en stor spridning i resursförbrukningen mellan ekipagen medför att det finns en statistisk osäkerhet i resultaten. Slutsatserna bedöms dock som rimliga eftersom de är samstämmiga.
  • 8.
    Alwin, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Äldre - vård - civilsamhälle (ÄVC) .
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    Health Related Quality of Life in Dementia as Effect Measure of AT Interventions - Methodological Aspects2007In: 9th European Conference for the Advancement of Assistive Technology in Europe,2007, Amsterdam: IOS Press , 2007, p. 217-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Alwin, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Perception and significance of an assistive technology intervention - the perspectives of relatives of persons with dementia2013In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 35, no 18, p. 1519-1526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine relatives' perception of an assistive technology intervention aimed at persons with dementia (PwDs) and their relatives, and to examine whether, and how, experiences of the intervention process differed between relatives valuing the intervention to be of high, and relatives perceiving it to be of low significance. Method: A total of 47 relatives of PwDs within the Swedish Technology and Dementia project were interviewed telephonically using a modified version of the Patient perspective on Care and Rehabilitation process instrument. A total of 46 participants were divided into two groups depending on whether they valued the intervention to be of great significance (GS group; N = 33) or of some/no significance (SNS group; N = 13). Results: Several aspects of the intervention were perceived as highly important, e.g. being shown consideration and respect, and having somewhere to turn. The results indicate that relatives in the GS group perceived certain aspects of the intervention process as highly fulfilled to a larger extent than did relatives in the SNS group. Conclusions: This study illustrates how process evaluations can be used to increase the understanding and to identify improvement aspects of interventions.

  • 10.
    Alwin, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Teknik för personer med demens: En utvärderingsstudie av teknikintervention för personer med demenssjukdom och deras närstående2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this study was to study costs and effects of an assistive technology intervention that included assistive technology, support and strategies for persons with dementia and their relatives. Further, the aim was to study the quality of the intervention process and how it was perceived by the participants in the project.

    This assessment study was performed within a project called “Technology and Dementia – development work, create methods and increase competence”. This project was coordinated by the Swedish Institute of Assistive Technology in collaboration with the Alzheimer Society in Sweden and the Dementia Association and was funded by the Swedish Inheritance Fund, Linköping University and the County Council of Östergötland. Two national resource centres were appointed within the project. These developed the assistive technology intervention.

    The study was designed as a pre/post study. Data was collected at three different occasions of measurement: baseline, first follow-up (four weeks after the intervention) and second follow-up (twelve weeks after the intervention). Different outcome measures were used to study the effect of the intervention: health related quality of life (HRQoL), support/caregiving situation, quality of sleep, perception of time and ability to perform everyday life activities. The costs in the study had a societal perspective. A process oriented instrument was used to study the quality of the intervention process. Persons with dementia as well as their relatives answered questionnaires and interviews in the study.

    Data was collected via interviews at the resource centres, via self ratings and through telephone interviews from the research team. The total population included in the analyses was 48 persons with dementia and 47 relatives.

    The results showed that there were no significant differences in effects between baseline and the two follow-ups, except for ability to perform everyday activities where data indicated deterioration during the study period. In one dimension of HRQoL for the relatives there was also a significant difference; the relatives rated greater difficulties at the second follow-up. Cognitive ability was used as a measure for disease stability during the study, and showed no significant differences. There was, however, a rather large drop-out at the second follow-up (15 %) in data on cognitive ability, therefore this result should be interpreted with caution; the persons with dementia may have deteriorated during the study period. This could be reflected in the deterioration in the ability to perform everyday life activities measure.

    The persons with dementia rated their HRQoL higher than the relatives’ proxy ratings (i.e. relatives’ ratings of the HRQoL of the persons with dementia), the differences between the proxy ratings and the persons’ own ratings were significant at all three occasions of measurement. The relatives rated their own HRQoL somewhat higher than the persons with dementia rated their own HRQoL. There were no significant differences between baseline and the followups.

    The intervention included many different types of assistive technologies. The cost of the intervention was 16 000 SEK/person with dementia and relative. There were no significant differences in costs of formal care during the study period. Many relatives performed informal care many hours of the day. Even though the differences in informal caregiving between baseline and the second follow-up were not significant there was a tendency of a slight increase in informal care time of everyday life activities and there was also a decrease in time spent supervising, a little less than one hour per day.

    An evaluation of the quality of the intervention process and how it was perceived was performed. Most relatives perceived that their needs were well fulfilled during the intervention process. Some aspects were brought forward where the intervention process could be improved. Seventy-two percent of the relatives rated the intervention as of great importance, 28 percent rated the intervention as of some importance or of no importance. The persons with dementia had higher expectations on the intervention than the relatives and most persons with dementia perceived the intervention as of great importance.

    Technology and Dementia was a trial project where potential effects and costs were studied. The study was explorative and contributes to increasing the knowledge on use of assistive technology in dementia and also on assessment methodology within this field. There were limitations in the study regarding size of the study population and lack of a comparison group.

