Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 122
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Care management in practice: on the use of talk and text in gerontological social work2010In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WELFARE, ISSN 1369-6866, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 339-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Int J Soc Welfare 2010: 19: 339-347 (C) 2010 The Author(s), Journal compilation (C) 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and International Journal of Social Welfare. This is a study of encounters between social workers and citizens in one type of welfare organisation, the municipal elder care system. The article sheds light on how older peoples claims are dealt with in the processing of home care applications. Twenty encounters between social workers and older people were studied using discourse analysis. The findings reveal that discursive practices are part of the routine when the applications are processed. The application handling follows an agenda-bound pattern that is visible in the encounters. In these standardised procedures, oral discourse is embedded in routines that also include the use of texts. However, within this institutional order, there is also an important element of negotiation between the parties. It is therefore claimed that the encounters include a negotiated order that does not exist on its own, but is achieved in the ongoing interaction.

  • 2.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, NISAL - Nationella institutet för forskning om äldre och åldrande.
    Care management in practice: on the use of talk and text in gerontological social work2010In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 339-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Int J Soc Welfare 2010: 19: 339-347 (C) 2010 The Author(s), Journal compilation (C) 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and International Journal of Social Welfare. This is a study of encounters between social workers and citizens in one type of welfare organisation, the municipal elder care system. The article sheds light on how older peoples claims are dealt with in the processing of home care applications. Twenty encounters between social workers and older people were studied using discourse analysis. The findings reveal that discursive practices are part of the routine when the applications are processed. The application handling follows an agenda-bound pattern that is visible in the encounters. In these standardised procedures, oral discourse is embedded in routines that also include the use of texts. However, within this institutional order, there is also an important element of negotiation between the parties. It is therefore claimed that the encounters include a negotiated order that does not exist on its own, but is achieved in the ongoing interaction.

  • 3.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Needs assessment, documentation, and social networks - analysis of care management in elder care2012In: Abstract book at the 2012 Joint World Conference on Social Work and Social Development: Action and Impact / [ed] Holmberg-Herrström, Eva, Stockholm, 2012, p. 223-224Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, NISAL - Nationella institutet för forskning om äldre och åldrande.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Socialt arbete.
    Needs assessment, documentation, and social networks - analysis of care management in elder care2012In: Abstract book at the 2012 Joint World Conference on Social Work and Social Development: Action and Impact, Stockholm, 2012, p. 223-224Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Positioning and identity construction in home care assessment talk2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports results from a study of meetings between old persons, their relatives and the care managers who work with assessments of home care. According to the Swedish Social Welfare Act old persons who are in need of care are entitled to apply for home care. The formal decision concerning home care is made by the assessment managers who handle these type of applications within the municipality. Old persons and their family members - such as spouses or children - are moreover supposed to have influences on how home care is organized. The issues related to home care may often comprise conflicting interests - both within the family, and between the old persons, their family members and the case managers. The data consist of 20 Swedish home care assessment meetings. The assessments were studied, as institutional practices in which the participants used discursive positioning in order to argue for their version in the decision-making. The results show that the home care assessment meetings functioned as a situated practice in which old persons were positioned both by care managers and their relatives as potential home care receivers. Although the old persons had the final saying in the decision process family members were prominent in constructing the old person as in need of care. This highlights further questions about old persons individual rights within the decision-making in this type of situation. It also poses questions about relatives and their needs in the caring practice for the future development of the old age care system.

  • 6.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, NISAL - Nationella institutet för forskning om äldre och åldrande.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, NISAL - Nationella institutet för forskning om äldre och åldrande.
    Positioning and identity construction in home care assessment talk2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports results from a study of meetings between old persons, their relatives and the care managers who work with assessments of home care. According to the Swedish Social Welfare Act old persons who are in need of care are entitled to apply for home care. The formal decision concerning home care is made by the assessment managers who handle these type of applications within the municipality. Old persons and their family members - such as spouses or children - are moreover supposed to have influences on how home care is organized. The issues related to home care may often comprise conflicting interests - both within the family, and between the old persons, their family members and the case managers. The data consist of 20 Swedish home care assessment meetings. The assessments were studied, as institutional practices in which the participants used discursive positioning in order to argue for their version in the decision-making. The results show that the home care assessment meetings functioned as a situated practice in which old persons were positioned both by care managers and their relatives as potential home care receivers. Although the old persons had the final saying in the decision process family members were prominent in constructing the old person as in need of care. This highlights further questions about old persons individual rights within the decision-making in this type of situation. It also poses questions about relatives and their needs in the caring practice for the future development of the old age care system.

