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  • 1.
    Andersson, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Statens Meteorologiska och Hydrologiska Institut.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Alberth, Johan
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Vulnerability Assessment Concept: A Tool for Prioritization of the Most Relevant Issues for Macro-regional Cooperation2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report aims at identifying potential issues for collaboration related to climate adaptation through application of a tool for assessing macro-regional risks. The tool is intended to assist decision-makers and other stakeholders in the Baltic Sea Region (BSR) in discussions on how climate adaptation related cooperation would benefit most from macro-regional cooperation. It is based on four criteria: 1) confidence, 2) speed (determined by Baltadapt climate modellers), 3) importance of impacts and 4) macro-regional coverage (based on a questionnaires answered by 3-8 stakeholders from each of the nine riparian BSR states). Based on equal weighting of these factors, impacts related to biodiversity/eutrophication of the Baltic Sea, as well and impacts related to agriculture were given the highest rankings, which demonstrates the importance to include these sectors and their interrelationship as an important focus in macro-regional cooperation on climate adaptation in the BSR. Impacts  related to biodiversity and agriculture have in common that they are caused by climate change that will occur or already has occurred with a high degree of certainty (e.g., linked to air and water temperatures and rising sea levels), as well as having a very large macro-regional spatial coverage, and being perceived as of high societal and/or environmental concern.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Hedberg, Per
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mandelin, Fredrik
    Vägvisaren2003Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Scoutmärken1995Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Andersson-Sköld, Yvonne
    et al.
    Swedish Geotechnical Institute, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Fallsvik, Jan
    Swedish Geotechnical Institute, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Hultén, Carina
    Swedish Geotechnical Institute, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Jonsson, Anna
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Climate change in Sweden - geotechnical and contaminated land consequences2008In: WSEAS International Conference on Environmental and Geological Science,2008, 2008, p. 52-57Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

         

  • 5.
    Andersson-Sköld, Yvonne
    et al.
    Swedish Geotechnical Institute.
    Fallsvik, Jan
    Swedish Geotechnical Institute.
    Hultén, Carina
    Swedish Geotechnical Institute.
    Jonsson, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköpings universitet.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköpings universitet.
    Climate change in Sweden: geotechnical and contaminated land consequences2008In: WSEAS International Conference on Environmental and Geological Science,2008, 2008, p. 52-57Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

         

  • 6.
    Antonson, Hans
    et al.
    VTI Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute, MAP Unit, SE-58195 Linkoping, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    VTI Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute, Sweden.
    Storbjörk, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Negotiating climate change responses: Regional and local perspectives on transport and coastal zone planning in South Sweden2016In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 52, p. 297-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Putting climate change policy-integration into practice is challenged by problems of institutional misfit, due to, inter alia, deficient vertical administrative interplay. While most focus within the field of climate change research has targeted the national-local interplay, less is known about the interface of regional and local perspectives. Here, the aim is to study that interface with a specific focus on the relation between regional and local spatial planning actors, through a case-study of transport and coastal zone management in a Swedish municipality. The article is based on interviews (focus group and single in-depth) and official planning documents. The material reveals a tricky planning situation, replete with conflict. In practice, various institutional frameworks, claims and ambitions collide. The attempts to steer the local spatial planning initiatives from the regional level led to conflicts, which in turn seems to have hampered the overall work for climate change management through spatial planning. Furthermore, there are few traces of prospects of a smooth vertical institutional interplay able to support the overall aims related to integrating climate change mitigation and adaptation in spatial planning. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Asplund, Therese
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Framings and coverage of climate change in Swedish specialized farming magazines2013In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 117, no 1-2, p. 197-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is a fundamental challenge for which agriculture is sensitive and   vulnerable. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has identified relevant information as key to enabling appropriate climate adaptation and mitigation action. Information specifically directed to farmers can be found, for example, in specialized farming magazines.

    While recent studies examine how national news media frame climate change, less —if any —studies have addressed climate framings and coverage in specialized media. Media framings are storylines that provide meaning by communicating how and why an issue should be seen as a problem, how it should be handled, and who is responsible for it. This paper analyses the framings and coverage of climate change in two Swedish specialized farming magazines from 2000 to 2009. It examines the extent of the climate change coverage, the content of the media items, and the dominant framings underlying their climate change coverage. The study identifies: increased coverage of climate change starting in 2007; frequent coverage of agriculture 's contribution to climate change, climate change impacts on agriculture, and consequences of climate politics for agriculture; and four prominent frames: conflict, scientific certainty, economic burden, and action. The paper concludes that climate change communicators addressing farmers and agricultural extension officers should pay attention to how these frames may be interpreted by different target audiences. Research is needed on how specialized media reports on climate-related issues and how science-based climate information is understood  by different groups of farmers and which other factors influence farmers’ engagement in climate mitigation and adaptation.

  • 8.
    Buhr, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Expectations on corporate climate action under regulatory uncertainty2012In: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, ISSN 1756-8692, E-ISSN 1756-8706, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 403-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - In absence of extensive regulation, expectations can be a noteworthy institutional pressure driving corporate climate change action. The purpose of this study is to explore expectations on businesses to act on climate change when the anticipations for a new global climate agreement are relatively low. Expectations on corporate climate action are compared in two ways: to the previous year, when anticipations for a new international climate treaty were high, and to other categories of societal actors.

    Design/methodology/approach - This paper builds on a questionnaire handed out to an élite sample of 205 participants at the UN climate conference COP16/CMP6 in Cancún 2010, when anticipations were low for regulatory breakthrough in the international climate negotiations.

    Findings - The responses suggest that expectations on businesses in 2010 did not decrease compared to 2009, when anticipations were high for regulatory breakthrough. 40% of the respondents indicated that their expectations had increased since the previous year. Expectations on businesses were relatively high compared to other societal actors; and the highest expectations were expressed by businesses themselves.

    Originality/value - The results provide an empirical foundation which stimulates thinking around expectations that make up an important component in the business environment. It is the first systematic ranking of expectations on business to act on climate change among participants at the UN climate change conference, one of the most prominent arenas in the field. The timing for the data collection provides a unique opportunity to analyse how expectations are related to different levels of regulatory anticipation.

  • 9.
    Buhr, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thörn, Philip
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Clean Development Mechanism in China: Institutional Perspectives on Governance2012In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 77-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) has grown into a central feature of the global carbon market. Besides a range of normative and evaluative research into the CDM, scholars have applied international relations perspectives in which the CDM has been analysed as an example of global governance, engaging multiple actors across administrative levels. This paper focuses on a national government and how its activities affect the CDM market. We draw on an empirical case study of China to demonstrate how governmental action can be understood in light of national institutional factors, defined as normative, cognitive or regulative elements. The paper describes and explains the extensiveness of Chinese government action regarding the CDM and discusses its consequences for the market.

