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  • 1.
    Elander, Louise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engström, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ruud, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mackerlova, Ludmila
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jakobsson, Per-Johan
    Karolinska Institute.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsberth, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Inducible Prostaglandin E-2 Synthesis Interacts in a Temporally Supplementary Sequence with Constitutive Prostaglandin-Synthesizing Enzymes in Creating the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Response to Immune Challenge2009In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 1404-1413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammation-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been suggested to depend on prostaglandins, but the prostaglandin species and the prostaglandin-synthesizing enzymes that are responsible have not been fully identified. Here, we examined HPA axis activation in mice after genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of prostaglandin E-2-synthesizing enzymes, including cyclooxygenase-1 (Cox-1), Cox-2, and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1). After immune challenge by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide, the rapid stress hormone responses were intact after Cox-2 inhibition and unaffected by mPGES-1 deletion, whereas unselective Cox inhibition blunted these responses, implying the involvement of Cox-1. However, mPGES-1-deficient mice showed attenuated transcriptional activation of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) that was followed by attenuated plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone. Cox-2 inhibition similarly blunted the delayed corticosterone response and further attenuated corticosterone release in mPGES-1 knock-out mice. The expression of the c-fos gene, an index of synaptic activation, was maintained in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus and its brainstem afferents both after unselective and Cox-2 selective inhibition as well as in Cox-1, Cox-2, and mPGES-1 knock-out mice. These findings point to a mechanism by which ( 1) neuronal afferent signaling via brainstem autonomic relay nuclei and downstream Cox-1-dependent prostaglandin release and ( 2) humoral, CRH transcription-dependent signaling through induced Cox-2 and mPGES-1 elicited PGE(2) synthesis, shown to occur in brain vascular cells, play distinct, but temporally supplementary roles for the stress hormone response to inflammation.

  • 2.
    Engström, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Örtegren (Kugelberg), Unn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mackerlova, Ludmila
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Paues, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Preproenkephalin mRNA expression in rat parabrachial neurons: relation to cells activated by systemic immune challenge2001In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 316, no 3, p. 165-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By using a dual-labeling immunohistochemical/in situ hybridization technique we examined if enkephalin-expressing neurons in the pontine parabrachial nucleus, a major brain stem relay for ascending visceral and homeostatic information, were activated by systemic immune challenge. While rats subjected to intravenous injection of bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide expressed dense labeling for the immediate-early gene product FOS in parts of the parabrachial nucleus that also demonstrated dense preproenkephalin expression, only a small proportion of the enkephalin-positive neurons were FOS-positive. These data indicate that enkephalins, although implicated in a variety of autonomic responses, are not primarily involved in the transmission of immune-related information from the parabrachial nucleus to its different forebrain and brain stem targets.

  • 3.
    Engström, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cellbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mackerlova, Ludmila
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cellbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cellbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lipopolysaccharide induces preproenkephalin transcription in hypophysiotropic neurons of the rat paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus suggesting a neuroendocrine role for enkephalins during immune stress2006In: Neuroscience, ISSN 0306-4522, Vol. 142, no 3, p. 781-788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Opioids have impact on stress responses and possess immune modulatory functions. We have previously shown that immune stress elevates the levels of preproenkephalin transcript in a variety of autonomic structures in the rat brain, including the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus. By using in situ hybridization with an intronic probe recognizing the preproenkephalin heteronuclear RNA combined with retrograde tract tracing, we examined the efferent target of the enkephalinergic neurons in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus that display induced transcriptional activity during immune challenge. Rats were first given i.p. injections of the tracer substance Fluoro-Gold, which following this route of administration is taken up only by nerve terminals residing outside the blood–brain barrier, and were then given an i.v. injection of lipopolysaccharide. Neuronal cell bodies retrogradely labeled with Fluoro-Gold were detected by immunohistochemistry, and—using a dual-labeling approach—the same cells were then examined for their expression of preproenkephalin heteronuclear RNA. We found that over 90% of the neurons that expressed preproenkephalin heteronuclear RNA also contained Fluoro-Gold. In addition, approximately 40% of the neurons expressing preproenkephalin heteronuclear RNA co-expressed mRNA for corticotropin-releasing hormone, the main adrenocorticotropic hormone secretagogue. These data show that the paraventricular hypothalamic neurons that display induced preproenkephalin transcription following immune challenge are almost exclusively hypophysiotropic neurons, indicating a role for enkephalin in the hypothalamic control of hormone release during infectious and inflammatory conditions.