  • 7.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sverker, Annette M.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Central County.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work.
    Bridging between social and medical perspectives: Old people´s experiences of a new health care model. 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Forssell, Emilia
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Torres, Sandra
    Sociologiska institutionen Uppsala universitet.
    Need assessment practice with older migrants: Challenges to social work2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Forssell, Emilia
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Socialt arbete.
    Torres, Sandra
    Sociologiska institutionen Uppsala universitet.
    Need assessment practice with older migrants: Challenges to social work2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Forssell, Emilia
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola, Stockholm.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Torres, Sandra
    Sociologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Needs assessors in elderlycare meet immigrant families: The welfare state reconsidered2013In: The Journal of Nutrition , Health and Aging, Vol. 17, Supplement 1, 2013 / [ed] Springer, Springer, 2013, p. 315-316Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Forssell, Emilia
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola, Stockholm.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Socialt arbete.
    Torres, Sandra
    Sociologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Needs assessors in elderlycare meet immigrant families: The welfare state reconsidered2013In: The Journal of Nutrition , Health and Aging, Vol. 17, Supplement 1, 2013 / [ed] Springer, Springer , 2013, p. 315-316Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Forssell, Emilia
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Torres, Sandra
    Sociologiska institutionen Uppsala universitet.
    Understandings of cross-cultural interaction and ethnic ‘Otherness’ as challenges for need assessment practices: results from a focus group study with Swedish need assessors2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Forssell, Emilia
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Socialt arbete.
    Torres, Sandra
    Sociologiska institutionen Uppsala universitet.
    Understandings of cross-cultural interaction and ethnic ‘Otherness’ as challenges for need assessment practices: results from a focus group study with Swedish need assessors2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Forssell, Emilia
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola, Stockholm.
    Torres, Sandra
    Sociologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Anhörigomsorg mot betalning: Biståndshandläggare om sent-i-livet-invandares önskemål2014In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 114-137Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Forssell, Emilia
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola, Stockholm.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Socialt arbete.
    Anhörigomsorg mot betalning: Biståndshandläggare om sent-i-livet-invandares önskemål2014In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 114-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Artikeln diskuterar den ökande internationella migrationens utmaningar för äldreinriktat socialt arbete. Konkret undersöks erfarenheter hos äldreomsorgens biståndshandläggare gällande att möta sent-i-livet-invandrare som önskar anhörigomsorg med betalning genom anhöriganställning eller kontantbidrag. Biståndshandläggarna erfar situationer där de i rollen som myndighetsutövare upplever sig sakna såväl kunskap som resurser att hantera sådana önskemål.

  • 16.
    Forssell, Emilia
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola.
    Torres, Sandra
    Sociologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Care managers' experiences of cross-cultural needs assessment meetings: the case of late-in-life immigrants2015In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 576-601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on care managers' experiences of the needs assessment process is scarce even though the literature on needs assessment practice is relatively extensive. One of the research areas that has not received attention yet is the way in which care managers experience the challenges that are presumably posed by increased ethnic, cultural, linguistic and religious diversity among prospective elder care recipients. This article addresses this research gap. It is based on a project that aims to shed light on care managers' experiences of the needs assessment process in general and cross-cultural needs assessment meetings in particular. The data are constituted of focus group interviews with care managers in Sweden (N=60). In this article we focus on care managers' experiences of needs assessment with older people who have immigrated late-in-life, who come from cultures considered different from the Swedish one and who have not mastered the Swedish language. This was the group of older people that the care managers mostly thought of when asked to describe their experiences of cross-cultural needs assessment meetings. The interviewed care managers discussed the challenges that these meetings present, which were related to communication due to language barriers, different demands and expectations, insecurity regarding what is customary in such meetings, as well as perceived passivity among late-in-life immigrants. The article discusses the contributions of the findings to research on care management practices in general, as well as to needs assessment practice in particular.