  • 10.
    Friman (Fridahl), Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Agreement, significance, and understandings of historical responsibility in climate change negotiations2015In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 302-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For over 20 years, Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change have struggled with the normative significance of history for the differentiation of responsibilities. Negotiations on ‘historical responsibility’ have been marked by considerable conflict between developed and developing countries. However, in 2010, the Parties acknowledged the concept in a consensus decision. This article analyses UN Climate Change Conference delegates' agreement with the decision, whether it reconciled conflict between interpretations of historical responsibility, and the significance that delegates ascribe to the decision for future agreements. The decision has not eliminated conflict between different interpretations. Delegates who understand historical responsibility as linking countries' historical contributions to climate change to their responsibilities to act agree more with the decision and foresee it having a stronger influence on future agreements than do those viewing the concept in more conceptual terms. The decision marks the start of negotiations concerning how rather than whether historical responsibility should guide operative text. This article demonstrates that (1) the divergent interpretations pose clear challenges for a necessary but demanding agreement on operationalization, and (2) focusing on an ambiguous version of proportionality between contribution to change and responsibility can become a first step for convergence between divergent positions.

  • 11.
    Glaas, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Friman (Fridahl), Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wilk, Julie
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Scientific Knowledge and knowledge production: How do different traditions inform climate science and policy research?2009Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Glaas, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Jonsson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Municipality Studies – CKS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Conditions Influencing Municipal Strategy-Making for Sustainable Urban Water Management: Assessment of Three Swedish Municipalities2018In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 1-22, article id 1102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strategy-making is key for realizing sustainable urban water management. Though general barriers and factors for change have been identified, fewer studies have assessed how different conditions influence municipalities’ strategy-making ability and, thus, how to plan strategically given these conditions. Healey’s strategy-making notion was applied to delimit a study of how size, finances, development path, and water organization influence Swedish municipalities’ strategy-making ability for urban water. Three municipalities, Laxå, Norrköping, and Skellefteå, with different, yet overlapping, institutional and socio-economic conditions were analyzed using semi-structured interviews, a stakeholder workshop, and document analyses. The study finds that even though key events have filtered urban water issues into the political agenda, this has not induced systemic change, except where the role of water management in urban development has been specified, i.e., has aligned dispersed planning processes. Organizational setup influences the strategy-making ability by prescribing not only when water issues are raised, but also what system perspective should be applied and what actors that should be enrolled. Judging from the three cases, size, finances, and development path do matter for strategy-making ability, but they appear to be less important than the organizational setup. Departures for improving strategy-making under different conditions are discussed.

  • 13.
    Glaas, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Storbjörk, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Bohman, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Muthumanickam, Prithiviraj
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Developing transformative capacity through systematic assessments and visualization of urban climate transitions2019In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 515-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming cities into low-carbon, resilient, and sustainable places will require action encompassing most segments of society. However, local governments struggle to overview and assess all ongoing climate activities in a city, constraining well-informed decision-making and transformative capacity. This paper proposes and tests an assessment framework developed to visualize the implementation of urban climate transition (UCT). Integrating key transition activities and process progression, the framework was applied to three Swedish cities. Climate coordinators and municipal councillors evaluated the visual UCT representations. Results indicate that their understanding of UCT actions and implementation bottlenecks became clearer, making transition more governable. To facilitate UCT, involving external actors and shifting priorities between areas were found to be key. The visual UCT representations improved system awareness and memory, building local transformative capacity. The study recommends systematic assessment and visualization of process progression as a promising method to facilitate UCT governance, but potentially also broader sustainability transitions.

  • 14.
    Glaas, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jonsson, Anna
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson-Sköld, Yvonne
    Swedish Geotechnical Institute (SGI), Risk and Planning, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Managing climate change vulnerabilities: formal institutions and knowledge use as determinants of adaptive capacity at the local level in Sweden2010In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 525-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Though managing vulnerabilities posed by climate change calls for effective strategies and measures, its challenges have hitherto not been fully understood. In Sweden, municipalities have recently started incorporating vulnerability management into their political and administrative agendas. This study discusses such experiences and explores how institutional determinants may influence adaptive capacity within a local case study area, to illustrate emerging challenges and opportunities for Swedish municipalities in managing climate vulnerabilities. Specifically, formal institutional structure and the use of knowledge are analysed, concluding that vulnerability management often is focused on technical and reactive fixes, due to limited cooperation between local sector organisations, lack of local co-ordination, and an absence of methods and traditions to build institutional knowledge. Even so, opportunities, such as a high capacity to examine risks to technical systems and important establishments which in turn facilitates protection of technical infrastructure exposed to climate variability and change, also exist.

  • 15.
    Glaas, Erik
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Jonsson, Anna
    Linköpings universitet.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköpings universitet.
    Andersson-Sköld, Yvonne
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Environment. Swedish Geotechnical Institute (SGI).
    Managing climate change vulnerabilities: formal institutions and knowledge use as determinants of adaptive capacity at the local level in Sweden2010In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 525-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Though managing vulnerabilities posed by climate change calls for effective strategies and measures, its challenges have hitherto not been fully understood. In Sweden, municipalities have recently started incorporating vulnerability management into their political and administrative agendas. This study discusses such experiences and explores how institutional determinants may influence adaptive capacity within a local case study area, to illustrate emerging challenges and opportunities for Swedish municipalities in managing climate vulnerabilities. Specifically, formal institutional structure and the use of knowledge are analysed, concluding that vulnerability management often is focused on technical and reactive fixes, due to limited cooperation between local sector organisations, lack of local co-ordination, and an absence of methods and traditions to build institutional knowledge. Even so, opportunities, such as a high capacity to examine risks to technical systems and important establishments which in turn facilitates protection of technical infrastructure exposed to climate variability and change, also exist.

  • 16.
    Glaas, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Insurance sector management of climate change adaptation in three Nordic countries: the influence of policy and market factors2017In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 60, no 9, p. 1601-1621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The insurance industry is important for facilitating climate change adaptation. Insurance companies involvement is, however, influenced by national adaptation policy. The literature suggests that especially policy factors - government interventions, political priorities and public-private cooperation - and market factors - cost offset, cost mitigation, planning flexibility and business opportunities - shape private actor approaches. To increase the understanding of insurance company involvement in adaptation, this study examines how insurance companies approaches are influenced by policy and market factors in three countries: Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The study found that the policy factors tested significantly shaped the approaches of the companies assessed, while market factors currently appear less influential. This is likely due to the absence of climate risk and adaptation in political debates and among insurance policyholders. The study discusses the potential role of the insurance industry in adaptation governance and suggests how barriers facing insurance companies could be overcome.

  • 17.
    Hedelin, Beatrice
    et al.
    Centrum för klimat och säkerhet, Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Examining the benefits of collaboration: the Provider-User Matrix for collaborative flood risk management illustrated by the case of the Ljusnan River, Sweden2015In: Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research, ISSN 1939-0459, E-ISSN 1939-0467, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 53-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the benefits of collaboration in flood risk management by introducing a Provider-User Matrix. The matrix is illustrated through a Swedish case of polycentric decision-making. In the Swedish case the users have not yet benefited from collaboration-benefits such as a more advanced understanding of the flood response system or from sharing detailed hydrological data; benefits that should be easily implemented. The Provider-User Matrix offers both a more holistic way to study benefits and a way to start raising the efficiency of collaboration, by identifying mismatches between the benefits provided and the benefits that users need.

  • 18.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Applying the 'Double Exposure' framework for flooding and erosion in high-income urban areas2009In: International Human Dimensions Programme Open Meeting 2009, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Om konsten att välja kanal: Tre scenarier för framtida utveckling av Kinda kanal2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport ”Om konsten att välja kanal – Tre scenarier för framtida utveckling av Kinda kanal” utgör slutrapport för projektet ”Samhällsekonomisk analys av turistkanalen Kinda kanal”. Projektet har genomförts på uppdrag av AB Kinda kanal vid Tema Vatten i natur och samhälle, Linköpings universitet. Genomförandet har skett i samverkan med bolagets verkställande direk-tör Lars Lööw. En presentation av projektet lämnades vid AB Kinda kanals ordinarie bolags-stämma den 25 maj 2005.