    Assessing assistive technology for persons with dementia and their relatives from a socioeconomic perspective entails certain methodological challenges. A model for assessment of assistive technology interventions was developed and tried in this study. Results and methodology are discussed in relation to the assessment model. From this assessment study, areas have been identified for future studies. Future studies will be performed through subgroup analyses to identify groups where the intervention was successful and groups where the intervention was not successful.

     

  • 11.
    Alwin, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Support/services among family caregivers of persons with dementia - perceived importance and services received2010In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 25, p. 240-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conclusion: The results from this study suggest that there is almost no difference between groups of caregivers experiencing higher and lower NI regarding their perception of what are important types of support/services. The caregivers rated different types of support/services within the areas of information, relief and counselling as very important.

  • 12.
    Aronsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kalkan, Almina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eckard, Nathalie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Differences between hypothetical and experience-based value sets for EQ-5D used in Sweden: Implications for decision makers2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 848-854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: A number of value sets are available today for converting EQ-5D questionnaire responses to quality-adjusted life year-weights used in health economic evaluations. The aim of this study is to analyse the differences between the commonly used hypothetical UK value set and the newly introduced Swedish experience-based value set and to evaluate health economic implications of such differences on policy decisions. Methods: Differences between the two value sets were studied using two methods: a comparison of health states and improvements as well as an empirical comparison. In the comparison of health states and improvements, the valuations of all EQ-5D states and all pure improvements were compared. In the empirical study, a database of 23,925 individuals was used to identify patient groups that could be affected by the implementation of the Swedish experience-based value set. Results: The comparison of health states and possible improvements showed that only three health states were assigned a lower quality-adjusted life year-weight and most improvements were given smaller absolute values if the experience-based value set was used. The empirical comparison showed that severe conditions were assigned higher values when using the experience-based value set. Conclusions: The Swedish experience-based value set seems to render a higher estimated level of health-related quality of life in virtually all health conditions compared to the hypothetical UK value set. In extension, health-related quality of life enhancing interventions are likely to be given higher priority in decision-making situations where hypothetical values are used to construct quality-adjusted life year-weights. In situations where experience-based quality-adjusted life year-weights are used, life-prolonging interventions would be prioritised.

  • 13.
    Bernfort, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eckard, Nathalie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A case of community-based fall prevention: Survey of organization and content of minor home help services in Swedish municipalities2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 643-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to survey minor home help services provided by Swedish municipalities with the main purpose to prevent fall injuries.

    METHODS: If minor home help services were presented on the homepage of a municipality, an initial telephone contact was taken. Thereafter a questionnaire was administered, including questions about target groups, aim with the services, tasks included, costs and restrictions for users, budget, and experienced gains with the services. Municipalities not providing minor home help services were asked about the reason therefore and if the municipality had previously provided the services Results: The questionnaire response rate was 92%. In 191 of Sweden's 290 municipalities services were provided by, or in cooperation with, the municipality. Reasons for not providing the services were mainly financial and lack of demand. Services were more often provided in larger cities and in municipalities located in populous regions. In some municipalities services were performed by persons with functional disabilities or unemployed persons. CONCLUSIONS: BOTH PROVIDERS AND USERS EXPRESSED SATISFACTION WITH THE SERVICES ASPECTS EXPRESSED WERE THAT SERVICES LEAD TO GREATER SENSE OF SAFETY AND SOCIAL GAINS THE EFFECT OF THE SERVICES IN TERMS OF FALL PREVENTION IS YET TO BE PROVED WITH ONLY A SMALL FALL-PREVENTIVE EFFECT SERVICES ARE PROBABLY COST-EFFECTIVE IMPROVED QUALITY OF LIFE, SENSE OF SAFETY, AND BEING ABLE TO OFFER MEANINGFUL WORK TO OTHERWISE UNEMPLOYED PERSONS ARE IMPORTANT ASPECTS THAT MIGHT IN THEMSELVES MOTIVATE THE PROVISION OF MINOR HOME HELP SERVICES.

  • 14.
    Brandt, Åse
    et al.
    Dept of Research and Development, Århus, Denmark.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Guest Editorial: Assistive Technology Outcomes Research: Contributions to Evidence-Based Assistive Technology Practice2012In: Technology and Disability, ISSN 1055-4181, Vol. 24, p. 5-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Heintz, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roback, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Förutsättningar för etablering av en nationell prioriteringskommitté i hälso- och sjukvården: Erfarenheter från andra länder2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna studie är att redovisa förutsättningar för en nationell kommitté eller motsvarande för utvärdering och prioritering vid beslut avseende införande av andra sjukvårdsteknologier än läkemedel i hälso- och sjukvården samt att presentera för- och nackdelar med olika lösningar.

    Huvuddelen av underlaget till studien kommer från intervjuer med ett flertal internationella aktörer - för att fånga ett brett faktaunderlag om hur andra länder har agerat i frågan. De länder som har ingått i studien är Australien, England, Kanada, Nederländerna, Norge, Nya Zeeland och Spanien. Utöver intervjuer med nyckelpersoner i respektive land har vi genomfört två workshops med representanter från Nationella samordningsgruppen för kunskapsstyrning. Statliga myndigheter och företrädare för medicintekniska företag har varit inbjudna att delta.