  • 4.
    Engström, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosén, Khadijah
    Angel, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Developmental Biology-IKE . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fyrberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mackerlova, Ludmila
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Konsman, Jan Pieter
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Systemic immune challenge activates an intrinsically regulated local inflammatory circuit in the adrenal gland2008In: Endocrinology, ISSN 0013-7227, E-ISSN 1945-7170, Vol. 149, no 4, p. 1436-1450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is evidence from in vitro studies that inflammatory messengers influence the release of stress hormone via direct effects on the adrenal gland; however, the mechanisms underlying these effects in the intact organism are unknown. Here we demonstrate that systemic inflammation in rats elicited by iv injection of lipopolysaccharide results in dynamic changes in the adrenal immune cell population, implying a rapid depletion of dendritic cells in the inner cortical layer and the recruitment of immature cells to the outer layers. These changes are accompanied by an induced production of IL-1β and IL-1 receptor type 1 as well as cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 in these cells, implying local cytokine-mediated prostaglandin E2 production in the adrenals, which also displayed prostaglandin E2 receptors of subtypes 1 and 3 in the cortex and medulla. The IL-1β expression was also induced by systemically administrated IL-1β and was in both cases attenuated by IL-1 receptor antagonist, consistent with an autocrine signaling loop. IL-1β similarly induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2, but the cyclooxygenase-2 expression was, in contrast, further enhanced by IL-1 receptor antagonist. These data demonstrate a mechanism by which systemic inflammatory agents activate an intrinsically regulated local signaling circuit that may influence the adrenals’ response to immune stress and may help explain the dissociation between plasma levels of ACTH and corticosteroids during chronic immune perturbations.

  • 5.
    Engström, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ruud, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eskilsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mackerlova, Ludmila
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kugelberg, Unn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Qian, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Hematology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vasilache, Ana Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sigvardsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Hematology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jönsson, Jan-Ingvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Hematology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Fever Depends on Prostaglandin E2 Production Specifically in Brain Endothelial Cells2012In: Endocrinology, ISSN 0013-7227, E-ISSN 1945-7170, Vol. 153, no 10, p. 4849-4861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Immune-induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis is critical for fever and other centrally elicited disease symptoms. The production of PGE2 depends on cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1), but the identity of the cells involved has been a matter of controversy. We generated mice expressing mPGES-1 either in cells of hematopoietic or nonhematopoietic origin. Mice lacking mPGES-1 in hematopoietic cells displayed an intact febrile response to lipopolysaccharide, associated with elevated levels of PGE2 in the cerebrospinal fluid. In contrast, mice that expressed mPGES-1 only in hematopoietic cells, although displaying elevated PGE2 levels in plasma but not in the cerebrospinal fluid, showed no febrile response to lipopolysaccharide, thus pointing to the critical role of brain-derived PGE2 for fever. Immunohistochemical stainings showed that induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression in the brain exclusively occurred in endothelial cells, and quantitative PCR analysis on brain cells isolated by flow cytometry demonstrated that mPGES-1 is induced in endothelial cells and not in vascular wall macrophages. Similar analysis on liver cells showed induced expression in macrophages and not in endothelial cells, pointing at the distinct role for brain endothelial cells in PGE2 synthesis. These results identify the brain endothelial cells as the PGE2-producing cells critical for immune-induced fever.

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  • 6.
    Hamlin, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mackerlova, Ludmila
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ericson, Ann-Charlott
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    AMPA-selective glutamate receptor subunits and their relation to glutamate-and GABA-like immunoreactive terminals in the nucleus submedius of the rat1996In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 217, no 2-3, p. 149-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glutamate plays an important role in supraspinal nociceptive systems. Thus, glutamate is present in the nucleus submedius of the medial thalamus, a major relay for nociceptive information. In this study, immunoreactivity for the four subunits (GluR1-4) of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxasoleproprionate (AMPA) receptors was examined by a preembedding immunohistochemical method in order to evaluate the presence of this glutamate receptor subtype in the nucleus submedius. Combining the preembedding method with a postembedding immunogold technique, we found that AMPA receptor-like immunoreactivity was present postsynaptically to glutamatergic terminals but not to terminals containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). These findings suggest a role for AMPA receptors in excitatory synaptic transmission in the nucleus submedius of the rat thalamus.