  • 17.
    Forssell, Emilia
    et al.
    Ersta Skondal Univ Coll, Dept Social Sci, SE-12806 Skondal, Sweden..
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Sociol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Olaison, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology, Centre for Social Work - CESAR.
    Care managers' experiences of cross-cultural needs assessment meetings: the case of late-in-life immigrants2015In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 576-601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on care managers' experiences of the needs assessment process is scarce even though the literature on needs assessment practice is relatively extensive. One of the research areas that has not received attention yet is the way in which care managers experience the challenges that are presumably posed by increased ethnic, cultural, linguistic and religious diversity among prospective elder care recipients. This article addresses this research gap. It is based on a project that aims to shed light on care managers' experiences of the needs assessment process in general and cross-cultural needs assessment meetings in particular. The data are constituted of focus group interviews with care managers in Sweden (N=60). In this article we focus on care managers' experiences of needs assessment with older people who have immigrated late-in-life, who come from cultures considered different from the Swedish one and who have not mastered the Swedish language. This was the group of older people that the care managers mostly thought of when asked to describe their experiences of cross-cultural needs assessment meetings. The interviewed care managers discussed the challenges that these meetings present, which were related to communication due to language barriers, different demands and expectations, insecurity regarding what is customary in such meetings, as well as perceived passivity among late-in-life immigrants. The article discusses the contributions of the findings to research on care management practices in general, as well as to needs assessment practice in particular.

  • 18.
    Karlsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Society, Diversity, Identity . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Skill, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mapping and Characterizing: Nordic Everyday Life Research2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this report is to present references that originate from the Nordic countries,including Sweden, Finland, Denmark, and Norway, and that have been assigned the keyword“everyday life” or one of its Nordic counterparts and published in the period 1990 through2008. The presentation includes information on the total number of references from eachcountry, the most frequent authors and the institutions to which they belong, and the referencetypes and the number of each type. Based on an analysis of some limited information aboutthe dissertations and the journals, it is discussed how Nordic everyday life research may becharacterized.

    In total 560 references were found in the search procedure that is described in the report. Thenumber of references from the different countries is: Finland 176, Sweden 171, Denmark 110,and Norway 103. The analysis imply that the field of Nordic everyday life research is big,multifaceted, and multi- and interdisciplinary. It is performed mainly within the frame ofvarious social science subjects, but also to quite a great extent within subjects of healthscience, and to a minor extent within technology subjects. Some of the references seem torepresent studies with a more comprehensive view on the everyday lives of a certain group ofpeople located in the same place or sharing some characteristic and they try to capture bothwhat people do and what they think and experience. Other studies are narrower and focus on,for example, attitudes towards food or how computers are used or should be designed. Inother words Nordic everyday life research is hard to define clearly. The limited analysis andthe fact that the international field of everyday life research is not well known, do not allowconclusions to be drawn about either a typically Nordic character of everyday life research, ordifferences between the Nordic countries. However, the work of mapping Nordic everydaylife research will continue and the plans of constructing an open-access Everyday LifeResearch Database that will be easily accessible on the Internet are presented.

  • 19.
    Karlsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Tema teknik och social förändring.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Samhälle, mångfald, Identitet (SMI).
    Skill, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Tema teknik och social förändring.
    Mapping and Characterizing: Nordic Everyday Life Research2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this report is to present references that originate from the Nordic countries,including Sweden, Finland, Denmark, and Norway, and that have been assigned the keyword“everyday life” or one of its Nordic counterparts and published in the period 1990 through2008. The presentation includes information on the total number of references from eachcountry, the most frequent authors and the institutions to which they belong, and the referencetypes and the number of each type. Based on an analysis of some limited information aboutthe dissertations and the journals, it is discussed how Nordic everyday life research may becharacterized.

    In total 560 references were found in the search procedure that is described in the report. Thenumber of references from the different countries is: Finland 176, Sweden 171, Denmark 110,and Norway 103. The analysis imply that the field of Nordic everyday life research is big,multifaceted, and multi- and interdisciplinary. It is performed mainly within the frame ofvarious social science subjects, but also to quite a great extent within subjects of healthscience, and to a minor extent within technology subjects. Some of the references seem torepresent studies with a more comprehensive view on the everyday lives of a certain group ofpeople located in the same place or sharing some characteristic and they try to capture bothwhat people do and what they think and experience. Other studies are narrower and focus on,for example, attitudes towards food or how computers are used or should be designed. Inother words Nordic everyday life research is hard to define clearly. The limited analysis andthe fact that the international field of everyday life research is not well known, do not allowconclusions to be drawn about either a typically Nordic character of everyday life research, ordifferences between the Nordic countries. However, the work of mapping Nordic everydaylife research will continue and the plans of constructing an open-access Everyday LifeResearch Database that will be easily accessible on the Internet are presented.