    Vi bedömer att det är realistiskt och motiverat att överväga införande av ett nationellt system för utvärdering och beslut om införande och utmönstring av icke-farmakologiska sjukvårdsteknologier. I ett sådant system förutsätts att beslut fattas av någon typ av nationell prioriteringskommitté eller nämnd, fortsättningsvis i rapporten förkortad NPK.

    Vårt uppdrag har varit att presentera och diskutera olika praktiska och principiella komponenter i ett sådant system. Hur organisationen bör utformas i detalj har vi inte tagit ställning till då frågan ligger utanför vårt uppdrag. I genomgången har vi pekat på fördelar och nackdelar med olika lösningar för de tio komponenter som vi menar utgör byggstenarna för en NPK. Baserat på dessa för- och nackdelar, men utan att ta ställning till organisatoriska eller tidsmässiga aspekter, eller omfattningen på verksamheten, så framträder för oss ett huvudalternativ. Detta huvudalternativ bör diskuteras i relation till alternativa lösningar och preciseras ytterligare.

    Med tanke på att utgångspunkten för denna rapport har varit att undersöka förutsättningar för etablering av en nationell prioriteringskommitté i hälso- och sjukvården, är det också naturligt att vi haft den nationella nivån som utgångspunkt. Varje land vi har undersökt har ett system som är utformat för att passa in i den sjukvårdsstruktur och finansiering som finns i det enskilda landet. Då ansvaret för Sveriges hälso- och sjukvård delas mellan stat och landsting, förefaller det mest adekvat att staten får ansvar för samordning, tillhandahållande av beslutsstöd och kompetens (via myndigheter och kommittéer) och att en NPK formas och drivs av staten tillsammans med sjukvårdshuvudmännen. De sistnämnda har ansvar för att producera och finansiera hälso- och sjukvården. En sådan organisation vore mest i linje med dagens sjukvårdssystem och hur finansieringsansvaret är uppdelat. Alternativet är att bilda ett nationellt organ med enbart företrädare från regioner och landsting. Mot detta talar att statens expertkompetens utnyttjas i lägre grad och att det finns en risk att regionalpolitiska hänsynstaganden kan spela en alltför stor roll.

    Med tanke på att budgetansvaret för att bekosta nya teknologier i hälso- och sjukvården i Sverige i huvudsak ligger på landstingen så förfaller det ologiskt att förorda direkt budgetansvar för NPK. Därmed inte sagt att kostnadsmedvetenhet inte är mycket viktigt i en sådan kommitté. Det bör därför vara en kommitté som kan balansera budgethänsyn med kostnadseffektivitet och rättvis fördelning av resurser.

    De flesta länder strävar mot ett system som är inkluderande när det gäller vilka typer av teknologier som ska ingå i utvärderingarna. De flesta typer av teknologier, både gamla och nya, ter sig därför som aktuella även i Sverige. Samtidigt är det tydligt att det inte går att utvärdera alla teknologier med tanke på den stora arbetsmängd detta skulle leda till. Den svenska branschorganisationen Swedish Medtech uppskattar att det idag finns cirka en halv miljon unika medicintekniska produkter och utifrån detta så förstår vi att inflödet av enbart nya medicintekniska produkter är mycket stort. Dessutom innebär många av dessa endast marginella förändringar jämfört med tidigare teknologier. Vi förespråkar ett system som prioriterar vilka teknologier som ska utvärderas baserat på deras konsekvenser (hälsoeffekt, ekonomisk omfattning, etisk kontrovers etc.) snarare än typ av teknologi eller om den är gammal eller ny. På detta sätt undviks att vissa typer av teknologier får ”fribrev” in isystemet.

    Det finns tre huvudalternativ med tanke på vem som tar fram kunskapsunderlag till utvärderingarna: 1. Enbart företagen; 2. Enbart den beslutande kommittén eller motsvarande; 3. Dessa två kombinerat. Baserat på våra erfarenheter från andra länder och även de återkopplingar vi har fått från referensgruppen tror vi att det vore olyckligt att införa ett system som helt utesluter företagen som uppgiftslämnare. Framför allt kommer NPK i sådana fall att gå miste om dataunderlag som ännu inte är publicerat men som kan vara av stor vikt för besluten. Dock behöver företagsbaserade underlag givetvis granskas av någon oberoende instans innan beslutet fattas.

    Det finns behov av tydliga incitament för att lyfta frågor till utvärdering och beslut. Erfarenheter från Västra Götalandsregionen tyder på att den startfinansieringsmodell som tillämpas där har varit ett lyckat sätt för att få in förslag på teknologier som bör utvärderas. Incitament behöver dock inte alltid vara av ekonomisk art utan kan även vara av administrativ karaktär. Registrering av alla nya teknologier (produkter och procedurer) i ett register innan de får användas skulle kunna bidra till att identifiera kandidater för utvärdering.

