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  • 1.
    Ahrén, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Olsson, Petter
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Klasson, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Petoral, Rodrigo Jr
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry .
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Rare earth nanoparticles as contrast agent in MRI: Nanomaterial design and biofunctionalization2007In: IVC-17/ICSS-13 ICNT,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ahrén, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Selegård, Linnéa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Klasson, Anna
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Abrikossova, Natalia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Skoglund, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bengtsson, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Synthesis and Characterization of PEGylated Gd2O3 Nanoparticles for MRI Contrast Enhancement2010In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 5753-5762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, much attention has been given to the development of biofunctionalized nanoparticles with magnetic properties for novel biomedical imaging. Guided, smart, targeting nanoparticulate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents inducing high MRI signal will be valuable tools for future tissue specific imaging and investigation of molecular and cellular events. In this study, we report a new design of functionalized ultrasmall rare earth based nanoparticles to be used as a positive contrast agent in MRI. The relaxivity is compared to commercially available Gd based chelates. The synthesis, PEGylation, and dialysis of small (3−5 nm) gadolinium oxide (DEG-Gd2O3) nanoparticles are presented. The chemical and physical properties of the nanomaterial were investigated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Neutrophil activation after exposure to this nanomaterial was studied by means of fluorescence microscopy. The proton relaxation times as a function of dialysis time and functionalization were measured at 1.5 T. A capping procedure introducing stabilizing properties was designed and verified, and the dialysis effects were evaluated. A higher proton relaxivity was obtained for as-synthesized diethylene glycol (DEG)-Gd2O3 nanoparticles compared to commercial Gd-DTPA. A slight decrease of the relaxivity for as-synthesized DEG-Gd2O3 nanoparticles as a function of dialysis time was observed. The results for functionalized nanoparticles showed a considerable relaxivity increase for particles dialyzed extensively with r1 and r2 values approximately 4 times the corresponding values for Gd-DTPA. The microscopy study showed that PEGylated nanoparticles do not activate neutrophils in contrast to uncapped Gd2O3. Finally, the nanoparticles are equipped with Rhodamine to show that our PEGylated nanoparticles are available for further coupling chemistry, and thus prepared for targeting purposes. The long term goal is to design a powerful, directed contrast agent for MRI examinations with specific targeting possibilities and with properties inducing local contrast, that is, an extremely high MR signal at the cellular and molecular level.

  • 3.
    Ahrén, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Selegård, Linnéa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kauczor, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Norman, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A simple polyol-free synthesis route to Gd2O3 nanoparticles for MRI applications: an experimental and theoretical study2012In: Journal of nanoparticle research, ISSN 1388-0764, E-ISSN 1572-896X, Vol. 14, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chelated gadolinium ions, e. g., GdDTPA, are today used clinically as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An attractive alternative contrast agent is composed of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as they have shown to provide enhanced contrast and, in principle, more straightforward molecular capping possibilities. In this study, we report a new, simple, and polyol-free way of synthesizing 4-5-nm-sized Gd2O3 nanoparticles at room temperature, with high stability and water solubility. The nanoparticles induce high-proton relaxivity compared to Gd-DTPA showing r(1) and r(2) values almost as high as those for free Gd3+ ions in water. The Gd2O3 nanoparticles are capped with acetate and carbonate groups, as shown with infrared spectroscopy, near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and combined thermogravimetric and mass spectroscopy analysis. Interpretation of infrared spectroscopy data is corroborated by extensive quantum chemical calculations. This nanomaterial is easily prepared and has promising properties to function as a core in a future contrast agent for MRI.

  • 4.
    Ahrén, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nordblad, Per
    Division of Solid State Physics, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Norman, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    One-step synthesis of sub 5 nm sized manganese oxide based nanoparticles2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sub 5 nm sized manganese oxide nanoparticles; MnOx (1 ≤ x ≤ 2), were synthesized via a short time room temperature synthesis route. The nanoparticles are crystalline, spherically shaped and in the size range of 2-4 nm as shown by transmission electron microscopy studies. Selected area electron diffraction patterns were collected and their appearance indicated that the nanoparticle cores are composed of MnO. Also, co-existence of the (II) and (III) oxidation states at the nanoparticle surface was verified by results achieved from infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These measurements also supported presence of a minor amount of acetate groups as well as a negligible fraction of carbonate groups at the nanoparticle surfaces. The interpretation of the IR spectra was confirmed by quantum chemical calculations using the high spin manganese nanoparticle Mn12O12(OAc)16(H2O)4, as a model system for the MnOx nanoparticle surface. Bulk MnO and Mn2O3 are known to be antiferromagnetic. The magnetic properties are however somewhat dependent of the crystallite size and changes when scaling down to the nanoregion. The MnOx (1 ≤ x ≤ 2) nanoparticles investigated in this work show a superparamagnetic behavior with a blocking temperature of approximately 12 K proven by means of SQUID measurements. The relaxivities of the nanoparticles and the Mn(OAc)2 precursors were studied with a bench top NMR analyzer verifying nanoparticle r1 and r2 of 0.5 and 6 mMs-1 respectively. The r1 relaxivity is lower than what is earlier reported for Gd based contrast agent, but improvements are expected by further surface modification, due to increased rotational time and higher water dispersability.