    För insamling, sammanställning och analys av fältdata har fil.dr Mattias Hjerpe svarat. Insam-lingsarbetet har genomfördes under den mest aktiva kanalsäsongen juli-augusti 2005. Analyserna och förslagen i rapporten är baserade dels på insamlade data och på registerdata. Rapporten är upplagd så att efter ett inledande avsnitt med en bakgrundsteckning om värderingar, samhälls-ekonomi och för skötsel och underhåll av långslivade infrastrukturer. Därefter presenteras under-sökningens syfte och tillvägagångssätt. Undersökningsresultaten redovisas i form av tre tänkbara utvecklingsscenarios. De är:

    A.Business-as-usualB.Utveckling av upplevelseområdetC.Det goda boendet.

    Rapporten avslutas med en sammanfattande diskussion om bl.a val av scenario, tydliga målfor-muleringar, betalningsviljan hos kunder/besökare, identifiering av starka områden i kanalområdet för vidare studier.

    Avslutningsvis vill jag passa på att rikta ett varmt tack till alla företagare, besökare, boende i ka-nalområdet för alla uppgifter och data, till AB Kinda kanal och dess kanaldirektör Lars Lööw för ett konstruktivt och givande samarbete och sist men inte minst till fil.dr Mattias Hjerpe som på ett kompetent och ansvarsfullt sätt genomfört undersökningsarbetet.

    Linköpings universitet i september 2005

    Reinhold Castensson, professor, projektledare

  • 20.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sustainable Development and Urban Water Management: Linking Theory and Practice of Economic Criteria2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The interest in using criteria and indicators for assessing activities in relation to sustainable development is increasing. This dissertation analyses the potential for using economic criteria for assessment of urban water management in relation to sustainable development. The analysis consists of three parts.

    First, to analyse the basis for economic criteria, there is a need to categorise general frameworks, disciplinary theories and practical assessments in order to explore what the economic dimension of sustainable could imply, depending on general assumptions about challenges, goals and means. Consequently, a number of general frameworks, economic theories and urban water assessments were categorised.

    Second, based on this analysis, a set of economic criteria was chosen, consisting of maintenance of water infrastructure, affordability, cost-recovery, effectiveness and development potential. For each criterion, one or more indicators are suggested.

    Third, these indicators were tested in three cases from Swedish municipalities: introduction of volumetric billing in a low-income apartment area, increased water supply in a growing city and introduction of kitchen waste disposers in a city with a stagnant population.

    On the basis of the application, introduction of volumetric billing in a low-income area resulted in deteriorating affordability and effectiveness, whereas cost-recovery improved. Introduction of kitchen waste disposers in a stagnant area was questionable from an effectiveness viewpoint whereas the water infrastructure was well maintained. In the growing city, increased income and population determined the outcome of the affordability, cost-recovery and development potential criteria, which all improved.

    The study also found that using economic criteria and indicators for assessment of urban water management in relation to sustainable development requires a continuous balance between the universal and the context specific, that is, between the criteria and indicators used and the water infrastructure change being assessed. This emphasises that criteria used should relate to all dimensions of sustainable development as well as of the decisiveness of involving actors and other stakeholders in sustainable development assessments.

  • 21.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Buhr, Katarina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Frames of Climate Change in Side Events from Kyoto to Durban2014In: Global Environmental Politics, ISSN 1526-3800, E-ISSN 1536-0091, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 102-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Addressing climate change is challenging because of its diverse meanings regarding the implications of science, values, risk, and governance. Climate change frames are central organizing ideas that allow us to identify why climate change is a problem of global concern, who is responsible, and the ways in which and by whom it should be governed. UN climate change conferences gather diverse actors for debating climate policy, allowing us to study the frames they represent and how they evolve. They examine the official side events at these conferences, considering the topics of all 2,214 side events from 1997 through 2011. The results show a prominence of the action and conformity frames, indicating that actors reluctant to change have not been engaged; a tendency to favor the social progress frame over the economic frame; that topical changes were not solely the result of new organizations being admitted; a rise in non-climatic issues indicating large potential for bandwagoning; and a symbiotic relationship between negotiations and side events.

  • 22.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Evolving local climate adaptation strategies: incorporating influences of socio–economic stress2012In: Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, ISSN 1381-2386, E-ISSN 1573-1596, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 471-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socio-economic and climatic stresses affect local communities’ vulnerability toflooding. Better incorporation of socio-economic stress in local vulnerability assessments isimportant when planning for climate adaptation. This is rarely done due to insufficientunderstanding of their interaction, in both theory and practice. The omission leads to criticalweaknesses in local adaptation strategies. This study analyses how socio-economic stressinteract with climatic stress and shape local vulnerability to flooding, and how such stresscan be more efficiently managed within local government organisations. A frameworkcontaining potential stresses was developed and applied to investigate how socio-economicstress affected exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity in two case studies, usinginterview and group exercise transcripts. Cases consisted of major development projects intwo Swedish municipalities, Gothenburg and Lilla Edet. The cases were similarly exposedto climatic stress but differed in socio-economic context, and previous professional climatechange experience. Fierce foreign competition and market structure were seen as the twomost significant socio-economic stresses influencing local vulnerability to flooding throughshaping the ‘local’ worldview. In falling order sensitivity, exposure, and adaptive capacitywere seen to be influenced by the socio-economic stresses. Two approaches to efficientlyincorporate climatic and socio-economic stress in local management are proposed: shiftingthe focus of vulnerability assessments towards future sensitivity of people and settlements,rather than on the current infrastructure’s sensitivity, would facilitate their use in planningand by ‘mainstreaming’ adaptation into long-term strategic planning vulnerability would bemore dynamically addressed and periodically revised.

  • 23.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Fenton, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The role of knowledge in climate transition and transformation literatures2017In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 29, p. 26-31Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rooted in different theories and focusing on different elements of the socio-ecological fabric, climate transitions and transformations are conceived to have various forms. Although these literatures recognize the significance of learning and boundary spanning, systematic reviews of the role of knowledge in climate transitions are lacking. We review how targets of transformation, functions, types, and intermediaries of knowledge are conceptualized in five types of literature. We highlight that knowledge has a role as: the motor of transition in Transition Management literature, a consultant supporting transition in Transformational Climate Adaptation literature, an emancipator of transition in Transform Political and Economic Systems literature, the beacon guiding transition in Social-Ecological Transformation literature, and an Ad Hoc Committee motivating transition in Grassroots Transitions literature.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-11-23 14:55
  • 24.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Storbjörk, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Scrutinizing virtual citizen involvement in planning: Ten applications of an online participatory tool2018In: Politics and Governance, ISSN 1801-3422, E-ISSN 2183-2463, ISSN 2183-2463, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 159-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How to organize citizen participation in planning is continuously debated. The amount of Online Participatory Tools (OPTs) to facilitate inclusive and efficient participation has increased. While studies have assessed their functionality, usability and effectiveness in planning, they have rarely analyzed OPTs beyond single-cases, targeted tools that are widely used or assessed how OPTs affect broader values of participation. Targeting this absence, this study analyzes how ten applications of a widely used OPT, CityPlanner™, affect the normative, substantive and instrumental values of citizen participatory planning in Swedish cities. By analyzing 1,354 citizen proposals and interviewing urban planners, we find that citizens more extensively submit proposals and initiate debates on planning when using the OPT. Results suggest a more even age and gender distribution among proposal users than with conventional methods, facilitating normative values of participation. The OPT was generally applied early in planning and generated high-quality inputs. Our results, however, nuance previous analyses by also emphasizing the importance of place-specificity of OPT applications and of joint participation strategies among departments. Key for OPT development includes the need to improve their ability to analyze overarching trends among inputs.