  • 20.
    Löf (Gillingsjö), Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Michailakis, Dimitris
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    HBTQ-äldre i den politiska debatten2018In: Gränsöverskridande Socialt arbete: Kritiska perspektiv / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2018, 1, p. 41-61Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Löf (Gillingsjö), Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Care decision-making and older LGBTQ adults in Sweden: Getting past generalities2018In: Innovation in Aging, ISSN 2399-5300, Vol. 2, no S1, p. 844-845Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is mounting evidence that Swedish elder care is unable to adequately address the unique needs of older lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) persons, and that social work research and services do not focus on individual variations within the LGTBQ-group. There are negative consequences for older LGBTQ individuals, including poor service utilization. Significantly, service utilization is associated with improved outcomes across the life course. Based on interviews with 15 participants living at home in Sweden, this qualitative study explores how older Swedish LGBTQ adults assess elder care alternatives for their future. Findings indicate that feeling accepted as individuals is essential, but that this did not necessarily mean being recognized as an LGBTQ individual. Feeling welcome individually transcended the need to be recognized as LGBTQ. Implications for social work include increasing cultural competence for work with diverse older adults, including LGBTQ persons, and advocating for person-centered care.

  • 22.
    Löf (Gillingsjö), Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linkoping University.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    ‘I don’t want to go back into the closet just because I need care’ [‘Jag vill inte gå tillbaka i garderoben bara för att jag behöver vård’]: recognition of older LGBTQ adults in relation to future care needs [Erkännande av äldre HBTQ personer i relation till framtida omsorgsbehov]2018In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is increasing awareness in research about the social service needs of older LGBTQ adults. However, there are few studies that deal with differences in this community regarding elder care services. As a rule, transgender individuals are not included in these studies. This study focuses on how older Swedish LGBTQ adults reason about openness in an elder care context concerning their future needs for services and adopts Nancy Fraser’s theoretical framework of recognition. The material consists of fifteen semi-structured interviews with older LGBTQ adults. The results indicate that the main concern for older LGBTQ individuals is being accepted for their preferred sexual orientation and/or gender identity in elder care. However, there were differences regarding that concern in this LGBTQ group. There were also a variety of approaches in the group as to preferences for equal versus special treatment with respect to their LGBTQ identity. In addition, there were differences as to whether they prefer to live in LGBTQ housing or not. The findings contribute to existing knowledge by highlighting the diverse views on elder care services in both this group of interviewees and its subgroups. These findings emphasise the importance of the social work practice recognising different preferences and having an accepting approach. The results can further provide guidance on how to design elder care services for older LGBTQ adults.

  • 23.
    Löf (Gillingsjö), Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    I want to be open when entering elder care: An interview study with older LGBTQ adults reasoning about future care needs.2018In: Proceedings of the 8th ECSWR European Conference for Social Work Research, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that there is an increasing awareness that elder care is not addressing the unique needs of older LGBTQ, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender persons. Many LGTBQ people entering old age today have worse health and, to a lesser extent than other older groups, tends to seek help from health and social services. Few studies within gerontological social work have however focused on how older LGBTQ persons express their needs, and wishes of future social services. This presentation addresses this knowledge gap by focusing on how older LGBTQ reason about possible good alternatives to meet their needs when they are entering a phase where they need care. The study is based on a qualitative interview study with (n= 15), older LGBTQ persons in Sweden who live at home and where only two of them have had prior experiences of services. The analysis shows that, the overall most important issue for the older LGTBQ persons, was to be able to be open with their sexual orientation and/or gender identity within a future elder care setting. It was essential for the LGBTQ persons that the engagement of staff must be based on respect and that they should be able to meet every person as an individual. Regarding the issue of need for education and knowledge among staff about LGBTQ issues the interviewed expressed a wish that staff should have knowledge about these issues. For some it was important to be seen as an LGBTQ-person and to others it was mostly important being met in a welcoming and affirmative way, but not focusing too much on their LGBTQ-identity. The results provide support for the debate on the importance of addressing the unique needs of older LGTBQ persons and highlight the importance for social work to address the diversity of needs and wishes that is present within the group in regards to entering elder care.

  • 24.
    Löf, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Michailakis, Dimitris
    Linköpings universitet.
    Olaison, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology, Centre for Social Work - CESAR.
    HBTQ-äldre i den politiska debatten2018In: Gränsöverskridande Socialt arbete:: Kritiska perspektiv / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt., Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2018, 1, p. 41-61Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25. Löf, Jenny
    et al.
    Olaison, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology, Centre for Social Work - CESAR.
    Care decision-making and older LGBTQ adults in Sweden:: Getting past generalities2018In: Innovation in Aging, ISSN 2399-5300, Vol. 2, no Suppl 1, p. 844-845Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is mounting evidence that Swedish elder care is unable to adequately address the unique needs of older lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) persons, and that social work research and services do not focus on individual variations within the LGTBQ-group. There are negative consequences for older LGBTQ individuals, including poor service utilization. Significantly, service utilization is associated with improved outcomes across the life course. Based on interviews with 15 participants living at home in Sweden, this qualitative study explores how older Swedish LGBTQ adults assess elder care alternatives for their future. Findings indicate that feeling accepted as individuals is essential, but that this did not necessarily mean being recognized as an LGBTQ individual. Feeling welcome individually transcended the need to be recognized as LGBTQ. Implications for social work include increasing cultural competence for work with diverse older adults, including LGBTQ persons, and advocating for person-centered care.