    Samtliga länder vi har undersökt har valt att ha flera aktörer involverade i processerna för identifiering, utvärdering, prioritering och beslut angående införande. Flera informanter har även framhållit vikten av att separera den organisation som fattar beslutet från den eller de som tar fram beslutsunderlaget för att öka legitimiteten. Det kan vara administrativt mer komplicerat med två separata organisationer men våra intryck från denna studie tyder på att denna nackdel uppvägs av de fördelar som uppnås.

    Det är en fördel om processerna för identifiering, utvärdering och beslut är så öppna som möjligt. Stor öppenhet i alla steg medför dock en stor arbetsbörda och kostnader. Frågan om öppenhet och medverkan från allmänheten förefaller vara en avvägning mellan tillräcklig grad av sekretess och öppenhet rörande både process och beslut för att uppnå legitimitet. Att vid ett eventuellt införande av NPK starta med en relativt sluten process där enbart besluten redovisas men sedan ha en tydlig ambition och plan för att bli mer öppen i hela processen efter hand kan vara en framkomlig väg. Vi bedömer att den värdegrund och det utvecklingsarbete av öppna prioriteringar som redan pågår i Sverige är av hög relevans för NPK. Vi ser därför inget behov av en särskild värdegrund för NPK, utöver den som blir resultatet av de pågående  prioriteringsdiskussionerna. Det är dock angeläget att ett eventuellt bildande av NPK föregås av framtagning av tydliga direktiv till NPK om hur den ska förhålla sig till och tillämpa riksdagens riktlinjer för prioriteringar.

    Med avseende på politisk involvering eller inte i besluten har det i samtliga länder vi har undersökt varit en tydlig politisk koppling till själva beslutet om införande eller inte av teknologin. Detta står i kontrast till hur det för närvarande fungerar i Sverige med t.ex. TLV, där besluten inte involverar politiker. I denna fråga verkar det snarare handla om att skapa ett system som gör att den kommitté eller person som ska fatta införandebeslutet har tillräckligt förtroende och legitimitet att förvalta denna uppgift. Det kan betyda att politiker inkluderas i en kommitté som befolkningsföreträdare eller representanter för den part som ansvarar för finansieringen. Lika väl kan det fungera med personer i kommittén som medverkar på personliga mandat, som har en adekvat kompetens och erfarenhet men också ett förtroende från andra att lösa uppgiften.

    Formen för ”Omprövning” är starkt sammankopplad med valet av andra strukturella komponenter. Vår utgångspunkt är dock att det bör finnas någon typ av omprövningsmekanism under processen samt efter beslut. Skulle det bli en myndighet som fattar bindande beslut på liknande sätt som TLV gör i dag bör det vara möjligt för företag att överklaga beslutet till domstol. I andra fall är det NPK som bör utveckla egna rutiner för omprövning på eget eller andras initiativ.

    Vi har i denna studie undersökt förutsättningar för etablering av en nationell prioriteringskommitté i Sverige för icke-farmakologiska sjukvårdsteknologier i hälso- och sjukvården. Arbetet har baserats på erfarenheter från länder med existerande system för beslut om införande av sjukvårdsteknologier samt diskussioner i Sverige med en referensgrupp samt styrgrupp för projektet. Vi har i vårt arbete identifierat tio viktiga komponenter för uppbyggnaden av en sådan kommitté och fört en diskussion kring dessa. Vi ser möjligheter och fördelar med att etablera en nationell prioriteringskommitté i Sverige för identifiering, utvärdering och prioritering vid beslut avseende införande av andra sjukvårdsteknologier än läkemedel i hälso- och sjukvården. För- och nackdelar med olika tänkbara lösningar har diskuterats i rapporten, medan de mer exakta formerna för en nationell prioriteringskommitté är en fråga för fortsatt utredning.

  • 16.
    Carlsson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Heintz, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roback, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tinghög, Gustav
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nationellt system för utvärdering, prioritering och införandebeslut av icke-farmakologiska sjukvårdsteknologier: en förstudie2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for a national system to evaluate medical technologies other than pharmaceuticals is being considered. Several proposals advocate establishing a type of “Treatment Benefits Board”. To highlight problems and analyse the conditions for national assessments in this context, the National Board of Health and Welfare, the Medical Products Agency, the Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU), and the Dental and Pharmaceutical Benefits Agency (TLV) jointly appointed the Centre for Medical Technology Assessment (CMT) at Linköping University to conduct a preliminary study. The preliminary study should provide a foundation for the agencies to decide whether or not the issue needs to be investigated further.

    The preliminary study aims to develop background information concerning how Sweden and other countries currently assess, prioritise, and implement decisions involving new nonpharmaceutical health technologies. The basic questions addressed are:

    1. How can nonpharmaceutical technologies be defined and categorised for the purpose of setting parameters for an approval process?
    2. How is the current process of assessment, prioritisation, and approval in Sweden structured, focusing on SBU, the Medical Products Agency, the National Board of Health and Welfare, and TLV?
    3. How have other countries organised their systems for assessment, prioritisation, and approval of nonpharmaceutical technologies?

