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  • 1.
    Andersson, Kenneth
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Johansson, Peter
    ISY LiTH.
    Forchheimer, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Motion compensation using backward prediction and prediction refinement2003In: Signal Processing: Image Communication, ISSN 0923-5965, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 381-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents new methods for use of dense motion fields for motion compensation of interlaced video. The motion estimation is based on previously decoded field-images. The motion is then temporally predicted and used for motion compensated prediction of the field-image to be coded. The motion estimation algorithm is phase-based and uses two or three field-images to achieve motion estimates with sub-pixel accuracy. To handle non-constant motion and the specific characteristics of the field-image to be coded, the initially predicted image is refined using forward motion compensation, based on block-matching. Tests show that this approach achieves higher PSNR than forward block-based motion estimation, when coding the residual with the same coder. The subjective performance is also better.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Kenneth
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    A perception based velocity estimator and its use for motion compensated prediction2001In: SCIA 2001 Scandinavian Conference on Image Analysis,2001, 2001, p. 493-499Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of temporal redundancy is of vital importance for a successful video coding algorithm. An effective approach is the hybrid video coder where motion estimation is used for prediction of the next image frame and code the prediction error, and the motion field. The standard method for motion estimation is block matching as in MPEG-2, typically resulting in block artifacts. In this paper a perception based velocity estimator and its use for pixel based motion compensated prediction of interlaced video is presented.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Image Feature Representation for Analogue VLSI Representation1989Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Burdakov, Oleg
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Optimization . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zikrin, Spartak
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Mathematics and Applied Mathematics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Global search strategies for solving multilinear least-squares problems2012In: Sultan Qaboos University Journal for Science, ISSN 1027-524X, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 12-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multilinear least-squares (MLLS) problem is an extension of the linear leastsquares problem. The difference is that a multilinear operator is used in place of a matrix-vector product. The MLLS is typically a large-scale problem characterized by a large number of local minimizers. It originates, for instance, from the design of filter networks. We present a global search strategy that allows for moving from one local minimizer to a better one. The efficiency of this strategy is illustrated by results of numerical experiments performed for some problems related to the design of filter networks.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Burdakov, Oleg
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Optimization . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zikrin, Spartak
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Global Search Strategies for Solving Multilinear Least-squares Problems2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The multilinear least-squares (MLLS) problem is an extension of the linear least-squares problem. The difference is that a multilinearoperator is used in place of a matrix-vector product. The MLLS istypically a large-scale problem characterized by a large number of local minimizers. It originates, for instance, from the design of filter networks. We present a global search strategy that allows formoving from one local minimizer to a better one. The efficiencyof this strategy isillustrated by results of numerical experiments performed forsome problems related to the design of filter networks.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Burdakov, Oleg
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Optimization . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zikrin, Spartak
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sparsity Optimization in Design of Multidimensional Filter Networks2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Filter networks is a powerful tool used for reducing the image processing time, while maintaining its reasonably high quality.They are composed of sparse sub-filters whose low sparsity ensures fast image processing.The filter network design is related to solvinga sparse optimization problem where a cardinality constraint bounds above the sparsity level.In the case of sequentially connected sub-filters, which is the simplest network structure of those considered in this paper, a cardinality-constrained multilinear least-squares (MLLS) problem is to be solved. If to disregard the cardinality constraint, the MLLS is typically a large-scale problem characterized by a large number of local minimizers. Each of the local minimizers is singular and non-isolated.The cardinality constraint makes the problem even more difficult to solve.An approach for approximately solving the cardinality-constrained MLLS problem is presented.It is then applied to solving a bi-criteria optimization problem in which both thetime and quality of image processing are optimized. The developed approach is extended to designing filter networks of a more general structure. Its efficiency is demonstrated by designing certain 2D and 3D filter networks. It is also compared with the existing approaches.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Burdakov, Oleg
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Optimization . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zikrin, Spartak
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Optimization . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sparsity Optimization in Design of Multidimensional Filter Networks2015In: Optimization and Engineering, ISSN 1389-4420, E-ISSN 1573-2924, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 259-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Filter networks are used as a powerful tool used for reducing the image processing time and maintaining high image quality.They are composed of sparse sub-filters whose high sparsity ensures fast image processing.The filter network design is related to solvinga sparse optimization problem where a cardinality constraint bounds above the sparsity level.In the case of sequentially connected sub-filters, which is the simplest network structure of those considered in this paper, a cardinality-constrained multilinear least-squares (MLLS) problem is to be solved. Even when disregarding the cardinality constraint, the MLLS is typically a large-scale problem characterized by a large number of local minimizers, each of which is singular and non-isolated.The cardinality constraint makes the problem even more difficult to solve.