  • 26.
    Löf, Jenny
    et al.
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University.
    Olaison, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology, Centre for Social Work - CESAR. Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University.
    I don’t want to go back into the closet just because I need care”: Recognition of older LGBTQ adults in relation to future care needs2018In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACTThere is increasing awareness in research about the social service needs ofolder LGBTQ adults. However, there are few studies that deal withdifferences in this community regarding elder care services. As a rule,transgender individuals are not included in these studies. This studyfocuses on how older Swedish LGBTQ adults reason about openness inan elder care context concerning their future needs for services andadopts Nancy Fraser’s theoretical framework of recognition. The materialconsists of fifteen semi-structured interviews with older LGBTQ adults.The results indicate that the main concern for older LGBTQ individuals isbeing accepted for their preferred sexual orientation and/or genderidentity in elder care. However, there were differences regarding thatconcern in this LGBTQ group. There were also a variety of approaches inthe group as to preferences for equal versus special treatment withrespect to their LGBTQ identity. In addition, there were differences as towhether they prefer to live in LGBTQ housing or not. The findingscontribute to existing knowledge by highlighting the diverse views onelder care services in both this group of interviewees and its subgroups.These findings emphasise the importance of the social work practicerecognising different preferences and having an accepting approach.The results can further provide guidance on how to design elder careservices for older LGBTQ adults.

  • 27.
    Löf, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Socialt arbete.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Socialt arbete.
    I want to be open when entering elder care: An interview study with older LGBTQ adults reasoning about future care needs.2018In: Proceedings of the 8th ECSWR European Conference for Social Work Research, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that there is an increasing awareness that elder care is not addressing the unique needs of older LGBTQ, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender persons. Many LGTBQ people entering old age today have worse health and, to a lesser extent than other older groups, tends to seek help from health and social services. Few studies within gerontological social work have however focused on how older LGBTQ persons express their needs, and wishes of future social services. This presentation addresses this knowledge gap by focusing on how older LGBTQ reason about possible good alternatives to meet their needs when they are entering a phase where they need care. The study is based on a qualitative interview study with (n= 15), older LGBTQ persons in Sweden who live at home and where only two of them have had prior experiences of services. The analysis shows that, the overall most important issue for the older LGTBQ persons, was to be able to be open with their sexual orientation and/or gender identity within a future elder care setting. It was essential for the LGBTQ persons that the engagement of staff must be based on respect and that they should be able to meet every person as an individual. Regarding the issue of need for education and knowledge among staff about LGBTQ issues the interviewed expressed a wish that staff should have knowledge about these issues. For some it was important to be seen as an LGBTQ-person and to others it was mostly important being met in a welcoming and affirmative way, but not focusing too much on their LGBTQ-identity. The results provide support for the debate on the importance of addressing the unique needs of older LGTBQ persons and highlight the importance for social work to address the diversity of needs and wishes that is present within the group in regards to entering elder care.

  • 28.
    Marcusson, Jan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Nord, Magnus
    Linköpings universitet.
    Johannsson, Maria
    Linköpings universitet.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköpings universitet.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköpings universitet.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    Thomas, Kristin
    Poksinska, Bonnie
    Sverker, Annette
    Olaison, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology, Centre for Social Work - CESAR.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Kelfve, Susanne
    Motel-Klingebiel, Andreas
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Wass, Malin
    Lyth, Johan
    Andersson, Agneta
    Proactive healthcare for frail elderly persons: study protocol for a prospective controlled primary care intervention in Sweden2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 5, article id e027847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction The provision of healthcare services is not dedicated to promoting maintenance of function and does not target frail older persons at high risk of the main causes of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of a proactive medical and social intervention in comparison with conventional care on a group of persons aged 75 and older selected by statistical prediction. Methods and analysis In a pragmatic multicentre primary care setting (n=1600), a prediction model to find elderly (75+) persons at high risk of complex medical care or hospitalisation is used, followed by proactive medical and social care, in comparison with usual care. The study started in April 2017 with a run-in period until December 2017, followed by a 2-year continued intervention phase that will continue until the end of December 2019. The intervention includes several tools (multiprofessional team for rehabilitation, social support, medical care home visits and telephone support). Primary outcome measures are healthcare cost, number of hospital care episodes, hospital care days and mortality. Secondary outcome measures are number of outpatient visits, cost of social care and informal care, number of prescribed drugs, health-related quality of life, cost-effectiveness, sense of security, functional status and ability. We also study the care of elderly persons in a broader sense, by covering the perspectives of the patients, the professional staff and the management, and on a political level, by using semistructured interviews, qualitative methods and a questionnaire. Ethics and dissemination Approved by the regional ethical review board in Linköping (Dnr 2016/347-31). The results will be presented in scientific journals and scientific meetings during 2019–2022 and are planned to be used for the development of future care models.