  • 25.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Storbjörk, Sofie
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jonsson, Anna C
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Brink, Ebba
    Wamsler, Christine
    Svensk forskning om klimatanpassning inom styrning och planering2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sedan klimat- och sårbarhetsutredningen presenterade sitt betänkande år 2007 har omfattande samhällsvetenskapliga forskningsinsatser riktats mot hur offentliga aktörer och myndigheter styr, planerar och arbetar med klimatanpassning och klimatomställning. Analytisk kompetens inom flera för klimatanpassning centrala områden har byggts upp vid ett flertal lärosäten och inom flera sektorsmyndigheter.

    Det   är   alltför  tidskrävande  att   göra   en   heltäckande  och   rättvisande  bild   av   dessa forskningsaktiviteter, men denna inlaga från Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning, CSPR, vid Linköpings universitet i samarbete med Lunds universitets centrum för studier av uthållig samhällsutveckling, LUCSUS, gör valda nedslag inom tre huvudområden i vilka kunskapen ökats genom svensk anpassningsforskning. De tre huvudområdena för kunskapsökning är: Klimatanpassning  på  offentliga  aktörers  agenda,  Verktyg  för  att  stimulera  och  stödja klimatanpassning och Klimatanpassning och stadsplanering.

    Det är vår förhoppning att detta ger en tillräckligt god bild av hur kunskapsläget ökar snabbt och att vi ser tecken på att ökningstakten tilltar. Vi vill också på förhand be om ursäkt för de texter och den forskning som vi på grund av begränsade resurser inte fick med i vår framställning.

  • 26.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Krantz, Helena
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Individuell mätning av vatten - om hushållens respons och praktikerns överväganden2006In: Vatten : tidskrift för vattenvård, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 62, p. 83-90Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

     Vi analyserade vattenförbrukning och utgifter för vatten i hushåll boende i ett flerbostadsområde med och utan individuell mätning och debitering efter förbrukning med såväl statistiska som kvalitativa metoder. Våra resultat visar att individuell mätning och debitering efter förbrukning ledde till minskad förbrukning av varm- och kallvatten,fastän rutinförändringarna generellt var förhållandevis små. Hushåll med relativt hög förbrukning sparade på vattnet medan de med relativt låg förbrukning, i genomsnitt, inte förändrade förbrukningen. I de flesta hushåll minskade utgifterna för vatten med mätning och debitering. Den fjärdedel av hushållen med högst förbrukning betalade omkring 500 kr per månad för varm- och kallvatten, vilket motsvarade nästan 5% av hushållets totala inkomst. För bostadsbolagets del var värdet av den minskade vattenförbrukningen och eventuellt ökade intäkter från hushållen samt bättre förmåga att upptäcka läckor de viktigaste nyttorna. Individuell mätning kräver, förutom tekniska komponenter, relativt mycket personal och tilltro till den som inför mätningen. Vi menar att det går att förutsäga effekten av individuell mätning utifrån demografiska och inkomststatistiska data, uppgifter om vattenförbrukning utan individuell mätning och genom val av en andel fast avgift. 

  • 27.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Environmental management since world war II2006Report (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Functions of COP side-events in climate-change governance2010In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 167-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Side-events are the most visible venue for civil society involvement in international climate negotiations. The many varied functions that side-events fulfil for participants and organizers are identified and analysed for their contributions generally as well as for their contribution to the negotiation process. The analysis is based on two surveys of over 2,000 side-event participants and organizers at COP-13 and COP-14. The surveyed side-events were found to fulfil the broader official objective of benefiting COP participants through providing a shared conceptual basis as well as building institutional capacity and legitimacy. All participant groups, particularly from Africa, G77, and less-developed countries, found these events useful for their work. As a venue for information dissemination, side-events provide an important opportunity for capacity building. Historically, new items were introduced at COP side-events before being discussed in the formal negotiations. Side-events also provide a process for creating a shared vision. By providing a forum that includes more organizations and actors in conjunction with the negotiations, side-events have the potential to increase the input legitimacy of the international policy process. A significant challenge will be the inclusion of a wider range of stakeholder groups and geographical, socioeconomic and epistemic communities, in order to avoid favouring the hegemony of NGOs and other organisations based in industrialized countries, as well as Annex 1 Parties.

  • 29.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Synergier mellan världshandels-och klimatpolitik: Exemplet ökad användning av biodrivmedel2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Biodrivmedel är ett av de tydligaste exemplen på synergi mellan världshandeloch klimatpolitik. Inom de pågående WTO-förhandlingarna har Brasilien harföreslagit att etanol ska tas upp som en av de miljövaror för vilka tullargradvis ska avskaffas. Gradvis liberalisering av handel med biodrivmedel,som en jordbruks- eller industrivara, är i linje med WTO:s mål samtidigt somökad användning av biodrivmedel är en verkningsfull åtgärd för att minskautsläppen av växthusgaser från trafiken – klimatpolitikens sorgebarn. Föreuropeisk del är denna fråga av särskilt intresse, på grund av dengemensamma skyddstullen för import av etanol.Rapporten har kartlagt olika konsekvenser som en ökad sammanlänkningmellan internationella avtal om världshandel och klimatförändringar kan fåför svensk politik för att öka användningen av biodrivmedel.Uppfattningarna varierar bland forskare och beslutsfattare om vilka effekteren ökad grad av interaktion mellan de handels- och klimatpolitiska områdenskulle få. Även om det ännu inte uppstått någon formell konflikt mellanregelverken inom FN:s klimatkonvention och WTO finns det problem som kanhämma åtaganden och genomförande på sikt, t.ex. subventioner och tullargällande biobränslen. Avsaknaden av tvist ger en indikation på att ingetmedlemsland ännu ansett att de klimatpolitiska styrmedlen försvåratgränsöverskridande handel nämnvärt eller skapat nya handelshinder förutländska företagDe flesta bedömare är överens om att bestämmelserna i WTO:s olika avtaloch klimatkonventionen och Kyotoprotokollet kan vara kompatibla medvarandra. Det handlar om att utforma handlingsprogram och åtgärder på rättsätt.Under det senaste decenniet har WTO:s avtal kommit att täcka ett allt vidareområde och accelererat liberaliseringen av den gränsöverskridande handelnmed varor och tjänster. Klimatavtalen har fokuserat på att minska eller i vartfall minska ökningstakten för utsläppen av växthusgaser, i första steget frånde rika länderna. Avtalen pekar också ut en rad områden inom vilka staternaförväntas genomföra sådana åtgärder, t.ex. främja energieffektivisering ochuthålligt jordbruk samt ökad användning av nya och förnyelsebaraenergikällor.Några områden för vilka förhållandet mellan regelsystemen bedöms vara merproblematiska är: Frågan om produktionsprocesser och produktionsmetoder somexempelvis försvårar användandet av kriterier för val av klimatvänligaalternativ i offentlig upphandling, Exportsubventioner som aldrig är tillåtna, Obligatoriska standarder och certifieringssystem: statlig inblandningoch förtäckta handelshinder.3Det finns också en osäkerhet, eftersom inga formella tvister ännu har gälltnågra av de klimatpolitiska styrmedel som utvecklats och just tagits i drift,men tidigare tillämpningar i liknande fall anses ge ett ganska gott underlagför bedömning. Utifrån en sådan bedömning anses exempelvis den modellmed garanterat pris för elektricitet framställd av förnybara råvaror somanvänds i Tyskland och det system med gröna drivmedelscertifikat somhåller på att utvecklas i Storbritannien vara kompatibla med WTO:s regler.