    An approach for approximately solving the cardinality-constrained MLLS problem is presented.It is then applied to solving a bi-criteria optimization problem in which both thetime and quality of image processing are optimized. The developed approach is extended to designing filter networks of a more general structure. Its efficiency is demonstrated by designing certain 2D and 3D filter networks. It is also compared with the existing approaches.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Granlund, Gösta H.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Hybrid Image Processing Architecture1988Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Adaptive Spatio-temporal Filtering of 4D CT-Heart2013In: Image Analyses: Image Processing, Computer Vision, Pattern Recognition, and Graphics / [ed] Joni-Kristian Kämäräinen, Markus Koskela, Berlin Heidelberg: Springer, 2013, p. 246-255Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this project is to keep the x-ray exposure of the patient as low as reasonably achievable while improving the diagnostic image quality for the radiologist. The means to achieve these goals is to develop and evaluate an efficient adaptive filtering (denoising/image enhancement) method that fully explores true 4D image acquisition modes.

    The proposed prototype system uses a novel filter set having directional filter responses being monomials. The monomial filter concept is used both for estimation of local structure and for the anisotropic adaptive filtering. Initial tests on clinical 4D CT-heart data with ECG-gated exposure has resulted in a significant reduction of the noise level and an increased detail compared to 2D and 3D methods. Another promising feature is that the reconstruction induced streak artifacts which generally occur in low dose CT are remarkably reduced in 4D.

  • 10.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Controllable 3-D Filters1993In: Proceedings of the SSAB Symposium on Image Analysis: Gothenburg, 1993Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Orientation Estimation in Ambiguous Neighbourhoods1992In: Theory & Applications of Image Analysis: eds P. Johansen and S. Olsen / [ed] P. Johansen and S. Olsen, Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Co , 1992, p. 189-210Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Transformation of local spatio-temporal structure tensor fields2003In: Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, 2003. Proceedings. (ICASSP '03). 2003 IEEE International Conference on  (Volume:3 ), IEEE , 2003, p. 285-288Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tensors and tensor fields are commonly used in multidimensional signal processing to represent the local structure of the signal. This paper focuses on the case where the sampling on the original signal is anisotropic, e.g when the resolution of the multidimensional image varies depending on the direction which is common e.g. in medical imaging devices. To obtain a geometrically correct description of the local structure there are mainly two possibilities. To resample the image prior to the computation of the local structure tensor field or to compute the tensor field on the original grid and transform the result to obtain a correct geometry of the local structure. This paper deals with the latter alternative and contains an in depth theoretical analysis establishing the appropriate rules for tensor transformations induced by changes in space-time geometry with emphasis on velocity and motion estimation.

  • 13.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Granlund, Gösta H.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Implementation of Image Processing Operations from Analogue Convolver Responses1989In: Proceedings of the SSAB Conference on Image Analysis: Gothenburg, Sweden, 1989, p. 67-74Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kronander, Torbjorn
    Velocity Adaptive Filtered Angiography1999Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    A method of imaging a blood vessel in a body using X-rays and an injectable contrast medium is described. The contrast medium is injected into the body, and signals constituted by an X-ray image sequence depicting X-ray attenuation values is recorded. The X-ray attenuated values in each spaced-time neighborhood are combined in a way that is dependent on the processed image sequence and separately established for each neighborhood, and separating, from background and vessel signals, flow signals having energy contributions mainly in an area of frequency domain bounded by surfaces corresponding to threshold velocities separately established for each neighborhood, which surfaces are shifted a specified amount along a temporal frequency axis.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Sandborg, Michael
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Farnebäck, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hans, Knutsson
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Adaptiv filtering of 4D-heart CT for image denoising and patient safety2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this medical image science project is to increase patient safety in terms of improved image quality and reduced exposure to ionizing radiation in CT. The means to achieve these goals is to develop and evaluate an efficient adaptive filtering (denoising/image enhancement) method that fully explores true 4D image acquisition modes. Four-dimensional (4D) medical image data are captured as a time sequence of image volumes. During 4D image acquisition, a 3D image of the patient is recorded at regular time intervals. The resulting data will consequently have three spatial dimensions and one temporal dimension. Increasing the dimensionality of the data impose a major increase the computational demands. The initial linear filtering which is the cornerstone in all adaptive image enhancement algorithms increase exponentially with the dimensionality. On the other hand the potential gain in Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) also increase exponentially with the dimensionality. This means that the same gain in noise reduction that can be attained by performing the adaptive filtering in 3D as opposed to 2D can be expected to occur once more by moving from 3D to 4D. The initial tests on on both synthetic and clinical 4D images has resulted in a significant reduction of the noise level and an increased detail compared to 2D and 3D methods. When tuning the parameters for adaptive filtering is extremely important to attain maximal diagnostic value which not necessarily coincide with an an eye pleasing image for a layman. Although this application focus on CT the resulting adaptive filtering methods will be beneficial for a wide range of 3D/4D medical imaging modalities e.g. shorter acquisition time in MRI and improved elimination of noise in 3D or 4D ultrasound datasets.

  • 16.
    Andersson, Mats T.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Controllable Multi-dimensional Filters and Models in Low-Level Computer Vision1992Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis concerns robust estimation of low-level features for use in computer vision systems. The presentation consists of two parts.