    Within the framework of the project it was not possible to conduct detailed, onsite studies of the healthcare systems in other countries. Hence, we relied on descriptions of other countries’ systems as reported in scientific articles, reports, and official documents available from various organisations and other sources via the Internet. In some instances the information was complemented by interviewing key individuals. The same applies to the descriptions of Swedish agencies. Information concerning the prevalence of various technologies was collected from official reports/reviews and registry data. We present information from six countries where we found sufficient information to preliminarily answer the questions we formulated in advance. The countries are Australia, New Zealand, England, Spain, Italy, Canada, and the USA.

    We draw the following conclusions from the preliminary study: It is relatively complicated to define nonpharmaceutical technologies and delineate the technologies that potentially could be subject to regulation. Our practical attempts to describe the technologies that SBU Alert has assessed show that:

    surgical and medical interventions dominate, but a relatively high number of screening programmes have also been assessed;

    • medical equipment and pharmaceuticals are the predominant input factors. Active implants and biological products are also relatively common. Assistive devices and dental products are seldom considered to be primary input factors;
    • most technologies are used primarily for treatment purposes. Diagnostic technologies are also relatively common.

    By removing pharmaceuticals from the equation and combining interventions and input factors, SBU Alert arrived at 18 different categories of health technologies that it assesses. The predominant combination is surgical intervention and biomedical equipment. This is followed by surgical intervention and insertion of active implants. In the report, we propose a way to define and classify technologies that we found to be appropriate for the purpose. This does not exclude pharmaceuticals. Rather, pharmaceuticals are included as one input factor among others.

    Another aim was to produce background information describing how Sweden and other countries currently assess, prioritise, and approve new nonpharmaceutical technologies. We identified several key components that we believe are worth considering in designing a national system for assessing, prioritising, and approving new nonpharmaceutical health technologies. These components are:

    • Organisational level – At what organisational level should the approval of nonpharmaceutical health technologies take place?
    • Scope – Should an all-inclusive or selective approach be taken towards inclusion/selection of health technologies for assessment?
    • Base package – Should there be a basic list showing what is financed with public funds, or is it sufficient to present only new decisions on the margin?
    • Diversity of actors – Should a single actor, or many actors, be responsible for assessment, prioritisation, and decisions regarding financing?
    • Fact producer – Who would be most appropriate to manage the factual information base?
    • Transparency – How transparent should one be in presenting the decisionmaking process and its results?
    • Political involvement – How politically independent should the decisions be?
    • Budgetary responsibility – Should the unit that recommends or decides on approval have a budgetary responsibility?
    • New and old – Should the decisions apply both to introducing new technology and phasing out old technology?
    • Fundamental values – Should there be an explicit set of fundamental values for prioritisation, and how should it be formulated?
    • Appeals – Should there be a mechanism to appeal decisions?

    To summarise, we see a trend in other countries towards an increasing level of assessment and prioritisation in decisions regarding the introduction of nonpharmaceutical health technologies. Our preliminary impression is that nearly every system that we studied continues to develop and remains “a work in progress”. For instance, in Australia and New Zealand official inquiries are under way to suggest or present proposals for improvement.

    Our studies of systems in different countries, although limited, indicate there is no perfect system to copy directly. The way in which the various systems are organised is somewhat related to how health care is organised in the respective countries and how many resources they have decided to dedicate to this purpose. The results from our preliminary study show, however, that several countries have more experience in “approving” nonpharmaceutical-based technologies than what we have in Sweden. The most interesting countries are England, New Zealand, Canada, and Australia. Spain could also be of interest. Hence, there is good reason to consider what might be the best way to analyse these countries’ systems in detail and complement this information with data from other nations that we were unable to include in the preliminary study, e.g. the Netherlands and Israel.

    To more rigorously analyse other systems, if this project is continued, investigators should probably start from one or more models for a Swedish mechanism. To arrive at one or more tentative models in this context, the county councils should be involved in the project. The format could be a workshop that engages representatives from public agencies, county councils, and professional associations, where they jointly outline conceivable models that could then be analysed and discussed in light of the experiences of other nations.

  • 17.
    Dahlbäck, Nils
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, CSELAB - Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wang, QianYing
    Stanford University, Stanford, CA.
    Nass, Clifford
    Stanford University, Stanford, CA.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Äldre - vård - civilsamhälle (ÄVC) . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Similarity is more important than expertise: accent effects in speech interfaces2007In: CHI '07 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York, NY, USA: ACM , 2007, p. 1553-1556Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a balanced between-participants experiment (N = 96) American and Swedish participants listened to tourist information on a website about an American or Swedish city presented in English with either an American or Swedish accent and evaluated the speakers' knowledge of the topic, the voice characteristics, and the information characteristics. Users preferred accents similar to their own. Similarity-attraction effects were so powerful that same-accents speakers were viewed as being more knowledgeable than different-accent speakers even when the information would be much better-known by the opposite-accent speaker. Implications for similarity-attraction overwhelming expertise are discussed.

