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  • 1.
    Ahlberg, Beth Maina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Skaraborg Institute for Research and Development, Skövde, Sweden.
    Hamed, Sarah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Thapar-Björkert, Suruchi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Invisibility of Racism in the Global Neoliberal Era: Implications for Researching Racism in Healthcare2019In: Frontiers in Sociology, ISSN 2297-7775, Vol. 4, article id 61Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the difficulties of researching racism in healthcare contexts as part of the wider issue of neoliberal reforms in welfare states in the age of global migration. In trying to understand the contradiction of a phenomenon that is historical and strongly felt by individuals and yet widely denied by both institutions and individuals, we consider the current political and socioeconomic context of healthcare provision. Despite decades of legislation against racism, its presence persists in healthcare settings, but data on these experiences is rarely gathered in Europe. National systems of healthcare provision have been subject to neoliberal reforms, where among others, cheaper forms of labor are sought to reduce the cost of producing healthcare, while the availability of services is rationed to contain demand. The restriction both on provision of and access to welfare, including healthcare, is unpopular among national populations. However, the explanations for restricted access to healthcare are assumed to be located outside the national context with immigrants being blamed. Even as migrants are used as a source of cheap labor in healthcare and other welfare sectors, the arrival of immigrants has been held responsible for restricted access to healthcare and welfare in general. One implication of (im)migration being blamed for healthcare restrictions, while racism is held to be a problem of the past, is the silencing of experiences of racism, which has dire consequences for ethnic minority populations. The implications of racism as a form of inequality within healthcare and the circumstances of researching racism in healthcare and its implication for the sociology of health in Sweden are described.

  • 2.
    Bradby, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Jama Mahmud, Amina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hamed, Sarah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Putting together services to meet everyday health needs: Diversity and bricolage in Sweden, UK, Portugal and Germany2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inequitable distribution of both healthcare resources and minority ethnic populations in European cities has put particular pressures on health service delivery. Multi-cultural models of society have tended to try to educate migrants and newly formed minorities in how to use services ‘appropriately’, rather than to reconfigure services. As neighbourhoods have been getting more diverse, existing models of healthcare delivery do not work so well, despite the rhetoric of ‘patient-centred care’.

     

    This study maps how people in two highly diverse neighbourhoods, with residents differentiated by faith, income, age, gender and legal status, put together the everyday support and healthcare they need. To build up a picture of the range of what people do to support their own wellbeing, we map people’s use of official health services, voluntary group support, informal help, including online and social media sources. This information, gathered by interviews and observations in neighbourhoods, is turned into an app that can be viewed and updated and which is used to further investigate the health care services that are valued and contrast these with the gaps where support is lacking.

     

    This paper draws on initial mapping data from Swedish neighbourhoods to critique ethnicity as a concept to investigate inequalities and diversity in respect of individuals’ relationship with healthcare, different modes of provision, and responsibilities for welfare allocation. Superdiversity (Vertovec 2007) is tested as a concept suitable for reconfiguring health services to respond to the ongoing diversification of diversity.

  • 3.
    Bradby, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Thapar-Björkert, Suruchi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Hamed, Sarah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Ahlberg, Beth Maina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Skaraborg Institute, Skövde, Sweden.
    Undoing the unspeakable: researching racism in Swedish healthcare using a participatory process to build dialogue2019In: Health Research Policy and Systems, ISSN 1478-4505, E-ISSN 1478-4505, Vol. 17, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Racism is difficult to discuss in the context of Swedish healthcare for various cultural and administrative reasons. Herein, we interpret the fragmentary nature of the evidence of racialising processes and the difficulty of reporting racist discrimination in terms of structural violence.

    Methods:

    In response to the unspeakable nature of racism in Swedish healthcare, we propose a phased participatory process to build a common vocabulary and grammar through a consultative framework involving healthcare providers and service users as well as policy-makers. These stakeholders will be involved in an educational intervention to facilitate discussion around and avoidance of racism in service provision.

    Discussion:

    Both the participatory process and outcomes of the process, e.g. educational interventions, will contribute to the social and political conversation about racism in healthcare settings. Creating new ways of discussing sensitive topics allows ameliorative actions to be taken, benefitting healthcare providers and users. The urgency of the project is underlined.

  • 4.
    Gil-Salmeron, A.
    et al.
    Polibienestar Res Inst, Valencia, Spain.
    Valia-Cotanda, E.
    Polibienestar Res Inst, Valencia, Spain.
    Garces-Ferrer, J.
    Polibienestar Res Inst, Valencia, Spain.
    Karnaki, P.
    Inst Prevent Med Environm & Occupat Hlth Prolepsi, Maroussi, Greece.
    Zota, D.
    Inst Prevent Med Environm & Occupat Hlth Prolepsi, Maroussi, Greece.
    Linos, A.
    Inst Prevent Med Environm & Occupat Hlth Prolepsi, Maroussi, Greece.
    Lebano, Adele
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hamed, Sarah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Immigrants and refugees' principal characteristics across Europe: a literature review2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no Supplement: 1, p. 61-61Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Hamed, Sarah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Ahlberg, Beth Maina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Trenholm, Jill E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Powerlessness, Normalization, and Resistance: A Foucauldian Discourse Analysis of Women’s Narratives On Obstetric Fistula in Eastern Sudan2017In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 27, no 12, p. 1828-1841Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eastern Sudan has high prevalence of female circumcision and child marriage constituting a risk for developing obstetric fistula. Few studies have examined gender roles’ relation with obstetric fistula in Sudan. To explore the associated power-relations that may put women at increased risk for developing obstetric fistula, we conducted nine interviews with women living with obstetric fistula in Kassala in eastern Sudan. Using a Foucauldian discourse analysis, we identified three discourses: powerlessness, normalization, and covert resistance. Existing power-relations between the women and other societal members revealed their internalization of social norms as absolute truth, and influenced their status and decision-making power in regard to circumcision, early marriage, and other transformative decisions as well as women’s general behaviors. The women showed subtle resistance to these norms and the harassment they encountered because of their fistula. These findings suggest that a more in-depth contextual assessment could benefit future maternal health interventions.

  • 6.
    Hamed, Sarah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Klingberg, Sonja
    Cambridge University.
    Mahmud, Amina Jama
    Independant researcher.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Researching health in diverse neighbourhoods:: critical reflection on the use of a community research model in Uppsala, Sweden2018In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 612-, article id s13104-018-3717-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: A community research model developed in the United Kingdom was adopted in a multi-country study of health in diverse neighbourhoods in European cities, including Sweden. This paper describes the challenges and opportunities of using this model in Sweden.Results: In Sweden, five community researchers were recruited and trained to facilitate access to diverse groups in the two study neighbourhoods, including ethnic, religious, and linguistic minorities. Community researchers recruited participants from the neighbourhoods, and assisted during semi-structured interviews. Their local networks, and knowledge were invaluable for contextualising the study and finding participants. Various factors made it difficult to fully apply the model in Sweden. The study took place when an unprecedented number of asylum-seekers were arriving in Sweden, and potential collaborators’ time was taken up in meeting their needs. Employment on short-term, temporary contracts is difficult since Swedish Universities are public authorities. Strong expectations of stable full-time employment, make flexible part-time work undesirable. The community research model was only partly suc-cessful in embedding the research project as a collaboration between community members and the University. While there was interest and some involvement from neighbourhood residents, the research remained University-led with a limited sense of community ownership.Keywords: Sweden, Healthcare research, Community research.

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