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  • 1.
    Andersson, Jenny
    et al.
    Center for European Studies of Sciences po, Paris, France.
    Rindzeviciute, EgleLinköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Center for European Studies of Sciences po, Paris, France.
    The Struggle for the Long-Term in Transnational Science and Politics: Forging the Future2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book reconsiders the power of the idea of the future. Bringing together perspectives from cultural history, environmental history, political history and the history of science, it investigates how the future became a specific field of action in liberal democratic, state socialist and post-colonial regimes after the Second World War. It highlights the emergence of new forms of predictive scientific expertise in this period, and shows how such forms of expertise interacted with political systems of the Cold War world order, as the future became the prism for dealing with post-industrialisation, technoscientific progress, changing social values, Cold War tensions and an emerging Third World. A forgotten problem of cultural history, the future re-emerges in this volume as a fundamentally contested field in which forms of control and central forms of resistance met, as different actors set out to colonise and control and others to liberate. The individual studies of this book show how the West European, African, Romanian and Czechoslovak "long term" was constructed through forms of expertise, computer simulations and models, and they reveal how such constructions both opened up new realities but also imposed limits on possible futures.

  • 2.
    Rindzeviciute, Egle
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Book review of Emma Waterton, Politics, Policy and the Discourses of Heritage in Britain, Palgrave Macmillan 20102012In: The International Journal of Cultural Policy, ISSN 1028-6632, E-ISSN 1477-2833, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 488-490Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Rindzeviciute, Egle
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Constructing Soviet Cultural Policy: Cybernetics and Governance in Lithuania after World War II2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    After World War I, the Soviet Union was one of the first modern states to engage explicitly in the governance of culture, which was formalised and institutionalised as state cultural policy. In this process of governance, sciences and technologies provided the state with conceptual and material resources, which were used to define both the process and the object of governance. After World War II, scientific and technological progress gave birth to a new science of control and communication, Norbert Wiener’s cybernetics, which was widely used not only in engineering, but also in the conceptualisation of humans, machines and societies. This thesis explores how cybernetics influenced the construction of cultural policy in the Soviet Union. It focuses particularly on the Soviet republic of Lithuania. The main argument is that since the 1950s a particularly powerful discourse of cybernetic governance was formed in the Soviet Union. A result of translation from techno-science, this discourse not only served the purposes of authoritarian rule, but was also used as a resource by cultural operators to criticise the Soviet government itself. By analysing organisational practices and official and public discourses, the study reveals the complexity of the relationship between governance, culture and sciences and technologies.

  • 4.
    Rindzeviciute, Egle
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    From Authoritarian to Democratic Cultural Policy: Making Sense of De-Sovietisation in Lithuania after 19902009In: Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-3216, E-ISSN 2000-8325, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 191-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article deals with discourses on governance in cultural policy in a context of radical political change. Drawing on an in-depth analysis of qualitative interviews, it explores how the meaning of “Soviet” cultural policy was retrospectively constructed by Lithuanian cultural operators as they talked about the post-1990 democratisation. The informants mobilised a complex discursive strategy of alienation and defamiliarisation which made sense of Soviet cultural policy and reconciled change with preservation of its elements. Particular attention is paid to the ways in which the informants perceived the changes in the distribution of power in which was associated with decentralisation reforms. The findings suggest that the distinction between authoritarian and democratic cultural policy models to a large extent came to be constructed in rather utilitarian terms and was strongly dependent on the contemporary practical issues. The conclusion therefore suggests we avoid essentialising the categories “authoritarian” and “democratic” in the theoretical construction of state cultural policy models. Instead, it points out that it is vital to examine the components of these categories as a subject of historically situated discursive negotiations.

  • 5.
    Rindzeviciute, Egle
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Imagining the Grand Duchy of Lithuania: The Politics and Economics of the Rebuilding of Trakai Castle and the Palace of Sovereigns in Vilnius2010In: CENTRAL EUROPE, ISSN 1479-0963, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 181-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1884 the prominent nation-builder Jonas Basanavicius declared that castle mounds and literature were the only appropriate elements from which to build the Lithuanian nation. Basanaviciuss view, this article suggests, had a lasting influence on the public uses of history in twentieth-century Lithuania. The study explores the construction of two iconic images of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, Trakai Castle and the `Palace of Sovereigns in Vilnius. Built in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, Trakai Castle was once the seat of the Grand Duke of Lithuania, but fell into neglect before its reconstruction in the 1960s. Dating back to the thirteenth century, the Palace in Vilnius deteriorated during the eighteenth century, was dismantled at the beginning of the nineteenth, and has been completely rebuilt since 2000. It is striking that the reconstructions of castles were the largest state investments in culture in both the Soviet and post-Soviet regimes. The reconstruction of Trakai Castle was criticized on economic and ideological grounds by Nikita Khrushchev. The rebuilding of the Palace polarized Lithuanian intellectuals. The presentation compares the intellectual, social, and political rationales which underpinned the two projects and explores the changes and continuities in the uses of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania under the Soviet and post-Soviet regimes.

