Digitala Vetenskapliga Arkivet

Change search
Refine search result
1 - 16 of 16
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Adermon, Adrian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU).
    Hensvik, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Gig-jobs: Stepping stones or dead ends?2022In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 76, article id 102171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How useful is work experience from the gig economy for labor market entrants searching for traditional wage jobs? We conducted a correspondence study in Sweden, comparing callback rates for recent high school graduates with (i) gig-experience, (ii) traditional experience, and (iii) unemployment history. We also study heterogeneous responses with respect to perceived foreign background. Our findings suggest that gig-experience is more valuable than unemployment, but less useful than traditional experience for majority applicants. Strikingly however, no form of labor market experience increases the callback rate for minority workers.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Eliason, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU).
    Hensvik, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU).
    Kramarz, Francis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Fiscal Studies.
    Informella kontaktnäts betydelse för arbetssökande och företag på den svenska arbetsmarknaden2017Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vi analyserar hur restaurangpriserna förändrades i samband med momssänkningar i Finland 2010 och Sverige 2012. Vi visar att prisförändringarna i samband med dessa skattesänkningar i stora drag kan karaktäriseras som ”allt” eller ”inget”. Vi lägger därför särskilt fokus på att förstå vilka restauranger som sänkte priserna och vilka som inte gjorde det. Det visar sig att nästan alla prisförändringar skedde genom att restauranger som tillhör någon form av kedja sänkte sina priser medan oberoende restauranger i de allra flesta fall lämnade sina priser opåverkade. Vi visar att mönstret ligger väl i linje med andra betydande skillnader i prissättningsaktivitet mellan de två typerna av restauranger. Detta tyder på att företagssammansättningen har en betydande direkt effekt på hur stort genomslag en momssänkning får på priser och, i förlängningen, ekonomisk aktivitet. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Eliason, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU).
    Hensvik, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU).
    Kramarz, Francis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Inst Polytech Paris, CREST ENSAE, 5 Ave Henry Le Chatelier, F-91764 Palaiseau, France..
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU).
    Social connections and the sorting of workers to firms2023In: Journal of Econometrics, ISSN 0304-4076, E-ISSN 1872-6895, Vol. 233, no 2, p. 468-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We assess the presumption that social networks reinforce inequality by providing high -wage workers' with preferential access to high-wage establishments. Our results based on very detailed Swedish register data contradict this view. We do show that high -wage job seekers tend to be connected to high-wage workers employed in high-wage establishments. Furthermore, social connections appear to directly cause the allocation of workers to jobs. But the sorting resulting from hires within social networks is less unequal than the sorting resulting from market hires, essentially because low-wage firms rely on social connections to hire high-wage workers.

  • 4.
    Eliason, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Labor Studies (UCLS).
    Hensvik, Lena
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Labor Studies (UCLS). CESIfo.
    Kramarz, Francis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Le Centre de Recherche en Économie et Statistique (CREST); CEPR; IZA.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Labor Studies (UCLS). IZA.
    Social Connections and the Sorting of Workers to Firms2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on social networks often presumes that job search through (strong) social ties leads to increased inequality by providing privileged individuals with access to more attractive labor market opportunities. We assess this presumption in the context of sorting between AKM-style person and establishment fixed effects. Our rich Swedish register data allow us to measure connections between agents – workers to workers and workers to firms – through parents, children, siblings, spouses, former co-workers and classmates from high school/college, and current neighbors. In clear contrast with the above presumption, there is less sorting inequality among the workers hired through social networks. This outcome results from opposing factors. On the one hand, reinforcing positive sorting, high-wage job seekers are shown to have social connections to high-wage workers, and therefore to high-wage firms (because of sorting of workers over firms). Furthermore, connections have a causal impact on the allocation of workers across workplaces – employers are much more likely to hire displaced workers to whom they are connected through their employees, in particular if their social ties are strong. On the other hand, attenuating positive sorting, the (causal) impact is much stronger for low-wage firms than it is for high-wage firms, irrespective of the type of worker involved, even conditional on worker fixed effects. The lower degree of sorting among connected hires thus arises because low-wage firms use their (relatively few) connections to high-wage workers to hire workers of a type that they are unable to attract through market channels. 

  • 5.
    Fredriksson, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. UCLS, Uppsala, Sweden;IZA, Bonn, Germany.
    Hensvik, Lena
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU). UCLS, Uppsala, Sweden; CESifo, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU). UCLS, Uppsala, Sweden;IZA, Bonn, Germany.
    Mismatch of Talent: Evidence on Match Quality, Entry Wages, and Job Mobility2018In: The American Economic Review, ISSN 0002-8282, E-ISSN 1944-7981, Vol. 108, no 11, p. 3303-3338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the impact of mismatch on entry wages, separations, and wage growth using unique data on worker talents. We show that workers are sorted on comparative advantage across jobs within occupations. The starting wages of inexperienced workers are unrelated to mismatch. For experienced workers, on the other hand, mismatch is negatively priced into their starting wages. Separations and wage growth are more strongly related to mismatch among inexperienced workers than among experienced workers. These findings are consistent with models of information updating, where less information is available about the quality of matches involving inexperienced workers.

