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  • 1.
    Gu, Gucci Jijuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Proximity Ligation Assay for High Performance Protein Analysis in Medicine2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    High quality reagents are preconditions for high performance protein analyses. But despite progress in some techniques, e.g. mass spectrometry, there is still a lack of affinity-based detection techniques with enhanced precision, specificity, and sensitivity. Building on the concept of multiple affinity recognition reactions and signal amplification, a proximity ligation assay (PLA) was developed as a molecular tool for analyzing proteins and their post-translational modification and interactions. PLA enhanced the analysis of protein expression levels and post-translational modifications in western blotting (Paper I), which had elevated sensitivity and specificity, and an ability to investigate protein phosphorylation.

    A general and straightforward method was established for the functionalization of affinity reagents through adding DNA strands to protein domains for protein analysis in medicine (Paper II). A method for protein domain-mediated conjugation was developed to simplify the use of recombinant affinity reagents, such as designed ankyrin repeat protein (DARPin), in DNA-mediated protein analyses.

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline and memory impairment, and amyloid-beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) in the brain are clinical hallmarks of the disease. In order to understand the mechanisms underlying the formation of NFT, in situ PLA was used to explore the role of microtubule affinity related kinase 2 (MARK2) in phosphorylating tau protein during the pathological progress of AD (Paper III). The analyses of roles of MARK proteins 1-4 in phosphorylating tau protein in cells and in post-mortem human brains were performed in Paper IV.

    The focus of this thesis was the study of post-translational modifications and interactions of proteins in medicine. Procedures for high performance protein analysis in western blotting via proximity ligation were developed, and a functionalization method for recombinant affinity reagents in DNA-mediated protein analysis was established. These and other techniques were used to investigate the roles of tau-phosphorylating MARK family proteins in AD.

  • 2.
    Gu, Gucci Jijuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Friedman, Mikaela
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Jost, Christian
    Johnsson, Kai
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Plückthun, Andreas
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Protein tag-mediated conjugation of oligonucleotides to recombinant affinity binders for proximity ligation2013In: New Biotechnology, ISSN 1871-6784, E-ISSN 1876-4347, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 144-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While antibodies currently play a dominant role as affinity reagents in biological research and for diagnostics, a broad range of recombinant proteins are emerging as promising alternative affinity reagents in detection assays and quantification. DNA-mediated affinity-based assays, such as immuno-PCR and proximity ligation assays (PLA), use oligonucleotides attached to affinity reagents as reporter molecules. Conjugation of oligonucleotides to affinity reagents generally employs chemistries that target primary amines or cysteines. Because of the random nature of these processes neither the number of oligonucleotides conjugated per molecule nor their sites of attachment can be accurately controlled for affinity reagents with several available amines and cysteines. Here, we present a straightforward and convenient approach to functionalize recombinant affinity reagents for PLA by expressing the reagents as fusion partners with SNAP protein tags. This allowed us to conjugate oligonucleotides in a site-specific fashion, yielding precisely one oligonucleotide per affinity reagent. We demonstrate this method using designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) recognizing the tumor antigen HER2 and we apply the conjugates in different assay formats. We also show that SNAP or CLIP tags expressed as fusion partners of transfected genes, allow oligonucleotide conjugations to be performed in fixed cells, with no need for specific affinity reagents. The approach is used to demonstrate induced interactions between the fusion proteins FKBP and FRB by allowing the in situ conjugated oligonucleotides to direct the production of templates for localized rolling circle amplification reactions.

  • 3.
    Gu, Gucci Jijuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Friedman, Mikaela
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Ren, Ping
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Torn, Carina
    Fex, Malin
    Hampe, Christiane S.
    Lernmark, Ake
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Elevated Serum GAD65 and GAD65-GADA Immune Complexes in Stiff Person Syndrome2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 11196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and autoantibodies specific for GAD65 (GADA) are associated with autoimmune diseases including Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS) and Type 1 diabetes (T1D). GADA is recognized as a biomarker of value for clinical diagnosis and prognostication in these diseases. Nonetheless, it remains medically interesting to develop sensitive and specific assays to detect GAD65 preceding GADA emergence, and to monitor GADA-GAD65 immune complexes in blood samples. In the present study, we developed a highly sensitive proximity ligation assay to measure serum GAD65. This novel assay allowed detection of as little as 0.65 pg/ml GAD65. We were also able to detect immune complexes involving GAD65 and GADA. Both free GAD65 and GAD65-GADA levels were significantly higher in serum samples from SPS patients compared to healthy controls. The proximity ligation assays applied for detection of GAD65 and its immune complexes may thus enable improved diagnosis and better understanding of SPS.

