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  • 1.
    Almén, Markus Sällman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Lamichhaney, Sangeet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Berglund, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Grant, B. Rosemary
    Princeton Univ, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA..
    Grant, Peter R.
    Princeton Univ, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA..
    Webster, Matthew T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Uppsala, Sweden.;Texas A&M Univ, Dept Vet Integrat Biosci, College Stn, TX USA..
    Adaptive radiation of Darwin's finches revisited using whole genome sequencing2016In: Bioessays, ISSN 0265-9247, E-ISSN 1521-1878, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 14-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We recently used genome sequencing to study the evolutionary history of the Darwin's finches. A prominent feature of our data was that different polymorphic sites in the genome tended to indicate different genetic relationships among these closely related species. Such patterns are expected in recently diverged genomes as a result of incomplete lineage sorting. However, we uncovered conclusive evidence that these patterns have also been influenced by interspecies hybridisation, a process that has likely played an important role in the radiation of Darwin's finches. A major discovery was that segregation of two haplotypes at the ALX1 locus underlies variation in beak shape among the Darwin's finches, and that differences between the two haplotypes in a 240 kb region in blunt and pointed beaked birds involve both coding and regulatory changes. As we review herein, the evolution of such adaptive haplotypes comprising multiple causal changes appears to be an important mechanism contributing to the evolution of biodiversity.

  • 2.
    Han, Fan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lamichhaney, Sangeet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Grant, B Rosemary
    Princeton Univ, Dept Ecol & Evolut Biol, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA.
    Grant, Peter R
    Princeton Univ, Dept Ecol & Evolut Biol, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden; Texas A&M Univ, Dept Vet Integrat Biosci, College Stn, TX 77843 USA.
    Webster, Matthew Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gene flow, ancient polymorphism, and ecological adaptation shape the genomic landscape of divergence among Darwin's finches2017In: Genome Research, ISSN 1088-9051, E-ISSN 1549-5469, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 1004-1015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genomic comparisons of closely related species have identified "islands" of locally elevated sequence divergence. Genomic islands may contain functional variants involved in local adaptation or reproductive isolation and may therefore play an important role in the speciation process. However, genomic islands can also arise through evolutionary processes unrelated to speciation, and examination of their properties can illuminate how new species evolve. Here, we performed scans for regions of high relative divergence (FST) in 12 species pairs of Darwin's finches at different genetic distances. In each pair, we identify genomic islands that are, on average, elevated in both relative divergence (FST) and absolute divergence (dXY). This signal indicates that haplotypes within these genomic regions became isolated from each other earlier than the rest of the genome. Interestingly, similar numbers of genomic islands of elevated dXY are observed in sympatric and allopatric species pairs, suggesting that recent gene flow is not a major factor in their formation. We find that two of the most pronounced genomic islands contain the ALX1 and HMGA2 loci, which are associated with variation in beak shape and size, respectively, suggesting that they are involved in ecological adaptation. A subset of genomic island regions, including these loci, appears to represent anciently diverged haplotypes that evolved early during the radiation of Darwin's finches. Comparative genomics data indicate that these loci, and genomic islands in general, have exceptionally low recombination rates, which may play a role in their establishment.

  • 3.
    Lamichhaney, Sangeet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    The genetic basis for adaptation in natural populations2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many previous studies in evolutionary genetics have been based on few model organisms that can be reared at ease in the laboratory. In contrast, genetic studies of non-model, natural populations are desirable as they provide a wider range of adaptive phenotypes throughout evolutionary timescales and allow a more realistic understanding of how natural selection drives adaptive evolution. This thesis represents an example of how modern genomic tools can be effectively used to study adaptation in natural populations.

    Atlantic herring is one of the world’s most numerous fish having multiple populations with phenotypic differences adapted to strikingly different environments. Our study demonstrated insignificant level of genetic drift in herring that resulted in minute genetic differences in the majority of the genome among these populations. In contrast, a small percentage of the loci showed striking genetic differentiation that were potentially under natural selection. We identified loci associated with adaptation to the Baltic Sea and with seasonal reproduction (spring- and autumn-spawning) and demonstrated that ecological adaptation in Atlantic herring is highly polygenic but controlled by a finite number of loci.

    The study of Darwin’s finches constitutes a breakthrough in characterizing their evolution. We identified two loci, ALX1 and HMGA2, which most likely are the two most prominent loci that contributed to beak diversification and thereby to expanded food utilization. These loci have played a key role in adaptive evolution of Darwin’s finches. Our study also demonstrated that interspecies gene flow played a significant role in the radiation of Darwin’s finches and some species have a mixed ancestry.