  • 5.
    Atakan, Aylin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mäkie, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Keraudy, Julien
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Emma
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Synthesis of a Cu-infiltrated Zr-doped SBA-15 catalyst for CO2 hydrogenation into methanol and dimethyl ethert2017In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 19, no 29, p. 19139-19149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A catalytically active nanoassembly comprising Cu-nanoparticles grown on integrated and active supports (large pore Zr-doped mesoporous SBA-15 silica) has been synthesized and used to promote CO2 hydrogenation. The doped mesoporous material was synthesized using a sal-gel method, in which the pore size was tuned between 11 and 15 nm while maintaining a specific surface area of about 700 m(2) g (1). The subsequent Cu nanoparticle growth was achieved by an infiltration process involving attachment of different functional groups on the external and internal surfaces of the mesoporous structure such that 7-10 nm sized Cu nanoparticles grew preferentially inside the pores. Chemisorption showed improved absorption of both CO2 and H-2 for the assembly compared to pure SBA-15 and 15% of the total CO2 was converted to methanol and dimethyl ether at 250 degrees C and 33 bar.

  • 6.
    Ballem, Mohamed Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nordblad, Per
    Uppsala Unversity, Sweden.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Growth of Gd2O3 nanoparticles inside mesoporous silica frameworks2013In: Microporous and Mesoporous Materials, ISSN 1387-1811, E-ISSN 1873-3093, Vol. 168, p. 221-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles with very small size, and narrow size distribution were synthesized by infiltration of Gd(NO3)3.6H2O as an oxide precursor into the pores of SBA-15 mesoporous silica using a wet-impregnation technique. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction show that during the hydrothermal treatment of the precursor at 550 °C, gadolinium oxide nanoparticles inside the silica pores are formed. Subsequent dissolution of the silica template by NaOH resulted in well dispersed nanoparticles with an average diameter of 3.6 ± 0.9 nm.

  • 7.
    Becker, Richard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Synthesis of silver nanowires in aqueous solutions2010In: Materials letters (General ed.), ISSN 0167-577X, E-ISSN 1873-4979, Vol. 64, no 8, p. 956-958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Silver nanowires with a diameter of 30 nm and typical lengths of 5–10 μm have been synthesized in an aqueous medium. To initiate the reaction, citrate ions were used, and during the reaction the aromatic organicmolecules polymerize forming “straight” chain surfactants which support the formation of nanowires. Characterization by TEM and HRETM revealed the nanowires to be highly crystalline with a growth along the [110] direction.

  • 8.
    Björk, Emma M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Grafting mesoporous silica particles to substrates: a method for synthesizing mesoporous films with cylindrical pores perpendicular to the substrate2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A method for synthesizing mesoporous silica films with cylindrical pores perpendicular to the substrate has been developed. The films consist of SBA-15 platelets that are grafted on glass substrates. The grafting is studied in terms of parameters such as pH, substrate functionalization, salt additions, time for TEOS prehydrolysis, and calcination. The best coverage of particles on the substrate was achieved for a low pH in combination with OTS-treated glass substrate. Furthermore, the prehydrolysis time of the TEOS was found to be a key parameter in order to bind the particles to the substrate. These porous films have potential in applications such as catalysis, drug delivery, and as a template for nanoparticle or nanorod, growth.

  • 9.
    Björk, Emma M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Single-pot synthesis of ordered mesoporous silica films with unique controllable morphology2014In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 413, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mesoporous silica films consisting of a monolayer of separated SBA-15 particles with unusually wide and short pores grown on silicon wafers have been fabricated in a simple single-pot-synthesis, and the formation of the films has been studied. A recipe for synthesizing mesoporous silica rods with the addition of heptane and NH4F at low temperature was used and substrates were added to the synthesis solution during the reaction. The films are ∼90 nm thick, have a pore size of 10.7–13.9 nm depending on the hydrothermal treatment time and temperature, and a pore length of 200–400 nm. All pores are parallel to the substrate, open, and easy to access, making them suitable for applications such as catalyst hosts and gas separation. The growth of the films is closely correlated to the evolution of the mesoporous silica particles. Here, we have studied the time for adding substrates to the synthesis solution, the evolution of the films with time during formation, and the effect of hydrothermal treatment. It was found that the substrates should be added within 30–60 s after turning off the stirring and the films are formed within 10 min after addition to the synthesis solution. The study has yielded a new route for synthesizing mesoporous silica films with a unique morphology.

  • 10.
    Björk, Emma M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tuning the shape of mesoporous silica particles by alterations in parameter space: from rods to platelets2013In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 29, no 44, p. 13551-13561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The knowledge of how to control the pore size and morphology of separated mesoporous silica particles is crucial for optimizing their performance in applications, such as molecular sieves and drug delivery systems. In this work, we have systematically studied the effects of various synthesis parameters to gain a deeper understanding of how particle morphologies can be altered. It was found that the morphology for isolated particles of SBA-15 type, with unusually short and wide pores, could be altered from rods to platelets by variations in the NH4F concentration. The pore length is nearly constant (similar to 300 nm) for the different morphologies, but the particle width is increasing from 200 nm to >3 mu m when decreasing the amount of NH4F, and the pore size can be tuned between 10 and 13 nm. Furthermore, other synthesis parameters such as heptane concentration, pH, silica precursor, and additions of ions have also been studied. The trend regarding particle width is independent of heptane concentration, at the same time as heptane increases the particle length up to a plateau value of similar to 500 nm. In all, parameters controlling particle width, length, and pore size have been separated in order to evaluate their function in the particle formation. Additionally, it was found that the formation time of the particles is strongly affected by the fluoride ion concentration, and a mechanism for particle formation for this system, where micelles transform from a foam, to multilamellar vesicles, and finally to cylindrical micelles, is suggested.