  • 18.
    Ekdahl, Anne W.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindh Mazya, Amelie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Wiklund, Rolf
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Long-Term Evaluation of the Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment: A Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT): Clinical Outcomes and Total Costs After 36 Months2016In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 263-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare the effects of care based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) as a complement to usual care in an outpatient setting with those of usual care alone. The assessment was performed 36 months after study inclusion. Design: Randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded, single-center trial. Setting: A geriatric ambulatory unit in a municipality in the southeast of Sweden. Participants: Community-dwelling individuals aged >= 75 years who had received inpatient hospital care 3 or more times in the past 12 months and had 3 or more concomitant medical diagnoses were eligible for study inclusion. Participants were randomized to the intervention group (IG) or control group (CG). Intervention: Participants in the IG received CGA-based care for 24 to 31 months at the geriatric ambulatory unit in addition to usual care. Outcome measures: Mortality, transfer to nursing home, days in hospital, and total costs of health and social care after 36 months. Results: Mean age (SD) of participants was 82.5 (4.9) years. Participants in the IG (n = 208) lived 69 days longer than did those in the CG (n = 174); 27.9% (n = 58) of participants in the IG and 38.5% (n = 67) in the CG died (hazard ratio 1.49, 95% confidence interval 1.05-2.12, P =.026). The mean number of inpatient days was lower in the IG (15.1 [SD 18.4]) than in the CG (21.0 [SD 25.0], P =.01). Mean overall costs during the 36-month period did not differ between the IG and CG (USD 71,905 [SD 85,560] and USD 65,626 [SD 66,338], P =.43). Conclusions: CGA-based care resulted in longer survival and fewer days in hospital, without significantly higher cost, at 3 years after baseline. These findings add to the evidence of CGAs superiority over usual care in outpatient settings. As CGA-based care leads to important positive outcomes, this method should be used more extensively in the treatment of older people to meet their needs. (c) 2016 AMDA - The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine.

  • 19.
    Ekdahl, Anne W
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Wirehn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Costs and Effects of an Ambulatory Geriatric Unit (the AGe-FIT Study): A Randomized Controlled Trial2015In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 497-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine costs and effects of care based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) provided by an ambulatory geriatric care unit (AGU) in addition to usual care.

    DESIGN: Assessor-blinded, single-center randomized controlled trial.

    SETTING: AGU in an acute hospital in southeastern Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling individuals aged 75 years or older who had received inpatient hospital care 3 or more times in the past 12 months and had 3 or more concomitant medical diagnoses were eligible for study inclusion and randomized to the intervention group (IG; n = 208) or control group (CG; n = 174). Mean age (SD) was 82.5 (4.9) years.

    INTERVENTION: Participants in the IG received CGA-based care at the AGU in addition to usual care.

    OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was number of hospitalizations. Secondary outcomes were days in hospital and nursing home, mortality, cost of public health and social care, participant' sense of security in care, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL).

    RESULTS: Baseline characteristics did not differ between groups. The number of hospitalizations did not differ between the IG (2.1) and CG (2.4), but the number of inpatient days was lower in the IG (11.1 vs 15.2; P = .035). The IG showed trends of reduced mortality (hazard ratio 1.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.988-2.310; P = .057) and an increased sense of security in care interaction. No difference in HRQoL was observed. Costs for the IG and CG were 33,371£ (39,947£) and 30,490£ (31,568£; P = .432).

    CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This study of CGA-based care was performed in an ambulatory care setting, in contrast to the greater part of studies of the effects of CGA, which have been conducted in hospital settings. This study confirms the superiority of this type of care to elderly people in terms of days in hospital and sense of security in care interaction and that a shift to more accessible care for older people with multimorbidity is possible without increasing costs. This study can aid the planning of future interventions for older people.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01446757.

  • 20.
    Lundqvist, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Roback, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The impact of service and hearing dogs on health-related quality of life and activity level: a Swedish longitudinal intervention study2018In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, article id 497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Individuals with severe disability often require personal assistance and help from informal caregivers, in addition to conventional health care. The utilization of assistance dogs may decrease the need for health and social care and increase the independence of these individuals. Service and hearing dogs are trained to assist specific individuals and can be specialized to meet individual needs. The aim of this study was to describe and explore potential consequences for health-related quality of life, well-being and activity level, of having a certified service or hearing dog. Methods: A longitudinal interventional study with a pre-post design was conducted. At inclusion, all participants in the study had a regular (untrained) companion dog. Data were collected before training of the dog started and three months after certification of the dog. Health-related quality of life was assessed with EQ-5D-3L, EQ-VAS and RAND-36. Well-being was measured with WHO-5 and self-esteem with the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. In addition, questions were asked about physical activity and time spent away from home and on social activities. Subgroups were analyzed for physical service and diabetes alert dogs. Results: Fifty-five owner-and-dog pairs completed the study (30 physical service dogs, 20 diabetes alert dogs, 2 epilepsy alert dogs, and 3 hearing dogs). Initially, study participants reported low health-related quality of life compared with the general population. At follow-up, health-related quality of life measured with the EQ-VAS, well-being and level of physical activity had improved significantly. In the subgroup analysis, physical service dog owners had lower health-related quality of life than diabetes alert dog owners. The improvement from baseline to follow-up measured with EQ-5D statistically differed between the subgroups. Conclusions: The target population for service and hearing dogs has an overall low health-related quality of life. Our study indicates that having a certified service or hearing dog may have positive impact on health-related quality of life, well-being and activity level. Service and hearing dogs are a potentially important "wagging tail aid" for this vulnerable population, able to alleviate strain, increase independence, and decrease the risk of social isolation.