  • 7.
    Konsman, Jan Pieter
    et al.
    Laboratoire de Neurobiologie Intégrative, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique FRE 2723 / Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique UR 1244, Institut François Magendie, Bordeaux, France.
    Vigues, Stephan
    Division of Endocrinology, National Institute for Biological Standards and Control, Herts, United Kingdom.
    Mackerlova, Ludmila
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bristow, Adrian
    Division of Endocrinology, National Institute for Biological Standards and Control, Herts, United Kingdom.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rat Brain Vascular Distribution of Interleukin-1 Type-1 Receptor Immunoreactivity: Relationship to Patterns of Inducible Cyclooxygenase Expression by Peripheral Inflammatory Stimuli2004In: Journal of Comparative Neurology, ISSN 0021-9967, E-ISSN 1096-9861, Vol. 472, no 1, p. 113-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß) is thought to act on the brain to induce fever, neuroendocrine activation, and behavioral changes during disease through induction of prostaglandins at the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, despite the fact that IL-1ß induces the prostaglandin-synthesizing enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in brain vascular cells, no study has established the presence of IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) protein in these cells. Furthermore, although COX inhibitors attenuate expression of the activation marker c-Fos in the preoptic and paraventricular hypothalamus after administration of IL-1ß or bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), they do not alter c-Fos induction in other structures known to express prostaglandin receptors. The present study thus sought to establish whether IL-1R1 protein is present and functional in the rat cerebral vasculature. In addition, the distribution of IL-1R1 protein was compared to IL-1ß- and LPS-induced COX-2 expression. IL-1R1-immunoreactive perivascular cells were mostly found in choroid plexus and meninges. IL-1R1-immunoreactive vessels were seen throughout the brain, but concentrated in the preoptic area, subfornical organ, supraoptic hypothalamus, and to a lesser extent in the paraventricular hypothalamus, cortex, nucleus of the solitary tract, and ventrolateral medulla. Vascular IL-1R1-ir was associated with an endothelial cell marker, not found in arterioles, and corresponded to the induction patterns of phosphorylated c-Jun and inhibitory-factor kappaB mRNA upon IL-1ß stimulation, and colocalized with peripheral IL-1ß- or LPS-induced COX-2 expression. These observations indicate that functional IL-1R1s are expressed in endothelial cells of brain venules and suggest that vascular IL-1R1 distribution is an important factor determining BBB prostaglandin-dependent activation of brain structures during infection. © 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 8.
    Paues, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mackerlova, Ludmila
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ericsson-Dahlstrand, Anders
    Department of Medicine, Unit of Rheumatology, The Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Feeding-related immune responsive brain stem neurons: association with CGRP2001In: Neuroreport, ISSN 0959-4965, Vol. 12, no 11, p. 2399-2403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using dual-labeling in situ hybridization histochemistry, the neurotransmitter expression of immune-responsive neurons in the pontine parabrachial nucleus, a major relay for interoceptive information, was investigated. Intravenous injection of bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide resulted in dense c-fos mRNA expression in the external lateral parabrachial nucleus, and a majority of the c-fos expressing cells also expressed calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) mRNA. In contrast CGRP-posi- tive cells in the adjoining external medial subnucleus were c-fos negative. Taken together with previous hodological and behavioral studies, these data suggest that CGRPergic parabrachial neurons may mediate lipopolysaccharide-induced anorexia by means of their projection to central nucleus of the amygdala.

  • 9.
    Paues, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cellbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mackerlova, Ludmila
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cellbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cellbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Expression of melanocortin-4 receptor by rat parabrachial neurons responsive to immune and aversive stimuli2006In: Neuroscience, ISSN 0306-4522, E-ISSN 1873-7544, Vol. 141, no 1, p. 287-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pontine parabrachial nucleus is a major relay area for visceral and other interoceptive information, and has been implicated in mechanisms underlying anorexia and food aversion during disease. Thus, physiological studies have shown that peripheral immune stimuli, as well as the administration of aversive substances such as lithium chloride, evoke a prominent Fos-expression in the lateral parabrachial nucleus and behavioral experiments have demonstrated that this structure is critical for the acquisition of conditioned taste aversion. The present study examined in rats the relationship between parabrachial neurons activated by systemic administration of bacterial cell-wall lipopolysaccharide or lithium chloride and the melanocortin system, a major regulator of feeding and energy homeostasis that also has been implicated in aversive behavior. Dual-labeling in situ hybridization showed melanocortin-4 receptor expression on neurons in the external lateral parabrachial subnucleus that displayed lipopolysaccharide- or lithium chloride-induced expression of c-fos mRNA. Melanocortin-4 receptor mRNA was also co-expressed with mRNA for calcitonin gene-related peptide in this subnucleus. Taken together with previous observations showing that calcitonin gene-related peptide expressing neurons in the external lateral parabrachial subnucleus are activated by peripheral immune challenge, that lipopolysaccharide-activated external lateral parabrachial subnucleus neurons project to the amygdala, and that the amygdala-projecting neurons in the external lateral parabrachial subnucleus are calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive, the present findings suggest the presence of a melanocortin-regulated calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive pathway from the external lateral parabrachial subnucleus to the amygdala that relays information of importance to forebrain responses to certain aspects of sickness behavior. These observations may thus help explain how melanocortins can reduce feeding and influence conditioned taste aversion during inflammation and other disease conditions.