    This thesis also explored the genetic basis for the remarkable phenotypic differences between three male morphs in the ruff. Identification of two different versions of a 4.5 MB inversion in Satellites and Faeders that occurred about 4 million years ago revealed clues about the genetic foundation of male mating strategies in ruff. We highlighted two genes in the inverted region; HSD17B2 that affects metabolism of testosterone and MC1R that has a key role in regulating pigmentation, as the major loci associated with this adaptation.

  • 4.
    Lamichhaney, Sangeet
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Barrio, Alvaro Martinez
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rafati, Nima
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sundström, Görel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rubin, Carl-Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gilbert, Elizabeth R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Berglund, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wetterbom, Anna
    Laikre, Linda
    Webster, Matthew T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Grabherr, Manfred
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ryman, Nils
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Population-scale sequencing reveals genetic differentiation due to local adaptation in Atlantic herring2012In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 109, no 47, p. 19345-19350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), one of the most abundant marine fishes in the world, has historically been a critical food source in Northern Europe. It is one of the few marine species that can reproduce throughout the brackish salinity gradient of the Baltic Sea. Previous studies based on few genetic markers have revealed a conspicuous lack of genetic differentiation between geographic regions, consistent with huge population sizes and minute genetic drift. Here, we present a cost-effective genome-wide study in a species that lacks a genome sequence. We first assembled amuscle transcriptome and then aligned genomic reads to the transcripts, creating an "exome assembly," capturing both exons and flanking sequences. We then resequenced pools of fish from a wide geographic range, including the Northeast Atlantic, as well as different regions in the Baltic Sea, aligned the reads to the exome assembly, and identified 440,817 SNPs. The great majority of SNPs showed no appreciable differences in allele frequency among populations; however, several thousand SNPs showed striking differences, some approaching fixation for different alleles. The contrast between low genetic differentiation at most loci and striking differences at others implies that the latter category primarily reflects natural selection. A simulation study confirmed that the distribution of the fixation index F-ST deviated significantly from expectation for selectively neutral loci. This study provides insights concerning the population structure of an important marine fish and establishes the Atlantic herring as a model for population genetic studies of adaptation and natural selection.

  • 5.
    Lamichhaney, Sangeet
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Berglund, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Almen, Markus Sällman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Maqbool, Khurram
    Grabherr, Manfred
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Martinez-Barrio, Alvaro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Promerova, Marta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Rubin, Carl-Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Wang, Chao
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Zamani, Neda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Grant, B. Rosemary
    Grant, Peter R.
    Webster, Matthew T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Evolution of Darwin's finches and their beaks revealed by genome sequencing2015In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 518, no 7539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Darwin's finches, inhabiting the Galapagos archipelago and Cocos Island, constitute an iconic model for studies of speciation and adaptive evolution. Here we report the results of whole-genome re-sequencing of 120 individuals representing all of the Darwin's finch species and two close relatives' Phylogenetic analysis reveals important discrepancies with the phenotype-based taxonomy. We find extensive evidence for interspecific gene flow throughout the radiation. Hybridization has given rise to species of mixed ancestry. A 240 kilobase haplotype encompassing the ALX1 gene that encodes a transcription factor affecting craniofacial. development is strongly associated with beak shape diversity across Darwin's finch species as well as within the medium ground finch (Geospiza fortis) a species that has undergone rapid evolution of beak shape in response to environmental changes. The ALX1 haplotype has contributed to diversification of beak shapes among the Darwin's finches and thereby, to an expanded utilization of food resources.

  • 6.
    Lamichhaney, Sangeet
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Fan, Guangyi
    BGI Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Peoples R China.;Univ Macau, Inst Chinese Med Sci, State Key Lab Qual Res Chinese Med, Taipa, Peoples R China..
    Widemo, Fredrik
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, S-90183 Umea, Sweden..
    Gunnarsson, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Thalmann, Doreen Schwochow
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Uppsala, Sweden.;AgroParisTech, Inst Natl Rech Agron, Genet Anim & Biol Integrat, Jouy En Josas, France..
    Höppner, Marc P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Kerje, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Gustafson, Ulla
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Shi, Chengcheng
    BGI Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, He
    BGI Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Peoples R China..
    Chen, Wenbin
    BGI Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Peoples R China..
    Liang, Xinming
    BGI Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Peoples R China..
    Huang, Leihuan
    BGI Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Jiahao
    BGI Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Peoples R China..
    Liang, Enjing
    BGI Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Peoples R China..
    Wu, Qiong
    BGI Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Peoples R China..
    Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen
    Univ Macau, Inst Chinese Med Sci, State Key Lab Qual Res Chinese Med, Taipa, Peoples R China..
    Xu, Xun
    BGI Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Peoples R China..
    Höglund, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Liu, Xin
    BGI Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Peoples R China..
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Uppsala, Sweden.;Texas A&M Univ, Dept Vet Integrat Biosci, College Stn, TX USA..
    Structural genomic changes underlie alternative reproductive strategies in the ruff (Philomachus pugnax)2016In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 84-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ruff is a Palearctic wader with a spectacular lekking behavior where highly ornamented males compete for females(1-4). This bird has one of the most remarkable mating systems in the animal kingdom, comprising three different male morphs (independents, satellites and faeders) that differ in behavior, plumage color and body size. Remarkably, the satellite and faeder morphs are controlled by dominant alleles(5,6). Here we have used whole-genome sequencing and resolved the enigma of how such complex phenotypic differences can have a simple genetic basis. The Satellite and Faeder alleles are both associated with a 4.5-Mb inversion that occurred about 3.8 million years ago. We propose an evolutionary scenario where the Satellite chromosome arose by a rare recombination event about 500,000 years ago. The ruff mating system is the result of an evolutionary process in which multiple genetic changes contributing to phenotypic differences between morphs have accumulated within the inverted region.

  • 7.
    Lamichhaney, Sangeet
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fuentes-Pardo, Angela P.
    Dalhousie Univ, Dept Biol, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada..
    Rafati, Nima
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ryman, Nils
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    McCracken, Gregory R.
    Dalhousie Univ, Dept Biol, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada..
    Bourne, Christina
    Fisheries & Oceans Canada, Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Ctr, St John, NF A1C 5X1, Canada..
    Singh, Rabindra
    Fisheries & Oceans Canada, St Andrews Biol Stn, St Andrews, NB E5B 2L9, Canada..
    Ruzzante, Daniel E.
    Dalhousie Univ, Dept Biol, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada..
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.;Texas A&M Univ, Dept Vet Integrat Biosci, College Stn, TX 77843 USA..
    Parallel adaptive evolution of geographically distant herring populations on both sides of the North Atlantic Ocean2017In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 114, no 17, p. E3452-E3461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atlantic herring is an excellent species for studying the genetic basis of adaptation in geographically distant populations because of its characteristically large population sizes and low genetic drift. In this study we compared whole-genome resequencing data of Atlantic herring populations from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. An important finding was the very low degree of genetic differentiation among geographically distant populations (fixation index = 0.026), suggesting lack of reproductive isolation across the ocean. This feature of the Atlantic herring facilitates the detection of genetic factors affecting adaptation because of the sharp contrast between loci showing genetic differentiation resulting from natural selection and the low background noise resulting from genetic drift. We show that genetic factors associated with timing of reproduction are shared between genetically distinct and geographically distant populations. The genes for thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), the SOX11 transcription factor (SOX11), calmodulin (CALM), and estrogen receptor 2 (ESR2A), all with a significant role in reproductive biology, were among the loci that showed the most consistent association with spawning time throughout the species range. In fact, the same two SNPs located at the 5' end of TSHR showed the most significant association with spawning time in both the east and west Atlantic. We also identified unexpected haplotype sharing between spring-spawning oceanic herring and autumn-spawning populations across the Atlantic Ocean and the Baltic Sea. The genomic regions showing this pattern are unlikely to control spawning time but may be involved in adaptation to ecological factor(s) shared among these populations.

  • 8.
    Lamichhaney, Sangeet
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Han, Fan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Berglund, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Wang, Chao
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Sällman Almen, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    T. Webster, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Grant, B. Rosemary
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA..
    R. Grant, Peter
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA..
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    A beak size locus in Darwin’s finches facilitated character displacement during a drought2016In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 352, no 6284, p. 470-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecological character displacement is a process of morphological divergence that reducescompetition for limited resources. We used genomic analysis to investigate the geneticbasis of a documented character displacement event in Darwin’s finches on Daphne Majorin the Galápagos Islands: The medium ground finch diverged from its competitor, the largeground finch, during a severe drought. We discovered a genomic region containing theHMGA2gene that varies systematically among Darwin’s finch species with different beaksizes. Two haplotypes that diverged early in the radiation were involved in the characterdisplacement event: Genotypes associated with large beak size were at a strong selectivedisadvantage in medium ground finches (selection coefficients= 0.59). Thus, a majorlocus has apparently facilitated a rapid ecological diversification in the adaptive radiationof Darwin’s finches.

  • 9.
    Lamichhaney, Sangeet
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Han, Fan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Webster, Matthew Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Uppsala, Sweden.; Texas A&M Univ, Dept Vet Integrat Biosci, College Stn, TX USA.; Harvard Univ, Dept Organism & Evolutionary Biol, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA.; Harvard Univ, Museum Comparat Zool, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA..
    Grant, B Rosemary
    Grant, Peter R
    Rapid hybrid speciation in Darwin's finches.2018In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 359, no 6372, p. 224-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Homoploid hybrid speciation in animals has been inferred frequently from patterns of variation, but few examples have withstood critical scrutiny. Here we report a directly documented example, from its origin to reproductive isolation. An immigrant Darwin's finch to Daphne Major in the Galápagos archipelago initiated a new genetic lineage by breeding with a resident finch (Geospiza fortis). Genome sequencing of the immigrant identified it as a G. conirostris male that originated on Española >100 kilometers from Daphne Major. From the second generation onward, the lineage bred endogamously and, despite intense inbreeding, was ecologically successful and showed transgressive segregation of bill morphology. This example shows that reproductive isolation, which typically develops over hundreds of generations, can be established in only three.

  • 10.
    Martínez Barrio, Álvaro
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Lamichhaney, Sangeet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fan, Guangyi
    State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Macau, China; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzen, China; 5 College of Physics, Qingdao University, Qingdao, China .
    Rafati, Nima
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pettersson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zhang, He
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzen, China; College of Physics, Qingdao University, Qingdao, China.
    Dainat, Jacques
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ekman, Diana
    Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University.
    Höppner, Marc P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jern, Patric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Martin, Marcel
    Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University.
    Nystedt, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Liu, Xin
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzen, China.
    Chen, Wenbin
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Liang, Xinming
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Shi, Chengcheng
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Fu, Yuanyuan
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Ma, Kailong
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Zhan, Xiao
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Feng, Chungang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gustafson, Ulla
    Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Rubin, Carl-Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sällman Almén, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Blass, Martina
    Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Coastal Research, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research.
    Folkvord, Arild
    Department of Biology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Hjort Center of Marine Ecosystem Dynamics, Bergen, Norway; Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway .
    Laikre, Linda
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Ryman, Nils
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen Lee
    State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Macao.
    Xu, Xun
    BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, Texas A&M University, Texas, United States.
    The genetic basis for ecological adaptation of the Atlantic herring revealed by genome sequencing2016In: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 5, article id e12081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecological adaptation is of major relevance to speciation and sustainable population management, but the underlying genetic factors are typically hard to study in natural populations due to genetic differentiation caused by natural selection being confounded with genetic drift in subdivided populations. Here, we use whole genome population sequencing of Atlantic and Baltic herring to reveal the underlying genetic architecture at an unprecedented detailed resolution for both adaptation to a new niche environment and timing of reproduction. We identify almost 500 independent loci associated with a recent niche expansion from marine (Atlantic Ocean) to brackish waters (Baltic Sea), and more than 100 independent loci showing genetic differentiation between spring- and autumn-spawning populations irrespective of geographic origin. Our results show that both coding and non-coding changes contribute to adaptation. Haplotype blocks, often spanning multiple genes and maintained by selection, are associated with genetic differentiation.

  • 11.
    Saenko, Suzanne V.
    et al.
    Univ Geneva, Dept Genet & Evolut, LANE, CH-1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland..
    Lamichhaney, Sangeet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Barrio, Alvaro Martinez
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Molecular Evolution.
    Rafati, Nima
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, Uppsala, Sweden.;Texas A&M Univ, Coll Vet Med & Biomed Sci, Dept Vet Integrat Biosci, College Stn, TX USA..
    Milinkovitch, Michel C.
    Univ Geneva, Dept Genet & Evolut, LANE, CH-1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland.;SIB Swiss Inst Bioinformat, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Amelanism in the corn snake is associated with the insertion of an LTR-retrotransposon in the OCA2 gene2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 17118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) is a new model species particularly appropriate for investigating the processes generating colours in reptiles because numerous colour and pattern mutants have been isolated in the last five decades. Using our captive-bred colony of corn snakes, transcriptomic and genomic next-generation sequencing, exome assembly, and genotyping of SNPs in multiple families, we delimit the genomic interval bearing the causal mutation of amelanism, the oldest colour variant observed in that species. Proceeding with sequencing the candidate gene OCA2 in the uncovered genomic interval, we identify that the insertion of an LTR-retrotransposon in its 11th intron results in a considerable truncation of the p protein and likely constitutes the causal mutation of amelanism in corn snakes. As amelanistic snakes exhibit white, instead of black, borders around an otherwise normal pattern of dorsal orange saddles and lateral blotches, our results indicate that melanocytes lacking melanin are able to participate to the normal patterning of other colours in the skin. In combination with research in the zebrafish, this work opens the perspective of using corn snake colour and pattern variants to investigate the generative processes of skin colour patterning shared among major vertebrate lineages.

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