  • 6.
    Grönqvist, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Labor Studies (UCLS).
    Hensvik, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Labor Studies (UCLS).
    Thoresson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Labor Studies (UCLS). Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU).
    Teacher career opportunities and school quality2022In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 77, article id 101997Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the effects of introducing a performance-based promotion program for teachers in Sweden. The pro-gram intended to make the teaching profession more attractive by raising wages for skilled teachers and taking advantage of teachers' professional competence. Our results show that: (i) high-wage teachers are more likely to be promoted; (ii) the stipulated wage increase has full pass-through onto wages for promoted teachers; (iii) schools with promotions have lower teacher separations and an improved pool of teachers. These results suggest that performance-based promotions could be an important tool for raising teacher quality.

  • 7.
    Hensvik, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    The effects of markets, managers and peers on worker outcomes2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Essay 1: This essay exploits the entry of private independent high schools in Sweden to examine how local school competition affects the wages and the mobility of teachers in a market with individual wage bargaining. Using rich matched employer-employee panel data covering all high school teachers over a period of 16 years, I show that the entry of private schools is associated with higher teacher salaries, including higher salaries for teachers in public schools. The wage returns from competition are highest for teachers entering the profession and for teachers trained in math and science. Private school entry has also increased wage dispersion between high- and low-skilled teachers within the same field. Several robustness checks support a causal interpretation of the results, which draw attention to the potential effects of school competition on teacher supply, through the more differentiated wage setting of teachers.

    Essay 2: (with Olof Åslund and Oskar Nordström Skans) We investigate how manager origin affects hiring patterns, job separations, and entry wages. The analysis, draws on a longitudinal matched employer-employee data including more than 100,000 workplaces during a nine year period. Immigrant managers are substantially more likely to hire immigrants, a result robust to comparisons within 5-digit industry and location as well as within firms across establishments. The finding holds also when we follow establishments that change management over time, even accounting for trends. Origin dissimilarity increases separations within the first year of employment, but there is no impact on entry wages. Several results point to information asymmetries as an important explanation to the patterns.

    Essay 3: The third essay examines whether women benefit from working under female management. I use matched employer-employee panel data for Sweden, which enables me to account for unobserved heterogeneity among both workers and firms. In line with existing work, I document a substantial negative correlation between the proportion of female managers and the establishment’s gender wage gap. However, most of this relationship reflects worker heterogeneity, suggesting that sorting is an important explanation for the lower gender wage difference in female-led firms. Further analysis supports this conclusion by showing that while female managers are not more likely to hire same-sex workers per se, they do indeed hire women with higher portable earnings capacity.

    Essay 4: (with Peter Nilsson) We analyze how peer effects among co‑workers affect fertility using population‑wide matched employer-employee panel data. We provide evidence on if, when, why and for whom co‑workers’ fertility decisions matter. Overall the impact of co-workers on own fertility is of the same magnitude as the effect of being one year older in the age span 20 to 30. “Same-type” co‑workers are particularly influential, although social status and own previous childbearing experiences modify the influence of peers in distinct ways. Peers’ fertility decisions matter most when the uncertainty about job-related costs of childbearing is low. The results provide insights to the sharp fluctuations in fertility rates observed in many countries, and give an indication of how social interactions affect important career related decisions.

     