  • 21.
    Mourad, Ghassan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Societal costs of non-cardiac chest pain compared with ischemic heart disease - a longitudinal study2013In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 403-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP) is a common complaint. Our aim was to present a detailed description of the costs of patients with NCCP compared to patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and Angina Pectoris (AP) from a societal perspective.

    Methods

    Data on healthcare utilization and annual societal costs, including direct healthcare costs and indirect costs due to productivity loss, were collected from different databases. The participants consisted of 199 patients from a general hospital in Sweden (99 with NCCP, 51 with AMI, 49 with AP), mean age of 67 years, 59% men.

    Results

    NCCP, AMI, and AP patients had on average 54, 50 and 65 primary care contacts and 3, 4, and 4 hospital admissions during a period of 2 years. Length of hospital stay was 6, 11 and 11 days. On average, 14%, 18%, and 25% of NCCP, AMI and AP patients were on sick-leave annually, and about 12% in each group received a disability pension. The mean annual societal costs of NCCP, AMI and AP patients were €10,068, €15,989 and €14,737.

    Conclusions

    Although the annual societal cost of NCCP patients was lower than in AMI and AP patients, the cost was still considerable (€10,068). Taken into account the high prevalence of NCCP, the cumulative annual national cost of these patients could be more than the double of AMI and AP if all patients incurred the same costs as in this study. Targeted interventions are important in order to support patients with NCCP and minimize healthcare utilization and costs.

  • 22.
    Mourad, Ghassan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Verheijden Klompstra, Leonie
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    What are patients with heart failure willing to pay for an exergame intervention?2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Regular physical activity in patients with heart failure (HF) improves physical capacity and quality of life, and may reduce health care utilization. One low-cost effective physical activity intervention to increase exercise capacity is exergaming. Exploring patients’ willingness to pay (WTP) for treatments/interventions is a way to obtain a monetary value for the health consequences of an intervention. This can further be used in economic evaluations.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe patients´ WTP for an exergame intervention and to determine factors influencing the WTP.

    Methods: This is a substudy of the Swedish cohort of the HF-Wii study (evaluating the effect of exergaming on exercise capacity in patients with HF; clinicaltrial.gov NCT01785121) including 34 patients who finished the 1-year follow-up. Structured telephone interviews were conducted focusing on WTP for the exergame intervention they received during the study including an exergame platform, an introduction lesson, installation of the exergame computer, and telephone follow-ups, and with an estimated cost of ∼€440 per patient. The WTP methodology used was adjusted for this specific study.

    Patients were also asked to rate their level of satisfaction with the intervention on a Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) from 0-10. In addition, information on background variables and income was collected during the interview, while data on six minute walk test (6MWT) and quality of life was retrieved from previous data collection in the main study.

    Results: In total, 29 patients with HF participated in this substudy, mean age 68±9 years, 69% males, and with a mean household disposable income/month of ∼€2700 (±1360). Ten patients (34.5%) had a clinically significant effect of the exergaming and improved more than 30 meters on the 6MWT.

    The average WTP for the exergame intervention was ∼€160 (range €0-580). Most patients were satisfied with the exergame intervention and the median score was 8 on the NRS. The satisfaction level was significantly related to WTP (rs=0.468, p=0.012). Patients with higher satisfaction levels were willing to pay more (€210±165) for the exergame intervention than those with lower satisfaction levels (€60±70), p=0.015. Income, changes in 6MWT, and quality of life showed no significant relationship to WTP.

    Conclusions: The WTP for an exergame intervention varied largely in patients with HF despite high satisfaction level with the intervention. The satisfaction level was the only factor influencing patients´ WTP. On average, patients were willing to pay about one-third of the cost of the exergame intervention. Future studies should focus on the cost-effectiveness of this intervention.

  • 23.
    Roback, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evidence-based disinvestment as a tool for sustained healthcare quality2012In: "HTA in Integrated Care for a Patient Centered System", Barcelona: Elsevier, 2012, p. 54-54Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Roback, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Lundqvist, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ordnad utmönstring av hälso- och sjukvårdsmetoder2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    It is a great challenge to provide a sustainable health care that maintain high quality and is available on equal terms for all citizens.

    Disinvestment in health care implies that existing health care services/interventions are removed from the publicly funded supply of health care or that they will be restricted in use. Quality improvements are continuously performed and unnecessary, harmful or ineffective services are replaced with new and better ones. This is generally not perceived as disinvestment. With time, however, a situation arises where it will be difficult to find "unnecessary, harmful or ineffective" care. This implies that clear priorities must be set for the provision of care and that evidence based disinvestment will be a necessary component to ensure the quality of care within limited budgets.