  • 10.
    Richard, Sabine
    et al.
    Station de Recherches Avicoles, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Nouzilly, France.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cellbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Paues, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cellbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mackerlova, Ludmila
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cellbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cellbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Activation of the parabrachio-amygdaloid pathway by immune challenge or spinal nociceptive input: a quantitative study in the rat using Fos immunohistochemistry and retrograde tract tracing2005In: Journal of Comparative Neurology, ISSN 0021-9967, E-ISSN 1096-9861, Vol. 481, no 2, p. 210-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peripheral nociceptive stimulation results in activation of neurons in the pontine parabrachial nucleus (PB) of rats. Electrophysiological studies have suggested that noxiously activated PB neurons project to the amygdala, constituting a potential pathway for emotional aspects of pain. In the present study we examined this hypothesis by combining retrograde tract tracing with Fos immunohistochemistry. Cholera toxin subunit B was injected into the amygdala of rats. After a minimum of 48 hours the rats were given a subcutaneous injection of 100 l of 5% formalin into one hindpaw and killed 60-90 minutes later. A dense aggregation of retrogradely labeled neurons was seen in the external lateral PB. Fos-expressing neurons were present preferentially in the central, dorsal, and superior lateral subnuclei as well as in the lateral crescent area, as described previously. There was little overlap between the retrogradely labeled and Fos-expressing populations and double-labeled neurons were rare. In contrast, systemic immune challenge by intravenous injection of bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide resulted in a Fos expression that overlapped the retrograde labeling in the external lateral PB, and many double-labeled neurons were seen. While these data provide direct functional anatomical evidence that nociceptive information from the hindlimb is relayed to the amygdala via the parabrachial nucleus, the number of parabrachio-amygdaloid neurons involved is small. Considering the widespread activation of parabrachio-amygdaloid neurons by a variety of visceral and humoral stimuli, the parabrachio-amygdaloid pathway thus appears to be more involved in the mediation of information related to viscerally and humorally elicited activity than in transmission of spinal nociceptive inputs.

  • 11. Saha, Sipra
    et al.
    Engström, Linda
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology.
    Mackerlova, Ludmila
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology.
    Jakobsson, Per-Johan
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology.
    Impaired febrile responses to immune challenge in mice deficient in microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-12005In: American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, ISSN 0363-6119, E-ISSN 1522-1490, Vol. 288, no 5 57-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fever is a common, centrally elicited sign of inflammatory and infectious processes and is known to be induced by the action of PGE2 on its specific receptors in the thermogenic region of the hypothalamus. In the present work, using genetically modified mice, we examined the role of the inducible terminal PGE2-synthesizing enzyme microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) for the generation of immune-elicited fever. Animals with a deletion of the Ptges gene, which encodes mPGES-1, or their wild-type littermates were given either a subcutaneous injection of turpentine-a model for aseptic cytokine-induced pyresis-or an intraperitoneal injection of interleukin-1β. While both procedures resulted in typical febrile responses in wild-type animals, these responses were strongly impaired in the mPGES-1 mutant mice. In contrast, both genotypes showed psychogenic stress-induced hyperthermia and displayed normal diurnal temperature variations. Both wild-type and mPGES-1 mutant mice also showed strongly reduced motor activity following turpentine injection. Taken together with previous observations on mPGES-1 induction in the brain vasculature during various inflammatory conditions and its role in endotoxin-induced pyresis, the present findings indicate that central PGE 2 synthesis by mPGES-1 is a general and critical mechanism for fever during infectious and inflammatory conditions that is distinct from the mechanism(s) underlying the circadian temperature regulation and stress-induced hyperthermia, as well as the inflammation-induced activity depression. Copyright © 2005 the American Physiological Society.

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