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  • 1.
    Ahle, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Drott, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Epidemiology and Trends of Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Sweden: 1987-20092013In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 132, no 2, p. E443-E451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate temporal, seasonal, and geographic variations in the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and its relation to early infant survival in the Swedish population and in subgroups based on gestational age, birth weight, and gender. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS: In the Swedish birth cohort of 1987 through 2009 all children with a diagnosis of NEC were identified in the National Patient Register, the Swedish Medical Birth Register, and the National Cause of Death Register. NEC incidence, early mortality, and seasonality were analyzed with descriptive statistics, Poisson regression, and auto regression. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS: The overall incidence of NEC was 3.4 in 10 000 live births, higher in boys than in girls (incidence rate ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.40, P = .005), with a peak in November and a trough in May, and increased with an average of similar to 5% a year during the study period. In most subgroups, except the most immature, an initial decrease was followed by a steady increase. Seven-day mortality decreased strongly in all subgroups over the entire study period (annual incidence rate ratio 0.96, 95% confidence interval 0.95-0.96, P andlt; .001). This was especially marked in the most premature and low birth weight infants. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSIONS: After an initial decrease, the incidence of NEC has increased in Sweden during the last decades. An association with the concurrent dramatically improved early survival seems likely.

  • 2.
    Ahle, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Drott, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Elfvin, Anders
    Department of Pediatrics, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland E.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Maternal, fetal and perinatal factors associated with necrotizing enterocolitis in Sweden: A national case-control study2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e0194352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To analyze associations of maternal, fetal, gestational, and perinatal factors with necrotizing enterocolitis in a matched case-control study based on routinely collected, nationwide register data.

    Study design

    All infants born in 1987 through 2009 with a diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis in any of the Swedish national health care registers were identified. For each case up to 6 controls, matched for birth year and gestational age, were selected. The resulting study population consisted of 720 cases and 3,567 controls. Information on socioeconomic data about the mother, maternal morbidity, pregnancy related diagnoses, perinatal diagnoses of the infant, and procedures in the perinatal period, was obtained for all cases and controls and analyzed with univariable and multivariable logistic regressions for the whole study population as well as for subgroups according to gestational age.

    Results

    In the study population as a whole, we found independent positive associations with necrotizing enterocolitis for isoimmunization, fetal distress, cesarean section, neonatal bacterial infection including sepsis, erythrocyte transfusion, persistent ductus arteriosus, cardiac malformation, gastrointestinal malformation, and chromosomal abnormality. Negative associations were found for maternal weight, preeclampsia, maternal urinary infection, premature rupture of the membranes, and birthweight. Different patterns of associations were seen in the subgroups of different gestational age.

    Conclusion

    With some interesting exceptions, especially in negative associations, the results of this large, population based study, are in keeping with earlier studies. Although restrained by the limitations of register data, the findings mirror conceivable pathophysiological processes and underline that NEC is a multifactorial disease.

  • 3.
    Altgärde, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Redéen, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hilding, Niclas
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Drott, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Horse-related trauma in children and adults during a two year period2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 22, no 40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Horse riding, with almost 200,000 participants, is the eighth most popular sport in Sweden. Severe injuries can occur with horse riding accidents which is well documented. This study was undertaken to investigate if injuries associated with horse riding are common, which type of injuries occur, what mechanisms are involved and to estimate the costs to the society. Material and methods: All patients attending the emergency department at Link ping University Hospital, during the years 2003-2004, due to horse related trauma were prospectively recorded. The patients were divided into two groups according to age, 147 children and 141 adults. The medical records were retrospectively scrutinized. Results: The most common mechanism of injury was falling from the horse. Most commonly, minor sprains and soft tissue injuries were seen, but also minor head injuries and fractures, mainly located in the upper limb. In total 26 adults and 37 children were admitted. Of these 63 patients 19 were considered having a serious injury. In total, four patients needed treatment in intensive care units. The total cost in each group was 200,000 Euro/year. Conclusion: Horse riding is a sport with well known risks. Our results corresponds to the literature, however we have not observed the same incidence of serious injuries. In contrast we find these to be fairly uncommon. The injuries are mainly minor, with a small risk of long term morbidity. Over time regulations and safety equipment seem to have decreased the number of serious accidents.

  • 4.
    Drott, Peder
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Johansson, Bo S
    Uppsala University.
    Åström, Bo
    University Childrens Hospital, Uppsala.
    Informal Parental Traffic Training and Children's Traffic Accidents2008In: Upsala journal of medical sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, Vol. 113, no 2, p. 143-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the present study were (a) to assess the relationship between informal traffic training by parents and their childrens involvement in traffic accidents and (b) to identify factors contributing to this relationship.

    The first two studies involved questionnaires on informal parental traffic education, the childs exposure to traffic and traffic-related accidents. Both studies showed that rate of accidents increased with training, particularly for outdoor training. An accident analysis indicated that most accidents involved the use of the bicycle, and that the major part of the accidents resulted in light injuries and occurred when the child was practicing the act of manoeuvring the bicycle. An interview study with 10 preschool teachers identified two quite disparate traffic education goals: emphasis on cautiousness versus emphasis on independence. The major implications of the study are that efforts in traffic training should give more emphasis to bicycle use and should be planned and carried out in cooperation with the parents.

  • 5. Frid, C
    et al.
    Anneren, G
    Rasmussen, F
    Sundelin, C
    Drott, Peder
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Utilization of medical care among children with Down's syndrome2002In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, ISSN 0964-2633, E-ISSN 1365-2788, Vol. 46, p. 310-317Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Frid, C
    et al.
    Drott, Peder
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Otterblad Olausson, P
    Sundelin, C
    Anneren, G
    Maternal and neonatal factors and mortality in children with Down syndrome born in 1973-1980 and 1995-19982004In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 93, p. 106-112Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Wide, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Glad Mattsson, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Drott, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Mattsson, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Independence does not come with the method - treatment of neurogenic bowel dysfunction in children with myelomeningocele2014In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 103, no 11, p. 1159-1164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimThe aim was to evaluate and compare different bowel regimes with regard to satisfaction, faecal incontinence and independence, and the relationship to quality of life among children with myelomeningocele (MMC). MethodsA questionnaire, including the health-related quality of life instrument PedsQL 4.0, was sent to all children aged seven to 16years (n=172) with MMC, treated at two centres in Sweden and one in Norway. The three centres cover a third of the population in the two countries. The response rate was 62%. ResultsParents of children (30%) using antegrade colonic enemas (ACE) reported higher satisfaction (p=0.01) than the parents of those (47%) using transanal irrigation (TAI). The children reported no significant difference. Children and parents in the ACE group reported more complete evacuation of the bowels than the TAI group. No significant difference was found in faecal incontinence or independent toileting. The children (40%) who emptied their bowels independently reported a higher quality of life. Children using TAI or ACE spent around one hour on the toilet at every bowel emptying. ConclusionTAI and ACE are effective treatments, but time-consuming and difficult to perform independently. Higher parental satisfaction is obtained with ACE. Irrespective of method the children who can use the toilet independently report a higher quality of life, which makes efforts to support independence valuable.

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