    The aim of this report on evidence based disinvestment is to describe how this is perceived and performed in Sweden's county councils and regions. We also give a brief overview of international disinvestment initiatives. The concept of disinvestment is illustrated by a number of ongoing or completed disinvestment initiatives and through a tentative framework for disinvestment in a Swedish context. The work has four parts:

    • An interview study for mapping disinvestment activities in Sweden
    • Case studies of active disinvestment
    • An overview of disinvestment initiatives internationally
    • A description of disinvestment processes and different types of disinvestment in a schematic framework

    Methods

    An initial literature search was performed in 2012 as a basis for a minor pilot study and to provide an introduction to the subject. The literature search was supplemented with new search terms in 2013 and 2015. The interviews were conducted by telephone with experts at Sweden's county councils and regions. A questionnaire was constructed to be used as an interview template and to serve as an e-mail survey in case any of our informants preferred this.

    Results

    In Sweden, open discussions on disinvestment of health care practices began in the early 2000s, which led to several counties starting to sketch on disinvestment policies. Few policies were, however, realized in practice. Organized disinvestment occurs in some counties/regions in the context of more general improvement or prioritization efforts and the term disinvestment is not always used. The majority of our respondents still thought that disinvestment was a significant issue requiring special attention.

    An evidence based disinvestment is always active, that is, it includes a conscious decision to stop using, restrict the use of, or withdraw resources from existing healthcare practices. The disinvestment work, however, was in most cases not clearly organized. The most active disinvestment work occurs where there is a priority setting committee or a group for evidence based adoption and disinvestment.

    This report describes disinvestment components and sub-processes in a schematic framework. The character of these processes was in large mapped by the interviews. Interview results were then synthesized with information from the literature into a tentative description of evidence based disinvestment. Whatever the causes and goals with disinvestment, the same problems arise and the work follows in large the same steps or sub-processes. Broadly, these sub-processes are:

    • identification of disinvestment objects
    • choice and preparation/assessment of disinvestment proposals
    • decision making
    • implementation of decisions and
    • follow-up and possible revision of decided disinvestments

    One of the sub-processes, that so far received little attention in Sweden, is how disinvestment decisions are implemented in operational health care. We have chosen to develop this in the framework as it seems to be an area on the rise internationally. There is a range of strategies and practical measures to facilitate and accelerate a desired change. This has been thoroughly investigated regarding implementation of new methods. Such strategies are based on different mechanisms to eliminate barriers and utilize facilitators.

    To illustrate the results presented in the report we present four cases of disinvestment in a little more detail. These are examples of how practices are identified as disinvestment objects, the preparation of cases, implementation of decisions, and of controversies that might arise. The cases have been selected to show the variation in types of disinvestment objects and the outcomes of disinvestment initiatives.

    Disinvestment has gained increased interest internationally in recent years. The problem of rising health care costs is present everywhere in the world and disinvestment is discussed in many countries. Early on, the focus was on disinvestment for greater efficiency. Then the trend turned to re-assessment of old services to be able to make evidence-based disinvestments. This resulted in so-called "low-value-lists" and "do-notdo" recommendations. Today, the focus is on measurable outputs of different disinvestment initiatives and studies have shown that compliance with "low-value-lists" is modest.

    Conclusions

    There are many indications that the future will call for efficient disinvestment processes to obtain a sustainable health care financing. Our study shows that disinvestment is used both for efficiency reasons and for cost control.

    • Most counties/regions are using or have used disinvestment; defined as decisions to withdraw or restrict the use of services/interventions in publicly funded health care.
    • The main reasons for disinvestment is the need for: quality improvements, reallocation of resources to new practices, cost control and/or better efficiency.
    • We identified two main types of organized disinvestment in Sweden: -  evidence based adoption including disinvestment as an integral part, and - proactive identification of disinvestment objects with a subsequent assessment and prioritization of the objects.
    • Services that are withdrawn or restricted in use is a mixture of pharmaceuticals, non-pharmaceutical methods and organizational arrangements.
    • Many withdrawn services remains available as privately funded options.
    • Prioritization principles are often indicative of disinvestment work and evidence-based medicine and health technology assessment are considered as obvious components.
    • Important criteria for classification as disinvestment candidates are: - the service/intervention has adverse effects or very little clinical benefit - the service/intervention is not cost effective - the service/intervention is perceived to have negative effects on the organization and/or work environment
    • There are also services that have been removed due to ethical considerations on what publicly funded healthcare should cover.
    • Today, disinvestment takes place without sufficient openness and citizen involvement in the processes. Documentation of the work, to the extent there is any, is usually not readily accessible.

    In order to improve health care quality, and at the same time control rising costs, it will be required that disinvestment is placed on the national agenda. Ethically difficult considerations associated with disinvestment have made it a question hard to tackle for decision makers at the regional political and administrative levels. Conflicting interests may arise between the patient and the caregiver's budgetary commitment. It is not always easy to determine which interventions are medically and socially justified in the individual patient case, which induces ethical dilemmas.

    Regardless of the ethical dilemmas and difficulties that arise – and at which organizational level decisions are made – a useful working model will be required for active withdrawal of services from the supply of publicly funded health care. In our study, we have outlined a framework that describes the processes, including medical and economic as well as social and ethical aspects.

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