    The first part deals with controllable filters and models. A basis filter set is introduced which supports a computationally efficient synthesis of filters in arbitrary orientations. In contrast to many earlier methods, this approach allows the use of more complex models at an early stage of the processing. A new algorithm for robust estimation of orientation is presented. The algorithm is based on synthesized quadrature responses and supports the simultaneous representation and individual averaging of multiple events. These models are then extended to include estimation and representation of more complex image primitives such as as line ends, T-junctions, crossing lines and curvature. The proposed models are based on symmetry properties in the Fourier domain as well as in the spatial plane and the feature extraction is performed by applying the original basis filters directly on the grey-level image. The basis filters and interpolation scheme are finally generalized to allow synthesis of 3-D filters. The performance of the proposed models and algorithms is demonstrated using test images of both synthetic and real world data.

    The second part of the thesis concerns an image feature representation adapted for a robust analogue implementation. A possible use for this approach is in analogue VLSI or corresponding analogue hardware adapted for neural networks. The methods are based on projections of quadrature filter responses and mutual inhibition of magnitude signals.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Mats T.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Controllable 3-D Filters for Low Level Computer Vision1993In: SCIA8: Tromso, 1993Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three-dimensional data processing is becoming more and more common. Typical operations are for example estimation of optical flow in video sequences and orientation estimation in 3-D MR images. This paper proposes an efficient approach to robust low level feature extraction for 3-D image analysis. In contrast to many earlier algorithms the methods proposed in this paper support the use of relatively complex models at the initial processing steps. The aim of this approach is to provide the means to handle complex events at the initial processing steps and to enable reliable estimates in the presence of noise. A limited basis filter set is proposed which forms a basis on the unit sphere and is related to spherical harmonics. From these basis filters, different types of orientation selective filters are synthesized. An interpolation scheme that provides a rotation as well as a translation of the synthesized filter is presented. The purpose is to obtain a robust and invariant feature extraction at a manageable computational cost.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Mats T.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Controllable 3-D Filters for Low Level Computer Vision1993Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Three-dimensional data processing is becoming more and more common. Typical operations are for example estimation of optical flow in video sequences and orientation estimation in 3-D MR images. This paper proposes an efficient approach to robust low level feature extraction for 3-D image analysis. In contrast to many earlier algorithms the methods proposed in this paper support the use of relatively complex models at the initial processing steps. The aim of this approach is to provide the means to handle complex events at the initial processing steps and to enable reliable estimates in the presence of noise. A limited basis filter set is proposed which forms a basis on the unit sphere and is related to spherical harmonics. From these basis filters, different types of orientation selective filters are synthesized. An interpolation scheme that provides a rotation as well as a translation of the synthesized filter is presented. The purpose is to obtain a robust and invariant feature extraction at a manageable computational cost.

  • 19.
    Andersson, Mats T.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Orientation Estimation in Ambiguous Neighbourhoods1991In: Proceedings of SCIA91: Aalborg, Denmark, 1991Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a new algorithm for local orientation estimation. The proposed algorithm detects and separates interfering events in ambiguous neighbourhoods and produces robust estimates of the two most dominant events. A representation suitable for simultaneous representation of two orientations is introduced. The main purpose of this representation is to make averaging of outputs for neigbourhoods containing two orientations possible. The feature extraction is performed by a set of quadrature filters. A method to obtain a large set of quadrature filter responses from a limited basis filter set is introduced. The estimation of the neighbourhood and the separation of the present events are based upon the quadrature responses in terms of local magnitude and phase. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated using test images.

  • 20.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filter Networks1999In: Proceedings of Signal and Image Processing (SIP'99), Nassau, Bahamas: IASTED , 1999, p. 213-217Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a new and efficient approach for optimization and implementation of filter banks e.g. velocity channels, orientation channels and scale spaces. The multi layered structure of a filter network enable a powerful decomposition of complex filters into simple filter components and the intermediary results may contribute to several output nodes. Compared to a direct implementation a filter network uses only a fraction of the coefficients to provide the same result. The optimization procedure is recursive and all filters on each level are optimized simultaneously. The individual filters of the network, in general, contain very few non-zero coefficients, but there are are no restrictions on the spatial position of the coefficients, they may e.g. be concentrated on a line or be sparsely scattered. An efficient implementation of a quadrature filter hierarchy for generic purposes using sparse filter components is presented.

  • 21.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sequential Filter Trees for Efficient 2D 3D and 4D Orientation Estimation1998Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A recursive method to condense general multidimensional FIR-filters into a sequence of simple kernels with mainly one dimensional extent has been worked out. Convolver networks adopted for 2, 3 and 4D signals is presented and the performance is illustrated for spherically separable quadrature filters. The resulting filter responses are mapped to a non biased tensor representation where the local tensor constitutes a robust estimate of both the shape and the orientation (velocity) of the neighbourhood. A qualitative evaluation of this General Sequential Filter concept results in no detectable loss in accuracy when compared to conventional FIR (Finite Impulse Response) filters but the computational complexity is reduced several orders in magnitude. For the examples presented in this paper the attained speed-up is 5, 25 and 300 times for 2D, 3D and 4D data respectively The magnitude of the attained speed-up implies that complex spatio-temporal analysis can be performed using standard hardware, such as a powerful workstation, in close to real time. Due to the soft implementation of the convolver and the tree structure of the sequential filtering approach the processing is simple to reconfigure for the outer as well as the inner (vector length) dimensionality of the signal. The implementation was made in AVS (Application Visualization System) using modules written in C.