    I framtiden väntas klimatregionen såväl skärpas inom utsläppsområdet somvidgas till att innefatta andra områden, såsom anpassning och koppling tillutvecklingsmål. Detta kommer sannolikt att öka risken för effekter påinternationell handel. Inom handelsregimen är det inte osannolikt attförhandlingarna inom jordbruksavtalet (och GATT) kommer att påbörja enliberalisering av handel med produkter för framställning av biobränslenoch/eller med de färdiga bränslena. Detta skapar ett tryck på att minskaeller avskaffa EU:s skyddstull för etanol. Det skapar också nya möjligheterför den svenska miljöteknikindustrin och för svenska lantbruksföretaggenom att snabbt kunna dra nytta av den förändrademarknadsförutsättningarna. Biodrivmedel är ett tydligt exempel på enpotentiell synergi mellan handel och klimat, eftersom handel i dagsläget ärmycket liten.Viktiga områden i den närmaste framtiden kan vara: Stöd för införande av miljöteknik (lika för alla företag mm) Subventioner till odling av biogrödor (påverkar detproduktionsvolymen?) Bristande harmonisering, dvs. länder inför olika typer av åtgärder ochpå skild sätt, vilket ökar risken för ojämlika konkurrensförhållanden.Rapporten diskuterar fyra sätt att främja användningen av biobränslen: skärpning av befintlig bränsle- och fordonsbeskattning gröna drivmedelscertifikat bilar som kan drivas med alternativa drivmedel som standard transportsektorn med i handel med utsläppsrätter.Samtliga system är eller kan göras kompatibla med WTO:s regelsystem (t.ex.genom att fler tillverkare tillhandahåller bilar som kan drivas medbiobränslen) och skulle därför gå att använda. De får dock olika effekter förmarkandens aktörer.

  • 30.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The arenas of environmental management,2006Report (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Utopian and dystopian thought in climate change science and policy2009In: FUTURES, ISSN 0016-3287, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 234-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change policies are increasingly seen as integral to sustainable development policies. This article examines how visions of future society have been employed in climate science and multilateral negotiations. Using elements of utopian and dystopian thought, we have categorized UNFCCC documents, IPCC assessments, and special reports and peer-reviewed climate policy articles. Our results indicate that utopian thinking surfaces with reference to sustainable development and emissions scenarios. Such visions of future society fall into three categories: projections, dystopian thought, and utopian thought. Dystopian thought is mainly evident in the rhetoric of various actors, and is used to spur action or inaction, to avoid either economic catastrophe by acting too fast or ecological catastrophe by not acting fast enough. Utopian elements in climate change science and policy refer to decoupling greenhouse gases and economic growth, evenly distributing the benefits of economic globalization, and smoothing technological development. The present piecemeal invocation of sustainable development concepts in climate science and policy emphasizes the difficulties of integrating environmental, social, and economic concerns. The article concludes that utopian thinking regarding sustainable development could result in more integrated and holistic visions of future society in climate science and policy.

  • 32.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Utopian thought as a missed opportunity and leverage point for systemic change2012In: Climate Change and the Crisis of Capitalism: A chance to reclaim self, society and nature / [ed] Mark Pelling, David Manuel-Navarrete and Michael Redclift, Kings College, London, UK, London: Routledge , 2012, p. 159-172Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Are established economic, social and political practices capable of dealing with the combined crises of climate change and the global economic system? Will falling back on the wisdoms that contributed to the crisis help us to find ways forward or simply reconfigure risk in another guise? This volume argues that the combination of global environmental change and global economic restructuring require a re-thinking of the priorities, processes and underlying values that shape contemporary development aspirations and policy.

    This volume brings together leading scholars to address these questions from several disciplinary perspectives: environmental sociology, human geography, international development, systems thinking, political sciences, philosophy, economics and policy/management science. The book is divided into four sections that examine contemporary development discourses and practices. It bridges geographical and disciplinary divides and includes chapters on innovative governance that confront unsustainable economic and environmental relations in both developing and developed contexts. It emphasises the ways in which dominant development paths have necessarily forced a separation of individuals from nature, but also from society and even from ‘self’. These three levels of alienation each form a thread that runs through the book. There are different levels and opportunities for a transition towards resilience, raising questions surrounding identity, governance and ecological management. This places resilience at the heart of the contemporary crisis of capitalism, and speaks to the relationship between the increasingly global forms of economic development and the difficulties in framing solutions to the environmental problems that carbon-based development brings in its wake.. Existing social science can help in not only identifying the challenges but also potential pathways for making change locally and in wider political, economic and cultural systems, but it must do so by identifying transitions out of carbon dependency and the kind of political challenges they imply for reflexive individuals and alternative community approaches to human security and wellbeing

  • 33.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Simonsson, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wråke, Markus
    IVL, Swedish Environmental Research Institute Ltd..
    Zetterberg, Lars
    IVL, Swedish Environmental Research Institute Ltd..
    The function of side events at the Conference of the Parties to The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Civil society involvement has grown to become an integral part of the UN negotiatingprocess. The side events at the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are today the most visible componentof and the only formal avenue of civil society involvement in international climate negotiations. This study assesses the extent to which side events effectively: a) provide input to the negotiations and b) contribute to the construction of the climate regime. Through surveying organisers of and participants in side events as well as COP delegates, we have analysed i) who attends side events, ii) why they attend them, iii) why organisations arrange side events, and iv) the outcome of side events.

    We distributed a questionnaire to all organisers of side events at COP 13 and the participants in twenty of the 200 side events held in Bali in November 2007. In addition, we also surveyed a strategic sample of the 10,800 participants at COP 13, receiving a total of nearly 1,100 responses.

    This report concludes that the side events fulfil the broader official objective of benefitingCOP participants, as these events are rated of high value across all participant groups and geographical categories. Negotiators were by far the most important target audience of all categories of side events, followed by representatives of UN organisations and researchers. Organisers considered the G77 plus China to be the most important Party groupings to reachin all categories of side events.

    The average number of side event participants was 82. The attendance at mitigation side events was 42% higher than at adaptation events. However, more negotiators and governmentrepresentatives attended adaptation side events, whereas there was very little media andbusiness and even less NGO and researcher presence at adaptation compared with mitigationevents. If we up-scale the results of this survey, approximately 1,400 of the 3,500 Party participants attended side events.