  • 4.
    Gu, Gucci Jijuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lund, Harald
    Wu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Blokzijl, Andries
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Classon, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    von Euler, Gabriel
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sunnemark, Dan
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Role of Individual MARK Isoforms in Phosphorylation of Tau at Ser(262) in Alzheimer's Disease2013In: Neuromolecular medicine, ISSN 1535-1084, E-ISSN 1559-1174, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 458-469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The microtubule-affinity regulating kinase (MARK) family consists of four highly conserved members that have been implicated in phosphorylation of tau protein, causing formation of neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Understanding of roles by individual MARK isoform in phosphorylating tau has been limited due to lack of antibodies selective for each MARK isoform. In this study, we first applied the proximity ligation assay on cells to select antibodies specific for each MARK isoform. In cells, a CagA peptide specifically and significantly inhibited tau phosphorylation at Ser(262) mediated by MARK4 but not other MARK isoforms. We then used these antibodies to study expression levels of MARK isoforms and interactions between tau and individual MARK isoforms in postmortem human brains. We found a strong and significant elevation of MARK4 expression and MARK4-tau interactions in AD brains, correlating with the Braak stages of the disease. These results suggest the MARK4-tau interactions are of functional importance in the progression of AD and the results also identify MARK4 as a promising target for AD therapy.

  • 5.
    Gu, Gucci Jijuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lund, Harald
    Dept. of Neuroscience, iMed, CNS and Pain Södertälje, AstraZeneca Research and Development.
    Sunnemark, Dan
    Dept. of Neuroscience, iMed, CNS and Pain Södertälje, AstraZeneca Research and Development.
    Kvist, Alexander
    Antibody Generation Group, Discovery Sciences, iMed, AstraZeneca Research and Development.
    Milner, Roy
    Antibody Generation Group, Discovery Sciences, iMed, AstraZeneca Research and Development.
    Eckersley, Sonia
    Antibody Generation Group, Discovery Sciences, iMed, AstraZeneca Research and Development.
    Nilsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Agerman, Karin
    Dept. of Neuroscience, iMed, CNS and Pain Södertälje, AstraZeneca Research and Development.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kamali‐Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Elevated MARK2-Dependent Phosphorylation of Tau in Alzheimer's Disease2013In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 699-713Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The appearance of neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), one of the major hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is most likely caused by inappropriate phosphorylation and/or dephosphorylation of tau, eventually leading to the accumulation of NFTs. Enhanced phosphorylation of tau on Ser(262) is detected early in the course of the disease and may have a role in the formation of tangles. Several kinases such as microtubule-affinity regulating kinase (MARK), protein kinase A, calcium calmodulin kinase II, and checkpoint kinase 2 are known to phosphorylate tau on Ser(262) in vitro. In this study, we took advantage of the in situ proximity ligation assay to investigate the role of MARK2, one of the four MARK isoforms, in AD. We demonstrate that MARK2 interacts with tau and phosphorylates tau at Ser(262) in stably transfected NIH/3T3 cells expressing human recombinant tau. Staurosporine, a protein kinase inhibitor, significantly reduced the interaction between MARK2 and tau, and also phosphorylation of tau at Ser(262). Furthermore, we observed elevated interactions between MARK2 and tau in post-mortem human AD brains, compared to samples from non-demented elderly controls. Our results from transfected cells demonstrate a specific interaction between MARK2 and tau, as well as MARK2-dependent phosphorylation of tau at Ser(262). Furthermore, the elevated interactions between MARK2 and tau in AD brain sections suggests that MARK2 may play an important role in early phosphorylation of tau in AD, possibly qualifying as a therapeutic target for intervention to prevent disease progression.