  • 22.
    Borga, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Generation of representations for supervised learning - A velocity estimation example2001In: SCIA 2001,2001, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Cros, Olivier
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark.
    Gaihede, Michael
    Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark / Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Structural Analysis of Micro-channels in Human Temporal Bone2015In: IEEE 12th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI), 2015 IEEE 12th International Symposium on, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2015, p. 9-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, numerous micro-channels have been discovered in the human temporal bone by micro-CT-scanning. Preliminary structure of these channels has suggested they contain a new separate blood supply for the mucosa of the mastoid air cells, which may have important functional implications. This paper proposes a structural analysis of the microchannels to corroborate this role. A local structure tensor is first estimated. The eigenvalues obtained from the estimated local structure tensor were then used to build probability maps representing planar, tubular, and isotropic tensor types. Each tensor type was assigned a respective RGB color and the full structure tensor was rendered along with the original data. Such structural analysis provides new and relevant information about the micro-channels but also their connections to mastoid air cells. Before carrying a future statistical analysis, a more accurate representation of the micro-channels in terms of local structure tensor analysis using adaptive filtering is needed.

  • 24.
    Cros, Olivier
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Pawels, Elin
    Centre for X-ray Tomography, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Gaihede, Michael
    Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark / Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Determination of the mastoid surface area and volume based on micro-CT scanning of human temporal bone: Geometrical parameters dependence on scanning resolutions2016In: Hearing Research, ISSN 0378-5955, E-ISSN 1878-5891, Vol. 340, p. 127-134Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The mastoid air cell system (MACS) with its large complex of interconnected air cells reflects an enhanced surface area (SA) relative to its volume (V), which may indicate that the MACS is adapted to gas exchange and has a potential role in middle ear pressure regulation. Thus, these geometric parameters of the MACS have been studied by high resolution clinical CT scanning. However, the resolution of these scans is limited to a voxel size of around 0.6 mm in all dimensions, and so, the geometrical parameters are also limited. Small air cells may appear below the resolution and cannot be detected. Such air cells may contribute to a much higher SA than the V, and thus, also the SA/V ratio. More accurate parameters are important for analysis of the function of the MACS including physiological modeling.

    Our aim was to determine the SA, V, and SA/V ratio in MACS in human temporal bones at highest resolution by using micro-CT-scanning. Further, the influence of the resolution on these parameters was investigated by downsampling the data. Eight normally aerated temporal bones were scanned at the highest possible resolution (30-60 μm). The SA was determined using a triangular mesh fitted onto the segmented MACS. The V was determined by summing all the voxels containing air. Downsampling of the original data was applied four times by a factor of 2.

    The mean SA was 194 cm2, the mean V was 9 cm3, and the mean SA/V amounted to 22 cm-1. Decreasing the resolution resulted in a non-linear decrement of SA and SA/V, whereas V was mainly independent of the resolution.

    The current study found significantly higher SA and SA/V compared with previous studies using clinical CT scanning at lower resolutions. These findings indicate a separate role of the MACS compared with the tympanum, and the results are important for a more accurate modeling of the middle ear physiology.

  • 25.
    Diczfalusy, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    A diffusion tensor-based finite element model of microdialysis in the deep brain2015In: Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering, ISSN 1025-5842, E-ISSN 1476-8259, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 201-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microdialysis of the basal ganglia was recently used to study neurotransmitter levels in relation to deep brain stimulation. In order to estimate the anatomical origin of the obtained data, the maximum tissue volume of influence (TVImax) for a microdialysis catheter was simulated using the finite element method. This study investigates the impact of brain heterogeneity and anisotropy on the TVImax using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to create a second-order tensor model of the basal ganglia. Descriptive statistics showed that the maximum migration distance for neurotransmitters varied by up to 55% (n = 98,444) for DTI-based simulations compared with an isotropic reference model, and the anisotropy differed between different targets in accordance with theory. The size of the TVImax was relevant in relation to the size of the anatomical structures of interest, and local tissue properties should be accounted for when relating microdialysis data to their anatomical targets.

  • 26.
    Diczfalusy, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The effect of tissue heterogeneity and anisotropy on microdialysis of the deep brainManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Microdialysis of the basal ganglia was recently used to study changes of neurotransmitter levels in relation to deep brain stimulation (DBS). In order to estimate the anatomical origin of the microdialysis data, the maximum tissue volume of influence (TVImax) for a microdialysis catheter was simulated and visualized using the finite element method (FEM). In the current study the impact of brain heterogeneity and anisotropy on the TVImax was investigated, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to create a second-order tensor model of the basal ganglia. The results were presented using descriptive statistics, indicating that the mean radius of the TVImax varied by up to 0.5 mm (n = 98444) for FEM simulations based on DTI compared to a homogeneous and isotropic reference model. The internal capsule and subthalamic area showed significantly higher anisotropy (p < 0.0001, n = 600) than the putamen and the globus pallidus, in accordance with theory. It was concluded that the size of the TVImax remained small enough to be relevant in relation to the anatomical structures of interest, and that local tissue properties should be accounted for when relating the microdialysis data to their anatomical targets.