    The study indicates high side event participation from countries with large economies,countries near the COP venue, and the host country. Three of eight side event participants were NGO representatives. About one quarter of the participantsconsisted of negotiators or government representatives. Each side event was attended by anaverage of seven negotiators, 14 government representatives, eight business representatives, seven UN/IGO representatives, and three media representatives. Business representatives.

  • 34.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Nasiritousi, Naghmeh
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Views on alternative forums for effectively tackling climate change2015In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 864-867Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This year (2015) marks the 21st formal anniversary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and in December a new climate treaty is expected to be reached. Yet, the UNFCCC has not been successful in setting the world on a path to meet a target to prevent temperatures rising by more than 2 degrees C above pre-industrial levels(1). Meanwhile, other forums, such as the G20 and subnational forums, have increasingly become sites of climate change initiatives(2-6). There has, however, so far been no systematic evaluation of what forums climate change policymakers and practitioners perceive to be needed to effectively tackle climate change. Drawing on survey data from two recent UNFCCC Conference of the Parties (COP), we show that there exists an overall preference for state-led, multilateral forums. However, preferences starkly diverge between respondents from different geographical regions and no clear alternative to the UNFCCC emerges. Our results highlight difficulties in coordinating global climate policy in a highly fragmented governance landscape.

  • 35.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Schauser, Inke
    Federal Environment Agency (UBA), Germany.
    Alberth, Johan
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Guideline on the System Vulnerability: Analysis of the Baltic Sea Region Vulnerability to the Impact of Climate Change2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report elaborates an integrated vulnerability assessment concept, intended as a knowledge brokerage tool for decision-makers in the Baltic Sea Region. By developing an integrated vulnerability concept, in line with advances in regional and local vulnerability and adaptation research and based on the project’s review of the scope and quality of current vulnerability assessments, the report supports discussions on what is needed for a systematic assessment of vulnerability in the region. The report rearticulates five critical challenges that potentially hamper realizing the full potential of vulnerability assessments to support and contribute to strategic decisions on climate adaptation: Adequate scope and goals; Ability to reflect the context; Inclusion of socio-economic stress; Clear connection between vulnerability assessment and decision-making on responses (and integrating knowledge and policies across sectors and levels); and Ability to merge top-down and bottom-up approaches. For each challenge, a principle has been formulated, which may serve as a guide in the development of the Baltic Sea Region Climate Change Adaptation Strategy.

  • 36.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Storbjörk, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Alberth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    “There is nothing political in it”: triggers of local political leaders' engagement in climate adaptation2015In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 855-873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Local government is attributed a vital role in climate-change adaptation. Previous studies contend that conflicting priorities, insufficient institutional incentives and knowledge of risks, and inadequate resources all impede local climate adaptation. Though the importance of local political support in enabling climate adaptation is widely acknowledged, the views of local politicians have rarely been analysed. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with local politicians in Sweden, we explore what affects their engagement in climate adaptation. The study claims that climate adaptation contrary to mitigation is not viewed as political beyond directing attention and sanctioning guidelines set by officials. A limited number of interviewees claim a more strategic political role in adaptation. The combined effect of institutional incentives (e.g. fragmented national guidelines, unappealing goals, and lack of funding), relative weight in local politics, and ability to exercise political leadership (e.g. campaign value, public and media pressure, and lack of ideology) is perceived as too insignificant to trigger strong political engagement. In less-populous municipalities, adaptive measures were highly valued for demonstrating political action.

  • 37.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Syssner, Josefina
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Municipality Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Utveckling av hållbara turistdestinationer: Om problem, processer och planering2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Besöksnäringen har på ett par decennier utvecklats från att uppfattas som en förhållandevis marginell företeelse, till att allt mer betraktas som en svensk basindustri. För att ytterligare stärka utvecklingen av en hållbar svensk besöksnäring gav regeringen i januari 2012 Tillväxtverket i uppdrag att under 2012–2014 i samråd med VisitSweden genomföra insatser riktade till ett mindre antal destinationer som bedömdes ha särskilt stor potential att utvecklas och attrahera utländska besökare. De destinationer som valdes ut att medverka i projektet var Bohuslän, Kiruna, Stockholms skärgård, Vimmerby och Åre. Dessa destinationer utgör det empiriska materialet för denna rapport.

    Syftet med denna studie var att synliggöra de kunskaper, metoder och verktyg som nyckelpersoner inom respektive destination kunde identifiera som viktiga i sitt arbete med hållbar destinationsutveckling. Studien skulle också undersöka vad offentliga aktörer, framför allt kommuner, bidrar eller skulle kunna bidra med i utvecklingen av hållbara turistdestinationer.

    Rapportens huvudsakliga slutsats är att destinationsutveckling inte ska ses som ett arbete som sker huvudsakligen via avgränsade metoder och specifika verktyg. I stället förordar författarna, docent Josefina Syssner och docent Mattias Hjerte, ett problembaserat, processorienterat perspektiv på hållbar destinationsutveckling. Det innebär att man identifierar relevanta problem kopplade till destinationsutveckling, och att man därefter identifierar de processer man behöver driva för att lösa de problem man identifierat.

    I rapporten identifieras fyra processer som särskilt viktiga: den första processen handlar om att etablera destinationen såväl organisatoriskt som geografiskt. Att etablera en destination innebär att man klargör destinationens organisatoriska och geografiska gränser, och att man i samband med det också tydliggör destinationens mål och varumärke. Den andra processen handlar om att stödja turistisk klusterutveckling och innovation. Att stödja klusterutveckling innebär att man stödjer och främjar samverkan mellan besöksnäringens aktörer – i första hand mellan de företag som tillsammans erbjuder den turistiska produkten. Den tredje processen handlar om att försörja destinationen med kompetens – både på destinationsnivå och på lokal nivå i de organisationer som tillsammans utgör det turistiska klustret. Slutligen handlar den fjärde processen om att koppla samman destinationsutveckling med samhällsplanering. Detta innebär att man tydliggör vilka av destinationsarbetets utmaningar – till exempel infrastruktur, detaljplanering, tillståndsgivning eller markanvändning – som har en koppling till det planeringsarbete som sker på framförallt kommunal, men också på regional och nationell nivå.

    rapporten konstateras avslutningsvis att en destination kan överskrida en mängd administrativa och funktionella gränser, och samtidigt utmana organisatoriska gränser. Det innebär att utvecklingen av hållbara destinationer i många fall består i att flera olika aktörer samtidigt deltar i flera olika processer. Dessa aktörer kan styras utifrån helt olika styrningslogiker och få sin legitimitet på helt olika sätt.De processer som dessa aktörer arbetar med kan också ha helt olika rumslig logik. Detta är en starkt bidragande orsak till att arbetetmed att utveckla destinationer många gånger upplevs som svårt.