  • 29.
    Marcusson, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Nord, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thomas, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kelfve, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Motel-Klingebiel, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hellstrom, Ingrid
    Norrkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Proactive healthcare for frail elderly persons: study protocol for a prospective controlled primary care intervention in Sweden2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 5, article id e027847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction The provision of healthcare services is not dedicated to promoting maintenance of function and does not target frail older persons at high risk of the main causes of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of a proactive medical and social intervention in comparison with conventional care on a group of persons aged 75 and older selected by statistical prediction.

    Methods and analysis In a pragmatic multicentre primary care setting (n=1600), a prediction model to find elderly (75+) persons at high risk of complex medical care or hospitalisation is used, followed by proactive medical and social care, in comparison with usual care. The study started in April 2017 with a run-in period until December 2017, followed by a 2-year continued intervention phase that will continue until the end of December 2019. The intervention includes several tools (multiprofessional team for rehabilitation, social support, medical care home visits and telephone support). Primary outcome measures are healthcare cost, number of hospital care episodes, hospital care days and mortality. Secondary outcome measures are number of outpatient visits, cost of social care and informal care, number of prescribed drugs, health-related quality of life, cost-effectiveness, sense of security, functional status and ability. We also study the care of elderly persons in a broader sense, by covering the perspectives of the patients, the professional staff and the management, and on a political level, by using semistructured interviews, qualitative methods and a questionnaire.

    Ethics and dissemination Approved by the regional ethical review board in Linköping (Dnr 2016/347-31). The results will be presented in scientific journals and scientific meetings during 2019–2022 and are planned to be used for the development of future care models.

  • 30.
    Nilsson, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    What is yet to come?: Couples living with dementia orienting themselves towards an uncertain future2019In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 475-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dementia is a chronic illness that not only has substantial effects on the life as well as future for the individuals diagnosed, but also affects those with whom these individuals have relationships. This has implications that need to be addressed by professional practice, not least since social work research has shown that the support available for couples managing dementia is insufficient. There are few studies today of how couples jointly talk about their future with dementia and how they adapt to it as a couple and as individuals. Therefore, this article explores how couples in which one of the spouses has a diagnosis of dementia jointly talk about an uncertain future with dementia. The study benefits from using the conversation analytic method when studying video-recorded interactions among 15 couples living with dementia. The results show that either or both spouses can actively request knowledge about the progression of dementia, but at the same time, the spouses without dementia express awareness of the uncertainty that is connected to a future with dementia. Moreover, either or both spouses may also express contentment with “not knowing.” In all examples, one or several of the participants alternate between taking epistemic stances of knowing and unknowing as well as ascribing stances to others, and spouses can display similar or oppositional stances. The findings suggest a need for developing communicative practice for couples to jointly talk about dementia, as well as a need for social workers to find ways of providing emotional support.

  • 31.
    Nilsson, Elin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Socialt arbete.
    Olaison, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology, Centre for Social Work - CESAR. Linköpings universitet, Socialt arbete.
    What is yet to come?: Couples living with dementia orienting themselves towards an uncertain future2019In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 475-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dementia is a chronic illness that not only has substantial effects on the life as well as future for the individuals diagnosed, but also affects those with whom these individuals have relationships. This has implications that need to be addressed by professional practice, not least since social work research has shown that the support available for couples managing dementia is insufficient. There are few studies today of how couples jointly talk about their future with dementia and how they adapt to it as a couple and as individuals. Therefore, this article explores how couples in which one of the spouses has a diagnosis of dementia jointly talk about an uncertain future with dementia. The study benefits from using the conversation analytic method when studying video-recorded interactions among 15 couples living with dementia. The results show that either or both spouses can actively request knowledge about the progression of dementia, but at the same time, the spouses without dementia express awareness of the uncertainty that is connected to a future with dementia. Moreover, either or both spouses may also express contentment with “not knowing.” In all examples, one or several of the participants alternate between taking epistemic stances of knowing and unknowing as well as ascribing stances to others, and spouses can display similar or oppositional stances. The findings suggest a need for developing communicative practice for couples to jointly talk about dementia, as well as a need for social workers to find ways of providing emotional support.