  • 27.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Josephson, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johannesson, Magnus
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Does Parametric fMRI Analysis with SPM Yield Valid Results? - An Empirical Study of 1484 Rest Datasets2012In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 565-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The validity of parametric functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis has only been reported for simulated data.Recent advances in computer science and data sharing make it possible to analyze large amounts of real fMRI data. In this study,1484 rest datasets have been analyzed in SPM8, to estimate true familywise error rates. For a familywise significance threshold of5%, significant activity was found in 1% - 70% of the 1484 rest datasets, depending on repetition time, paradigm and parametersettings. This means that parametric significance thresholds in SPM both can be conservative or very liberal. The main reason forthe high familywise error rates seems to be that the global AR(1) auto correlation correction in SPM fails to model the spectra ofthe residuals, especially for short repetition times. The findings that are reported in this study cannot be generalized to parametricfMRI analysis in general, other software packages may give different results. By using the computational power of the graphicsprocessing unit (GPU), the 1484 rest datasets were also analyzed with a random permutation test. Significant activity was thenfound in 1% - 19% of the datasets. These findings speak to the need for a better model of temporal correlations in fMRI timeseries.

  • 28.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    4D Medical Image Processing with CUDA2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Learn how to do 4D image processing with CUDA, especially for medical imaging applications. In this session we will give a couple of examples of how 4D image processing can take advantage of the computational power of the GPU. We will present how to use the GPU for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis and true 4D image denoising. Most of our examples use the GPU both to speedup the analysis and to visualize the results.

  • 29.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Functional Connectivity Inspired Approach to Non-Local fMRI Analysis2012In: Proceedings of the 19th IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP), 2012, IEEE conference proceedings, 2012, p. 1245-1248Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose non-local analysis of functional magnetic resonanceimaging (fMRI) data in order to detect more brain activity.Our non-local approach combines the ideas of regularfMRI analysis with those of functional connectivity analysis,and was inspired by the non-local means algorithm thatcommonly is used for image denoising. We extend canonicalcorrelation analysis (CCA) based fMRI analysis to handlemore than one activity area, such that information fromdifferent parts of the brain can be combined. Our non-localapproach is compared to fMRI analysis by the general linearmodel (GLM) and local CCA, by using simulated as well asreal data.

  • 30.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fast Random Permutation Tests Enable Objective Evaluation of Methods for Single Subject fMRI Analysis2011In: International Journal of Biomedical Imaging, ISSN 1687-4188, E-ISSN 1687-4196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parametric statistical methods, such as Z-, t-, and F-values are traditionally employed in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for identifying areas in the brain that are active with a certain degree of statistical significance. These parametric methods, however, have two major drawbacks. First, it is assumed that the observed data are Gaussian distributed and independent; assumptions that generally are not valid for fMRI data. Second, the statistical test distribution can be derived theoretically only for very simple linear detection statistics. With non-parametric statistical methods, the two limitations described above can be overcome. The major drawback of non-parametric methods is the computational burden with processing times ranging from hours to days, which so far have made them impractical for routine use in single subject fMRI analysis. In this work, it is shown how the computational power of cost-efficient Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) can be used to speed up random permutation tests. A test with 10 000 permutations takes less than a minute, making statistical analysis of advanced detection methods in fMRI practically feasible. To exemplify the permutation based approach, brain activity maps generated by the General Linear Model (GLM) and Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) are compared at the same significance level. During the development of the routines and writing of the paper, 3-4 years of processing time has been saved by using the GPU.

  • 31.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    fMRI Analysis on the GPU - Possibilities and Challenges2012In: Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine, ISSN 0169-2607, E-ISSN 1872-7565, Vol. 105, no 2, p. 145-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) makes it possible to non-invasively measure brain activity with high spatial resolution.There are however a number of issues that have to be addressed. One is the large amount of spatio-temporal data that needsto be processed. In addition to the statistical analysis itself, several preprocessing steps, such as slice timing correction and motioncompensation, are normally applied. The high computational power of modern graphic cards has already successfully been used forMRI and fMRI. Going beyond the first published demonstration of GPU-based analysis of fMRI data, all the preprocessing stepsand two statistical approaches, the general linear model (GLM) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA), have been implementedon a GPU. For an fMRI dataset of typical size (80 volumes with 64 x 64 x 22 voxels), all the preprocessing takes about 0.5 s on theGPU, compared to 5 s with an optimized CPU implementation and 120 s with the commonly used statistical parametric mapping(SPM) software. A random permutation test with 10 000 permutations, with smoothing in each permutation, takes about 50 s ifthree GPUs are used, compared to 0.5 - 2.5 h with an optimized CPU implementation. The presented work will save time forresearchers and clinicians in their daily work and enables the use of more advanced analysis, such as non-parametric statistics, bothfor conventional fMRI and for real-time fMRI.