  • 6.
    Rindzeviciute, Egle
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Internal Transfer of Cybernetics and Informality in the Soviet Union: The Case of Lithuania2011In: Reassessing Cold War Europe / [ed] Sari Autio Sarasmo, Katalin Miklossy, London and New York: Routledge, 2011, p. 119-137Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book presents a comprehensive reassessment of Europe in the Cold War period, 1945-91. Contrary to popular belief, it shows that relations between East and West were based not only on confrontation and mutual distrust, but also on collaboration. The authors reveal that - despite opposing ideologies - there was in fact considerable interaction and exchange between different Eastern and Western actors (such states, enterprises, associations, organisations and individuals) irrespective of the Iron Curtain.  This book challenges both the traditional understanding of the East-West juxtaposition and the relevancy of the Iron Curtain. Covering the full period, and taking into account a range of spheres including trade, scientific-technical co-operation, and cultural and social exchanges, it reveals how smaller countries and smaller actors in Europe were able to forge and implement their agendas within their own blocs. The books suggests that given these lower-level actors engaged in mutually beneficial cooperation, often running counter to the ambitions of the bloc-leaders, the rules of Cold War interaction were not, in fact,  exclusively dictated by the superpowers.

  • 7.
    Rindzeviciute, Egle
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    National Museums in Lithuania: A Story of State Building (1855-2010)2011In: Building National Museums in Europe 1750–2010: Conference proceedings from EuNaMus, European National Museums: Identity Politics, the Uses of the Past and the European Citizen, Bologna 28-30 April 2011, Report No. 1 / [ed] Peter Aronsson & Gabriella Elgenius, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2011, p. 521-552Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The construction of national museums in Lithuania can be analysed in relation to traditional conceptualizations of European nationalism which emphasize state building through the identification of an ethnic and cultural nation situated in a particular territory (Hroch 2000). Although state building is not entirely explained by theories of nationalism, this report will broadly rely on this theoretical framework. The history of Lithuanian national museums can be divided into the following stages, based on forms of national statehood, key museums and key political oppositions:

    I. The first public museums: Baublys local history museum (1812) and Vilnius Museum of Antiquities (1855-1863), were established by Lithuanian-Polish aristocrats who were interested in the political and archaeological history of Lithuania. Opposition to the Russian Empire.

    II. The first state museums (1918-1940): Vytautas the Great Military Museum and Ciurlionis Art Gallery were organized by groups of Lithuanian intellectuals and established as part of a ‘national pantheon’ in Kaunas. Opposition to Poland, which occupied Vilnius.

    III. The establishment of a centralized museums system (1940/1944-1990): state initiated museums were dedicated to Soviet propaganda in line with Marxism-Leninism, but groups of Lithuanian intellectuals built museums relying on the nineteenth-century template of an ethnic nation. Silent opposition to the communist regime, forgetting of the Holocaust.

    IV. The consolidation of national state museums system (1990-2010): Soviet centralized administrative system was both subverted and modified to emphasize the ethnic Lithuanian dimension of nation-building through history, archaeology and culture. Opposition to Western popular culture and other perceived negative aspects of globalization, but beginning to deal with the Holocaust and communist crimes.

    Stage I saw emphasis on the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (PLC), but also on the prehistory of Lithuania. In stage II, the Polish element of Lithuania’s history was represented as negative; hence there was little interest in aristocratic culture. History museums focused on the territory of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania (GDL); a cult of grand dukes emerged alongside interest in Lithuanian folk culture. Jewish, Karaite and Belarusian learned societies organized ethnic museums too. During stage III, the political dimensions of ethnic nation-building were eliminated by the communist regime. However, the Lithuanian state was further constructed in museums through a history of the Middle Ages and folk culture. Aristocratic culture and the cultural heritage of the Lithuanian Jewish community did not get much space in Soviet museums, but were not completely eliminated either. The territorial focus was on the Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic (LSSR); references to the GDL were carefully censored. In stage IV the political dimension of ethnicity was brought back into the museums. Jews and Karaites were represented in existing museums or acquired their own museums. The Polish dimension of Lithuania’s history remained contested. However, there emerged new museums, dedicated to the difficult parts of twentieth century history, such as the Holocaust and communist crimes.

    Note: A Full list of the abbreviations used can be found in an annexe of this report.