  • 11.
    Buchholt, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ieva, Eliana
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Torsi, L
    Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Bari, Italy.
    Cioffi, N
    Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Bari, Italy.
    Colaianni, L
    Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Bari, Italy.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics.
    A comparison between the use of Pd- and Au-nanoparticles as sensing layers in a field effect NOx-sensitive sensor2007In: The 2nd Conference on Sensing Technology ICST,2007, 2007, p. 87-92Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Buchholt, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Leva, E
    Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Bari, Bari, Italy.
    Torsi, L
    Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Bari, Bari, Italy.
    Cioffi, N
    Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Bari, Bari, Italy.
    Colaianni, L
    Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Bari, Bari, Italy.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Electrochemically Synthesised Pd- and Au-nanoparticles as sensing layers in NOx-sensitive field effect devices2008In: Smart Sensors and Sensing Technology / [ed] Subhas Chandra Mukhopadhyay and Gourab Sen Gupta, Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer , 2008, p. 63-75Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An environmental pollutant of great concern is NOx (nitrogen monoxide and nitrogen dioxide). Here we report the utilisation of electrochemically synthesised gold and palladium nanoparticles as catalytically active gate material on gas sensitive field effect sensor devices. The synthesised nanoparticles have been characterised by TEM and XPS, and the morphology of the thermally treated nanostructured sensing layers has been investigated using SEM and XPS. Measurements on the gas response of the palladium as well as the gold nanoparticle sensors towards a number of analytes found in automotive gas exhausts were performed and their response patterns were compared. The initial gas response measurements show interesting sensing properties for both the gold and the palladium nanoparticle sensors towards NOx detection.

  • 13.
    Eriksson, Jens
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khranovskyy, Volodymyr
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd-Spets, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    ZnO nanoparticles or ZnO films: A comparison of the gas sensing capabilities2009In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 137, no 1, p. 94-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zinc oxide is an interesting material for bio and chemical sensors. it is a semiconducting metal oxide with potential as an integrated multisensing sensor platform, which simultaneously detects Parameters like change in field effect, mass and Surface resistivity. in this investigation we have used resistive sensor measurements regarding the oxygen gas sensitivity in order to characterize sensing layers based on electrochemically produced ZnO nanoparticles and PE-MOCVD grown ZnO films. Proper annealing procedures were developed in order to get stable sensing properties and the oxygen sensitivity towards operation temperature was investigated. The ZnO nanoparticles showed a considerably increased response to oxygen as compared to the films. Preliminary investigations were also performed regarding the selectivity to other gases present in car exhausts or flue gases.

  • 14.
    Fortin, Marc-Andre
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Petoral, Rodrigo Jr
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry .
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Synthesis of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as a contrast agent in MRI2006In: Trends in Nanotechnology,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

           

  • 15.
    Fortin, Marc-André
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petoral Jr, Rodrigo M.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klasson, Anna
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Veres, Teodor
    National Research Council of Canada (CNRC-IMI) 75, Boucherville, QC, Canada.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Polyethylene glycol-cover ultra-small Gd2O3 nanoparticles for positive contras at 1.5 T magnetic resonance clinical scanning2007In: Nanotechnology, ISSN 0957-4484, Vol. 18, no 39, p. 395501-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The size distribution and magnetic properties of ultra-small gadolinium oxide crystals (US-Gd2O3) were studied, and the impact of polyethylene glycol capping on the relaxivity constants (r1, r2) and signal intensity with this contrast agent was investigated. Size distribution and magnetic properties of US-Gd2O3 nanocrystals were measured with a TEM and PPMS magnetometer. For relaxation studies, diethylene glycol (DEG)-capped US-Gd2O3 nanocrystals were reacted with PEG-silane (MW 5000). Suspensions were adequately dialyzed in water to eliminate traces of Gd3+ and surfactants. The particle hydrodynamic radius was measured with dynamic light scattering (DLS) and the proton relaxation times were measured with a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Parallel studies were performed with DEG–Gd2O3 and PEG-silane–SPGO (Gd2O3,< 40 nm diameter). The small and narrow size distribution of US-Gd2O3 was confirmed with TEM (~3 nm) and DLS. PEG-silane–US-Gd2O3 relaxation parameters were twice as high as for Gd–DTPA and the r2/r1 ratio was 1.4. PEG-silane–SPGO gave low r1 relaxivities and high r2/r1 ratios, less compatible with positive contrast agent requirements. Higher r1 were obtained with PEG-silane in comparison to DEG–Gd2O3. Treatment of DEG–US-Gd2O3 with PEG-silane provides enhanced relaxivity while preventing aggregation of the oxide cores. This study confirms that PEG-covered Gd2O3 nanoparticles can be used for positively contrasted MR applications requiring stability, biocompatible coatings and nanocrystal functionalization.

