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  • 1.
    Ekdahl, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svensson, E.
    Division of Clinical Bacteriology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lennart E.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rapid decrease of free vancomycin in dense staphylococcal cultures2005In: European journal of clinical microbiology and infectious diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 596-602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial numbers in broth cultures were determined by bioluminescence assay of intracellular bacterial ATP. Broth MICs for strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 14990 and 35984) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923, 29213 and 6538) were determined for cultures with different inocula (105–108 bacteria/ml) after 24 h of incubation in supplemented Mueller–Hinton broth containing vancomycin. All of the tested strains except one were susceptible to methicillin, and all of the strains were susceptible to vancomycin. Free vancomycin concentrations in the broth cultures of all strains were determined with an agar well bioassay after 24 h of incubation. Free vancomycin concentrations and bacterial numbers of ATCC 35984 and ATCC 29213 were also determined after 0.5, 2, 4, and 8 h. In a low inoculum (105 bacteria/ml), the broth MICs were 1–4 μg/ml. In a high inoculum (∼108 bacteria/ml), the broth MICs increased two- to fourfold to 4–8 μg/ml. In dense inocula (∼109–1010 bacteria/ml), the concentrations of free vancomycin in the broth were reduced, in most cases below the detection limit of the bioassay (≤0.5 μg/ml). This reduction of free vancomycin was fast, occurring in initially dense inocula in less than 30 min. No emergence of resistance was seen. These results show a rapid reduction of free vancomycin in the broth and a simultaneous increase in broth MICs in high inocula, without development of resistance. This indicates that the dosing regimen of vancomycin is of particular importance in staphylococcal infections with dense inocula, e.g. infective endocarditis.

  • 2.
    Mylen, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Nilsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    To feel strong in an unfamiliar situation; Patients lived experiences of neurosurgical intensive care. A qualitative study2016In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 32, p. 42-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the lived experiences of conscious patients in neurosurgical intensive care. Method: Data collection was performed by qualitative interviews using an interview guide. Eleven former patients, seven women and four men, were interviewed two to 14 months after discharge. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analysed using an interpretive phenomenological approach. Findings: The analysis revealed three themes: To feel safe in an unfamiliar situation, to experience strains and limitations, and to be confirmed as a human being. These three themes culminated in the essence: To feel strong in an unfamiliar situation. Patients experienced a soothing environment where, despite strains, they felt safe being cared for in a ward with specialised medical treatment. When mental and physical strains decreased during the period of care, they experienced the ability to cope with the simplest tasks as a sign of regained identity. Conclusion: Patients main experience during intensive care was security. Security along with human contact and interaction with staff and next of kin made the patients feel strengthened as human beings in an unfamiliar situation. The fact that the patients were conscious enabled them to understand their situation and to experience security. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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