  • 38.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wilk, Julie
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Baltic Climate Vulnerability Assessment Framework: Introduction and Guidelines2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This Vulnerability Assessment Framework was put together within the project Baltic Challenges and Chances for local and regional development generated by Climate Change financed by the European Regional Development Fund and the Baltic Sea Region Programme 2007-2013. The purpose of the framework is to guide and assist the Target Areas (TA) within the project in mapping and analysing the challenges and chances created by climate change. The Vulnerability exercises have originally been developed and tested within a number of other research projects within the Key Research Area Vulnerability & Adaptation at the Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research (CSPR). The projects Enhancing Cities’ Capacity to Manage Vulnerability to Climate Change (financed by FORMAS), Participatory Modelling for Assessment of Climate Change– impacts on Water Resources in Southern Africa (financed by SIDA/Sarec), and the Swedish Research Programme on Climate, Impacts and Adaptation (financed by MISTRA) are the most important and we acknowledge the sharing of results made possible by those financing agencies. Apart from the authors, the following persons have contributed to the design of individual exercises: Lotta Andersson, Yvonne Andersson-Sköld, Karin André, Åsa Gerger-Swartling, Erik Glaas, Anna Jonsson and Louise Simonsson. These people all have been generous to share their expertise and are gratefully acknowledged. We are also grateful for all stakeholders that by their participating in the exercises have helped us in developing them. Please refer to any individual exercise use according to the following example: André, K. and Å. Gerger-Swartling, 2010. Exercise VI – Identification of Key Actors and Mapping of their Responsibilities. In Hjerpe and Wilk, 2010. Baltic Climate Vulnerability Assessment Framework: Introduction and Guidelines. CSPR Briefing No 5. 2010.

    At the time of publishing, results based on the methods described in this briefing have still not been published and are still work in progress. The exercises are in a process of modification and adjustment, both within the Baltic Climate project and other initiatives. If you wish to use any of these exercises, please contact Mattias Hjerpe or Julie Wilk at CSPR. The Briefing in an earlier version was primarily intended for use in regional and local applications in the Baltic Sea Region starting December 2009 and forward. Any suggestions for improvement and tests of the VAF pilot version will be of pertinent importance to develop the final version.

    This Briefing consists of three sections and one appendix.

    Section 1 "Introducing Vulnerability to Climate Change" describes the main elements in an assessment of vulnerability to climate variation and climate change. It intends to familiarize project participants within the vulnerability assessment process in the TAs.

    Section 2 "BalticClimate Vulnerability Assessment Framework" presents the VAF and explains the idea of using exercises to systematically discuss the main elements shaping vulnerability to climate change in your TA. It also presents how the WP3 researchers can support the TAs.

    Section 3 "Exercises for analysis of vulnerability and adaptation" contains the aims, outputs, and description of the eight exercises, and the exercises Identification of Challenges & Chances of Climate Change and Introducing Climate Adaptation undertaken during the Inventory phase. The appendix contains a more elaborated description of adaptation and vulnerability to climate change.

     

     

    Mattias Hjerpe, Assistant Professor, BalticClimate Work Package 3 Leader Email: mattias.hjerpe@liu.se, Phone: +46-11-36 34 38, Fax: +46-11-36 32 92

    Julie Wilk, Associate Professor, BalticClimate Work Package 3 Co-leader Email: julie.wilk@smhi.se, Phone: +46-13-28 44 63, Fax: +46-11-36 32 92

  • 39.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wilk, Julie
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Practical guidance for vulnerability assessments at the regional and local scale (BalticClimate)2014In: Climate change adaptation manual: lessons learned from European and other industrialised countries / [ed] Andrea Prutsch, Torsten Grothmann, Sabine McCallum, Inke Schauser, Rob Swart, London: Routledge, 2014, p. 50-56Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Hrelja, Robert
    et al.
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Storbjörk, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Creating Transformative Force?: The Role of Spatial Planning in Climate Change Transitions Towards Sustainable Transportation2015In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 617-635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Informed by the concept of strategy making, this paper analyses the ability of spatial planning to support local climate change transitions towards sustainable transportation in two case studies of planning in Swedish municipalities with comparatively high climate ambitions. The analysis shows that the expectations on planning to effect change need to be moderated. Not even in these climate-ambitious municipalities did transportation planning result in strategic reorientation. While climate change was clearly filtered into local strategy making, no new climate frame was established. Rather in goals, it was linked to an overall attractive city storyline. Transportation planners have sought to mobilize force through developing new tools and routines to strengthen the role of climate change. In detailed planning, however, when plans become legally binding, agency in relation to climate change was limited by allowing private actors a pivotal position. Also, tools were used selectively and when settling priorities, climate change was subordinate to economic growth interests. While the planning observed can be regarded as weak, its ability to support climate transition would have been even weaker had it not been linked to the attractive city storyline. Consequently, to facilitate climate transition mobilizing force needs to be generated within the current local implementation structure.

  • 41.
    Johansson, Madelaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Simonsson, Louise
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Storbjörk, Sofie
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hur möter östgötakommunerna klimatfrågan?: En kartläggning av risker, sårbarhet och anpassning inför klimatvariationer och klimatförändringar2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Denna rapport ingår i forskningsprojektet Kartläggning av risker, sårbarhet och anpassning inför klimatvariationer och klimatförändringar i Östergötland, vilket finansieras av Centrum för kommunstrategiska studier (CKS) och utförs av forskare verksamma vid Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning (CSPR). Projektet syftar till att bidra till en ökad förståelse för kommuners sårbarhet och förutsättningar för att öka sin robusthet inför klimatförändringar och klimatrelaterade risker. Projektet pågår från augusti 2008 till augusti 2011 och studerar huvudsakligen tre övergripande problemställningar:

    1. Varför, när och hur är lokalsamhället sårbart? Vi identifierar kritiska faktorer, som enskilt eller i kombination, bidrar till sårbarhet – både samhälleliga och biogeofysiska aspekter.
    2. Hur gör man för att bedöma en kommuns sårbarhet? Vi testar metoder/övningar för mer integrerade sårbarhetsbedömningar på lokal nivå. Vi diskuterar bland annat: krav på information och kunskap, resurser, uppdateringar, analyskapacitet, tillämpbarhet och implementering i existerande organisationer och förvaltningar.
    3. Hur kan man minska en kommuns sårbarhet? Vi analyserar vilka möjligheter, hinder och begränsningar för anpassning inför klimatförändringar som uppfattas inom kommunala förvaltningar för såväl beslutsfattare som tjänstemän.

    Denna rapport utgör steg 1 i projektet och består av en kartläggning av läget i samtliga kommuner i Östergötland. Syftet är att ge en bild av hur östgötakommunerna ser på risker och sårbarhet inför samtida klimatvariationer och kommande klimatförändringar, pågående arbete (kartläggningar, policy, strategier, åtgärder, etc.) kopplat till risker, sårbarhet och anpassning samt frågor kring organisation, samverkan, roll- och ansvarsfördelning. Utifrån kartläggningens resultat kommer ett mindre antal fördjupningar att genomföras under 2010.

    Kartläggningen (kapitel 6) har genomförts och sammanställts av Madelaine Johansson. Mattias Hjerpe har varit huvudförfattare för kapitel 2 och 5, Louise Simonsson för kapitel 3 och Sofie Storbjörk för kapitel 4. Kapitel 8 har skrivits gemensamt av Hjerpe, Simonsson och Storbjörk. Arbetet har koordinerats av Sofie Storbjörk.

    Författarna riktar ett varmt tack till alla kommunrepresentanter som så generöst delade med sig av sin arbetstid, sina reflektioner och erfarenheter, CKS för finansiering av projektet, Eva Lindblad för layout och granskning och Tora Friberg för granskning.