  • 16.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ahrén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Córdoba Gallego, José M.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nordblad, Per
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Westlund, Per-Olof
    Umeå Universitet.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnetic and Electron Spin Relaxation Properties of (GdxY1-x)2O3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) Nanoparticles Synthesized by the Combustion Method. Increased Electron Spin Relaxation Times with Increasing Yttrium Content2011In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 115, no 13, p. 5469-5477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The performance of a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent (CA) depends on several factors, including the relaxation times of the unpaired electrons in the CA. The electron spin relaxation time may be a key factor for the performance of new CAs, such as nanosized Gd2O3 particles. The aim of this work is, therefore, to study changes in the magnetic susceptibility and the electron spin relaxation time of paramagnetic Gd2O3 nanoparticles diluted with increasing amounts of diamagnetic Y2O3. Nanoparticles of (GdxY1-x)2O3 (0 e x e 1) were prepared by the combustion method and thoroughly characterized (by X-ray di.raction, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetry coupled with mass spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility measurements). Changes in the electron spin relaxation time were estimated by observations of the signal line width in electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and it was found that the line width was dependent on the concentration of yttrium, indicating that diamagnetic Y2O3 may increase the electron spin relaxation time of Gd2O3 nanoparticles.

  • 17.
    Hu, Zhangjun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ahrén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Selegård, Linnéa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Skoglund, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Highly Water-Dispersible Surface-Modified Gd2O3 Nanoparticles for Potential Dual-Modal Bioimaging2013In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 19, no 38, p. 12658-12667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water-dispersible and luminescent gadolinium oxide (GO) nanoparticles (NPs) were designed and synthesized for potential dual-modal biological imaging. They were obtained by capping gadolinium oxide nanoparticles with a fluorescent glycol-based conjugated carboxylate (HL). The obtained nanoparticles (GO-L) show long-term colloidal stability and intense blue fluorescence. In addition, L can sensitize the luminescence of europium(III) through the so-called antenna effect. Thus, to extend the spectral ranges of emission, europium was introduced into L-modified gadolinium oxide nanoparticles. The obtained Eu-III-doped particles (Eu:GO-L) can provide visible red emission, which is more intensive than that without L capping. The average diameter of the monodisperse modified oxide cores is about 4nm. The average hydrodynamic diameter of the L-modified nanoparticles was estimated to be about 13nm. The nanoparticles show effective longitudinal water proton relaxivity. The relaxivity values obtained for GO-L and Eu:GO-L were r(1)=6.4 and 6.3s(-1)mM(-1) with r(2)/r(1) ratios close to unity at 1.4T. Longitudinal proton relaxivities of these nanoparticles are higher than those of positive contrast agents based on gadolinium complexes such as Gd-DOTA, which are commonly used for clinical magnetic resonance imaging. Moreover, these particles are suitable for cellular imaging and show good biocompatibility.

  • 18.
    Khan, Yagoob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tajammul Hussain, Syed
    National Centre for Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University Campus, Islamabad, Pakistan.
    Abbasi, Mazhar Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    On the decoration of 3D nickel foam with single crystal ZnO nanorod arrays and their cathodoluminescence study2013In: Materials letters (General ed.), ISSN 0167-577X, E-ISSN 1873-4979, Vol. 90, p. 126-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Starting with an ammonical solution of zinc acetate, dense single crystal ZnO nanorod arrays were grown directly on high surface area porous 3D nickel foam substrates using a low temperature hydrothermal route. Heterogeneous nucleation of the nanorods with diameters around 100 nm can be conveniently and reproducibly Controlled by adjusting the amount of ammonia added to the growth solution. X-ray diffraction and HRTEM analysis confirmed the single phase wurtzite structure and c-axis orientation of the as grown ZnO nanorod arrays. Cathodoluminescence measurements indicate that the as-grown nanorod arrays were rich in atomic defects and gave strong orange emissions in the visible region. The nanorod arrays on unique 3D substrate are expected to improve the sensitivity and efficiency of ZnO based electrochemical sensors and heterogeneous catalysts.

  • 19.
    Khan, Yaqoob
    et al.
    National Centre for Nanotechnology, Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, PIEAS, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad.
    Hussain, Sajjad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Abbasi, Mazhar Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Durrani, Shahid Khan
    Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad.
    Honeycomb β-Ni(OH)2 films grown on 3D nickel foam substrates at low temperature2012In: Materials letters (General ed.), ISSN 0167-577X, E-ISSN 1873-4979, Vol. 69, p. 37-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simple method is presented to grow thick honeycomb β-Ni(OH)2 films on 3D nickel foam substrates at80 °C using nickel sulfate and ammonia as the starting materials. The porous honeycomb network structureof the films with pore openings about 0.5–1 μm wide is built from seamlessly connected polycrystallinenanowalls, approximately 10–20 nm thick. The amount of ammonia added to the growth solution and thegrowth time were found to be critical parameters in determining the morphology and pore structure ofthe films. Air annealing of the as-prepared films resulted in polycrystalline NiO films with morphologiessimilar to those of their hydroxide precursors.