  • 32.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Applying for home care: old people’s perspectives of assessments2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, NISAL - Nationella institutet för forskning om äldre och åldrande.
    Applying for home care: old people’s perspectives of assessments2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Assessments for home care as practices of everyday life2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, NISAL - Nationella institutet för forskning om äldre och åldrande.
    Assessments for home care as practices of everyday life2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Categorizing older peoples needs for home care. Discursive patterns in case files.2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, NISAL - Nationella institutet för forskning om äldre och åldrande.
    Categorizing older peoples needs for home care. Discursive patterns in case files.2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Challenges in Using Discourse Analysis When Studying Old Persons’ Self-Presentations in Institutional Interaction2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, NISAL - Nationella institutet för forskning om äldre och åldrande.
    Challenges in Using Discourse Analysis When Studying Old Persons’ Self-Presentations in Institutional Interaction2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Contradictions of care. How welfare political conflicts in care management can be viewed through positioning theory2010In: Words of conflict, Words of war. How the Language we Use in Political Processes Sparks Fighting / [ed] Fathali Moghaddam, Rom Harré, New York: Praeger , 2010, 1, p. 69-88Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Words of Conflict, Words of War: How the Language We Use in Political Processes Sparks Fighting is a fascinating exploration of the narratives leaders use to position both themselves and others in the course of political processes that lead to peace or conflict. Drawing on the relatively new field of "positioning theory," expert essays provide insights into the ways words position us—for better or worse—and influence our intended results. The focus on narratives, from the interpersonal to the international, leads to a better understanding of political processes and conflict resolution.

    Part one of the study deals with micropolitics and personal positioning. Part two explores positioning by political parties and factions. Links between micro and macro are illustrated by leadership studies of individuals such as President Barak Obama, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, President George W. Bush, Governor Sarah Palin, and the Reverend Ian Paisley. The focus throughout is on how a leader can use language to redirect collective politics in support of conflict or of peace.

  • 41.
    Olaison, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology, Centre for Social Work - CESAR.
    Contradictions of care. How welfare political conflicts in care management can be viewed through positioning theory2010In: Words of conflict, Words of war. How the Language we Use in Political Processes Sparks Fighting / [ed] Fathali Moghaddam, Rom Harré, New York: Praeger , 2010, 1, p. 69-88Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Words of Conflict, Words of War: How the Language We Use in Political Processes Sparks Fighting is a fascinating exploration of the narratives leaders use to position both themselves and others in the course of political processes that lead to peace or conflict. Drawing on the relatively new field of "positioning theory," expert essays provide insights into the ways words position us—for better or worse—and influence our intended results. The focus on narratives, from the interpersonal to the international, leads to a better understanding of political processes and conflict resolution.

    Part one of the study deals with micropolitics and personal positioning. Part two explores positioning by political parties and factions. Links between micro and macro are illustrated by leadership studies of individuals such as President Barak Obama, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, President George W. Bush, Governor Sarah Palin, and the Reverend Ian Paisley. The focus throughout is on how a leader can use language to redirect collective politics in support of conflict or of peace.

  • 42.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Creating home care recipients. Using categorization as a tool in home care case management2012In: Perspectives on care at home for older people / [ed] Christine Ceci, Kristin Björnsdóttir, and Mary Ellen Purkis, New York: Routledge , 2012, p. 158-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       "This volume focuses on how high quality care is provided and the practices and policies that support this. It will offer case studies (both policy- and practice-oriented empirical studies) from countries that share a basic orientation to social welfare: Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Sweden and the United Kingdom. This book will be essential reading for students, practitioners and researchers who wish to understand diverse problems in service provision for the elderly and the complexities of policy responses in different health and social care contexts"--

  • 43.
    Olaison, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology, Centre for Social Work - CESAR.
    Creating home care recipients.: Using categorization as a tool in home care case management2012In: Perspectives on care at home for older people / [ed] Christine Ceci, Kristin Björnsdóttir, Mary Ellen Purkis, New York: Routledge , 2012, p. 158-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       "This volume focuses on how high quality care is provided and the practices and policies that support this. It will offer case studies (both policy- and practice-oriented empirical studies) from countries that share a basic orientation to social welfare: Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Sweden and the United Kingdom. This book will be essential reading for students, practitioners and researchers who wish to understand diverse problems in service provision for the elderly and the complexities of policy responses in different health and social care contexts"--