  • 8.
    Rindzeviciute, Egle
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Purification and Hybridisation of Soviet Cybernetics: The Politics of Scientific Governance in an Authoritarian Regime2010In: Archiv für Sozialgeschichte, ISSN 0066-6505, Vol. 50, p. 289-309Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Rindzeviciute, Egle
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The House of Human & Social Sciences2012In: Kulturaliseringens samhälle: Problemorienterad kulturvetenskaplig forskning vid Tema Q 2002 - 2012 / [ed] Svante Beckman, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012, p. 221-223Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Rindzeviciute, Egle
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Towards a joint future beyond the iron curtain: East-West politics of global modelling2015In: The struggle for the long-term in transnational science and politics: forging the future / [ed] Egle Rindzeviciute, Jenny Andersson, London, New York: Routledge, 2015, p. 115-143Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Rindzeviciute, Egle
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Towards a Social History of the Purification of Governance: The Case of the IIASA2010In: Interdisciplines, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses a history of the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), a particularly intriguing case of intertwining of techno-sciences and politics during the Cold War and detente periods. The case of IIASA, as my argument suggests, reveals complex processes of semiotic and institutional constructions of categories of “neutrality”, “the political”, “governance” and “techno-science”. IIASA embodied the ambition of techno-science to generate scientific knowledge about future, which would contribute to better governance of the planet and bridge political divides between capitalism and communism. 

  • 12.
    Rindzeviciute, Egle
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    When Formal Organisations Meet Informal Relations in Soviet Lithuania: Action Nets, Networks and Boundary Objects in the Construction of the Lithuanian Sea Museum2010In: Lithuanian Historical Studies, ISSN 1392-2343, Vol. 15, p. 107-134Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Rindzeviciute, Egle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Burch, Stuart
    Nottingham Trent University.
    Difficult Choices: Opening the National Gallery of Art2009In: CAC Interviu: Conversation about Art, Vol. 15, p. 7-14Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Rindzeviciute, Egle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Svensson, Jenny
    School of Social Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge.
    Tomson, Klara
    School of Social Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge.
    The international transfer of creative industries as a policy idea2016In: The International Journal of Cultural Policy, ISSN 1028-6632, E-ISSN 1477-2833, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 594-610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the transfer of creative industries as a policy idea to Lithuania. Tracing the stages of the transfer and analysing its consequences in the local cultural policy field, this paper argues for the importance of studying cultural policy process. The findings reveal that the process of the international transfer of creative industries mattered, because it generated wider transformations in cultural policy field by having ambiguous effects on local power relations. The policy idea of creative industries opened the cultural policy field to new actors. As a result, competition for scarce state funding increased, but cultural organisations gained access to the European Union structural funds. In all, creative industries as a policy idea significantly transformed Lithuanian state cultural policy, in that it led to a reassessment of both the practices and identities of cultural organisations.

  • 15.
    Rindzevičiūte, Eglė
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Soviet Lithuanians, Amber and the ‘The New Balts’: Historical Narratives of National and Regional Identities in Lithuanian Museums, 1940-20092010In: Culture Unbound, ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 2, p. 665-694Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the twentieth century Lithuania emerged from the crumbling Russian Empire as a post-colonial nationalising state. Its short-lived independence (1918–1940) fea-tured attempts to assemble the material foundations for an imagined community of Lithuanians, however in 1940 this nationalist project was disrupted by Soviet occupation. However, this article argues that regardless of the measures taken against political nationalism by the Soviets, the material work of assembling the Lithuanians as a historical and ethnic nation was not abandoned. The study analy-ses the ways in which Northern and Baltic categories were used to regionally situ-ate the ethnic identification of the Lithuanian population in Soviet and post-Soviet Lithuanian museums. The cases of the Historical-Ethnographic Museum and the Museum of Amber reveal that Northern and Baltic dimensions had to be recon-ciled with the Soviet version of the Lithuanian past. The resulting assemblage of Lithuania as a synchronic and diachronic community of inhabitants who defined themselves through shared Baltic ancestors and centuries-old uses of amber was transmitted to the post-Soviet museums. The most salient post-Soviet changes were, first, the rewriting of the relations between Lithuanians and the Nordic countries in positive terms and in this way reversing the Soviet narrative of Lithuania as a victim of aggression from the North. Second, the Soviet construc-tion of amber as a material mediator which enabled Lithuanians to connect with each other as a synchronic and diachronic imagined community was somewhat pushed aside in favour of the understanding of amber as a medium of social and cultural distinction for the ancient Balts and contemporary Lithuanian elites.

  • 16.
    Rindzevičiūtė, Eglė
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Gothenburg research institute, Stockholm school of economics, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cultural Studies Travel to (and from) East Central Europe2011In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 18-19Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

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