  • 20.
    Klasson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ahrén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hellqvist, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Positive MRI Enhancement in THP-1 Cells with Gd2O3 Nanoparticles2008In: Contrast Media and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1555-4309, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 106-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a demand for more efficient and tissue-specific MRI contrast agents and recent developments involve the design of substances useful as molecular markers and magnetic tracers. In this study, nanoparticles of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) have been investigated for cell labeling and capacity to generate a positive contrast. THP-1, a monocytic cell line that is phagocytic, was used and results were compared with relaxivity of particles in cell culture medium (RPMI 1640). The results showed that Gd2O3-labeled cells have shorter T1 and T2 relaxation times compared with untreated cells. A prominent difference in signal intensity was observed, indicating that Gd2O3 nanoparticles can be used as a positive contrast agent for cell labeling. The r1 for cell samples was 4.1 and 3.6 s-1 mm-1 for cell culture medium. The r2 was 17.4 and 12.9 s-1 mm-1, respectively. For r1, there was no significant difference in relaxivity between particles in cells compared to particles in cell culture medium, (pr1 = 0.36), but r2 was significantly different for the two different series (pr2 = 0.02). Viability results indicate that THP-1 cells endure treatment with Gd2O3 nanoparticles for an extended period of time and it is therefore concluded that results in this study are based on viable cells.

  • 21.
    Kugler, Veronika Mozhdeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Music, Denis
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Helmersson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andreasson, J.
    Department of Materials Engineering, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Lindback, T.
    Department of Materials Engineering, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Low temperature growth and characterization of (Na,K)NbOx thin films2003In: Journal of Crystal Growth, ISSN 0022-0248, E-ISSN 1873-5002, Vol. 254, no 3-4, p. 400-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin (Na,K)NbOx perovskite films (NKN) have been deposited on SiO2/Si(0 0 1) substrates at low temperatures, from 350°C to 550°C, by RF magnetron sputtering. The effects of substrate temperature on microstructure, electrical-, and mechanical properties of the NKN films have been studied. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that films deposited at temperatures in the range of 450–550°C were crystalline, growing as a single phase, with a preferred orientation of (0 0 1). Films deposited at 350°C, were shown to be amorphous. The growth temperature had a strong influence on the electrical properties of the NKN films and the relative dielectric constants of the obtained films were in between 38 and 78. Variations of the mechanical properties of the NKN films were observed for different substrate temperatures: The elastic moduli and the hardness values ranged from 205±26 to 93±29 GPa, and from 12±2 to around 2 GPa, for films deposited at 550°C and 450°C, respectively.

  • 22.
    Kugler, Veronika Mozhdeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Music, Denis
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Helmersson, Ulf
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics.
    Andreasson, J.
    Department of Materials Engineering, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Lindback, T.
    Department of Materials Engineering, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Microstructure/dielectric property relationship of low temperature synthesised (Na,K)NbOx thin films2004In: Journal of Crystal Growth, ISSN 0022-0248, E-ISSN 1873-5002, Vol. 262, no 1-4, p. 322-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin films of (Na,K)NbOx (NKN) were grown by reactive RF magnetron sputtering on polycrystalline Pt80Ir20 substrates, at relatively low growth temperatures between 300°C and 450°C. The results show that the electrical performance and the microstructure of the films are a strong function of the substrate temperature. X-ray diffraction of films grown up to 400°C revealed the formation of only one crystalline NKN-phase with a preferred (0 0 2)-orientation. However, a mixed orientation together with a secondary, paraelectric potassium niobate phase, were observed for NKN films deposited at 450°C. The differences in the microstructure explains the variations in the dielectric constants and losses: The single phase NKN films displayed a dielectric constant and a dielectric loss of 506 and 0.011, respectively, while the films with mixed phases exhibited values of 475 and 0.022, respectively. The possibility of fabricating NKN films with relatively high dielectric properties at low growth temperatures, as demonstrated here, is of high technological importance.

  • 23.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry .
    Grins, J.
    Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry .
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Synthesis, structure determination and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterisation of a novel polymeric silver(I) nicotinic acid complex, H[Ag(py-3-CO2)2]2001In: Polyhedron, ISSN 0277-5387, E-ISSN 1873-3719, Vol. 20, no 21, p. 2747-2753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymeric inorganic or organometallic coordination compounds represent an interesting class of materials where novel (combinations of) electrical, optical, magnetic, catalytic, or other properties are expected to occur. It has recently been shown that Ag1 complexes formed by organic N,N'-bidentate type ligands exhibit a rich structural variety encompassing ID, 2D and 3D polymers. Previous investigations of the silver(I) nicotinic acid system have revealed two different structural types, in both of which Ag1 is three-coordinated. We have investigated the system nicotinic acid (C6H5NO2/AgA in water (A = NO3-, CH3COO- and F-). In all the cases the same product precipitated, catena-{hydrogen bis[pyridine-3-carboxylato-(N,N')]silver(I)}, H[Ag(py-3-CO2)2] (M = 353.1 g mol-1). The structure can be described as a 1D polymer consisting of [Ag(C6H4NO2)2]- monomers linked via C21(12)[R21(4)] hydrogen bonds, where the connecting H+ ion is located at the same distance (1.24 Å) to the carboxyl oxygens of consecutive monomers. The measured X-ray photoelectron spectrum shows an excellent agreement with the proposed structure. FTIR measurements of the complex were also performed. © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 24.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry .
    Ojamäe, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry .
    Pedersen, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Materials Science .
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Petoral, Rodrigo Jr
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Zhang, H.
    Zouc, X.
    Synthesis, Characterisation and Molecular Functionalisation of Gd2O3 Nanocrystals2004In: NAN:-8,2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 25.
    Lenz, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Selegård, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Inorganic Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Larsson, Arvid
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holtz, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ojamäe, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Inorganic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    ZnO Nanoparticles Functionalized with Organic Acids: An Experimental and Quantum-Chemical Study2009In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 113, no 40, p. 17332-17341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrochemical synthesis and physical characterization of ZnO nanoparticles functionalized with four different organic acids, three aromatic (benzoic, nicotinic, and trans-cinnamic acid) and one nonaromatic (formic acid), are reported. The functionalized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV−vis, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The adsorption of the organic acids at ZnO nanoparticles was further analyzed and interpreted using quantum-chemical density-functional theory computations. Successful functionalization of the nanoparticles was confirmed experimentally by the measured splitting of the carboxylic group stretching vibrations as well as by the N(1s) and C(1s) peaks from XPS. From a comparison between computed and experimental IR spectra, a bridging mode adsorption geometry was inferred. PL spectra exhibited a remarkably stronger near band edge emission for nanoparticles functionalized with formic acid as compared to the larger aromatic acids. From the quantum-chemical computations, this was interpreted to be due to the absence of aromatic adsorbate or surface states in the band gap of ZnO, caused by the formation of a complete monolayer of HCOOH. In the UV−vis spectra, strong charge-transfer transitions were observed.