  • 44.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Creating images of old people as home-care receivers: Categorizing  needs in social work case files2010In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 0, no 0, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Central to the assessment process in case management is howolder people’s needs are constructed through documentationand case files. This article examines how older people’s needsare categorized in written documentation. Sixteen case filesfrom three social work districts in Sweden were studied usingdiscourse analysis. The results identified two general types ofcase files; the fact-oriented (using objective language) andevent-oriented case file (using more personal language) –which depicted the older individuals quite differently. Allcase files employed several need categories; though socialneeds were important in describing living conditions, it wasmedical and physical needs that impinged on home care decisions.This raises questions about how case documentationdepicts older people through society’s eyes and about thediscourses prevailing in gerontological social work.

  • 45.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, NISAL - Nationella institutet för forskning om äldre och åldrande.
    Creating images of old people as home-care receivers: Categorizing  needs in social work case files2010In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 0, no 0, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Central to the assessment process in case management is howolder people’s needs are constructed through documentationand case files. This article examines how older people’s needsare categorized in written documentation. Sixteen case filesfrom three social work districts in Sweden were studied usingdiscourse analysis. The results identified two general types ofcase files; the fact-oriented (using objective language) andevent-oriented case file (using more personal language) –which depicted the older individuals quite differently. Allcase files employed several need categories; though socialneeds were important in describing living conditions, it wasmedical and physical needs that impinged on home care decisions.This raises questions about how case documentationdepicts older people through society’s eyes and about thediscourses prevailing in gerontological social work.

  • 46.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Creating images of older people as home-care receivers: Categorizing needs in social work case files2010In: Qualitative Social Work, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 500-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Central to the assessment process in case management is how older people’s needs are constructed through documentation and case files. This article examines how older people’s needs are categorized in written documentation. Sixteen case files from three social work districts in Sweden were studied using discourse analysis. The results identified two general types of case files; the fact-oriented (using objective language) and eventoriented case file (using more personal language) – which depicted the older individuals quite differently. All case files employed several need categories; though social needs were important in describing living conditions, it was medical and physical needs that impinged on home care decisions. This raises questions about how case documentation depicts older people through society’s eyes and about the discourses prevailing in gerontological social work.

  • 47.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, NISAL - Nationella institutet för forskning om äldre och åldrande.
    Creating images of older people as home-care receivers: Categorizing needs in social work case files2010In: Qualitative Social Work, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 500-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Central to the assessment process in case management is how older people’s needs are constructed through documentation and case files. This article examines how older people’s needs are categorized in written documentation. Sixteen case files from three social work districts in Sweden were studied using discourse analysis. The results identified two general types of case files; the fact-oriented (using objective language) and eventoriented case file (using more personal language) – which depicted the older individuals quite differently. All case files employed several need categories; though social needs were important in describing living conditions, it was medical and physical needs that impinged on home care decisions. This raises questions about how case documentation depicts older people through society’s eyes and about the discourses prevailing in gerontological social work.

  • 48.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Everyday life research – a literary survey2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, NISAL - Nationella institutet för forskning om äldre och åldrande.
    Everyday life research – a literary survey2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Negotiating needs: Processing older persons as home care recipients in gerontological social work practices2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The study concerns the needs assessment processes that older persons undergo to gain access to home care. The participation of older persons, their relatives and municipal care managers was studied from a communicative perspective. The assessment meetings functions as formal problem-solving events. The older persons´ accounts are negotiated discursively in interaction. Various storylines are used by the older persons and their relatives whether they view home care as an intrusion, as a complement or as a right. In case of divergent opinions the older person has the final say as prescribed by the Swedish social service act. One conclusion is that the role of relatives is not defined and a family perspective is not present. In the study the institutional structure of the assessment process was also analyzed. Older persons are processed into clients; their needs are fitted within the framework of documentation and institutional categories. In the transfer of talk to text all the particulars are not reflected and two types of documentation was identified; a fact-oriented objective language or an event-oriented personal language. Care management models and a managerialist thinking has influenced the assessment process by bureaucratisation of older people trough people processing, which is in contradiction to the individual-centric perspective prescribed by the law. The introduction of care management models in gerontological social work has lead to an embedded contradiction and constitutes a welfare political dilemma. Improved communicative methods are needed in order to achieve a holistic assessment situation.

123 1 - 50 of 122
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf