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  • 1.
    Hammond, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    DNA-Mediated Detection and Profiling of Protein Complexes2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Proteins are the effector molecules of life. They are encoded in DNA that is inherited from generation to generation, but most cellular functions are executed by proteins. Proteins rarely act on their own – most actions are carried out through an interplay of tens of proteins and other biomolecules.

    Here I describe how synthetic DNA can be used to study proteins and protein complexes. Variants of proximity ligation assays (PLA) are used to generate DNA reporter molecules upon proximal binding by pairs of DNA oligonucleotide-modified affinity reagents. In Paper I, a robust protocol was set up for PLA on paramagnetic microparticles, and we demonstrated that this solid phase PLA had superior performance for detecting nine candidate cancer biomarkers compared to other immunoassays. Based on the protocol described in Paper I I then developed further variants of PLA that allows detection of protein aggregates and protein interactions. I sensitively detected aggregated amyloid protofibrils of prion proteins in paper II, and in paper III I studied binary interactions between several proteins of the NFκB family. For all immunoassays the selection of high quality affinity binders represents a major challenge. I have therefore established a protocol where a large set of protein binders can be simultaneously validated to identify optimal pairs for dual recognition immunoassays (Paper IV).  

  • 2.
    Hammond, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Deslys, Jean-Philippe
    CEA DSV/iMETI/SEPIA, Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex, France.
    Wik, Lotta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Commoy, Emmanuel
    CEA DSV/iMETI/SEPIA, Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex, France.
    Linné, Tommy
    Dept. of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Sensitive detection of aggregated prion protein by proximity ligation assayManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Hammond, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    A DNA-mediated search for optimal combinations of protein bindersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Hammond, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wik, Lotta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Deslys, Jean-Philippe
    Comoy, Emmanuel
    Linné, Tommy
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sensitive detection of aggregated prion protein via proximity ligation2014In: Prion, ISSN 1933-6896, E-ISSN 1933-690X, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 261-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The DNA assisted solid-phase proximity ligation assay (SP-PLA) provides a unique opportunity to specifically detect prion protein (PrP) aggregates by investigating the collocation of three or more copies of the specific protein. We have developed a SP-PLA that can detect PrP aggregates in brain homogenates from infected hamsters even after a 10(7)-fold dilution. In contrast, brain homogenate from uninfected animals did not generate a detectable signal at hundred-fold higher concentration. Using either of the two monoclonal anti-PrP antibodies 3F4 and 6H4 we successfully detected low concentrations of aggregated PrP. The presented results provide a proof of concept that this method might be an interesting tool in the development of diagnostic approaches of prion diseases.

  • 5.
    Landegren, Ulf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Vänelid, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hammond, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nong, Rachel Yuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ullerås, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Opportunities for sensitive plasma proteome analysis2012In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 84, no 4, p. 1824-1830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite great interest, investments, and efforts, the ongoing search for plasma protein biomarkers for disease so far has come up surprisingly empty-handed. While discovery programs have revealed large numbers of biomarker candidates, the clinical utility has been validated for only a very small number of these. While this disappointing state of affairs may suggest that plasma protein biomarkers have little more to offer for diagnostics, we take the perspective that experimental conditions might not have been optimal, and that analyses will be required that offer far greater sensitivity than currently available, in terms of numbers of molecules needed for unambiguous detection. Accordingly, techniques are needed to search deep and wide for protein biomarker candidates. The requirements and feasibility of such assays will be discussed.

  • 6.
    Liu, Yanling
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gu, Jijuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hagner-McWhirter, Asa
    Sathiyanarayanan, Poojahrau
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gullberg, Mats
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Johansson, Johan
    Hammond, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ivansson, Daniel
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Western Blotting via Proximity Ligation for High Performance Protein Analysis2011In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 10, no 11, p. O111.011031-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Western blotting is a powerful and widely used method, but limitations in detection sensitivity and specificity, and dependence upon high quality antibodies to detect targeted proteins, are hurdles to overcome. The in situ proximity ligation assay, based on dual antibody recognition and powerful localized signal amplification, offers increased detection sensitivity and specificity, along with an ability to identify complex targets such as phosphorylated or interacting proteins. Here we have applied the in situ proximity ligation assay mechanism in Western blotting. This combination allowed the use of isothermal rolling circle amplification of DNA molecules formed in target-specific ligation reaction, for 16-fold or greater increase in detection sensitivity. The increased specificity because of dual antibody recognition ensured highly selective assays, detecting the specific band when combinations of two cross-reactive antitubulin antibodies were used (i.e. both producing distinct nonspecific bands in traditional Western blotting). We also demonstrated detection of phosphorylated platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta by proximity ligation with one antibody directed against the receptor and another directed against the phosphorylated tyrosine residue. This avoided the need for stripping and re-probing the membrane or aligning two separate traditional blots. We demonstrate that the high-performance in situ proximity ligation-based Western blotting described herein is compatible with detection via enhanced chemiluminescence and fluorescence detection systems, and can thus be readily employed in any laboratory.