  • 26.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pearce, Ruth
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hedin, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khranovskyy, Volodymyr
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    New transducer material concepts for biosensors and surface functionalization2009In: Smart Sensors, Actuators,and MEMS IV / [ed] Ulrich Schmid, Carles Cané, Herbert Shea, Bellingham, WA United States: SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2009, Vol. 7362, p. 736206-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wide bandgap materials like SiC, ZnO, AlN form a strong platform as transducers for biosensors realized as e.g. ISFET (ion selective field effect transistor) devices or resonators. We have taken two main steps towards a multifunctional biosensor transducer. First we have successfully functionalized ZnO and SiC surfaces with e.g. APTES. For example ZnO is interesting since it may be functionalized with biomolecules without any oxidation of the surface and several sensing principles are possible. Second, ISFET devises with a porous metal gate as a semi-reference electrode are being developed. Nitric oxide, NO, is a gas which participates in the metabolism. Resistivity changes in Ga doped ZnO was demonstrated as promising for NO sensing also in humid atmosphere, in order to simulate breath.

  • 27.
    Pearce, Ruth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Becker, Elin
    Chalmers Göteborg.
    Haglin, A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Skoglundh, Magnus
    Chalmers, Göteborg.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Understanding the gas sensor response of ZnO and Ga:ZnO2010In: IMCS13, 2010, p. 376-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Pearce, Ruth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hagelin, Alexander
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Becker, Elin
    Competence Centre for Catalysis Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Skoglundh, Magnus
    Competence Centre for Catalysis Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Effect of Water vapour on Gallium doped Zinc Oxide nanoparticle sensor gas response2009In: IEEE Sensors, 2009, Piscataway, NJ, United States: IEEE , 2009, p. 2039-2043Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zinc oxide is a wide band gap (similar to 3.4ev) semiconductor material, making it a promising material for high temperature applications, such as exhaust and flue environments where NO and NO2 monitoring is increasingly required due to stricter emission controls[1]. In these environments water vapour and background levels of oxygen are present and, as such, the effect of humidity on the sensing characteristics of these materials requires further study. The reaction mechanisms in the presence of water vapour are poorly understood and there is a need for deeper understanding of the principles and mechanisms of gas response of these materials. An investigation of the influence of changing water vapour (H2O) and oxygen (O-2) backgrounds on the response of nanoparticulate Ga-doped ZnO resistive sensors is presented.

  • 29.
    Pedersen, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petoral, Rodrigo M.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ojamäe, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Surface interactions between Y2O3 nanocrystals and organic molecules—an experimental and quantum-chemical study2005In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 592, no 1-3, p. 124-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The surface interactions between Y2O3 nanocrystals and the organic molecules formic acid, diethylene glycol (DEG), and tetramethoxy silane (TMOS), have been studied experimentally and by quantum chemical calculations with the intent to elucidate the chemisorption characteristics such as adsorbate vibrational spectra and adsorption structures. Nanocrystal synthesis was performed by a colloidal method based on polyols and by a rapid combustion method. The products were experimentally characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

    In the quantum chemical calculations, the B3LYP hybrid density functional ab initio method was used to study the chemisorption of formic acid, DEG and TMOS at the surface of Y12O18 clusters. From a comparison of calculated and experimental vibrational spectra, the binding mode for formic acid on Y2O3 was inferred to be of bridge or bidentate type. The XPS and FT-IR experiments showed that DEG is chemisorbed on the particle surface. The experimental IR spectra of DEG chemisorbed on Y2O3 were consistent with an adsorption mode where the hydroxyl groups are deprotonated according to the quantum-chemical computations. The adsorption energy is of the order of 370 kJ mol−1 for formic acid, 550 kJ mol−1 for DEG, and 60 kJ mol−1 for TMOS, according to the quantum chemical calculations.