  • 32.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Improving CCA based fMRI Analysis by Covariance Pooling - Using the GPU for Statistical Inference2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is a statistical methodthat can be preferable to the general linear model (GLM) for analysisof functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. There are,however, two problems with CCA based fMRI analysis. First, it is notfeasible to use a parametric approach to calculate an activity thresholdfor a certain signi cance level. Second, two covariance matrices need tobe estimated in each voxel, from a rather small number of time samples.We recently solved the rst problem by doing random permutation testson the graphics processing unit (GPU), such that the null distribution ofany maximum test statistics can be estimated in the order of minutes. Inthis paper we consider the second problem. We extend the idea of variancepooling, that previously has been used for the GLM, to covariancepooling to improve the estimates of the covariance matrices. Our GPUimplementation of random permutation tests is used to calculate signicance thresholds, which are needed to compare the di erent activitymaps in an objective way. The covariance pooling results in more robustestimates of the covariance matrices. The number of signi cantly activevoxels that are detected (thresholded at p = 0.05, corrected for multiplecomparisons) is increased with 40 - 120% (if 8 mm smoothing is appliedto the covariance estimates). Too much covariance pooling can howeverresult in a loss of small activity clusters, 7-10 mm of smoothing givesthe best results. The calculations that were made in order to generatethe results in this paper would have taken a total of about 65 days witha Matlab implementation and about 10 days with a multithreaded Cimplementation, with our multi-GPU implementation they took about 2hours. By using fast random permutation tests, suggested improvementsof existing methods for fMRI analysis can be evaluated in an objective way.

  • 33.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    On Structural Based Certainty for Robust fMRI AnalysisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a method for obtaining and using a structural based certainty for robust functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis. In the area of fMRI it is common to see brain activity maps with activity at the edge of the brain. It is however a known fact that activity close to the edge of the brain can be due to head movement, since the voxels close to the edge will have a higher variance if they switch between being outside and inside the brain. To some extent this can be remedied by aligning each volume to a reference volume, by the means of volume registration. However, the problem with fMRI volumes is that the slices in the volume normally are taken at different timepoints, and motion between the slices can occur. We calculate a structural based certainty for each voxel, from a high resolution T1-weighted volume, and incorporate this certainty into the statistical analysis of the fMRI data. We show that our certainty approach removes a lot of false activity, both on simulated data and on real data.

  • 34.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Phase Based Volume Registration Using CUDA2010In: Acoustics Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP), 2010, IEEE , 2010, p. 658-661Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a method for fast phase based registration of volume data for medical applications. As the number of different modalities within medical imaging increases, it becomes more and more important with registration that works for a mixture of modalities. For these applications the phase based registration approach has proven to be superior. Today there seem to be two kinds of groups that work with medical image registration, one that works with refining of the registration algorithms and one that works with implementation of more simple algorithms on graphic cards for speeding up the algorithms. We put the work from these groups together and get the best from both worlds. We achieve a speedup of 10-30 compared to our CPU implementation, which makes fast phase based registration possible for large medical volumes.

  • 35.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    True 4D Image Denoising on the GPU2011In: International Journal of Biomedical Imaging, ISSN 1687-4188, E-ISSN 1687-4196, Vol. 2011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of image denoising techniques is an important part of many medical imaging applications. One common application isto improve the image quality of low-dose, i.e. noisy, computed tomography (CT) data. The medical imaging domain has seen atremendous development during the last decades. It is now possible to collect time resolved volumes, i.e. 4D data, with a number ofmodalities (e.g. ultrasound (US), CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)). While 3D image denoising previously has been appliedto several volumes independently, there has not been much work done on true 4D image denoising, where the algorithm considersseveral volumes at the same time (and not a single volume at a time). By using all the dimensions, it is for example possibleto remove some of the time varying reconstruction artefacts that exist in CT volumes. The problem with 4D image denoising,compared to 2D and 3D denoising, is that the computational complexity increases exponentially.In this paper we describe a novel algorithm for true 4D image denoising, based on local adaptive filtering, and how to implementit on the graphics processing unit (GPU). The algorithm was applied to a 4D CT heart dataset of the resolution 512 x 512 x 445 x 20.The result is that the GPU can complete the denoising in about 25 minutes if spatial filtering is used and in about 8 minutes if FFTbased filtering is used. The CPU implementation requires several days of processing time for spatial filtering and about 50 minutesfor FFT based filtering. Fast spatial filtering makes it possible to apply the denoising algorithm to larger datasets (compared to ifFFT based filtering is used). The short processing time increases the clinical value of true 4D image denoising significantly.

  • 36.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ohlsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Brain Computer Interface for Communication Using Real-Time fMRI2010In: Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Pattern Recognition, Los Alamitos, CA, USA: IEEE Computer Society, 2010, p. 3665-3669Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the first step towards a brain computer interface (BCI) for communication using real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The subject in the MR scanner sees a virtual keyboard and steers a cursor to select different letters that can be combined to create words. The cursor is moved to the left by activating the left hand, to the right by activating the right hand, down by activating the left toes and up by activating the right toes. To select a letter, the subject simply rests for a number of seconds. We can thus communicate with the subject in the scanner by for example showing questions that the subject can answer. Similar BCI for communication have been made with electroencephalography (EEG). The subject then focuses on a letter while different rows and columns of the virtual keyboard are flashing and the system tries to detect if the correct letter is flashing or not. In our setup we instead classify the brain activity. Our system is neither limited to a communication interface, but can be used for any interface where five degrees of freedom is necessary.

  • 37.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Warntjes, Marcel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Phase Based Volume Registration on the GPU with Application to Quantitative MRI2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a method for fast phase based registration of volume data for medical applications. As the number of different modalities within medical imaging increases, it becomes more and more important with registration that works for a mixture of modalities. For these applications the phase based registration approach has proven to be superior. Today there seem to be two kinds of groups that work with medical image registration, one that works with refining of the registration algorithms and one that works with implementation of more simple algorithms on graphic cards for speeding up the algorithms. We put the work from these groups together and get the best from both worlds. We achieve a speedup of 10-30 compared to our CPU implementation, which makes fast phase based registration possible for large medical volumes.

  • 38.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Forsberg, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Using the Local Phase of the Magnitude of the Local Structure Tensor for Image Registration2011In: Image Analysis: 17th Scandinavian Conference, SCIA 2011, Ystad, Sweden, May 2011. Proceedings / [ed] Anders Heyden, Fredrik Kahl, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, Vol. 6688, p. 414-423Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need of image registration is increasing, especially in the medical image domain. The simplest kind of image registration is to match two images that have similar intensity. More advanced cases include the problem of registering images of different intensity, for which phase based algorithms have proven to be superior. In some cases the phase based registration will fail as well, for instance when the images to be registered do not only differ in intensity but also in local phase. This is the case if a dark circle in the reference image is a bright circle in the source image. While rigid registration algorithms can use other parts of the image to calculate the global transformation, this problem is harder to solve for non-rigid registration. The solution that we propose in this work is to use the local phase of the magnitude of the local structure tensor, instead of the local phase of the image intensity. By doing this, we achieve invariance both to the image intensity and to the local phase and thereby only use the structural information, i.e. the shapes of the objects, for registration.

  • 39.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Friman, Ola
    Fraunhofer Mevis, Bremen, Germany.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A GPU accelerated interactive interface for exploratory functional connectivity analysis of FMRI data2011In: Image Processing (ICIP), 2011, IEEE , 2011, p. 1589-1592Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Functional connectivity analysis is a way to investigate how different parts of the brain are connected and interact. A common measure of connectivity is the temporal correlation between a reference voxel time series and all the other time series in a functional MRI data set. An fMRI data set generally contains more than 20,000 within-brain voxels, making a complete correlation analysis between all possible combinations of voxels heavy to compute, store, visualize and explore. In this paper, a GPU-accelerated interactive tool for investigating functional connectivity in fMRI data is presented. A reference voxel can be moved by the user and the correlations to all other voxels are calculated in real-time using the graphics processing unit (GPU). The resulting correlation map is updated in real-time and visualized as a 3D volume rendering together with a high resolution anatomical volume. This tool greatly facilitates the search for interesting connectivity patterns in the brain.

  • 40.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Friman, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Comparing fMRI Activity Maps from GLM and CCA at the Same Significance Level by Fast Random Permutation Tests on the GPU2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Parametric statistical methods are traditionally employed in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for identifying areas in the brain that are active with a certain degree of statistical significance. These parametric methods, however, have two major drawbacks. First, it isassumed that the observed data are Gaussian distributed and independent; assumptions that generally are not valid for fMRI data. Second, the statistical test distribution can be derived theoretically only for very simple linear detection statistics. In this work it is shown how the computational power of the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) can be used to speedup non-parametric tests, such as random permutation tests. With random permutation tests it is possible to calculate significance thresholds for any test statistics. As an example, fMRI activity maps from the General Linear Model (GLM) and Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) are compared at the same significance level.

  • 41.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics.
    Nichols, Thomas
    Department of Statistics, University of Warwick, England.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Empirically Investigating the Statistical Validity of SPM, FSL and AFNI for Single Subject fMRI Analysis2015In: 2015 IEEE 12th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI), IEEE conference proceedings, 2015, p. 1376-1380Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The software packages SPM, FSL and AFNI are the most widely used packages for the analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Despite this fact, the validity of the statistical methods has only been tested using simulated data. By analyzing resting state fMRI data (which should not contain specific forms of brain activity) from 396 healthy con- trols, we here show that all three software packages give in- flated false positive rates (4%-96% compared to the expected 5%). We isolate the sources of these problems and find that SPM mainly suffers from a too simple noise model, while FSL underestimates the spatial smoothness. These results highlight the need of validating the statistical methods being used for fMRI. 

  • 42.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ohlsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Electronics System. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rydell, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Balancing an Inverted Pendulum by Thinking A Real-Time fMRI Approach2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a method for controlling a dynamical system using real-time fMRI. The objective for the subject in the MR scanner is to balance an inverse pendulum by activating the left or right hand or resting. The brain activity is classified each second by a neural network and the classification is sent to a pendulum simulator to change the force applied to the pendulum. The state of the inverse pendulum is shown to the subject in a pair of VR goggles. The subject was able to balance the inverse pendulum both with real activity and imagined activity. The developments here have a potential to aid people with communication disabilities e.g., locked in people. It might also be a tool for stroke patients to be ableto train the damaged brain area and get real-time feedback of when they do it right.

  • 43.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ohlsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rydell, Joakim
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Using Real-Time fMRI to Control a Dynamical System2009In: ISMRM 17th Scientific Meeting & Exhibition, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present e method for controlling a dynamical system using real-time fMRI. The objective for the subject in the MR scanner is to balance an inverse pendulum by activating the left or right hand or resting. The brain activity is clasified each second by a neural network and the classification is sent to a pendulum simulator to change the state of the pendulum. The state of the inverse pendulum is shown to the subject in a pair of VR goggles. The subject was able to balance the inverse pendulum during a 7 minute test run.

  • 44.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ohlsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rydell, Joakim
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Using Real-Time fMRI to Control a Dynamical System2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present e method for controlling a dynamical system using real-time fMRI. The objective for the subject in the MR scanner is to balance an inverse pendulum by activating the left or right hand or resting. The brain activity is clasified each second by a neural network and the classification is sent to a pendulum simulator to change the state of the pendulum. The state of the inverse pendulum is shown to the subject in a pair of VR goggles. The subject was able to balance the inverse pendulum during a 7 minute test run.

  • 45.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ohlsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Rydell, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Using Real-Time fMRI to Control a Dynamical System by Brain Activity Classification2009In: Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention – MICCAI 2009: 12th International Conference, London, UK, September 20-24, 2009, Proceedings, Part I / [ed] Gerhard Goos, Juris Hartmanis and Jan van Leeuwen, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2009, 1, p. 1000-1008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a method for controlling a dynamical system using real-time fMRI. The objective for the subject in the MR scanner is to balance an inverted pendulum by activating the left or right hand or resting. The brain activity is classified each second by a neural network and the classification is sent to a pendulum simulator to change the force applied to the pendulum. The state of the inverted pendulum is shown to the subject in a pair of VR goggles. The subject was able to balance the inverted pendulum during several minutes, both with real activity and imagined activity. In each classification 9000 brain voxels were used and the response time for the system to detect a change of activity was on average 2-4 seconds. The developments here have a potential to aid people with communication disabilities, such as locked in people. Another future potential application can be to serve as a tool for stroke and Parkinson patients to be able to train the damaged brain area and get real-time feedback for more efficient training.

  • 46.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Warntjes, Marcel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fast Phase Based Registration for Robust Quantitative MRI2010In: Proceedings of the annual meeting of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2010), 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging has the major advantage that it handles absolute measurements of physical parameters. Quantitative MRI can for example be used to estimate the amount of different tissue types in the brain, but other applications are possible. Parameters such as relaxation rates R1 and R2 and proton density (PD) are independent of MR scanner settings and imperfections and hence are directly representative of the underlying tissue characteristics. Brain tissue quantification is an important aid for diagnosis of neurological diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and dementia. It is applied to estimate the volume of each tissue type, such as white tissue, grey tissue, myelin and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Tissue that deviates from normal values can be found automatically using computer aided diagnosis. In order for the quantification to have a clinical value, both the time in the MR scanner and the time for the data analysis have to be minimized. A challenge in MR quantification is to keep the scan time within clinically acceptable limits. The quantification method that we have used is based on the work by Warntjes et al.

  • 47.
    Eriksson-Bylund, Nina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Detecting and reducing reverberation artifacts2004In: Proceedings of the Swedish Symposium on Image Analysis (2004), 2004, p. 54-57Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Eriksson-Bylund, Nina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Interactive 3D filter design for ultrasound artifact reduction2005In: Image Processing, 2005. ICIP 2005. IEEE International Conference on  (Volume:3 ), 2005, p. 728-731Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method for detecting and reducing reverberation artifacts in ultrasound image sequences is described. A reverberation artifact localization map is produced using local Rf-bandwidth estimation. To reduce the artifacts an ideal 3D (2D + time) Wiener filter function is computed by using the reverberation map to interactively produce an estimate of the noise and signal spectra. The Wiener filter kernel is optimized to obtain good locality properties. The optimized filter is then applied to the ultrasound image sequence. The test sequence used is from an open chest pig heart, corrupted by strong reverberation artifacts. The selective power of a 3D filter is far superior to that of ID and 2D filters and the reverberation artifacts are almost completely removed by the developed method.

  • 49.
    Eriksson-Bylund, Nina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Wide range frequensy estimation in ultrasound images2001In: SSAB Symposium on Image Analysis,2001, 2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Farnebäck, Gunnar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rydell, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Efficient computation of the inverse gradient on irregular domains2007In: 2007 IEEE 11TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMPUTER VISION, VOLS 1-6, IEEE , 2007, p. 2710-2717Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The inverse gradient problem, finding a scalar field f with a gradient near a given vector field g on some bounded and connected domain Omega epsilon R(n), can be solved by means of a Poisson equation with inhomogeneous Neumann boundary conditions. We present an elementary derivation of this partial differential equation and an efficient multigrid-based method to numerically compute the inverse gradient on non-rectangular domains. The utility of the method is demonstrated by a range of important medical applications such as phase unwrapping, pressure computation, inverse deformation fields, and fiber bundle tracking.

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