  • 7.
    Nong, Rachel Yuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Yan, Junhong
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hammond, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gu, Gucci Jijuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Darmanis, Spyros
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Solid-phase proximity ligation assays for individual or parallel protein analyses with readout via real-time PCR or sequencing2013In: Nature Protocols, ISSN 1754-2189, E-ISSN 1750-2799, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 1234-1248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solid-phase proximity ligation assays share properties with the classical sandwich immunoassays for protein detection. The proteins captured via antibodies on solid supports are, however, detected not by single antibodies with detectable functions, but by pairs of antibodies with attached DNA strands. Upon recognition by these sets of three antibodies, pairs of DNA strands brought in proximity are joined by ligation. The ligated reporter DNA strands are then detected via methods such as real-time PCR or next-generation sequencing (NGS). We describe how to construct assays that can offer improved detection specificity by virtue of recognition by three antibodies, as well as enhanced sensitivity owing to reduced background and amplified detection. Finally, we also illustrate how the assays can be applied for parallel detection of proteins, taking advantage of the oligonucleotide ligation step to avoid background problems that might arise with multiplexing. The protocol for the singleplex solid-phase proximity ligation assay takes similar to 5 h. The multiplex version of the assay takes 7-8 h depending on whether quantitative PCR (qPCR) or sequencing is used as the readout. The time for the sequencing-based protocol includes the library preparation but not the actual sequencing, as times may vary based on the choice of sequencing platform.

  • 8.
    Yan, Junhong
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gu, Gucci Jijuan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Jost, Christian
    Hammond, Maria
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Plueckthun, Andreas
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    A Universal Approach to Prepare Reagents for DNA-Assisted Protein Analysis2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 9, p. e108061-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The quality of DNA-labeled affinity probes is critical in DNA-assisted protein analyses, such as proximity ligation and extension assays, immuno-PCR, and immuno-rolling circle amplification reactions. Efficient, high-performance methods are therefore required for isolation of pure conjugates from reactions where DNA strands have been coupled to antibodies or recombinant affinity reagents. Here we describe a universal, scalable approach for preparing high-quality oligonucleotide-protein conjugates by sequentially removing any unconjugated affinity reagents and remaining free oligonucleotides from conjugation reactions. We applied the approach to generate high-quality probes using either antibodies or recombinant affinity reagents. The purified high-grade probes were used in proximity ligation assays in solution and in situ, demonstrating both augmented assay sensitivity and improved signal-to-noise ratios.

  • 9.
    Yan, Junhong
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Horak, Daniel
    Lenfeld, Jiri
    Hammond, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    A tosyl-activated magnetic bead cellulose as solid support for sensitive protein detection2013In: Journal of Biotechnology, ISSN 0168-1656, E-ISSN 1873-4863, Vol. 167, no 3, p. 235-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Magnetic bead cellulose (MBC) was prepared using sol-gel transition of viscose in the presence of maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanoparticles. The MBC particles were then activated with p-toluenesulfonyl chloride to yield tosyl-activated magnetic bead cellulose (MBC-Ts). The microspheres were characterized by light and electron microscopy, elemental analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy to determine morphology, size, polydispersity and content of iron and tosyl groups. The functionality of the MBC-Ts microspheres was demonstrated using proximity ligation assay (PLA) to detect vascular endothelial growth factor in femtomolar concentration range. The MBC-Ts microspheres performed equally well as commercially available microparticles that are routinely used as solid support in solid phase PLA.

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