  • 42.
    Jonsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson-Sköld, Yvonne
    Statens Geotekniska Institut, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    André, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Simonsson, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut, Umeå, Sverige.
    Cities’ capacity to manage climate vulnerability: experiences from participatory vulnerability assessments in the lower Göta Älv Catchment, Sweden2012In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 17, no 6-7, p. 735-750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the scope of this project, tools for conducting systematic and integrated climate vulnerability and sustainability assessments have been developed. Two municipalities in the lower Göta Älv catchment were selected as study cases. Together with representatives from key municipal departments and national government agencies, the interdisciplinary research team designed and conducted a co-production process. Results obtained using the developed tools demonstrate that conducting such a systematic assessment of the current situation and potential impacts of climate change adaptation measures would contribute to synergies between adaptation strategies and other policy arenas. Our recommendation for enhancing the capacity of local vulnerability management in Sweden is to shift foci in four fields: from static analysis of climate vulnerability to a dynamic approach to social vulnerability, from a sectorwise fragmented approach to integrated management, from a focus on technical fixes and physical measures to institutional adaptation measures, and, finally, from sustainability-blind adaptation investments to long-term sustainable climate adaptation measures. The processes and mechanisms for succeeding in this requires that knowledge be produced, shared, and managed in partly new ways, allowing stakeholders both inside and outside local government administration to voice and synergise their concerns and solutions.

  • 43.
    Jonsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköpings universitet.
    Andersson-Sköld, Yvonne
    Statens Geotekniska Institut.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköpings universitet.
    André, Karin
    Linköpings universitet.
    Simonsson, Louise
    Linköpings universitet.
    Cities’ capacity to manage climate vulnerability: experiences from participatory vulnerability assessments in the lower Göta Älv Catchment, Sweden2012In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 17, no 6-7, p. 735-750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the scope of this project, tools for conducting systematic and integrated climate vulnerability and sustainability assessments have been developed. Two municipalities in the lower Göta Älv catchment were selected as study cases. Together with representatives from key municipal departments and national government agencies, the interdisciplinary research team designed and conducted a co-production process. Results obtained using the developed tools demonstrate that conducting such a systematic assessment of the current situation and potential impacts of climate change adaptation measures would contribute to synergies between adaptation strategies and other policy arenas. Our recommendation for enhancing the capacity of local vulnerability management in Sweden is to shift foci in four fields: from static analysis of climate vulnerability to a dynamic approach to social vulnerability, from a sectorwise fragmented approach to integrated management, from a focus on technical fixes and physical measures to institutional adaptation measures, and, finally, from sustainability-blind adaptation investments to long-term sustainable climate adaptation measures. The processes and mechanisms for succeeding in this requires that knowledge be produced, shared, and managed in partly new ways, allowing stakeholders both inside and outside local government administration to voice and synergise their concerns and solutions.

  • 44.
    Karlsson, Christer
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Parker, Charles
    Uppsala Universitet, Sweden.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Legitimacy of Leadership in International Climate Change Negotiations2012In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 41, no S1, p. 46-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leadership is an essential ingredient in reaching international agreements and overcoming the collective action problems associated with responding to climate change. In this study, we aim at answering two questions that are crucial for understanding the legitimacy of leadership in international climate change negotiations. Based on the responses of three consecutive surveys distributed at COPs 14–16, we seek first to chart which actors are actually recognized as leaders by climate change negotiation participants. Second, we aim to explain what motivates COP participants to support different actors as leaders. Both these questions are indeed crucial for understanding the role, importance, and legitimacy of leadership in the international climate change regime. Our results show that the leadership landscape in this issue area is fragmented, with no one clear-cut leader, and strongly suggest that it is imperative for any actor seeking recognition as climate change leader to be perceived as being devoted to promoting the common good.

  • 45.
    Karlsson, Christer
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sverige.
    Parker, Charles
    Uppsala universitet; Sverige.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Looking for Leaders: Perceptions of Climate Change Leadership among Climate Change Negotiation Participants2011In: Global Environmental Politics, ISSN 1526-3800, E-ISSN 1536-0091, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 89-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is widespread consensus that effective leadership will be required in order to successfully address the climate change challenge. Presently there are a number of self-proclaimed climate change leaders, but leadership is a relationship between leaders and followers. An actor aspiring to be a leader needs to be recognized as such. Despite its fundamental importance for leadership relationships, the demand side of the leadership equation has been comparatively neglected by past research. In this study we are looking for leaders by analyzing the perceptions of climate change leadership among UNFCCC COP-14 participants. Our results show that the climate change leadership mantle will have to be worn by more than one actor. Among the leadership candidates the EU was most widely recognized as a leader, however, only a small minority reported that they saw the EU as the only leader. The data also show that the US and the G77 thus far have failed to impress potential followers and it was China that clearly emerged as the second strongest leadership candidate.

  • 46.
    Krantz, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Användning av våtmarker för kommunalt dag- och avloppsvatten.: Nuläge och framtida trender.2000In: Vatten. Tidskrift för vattenvård, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 273-278Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Krantz, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hantering av dagvatten i öppna strukturer i stadsmiljö.: Fallet Augustenborg i Malmö.2002Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Löfgren, Tora
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekonomisk värdering av Göta Kanal med Contingent Valuation Method2001Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Föreliggande uppsats syftar till att tillämpa Contingent Valuation Method på den kollektiva nyttigheten Göta Kanal, för att därigenom erhålla en värdering av det svenska folkets betalningsvilja för kanalen.

    Undersökningen omfattar två urvalsgrupper, riket och närområdet, om 1.500 personer vardera. Svarsfrekvensen för riksurvalet var 53,2 procent och för närområdet 64,8 procent. Frågeställningarna i vår enkät diskuteras utifrån de svar som inkommit. Fler belopp hade med fördel kunnat användas, exempelvis 300 kronor. Fyra grupper identifieras med avseende på om respondenten besökt Göta Kanal, samt om respondenten tror sig vilja besöka Göta Kanal under de kommande fem åren. De fyra grupperna används i kapitel sju för att urskilja respondenter med endast existensvärde från respondenter med framtida värde och framtida värde samt användarvärde.

  • 49.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. University of Oxford, England.
    Making climate governance global: how UN climate summitry comes to matter in a complex climate regime2017In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 580-599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the role the UNFCCC plays in a polycentric climate regime complex. Through an extended questionnaire survey at the UN Climate Conferences in Warsaw (2013), Lima (2014) and Paris (2015), we study what government delegates and non-state observers see as the main purpose of UN climate summitry and their roles therein. Only a minority of these actors attend UN Climate Conferences to actively influence the outcome of the intergovernmental negotiation process. Instead, most come to these meetings to network, build interpersonal relationships, learn from each other and foster a sense of community across scales of difference. The ability of the UNFCCC to bring together different actors across time and space, to perform multiple policy tasks, has become one of its notable strengths and is an important facilitative practice that holds the polycentric regime complex together.

  • 50.
    Löwgren, Marianne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Frykblom, Peter
    n/a.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Krantz, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Våtmarkernas kostnader, "onytta" och nytta.2002In: Våtmarksboken: skapande och nyttjande av värdefulla våtmarker. / [ed] Karin Tonderski, Göteborg: Vattenstrategiska forskningsprogrammet (VASTRA) , 2002, p. 212-231Chapter in book (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 69
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