  • 30.
    Selegård, Linnéa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ahrén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brommesson, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Per. O. Å
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bifunctional gadolinium decorated ZnO nanocrystals integrating both enhanced MR signal and bright fluorescence2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Gadolinium decorated ZnO nanoparticles simultaneously possess both fluorescent and MR enhancement properties. These ZnO nanoparticles are crystalline and shielded by an amorphous gadolinium acetate matrix. Interestingly, the Gd-acetate decoration enhances the fluorescence emission of the ZnO nanoparticles. The quantum yield does increase for samples with high Gd/Zn relative ratios and these samples do also show a higher colloidal stability.

    In addition, these nanoparticles show an enhanced relaxivity value per Gd atom (r119.9mM1s-1) compared to results earlier reported both on Gd alloyed ZnO nanoparticles and pure Gd2O3 nanoparticles. This improvement is considered to be due to the close proximity of Gd atoms and surrounding water molecules. A comprehensive study of the quantum yield and the relaxivity, as a function of composition, enable us to identify the ultimate design/composition of gadolinium decorated ZnO nanoparticles for optimum fluorescence and MR enhancement properties.

  • 31.
    Selegård, Linnéa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khranovskyy, Volodymyr
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vahlberg, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ahrén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Biotinylation of ZnO Nanoparticles and Thin Films: A Two-Step Surface Functionalization Study2010In: ACS APPLIED MATERIALS and INTERFACES, ISSN 1944-8244, Vol. 2, no 7, p. 2128-2135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reports ZnO nanoparticles and thin film surface modification using a two-step functionalization strategy. A small silane molecule was used to build up a stabilizing layer and for conjugation of biotin (vitamin B7), as a specific tag. Biotin was chosen because it is a well-studied bioactive molecule with high affinity for avidin. ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by electrochemical deposition under oxidizing condition, and ZnO films were prepared by plasma-enhanced metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Both ZnO nanoparticles and ZnO thin films were surface modified by forming a (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTS) layer followed by attachment of a biotin derivate. lodoacetyl-PEG2-biotin molecule was coupled to the thiol unit in MPTS through a substitution reaction. Powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy were used to investigate the as-synthesized and functionalized ZnO materials. The measurements showed highly crystalline materials in both cases with a ZnO nanoparticle diameter of about 5 nm and a grain size of about 45 nm for the as-grown ZnO thin films. The surface modification process resulted in coupling of silanes and biotin to both the ZnO nanoparticles and ZnO thin films. The two-step functionalization strategy has a high potential for specific targeting in bioimaging probes and for recognition studies in biosensing applications.

  • 32.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Inorganic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Colloidal Synthesis and Characterisation of (a) Na0.5K0.5NbO3 Thin Films; and (b) Functionalised Gd2O3 Nanocrystals2004Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    (a) Thin films of the perovskite structured Na0.5K0.5NbO3 (NKN) have been synthesised with several different sol-gel methods. Only one method gave pure NKN phase while the other methods gave extra peaks in the x-ray diffraction patterns, indicating that other, unidentified, phases were present. Scanning electron microscopy revealed grain sizes ranging from about 50 to 300 nm. The films prepared by chemical methods are compared with sputtered thin films.

    (b) Nanocrystals of Gd2O3 have been prepared by various methods, using e.g. trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO), diethylene glycol (DEG). The crystalline particles were of sizes 5 to 15 nm. Onto the surface of the particles, made with DEG, different carboxylic acids e.g. oleic acid or citric acid etc, were adsorbed. From IR measurements the bonding to the surface is recognised as chemisorbed via the carboxylate group in a bidentate or bridging fashion, with preference for the bridging coordination. The organic acid-particle complexes were characterised by XRPD, TEM, FTIR, Raman and XPS.

  • 33.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Colloidal synthesis of metal oxide nanocrystals and thin films2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A main driving force behind the recent years’ immense interest in nanoscience and nanotechnology is the possibility of achieving new material properties and functionalities within, e.g., material physics, biomedicine, sensor technology, chemical catalysis, energy storing systems, and so on. New (theoretical) possibilities represent, in turn, a challenging task for chemists and physicists. An important feature of the present nanoscience surge is its strongly interdisciplinary character, which is reflected in the present work.

    In this thesis, nanocrystals and thin films of magnetic and ferroelectric metal oxides, e.g. RE2O3 (RE = Y, Gd, Dy), GdFeO3, Gd3Fe5O12, Na0.5K0.5NbO3, have been prepared by colloidal and sol-gel methods. The sizes of the nanocrystals were in the range 3-15 nm and different carboxylic acids, e.g. oleic or citric acid, were chemisorbed onto the surface of the nanoparticles. From FT-IR measurements it is concluded that the bonding to the surface takes place via the carboxylate group in a bidentate or bridging fashion, with some preference for the latter coordination mode. The magnetic properties of nanocrystalline Gd2O3 and GdFeO3 were measured, both with respect to magnetic resonance relaxivity and magnetic susceptibility. Both types of materials exhibit promising relaxivity properties, and may have the potential for use as positive contrast enhancing agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The nanocrystalline samples were also characterised by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and quantum chemical calculations.