  • 6.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Yan, Junhong
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Löf, Liza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gu, Jijuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Molecular tools for sensitive detection of microvesicles as biomarkers2012In: Protein Science, ISSN 0961-8368, E-ISSN 1469-896X, Vol. 21, no S1, p. 164-164Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Liu, Yanling
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gu, Jijuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hagner-McWhirter, Asa
    Sathiyanarayanan, Poojahrau
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gullberg, Mats
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Johansson, Johan
    Hammond, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ivansson, Daniel
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Western Blotting via Proximity Ligation for High Performance Protein Analysis2011In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 10, no 11, p. O111.011031-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Western blotting is a powerful and widely used method, but limitations in detection sensitivity and specificity, and dependence upon high quality antibodies to detect targeted proteins, are hurdles to overcome. The in situ proximity ligation assay, based on dual antibody recognition and powerful localized signal amplification, offers increased detection sensitivity and specificity, along with an ability to identify complex targets such as phosphorylated or interacting proteins. Here we have applied the in situ proximity ligation assay mechanism in Western blotting. This combination allowed the use of isothermal rolling circle amplification of DNA molecules formed in target-specific ligation reaction, for 16-fold or greater increase in detection sensitivity. The increased specificity because of dual antibody recognition ensured highly selective assays, detecting the specific band when combinations of two cross-reactive antitubulin antibodies were used (i.e. both producing distinct nonspecific bands in traditional Western blotting). We also demonstrated detection of phosphorylated platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta by proximity ligation with one antibody directed against the receptor and another directed against the phosphorylated tyrosine residue. This avoided the need for stripping and re-probing the membrane or aligning two separate traditional blots. We demonstrate that the high-performance in situ proximity ligation-based Western blotting described herein is compatible with detection via enhanced chemiluminescence and fluorescence detection systems, and can thus be readily employed in any laboratory.

  • 8.
    Nong, Rachel Yuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gu, Jijuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Darmanis, Spyros
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    DNA-assisted protein detection technologies2012In: Expert Review of Proteomics, ISSN 1478-9450, E-ISSN 1744-8387, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 21-32Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improved protein assays promise to offer new insights into biological processes as well as the identification of new, clinically important biomarkers. In recent years, a number of approaches have been developed where protein-binding reagents, typically antibodies, are equipped with DNA strands to enable protein analyses via powerful nucleic acid detection reactions for improved performance. In this review, we provide a background to this emerging field, and we describe several different ways in which these reagents can improve protein analyses by lowering detection thresholds, improving multiplexing and extending the range of biomolecules available for analysis, both in research settings and in clinical routine.

  • 9.
    Nong, Rachel Yuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Yan, Junhong
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hammond, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gu, Gucci Jijuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Darmanis, Spyros
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Solid-phase proximity ligation assays for individual or parallel protein analyses with readout via real-time PCR or sequencing2013In: Nature Protocols, ISSN 1754-2189, E-ISSN 1750-2799, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 1234-1248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solid-phase proximity ligation assays share properties with the classical sandwich immunoassays for protein detection. The proteins captured via antibodies on solid supports are, however, detected not by single antibodies with detectable functions, but by pairs of antibodies with attached DNA strands. Upon recognition by these sets of three antibodies, pairs of DNA strands brought in proximity are joined by ligation. The ligated reporter DNA strands are then detected via methods such as real-time PCR or next-generation sequencing (NGS). We describe how to construct assays that can offer improved detection specificity by virtue of recognition by three antibodies, as well as enhanced sensitivity owing to reduced background and amplified detection. Finally, we also illustrate how the assays can be applied for parallel detection of proteins, taking advantage of the oligonucleotide ligation step to avoid background problems that might arise with multiplexing. The protocol for the singleplex solid-phase proximity ligation assay takes similar to 5 h. The multiplex version of the assay takes 7-8 h depending on whether quantitative PCR (qPCR) or sequencing is used as the readout. The time for the sequencing-based protocol includes the library preparation but not the actual sequencing, as times may vary based on the choice of sequencing platform.

  • 10.
    Piening, Brian D.
    et al.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Zhou, Wenyu
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Contrepois, Kévin
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Röst, Hannes
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Gu Urban, Gucci Jijuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Mishra, Tejaswini
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Hanson, Blake M.
    Jackson Lab Genom Med, Farmington, CT, USA.
    Bautista, Eddy J.
    Jackson Lab Genom Med, Farmington, CT, USA; Corp Invest & Agr Corpoica, Ctr Invest Tibaitata, Mosquera, Colombia.
    Leopold, Shana
    Jackson Lab Genom Med, Farmington, CT, USA.
    Yeh, Christine Y.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA; Stanford Univ, Dept Radiol, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA; Stanford Univ, Canary Ctr Stanford, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA; Stanford Univ, Biomed Informat Program, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Spakowicz, Daniel
    Jackson Lab Genom Med, Farmington, CT, USA.
    Banerjee, Imon
    Stanford Univ, Dept Biomed Data Sci, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Chen, Cynthia
    Stanford Univ, Dept Biomed Data Sci, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Kukurba, Kimberly
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Perelman, Dalia
    Stanford Univ, Div Endocrinol, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Craig, Colleen
    Stanford Univ, Div Endocrinol, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Colbert, Elizabeth
    Stanford Univ, Div Endocrinol, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Salins, Denis
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Rego, Shannon
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Lee, Sunjae
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zhang, Cheng
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wheeler, Jessica
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Sailani, M. Reza
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Liang, Liang
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Abbott, Charles
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Gerstein, Mark
    Yale Univ, Dept Mol Biophys & Biochem, New Haven, CT USA; Yale Univ, Dept Comp Sci, New Haven, CT, USA; Yale Univ, Program Computat Biol & Bioinformat, New Haven, CT, USA.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden; Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Smith, Ulf
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rubin, Daniel L.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Biomed Data Sci, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Pitteri, Sharon
    Stanford Univ, Dept Radiol, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA; Stanford Univ, Canary Ctr Stanford, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Sodergren, Erica
    Jackson Lab Genom Med, Farmington, CT, USA.
    McLaughlin, Tracey L.
    Stanford Univ, Div Endocrinol, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Weinstock, George M.
    Jackson Lab Genom Med, Farmington, CT, USA.
    Snyder, Michael P.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Sch Med, Stanford, CA, USA.
    Integrative Personal Omics Profiles during Periods of Weight Gain and Loss2018In: CELL SYSTEMS, ISSN 2405-4712, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 157-170.e8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances in omics technologies now allow an unprecedented level of phenotyping for human diseases, including obesity, in which individual responses to excess weight are heterogeneous and unpredictable. To aid the development of better understanding of these phenotypes, we performed a controlled longitudinal weight perturbation study combining multiple omics strategies (genomics, transcriptomics, multiple proteomics assays, metabolomics, and microbiomics) during periods of weight gain and loss in humans. Results demonstrated that: (1) weight gain is associated with the activation of strong inflammatory and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy signatures in blood; (2) although weight loss reverses some changes, a number of signatures persist, indicative of long-term physiologic changes; (3) we observed omics signatures associated with insulin resistance that may serve as novel diagnostics; (4) specific biomolecules were highly individualized and stable in response to perturbations, potentially representing stable personalized markers. Most data are available open access and serve as a valuable resource for the community.

  • 11.
    Yan, Junhong
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gu, Gucci Jijuan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Jost, Christian
    Hammond, Maria
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Plueckthun, Andreas
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    A Universal Approach to Prepare Reagents for DNA-Assisted Protein Analysis2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 9, p. e108061-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The quality of DNA-labeled affinity probes is critical in DNA-assisted protein analyses, such as proximity ligation and extension assays, immuno-PCR, and immuno-rolling circle amplification reactions. Efficient, high-performance methods are therefore required for isolation of pure conjugates from reactions where DNA strands have been coupled to antibodies or recombinant affinity reagents. Here we describe a universal, scalable approach for preparing high-quality oligonucleotide-protein conjugates by sequentially removing any unconjugated affinity reagents and remaining free oligonucleotides from conjugation reactions. We applied the approach to generate high-quality probes using either antibodies or recombinant affinity reagents. The purified high-grade probes were used in proximity ligation assays in solution and in situ, demonstrating both augmented assay sensitivity and improved signal-to-noise ratios.

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