    Thin films of Na0.5K0.5NbO3, GdFeO3 and Gd3Fe5O12 were prepared by sol-gel methods and characterized by x-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Under appropriate synthesis conditions, rather pure phase materials could be obtained with grain sizes ranging from 50 to 300 nm. Magnetic measurements in the temperature range 2-350 K indicated that the magnetization of the perovskite phase GdFeO3 can be described as the sum of two contributing terms. One term (mainly) due to the spontaneous magnetic ordering of the iron containing sublattice, and the other a susceptibility term, attributable to the paramagnetic gadolinium sublattice. The two terms yield the relationship M(T)=M0(T)+χ(T)*H for the magnetization. The garnet phase Gd3Fe5O12 is ferrimagnetic and showed a compensation temperature Tcomp ≈ 295 K.

  • 34.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fortin, Marc A.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petoral, Rodrigo M.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klasson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Veres, Teodor
    National Research Council of Canada .
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Colloidal synthesis and characterization of ultrasmall perovskite GdFeO3 nanocrystals2008In: Nanotechnology, ISSN 0957-4484, Vol. 19, no 8, p. 085608-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synthesis of very small (about 4 nm) perovskite structured gadolinium orthoferrite nanoparticles (GdFeO3) was performed by the polyol method. The material shows promising relaxivity properties and potential as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging. The perovskite nanoparticles were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, magnetic resonance, and magnetization measurements. Upon heating in air at 800 °C for 3 h the size of the crystals increased to about 40 nm. The crystalline structure of the heat treated compound is in good agreement with perovskite GdFeO3 as the primary product. Contributions from various secondary phases were also identified, including one hitherto unknown phase with the suggested composition 'Gd3FeO6' and isostructural with Gd3GaO6. The novel 'Gd3FeO6' phase appears to be kinetically stabilized in the nano state.

  • 35.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sol-gel synthesis of ferroelectric (Na,K)NbO3 thin films2002Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of this work was to make thin films of (Na,K)NbO3 with sol-gel technique. In this work several sol-gel methods, novel and previously known, have been used, with various results. When working with sol-gel there are several parameters that can be modified, (e.g. the composition of the solution, heat treatment, etc.) which will improve or diminish the properties of the final film. The principle of sol-gel is to make a solution with the desired cations dispersed in organic solvents; furthermore the solution must have good adhesion to the substrate on which the solution is deposited.

  • 36.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Inorganic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Helmersson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sol–gel synthesis and characterization of Na0.5K0.5NbO3 thin films2005In: Journal of Crystal Growth, ISSN 0022-0248, E-ISSN 1873-5002, Vol. 281, no 2-4, p. 468-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin films of the perovskite structured Na0.5K0.5NbO3 (NKN) have been synthesized with three different sol–gel methods, viz. the alkoxide method, a modified Pechini method and a somewhat novel oxalate method, based on 2-methoxy ethanol as solvent with oxalic acid and ethylene glycol as chelating ligand and stabilizer. Only one method (the modified Pechini method) gave pure NKN phase while the other two methods gave extra peaks in the X-ray diffraction patterns, indicating that other, unidentified, phases were present. SEM images revealed grain sizes ranging from 100 to 300 nm.

  • 37.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Inorganic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pedersen, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petoral, Rodrigo M.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Synthesis and characterisation of Gd2O3 nanocrystals functionalised by organic acids2005In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 288, no 1, p. 140-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocrystals of Gd2O3 have been prepared by various methods, using, e.g., trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO), diethylene glycol (DEG) or glycine. The crystalline particles were of sizes 5 to 15 nm. Different carboxylic acids, e.g., oleic acid or citric acid, were adsorbed onto the surface of the particles made with DEG. IR measurements show that the molecules coordinate to the Gd2O3 surface via the carboxylate group in a bidentate or bridging manner. The organic-acid/particle complexes were characterised by XRPD, TEM, FTIR, Raman, and XPS.

  • 38.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Inorganic Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Selegård, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nordblad, Per
    Uppsala University.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sol-gel synthesis and characterization of polycrystalline GdFeO3 and Gd3Fe5O12 thin films2009In: Journal of Sol-Gel Science and Technology, ISSN 0928-0707, E-ISSN 1573-4846, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 253-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin films of the perovskite and garnet structured gadolinium ferrites GdFeO3 and Gd3Fe5O12 have been synthesized by a sol-gel method, based on stoichiometric mixtures of acetyl acetone chelated Gd3+ and Fe3+ dissolved in 2-methoxy ethanol. After spin coating onto Si wafers, and heating in air at 700 degrees C for 20 h, neatly grown essentially single phase films were obtained. From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy an iron deficiency is observed in the uppermost layer of both films, implying that the crystallites preferably end in planes rich in Gd and O but not in Fe. The films were also characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and magnetic measurements.

  • 39.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Ahrén, Maria
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Selegård, Linnéa
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Abrikossova, Natalia
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Klasson, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry .
    Functionalized Gd2O3 Nanoparticles to Be used for MRI Contrast Enhancement2008In: AVS,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Ahrén, Maria
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Klasson, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Vahlberg, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Petoral, Rodrigo Jr
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry .
    Functionalized rare earth nanocrystals for MRI contrast enhancement2006In: e-MRS,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 41.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Petoral, Rodrigo Jr
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry .
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry .
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Magnetic circular X-ray dichroism of Gd2O3 nano particles2003In: AVS,2003, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
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