  • 8.
    Hensvik, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Le Barbanchon, Thomas
    Bocconi Univ, Milan, Italy..
    Rathelot, Roland
    Univ Warwick, Warwick, England..
    Job search during the COVID-19 crisis2021In: Journal of Public Economics, ISSN 0047-2727, E-ISSN 1879-2316, Vol. 194, article id 104349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper measures the job-search responses to the COVID-19 pandemic using real-time data on vacancy postings and job ad views on Sweden's largest online job board. First, new vacancy postings drop by 40%, similar to the US. Second, job seekers respond by searching less intensively, to the extent that effective labour market tightness increases during the first three months after the COVID outbreak. Third, they redirect their search towards less severely hit occupations, beyond what changes in vacancies would predict. Overall, these job-search responses have the potential to amplify the labour demand shock.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Hensvik, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Labor Studies (UCLS). CESifo, Sweden.
    Müller, Dagmar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Labor Studies (UCLS). Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN), Sweden; IZA, Sweden.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Labor Studies (UCLS). IZA, Sweden.
    Connecting the Young: High School Graduates' Matching to First Jobs in Booms and Great Recessions2023In: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297, Vol. 133, no 652, p. 1466-1509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using Swedish economy-wide data, we examine the relationship between business-cycle conditions and the use of social contacts in the process where young workers are matched to their first real jobs. We measure social contacts acquired during paid work during high school, and we rely on interacted class-establishment fixed-effect models to isolate the effects of interest. One-third of post-graduation matches are formed at establishments where youths worked during their studies. Graduates are much more likely to match with sites to which adult co-workers from these jobs have relocated. The importance of these job-finding channels is strongly counter-cyclical for young labour market entrants.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Hensvik, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU).
    Müller, Dagmar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU).
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Fiscal Studies.
    Connecting the Young: High School Graduates' Matching to First Jobs in Booms and Great Recessions, IFAU Working paper 2017:2 [Elektronisk resurs]2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Using Swedish economy-wide data spanning across two deep recessions, we examine the relationship between labor market conditions and the role of social contacts in matching labor market entrants to employing firms. We use class-plant fixed-effects models to isolate the role of social contacts from paid work during high-school. One third of post-graduation matches are formed at establishments where youths worked during their studies. Furthermore, graduates are much more likely to match with sites to which adult coworkers from these jobs have relocated. These patterns are strikingly counter-cyclical. Contacts are much more important for job matching in deep recessions than in good times, suggesting that informal contacts and social networks are crucial determinants of matching patterns in bad times.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Hensvik, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU). UCLS, Uppsala, Sweden;CESifo, Munich, Germany.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. UCLS, Uppsala, Sweden;IZA, Bonn, Germany.
    Social Networks, Employee Selection, and Labor Market Outcomes2016In: Journal of Labor Economics, ISSN 0734-306X, E-ISSN 1537-5307, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 825-867Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We provide a direct empirical test of Montgomery's 1991 notion that firms hire workers through social ties of productive employees as these workers know others with high unobserved productivity. We focus on coworker networks and show that firms recruit workers with better military draft test scores but shorter schooling when hiring previous colleagues of current employees, suggesting that firms use these networks to attract workers with better qualities in hard-to-observe dimensions. Incumbent workers' abilities predict the incidence, abilities, and wages of linked entrants. These results suggest that firms rely on the ability density of the studied networks when setting entry wages.

  • 12.
    Hensvik, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU).
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Fiscal Studies.
    The skill-specific impact of past and projected occupational decline. IFAU Working Paper 2019:28 [Elektronisk resurs]2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Using very detailed register data on cognitive abilities and productive personality traits for nearly all Swedish males at age 18, we show that employment in the recent past has shifted towards skill-intensive occupations. Employment growth is monotonically skill biased in relation to this set of general-purpose transferable skills, despite the well-known U-shaped (”polarizing”) relationship to occupational wage ranks. The patterns coexist because growing low-wage occupations tend to employ workers who are comparably skilled in these dimensions, whereas workers in declining mid-wage occupations instead have less of these general non-manual skills than suggested by their wages. Employment has primarily increased in occupations where workers have larger-than-average endowments of verbal and technical abilities and social maturity. Projections of future occupational decline and automation risks are even more skill-biased, but show similar associations to most of our specifc skill-measures. The most pronounced difference is that occupations relying on tolerance to stress are projected to decline in the coming decades.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Hensvik, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU).
    Rosenqvist, Olof
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU).
    Keeping the Production Line Running: Internal Substitution and Employee Absence2019In: The Journal of human resources, ISSN 0022-166X, E-ISSN 1548-8004, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 200-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We postulate that the production losses from absence depend on firms' ability to internally substitute for absent workers, incentivizing firms to keep absence low in jobs with few substitutes. Using Swedish employer-employee data we show that absence is substantially lower in such positions conditional on establishment and occupation fixed effects. The result is driven by employee adjustments of absence to substitutability, and sorting of low (high) absence workers into (out of) positions with few substitutes. These findings highlight that internal substitution insures firms against production disruptions and that absence costs are important aspects of firms' hiring and separation decisions.

  • 14.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Fiscal Studies.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Hensvik, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU).
    Åtgärder för en inkluderande arbetsmarknad2017 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Fiscal Studies.
    Müller, Dagmar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU).
    Hensvik, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU).
    Kontakterna och konjunkturen – jobb under skoltiden och inträdet på arbetsmarknaden2017In: Ekonomisk Debatt, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 44-52Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Kontakter via tillfälliga anställningar under gymnasietiden är mycket viktiga för var yrkeselever hittar sina första jobb. Benägenheten att få en varaktig anställning efter examen hos en tidigare arbetsgivare är 40 procentenheter högre jämfört med klasskamraterna. Sannolikheten att börja arbeta på en arbetsplats där en kollega från det tidigare sommar/extrajobbet arbetar, men där ungdomarna själva saknar erfarenhet, är också högre. I båda fallen är sambandet särskilt starkt i lågkonjunktur. Resultaten antyder att företag föredrar att anställa ungdomar som de har kännedom om och att denna information är särskilt viktig när det finns många arbetssökande i förhållande till antalet jobb.

  • 16.
    Åslund, Olof
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Hensvik, Lena
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU).
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Seeking Similarity: How Immigrants and Natives Manage in the Labor Market2014In: Journal of Labor Economics, ISSN 0734-306X, E-ISSN 1537-5307, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 405-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate how the interplay between manager and worker origin affects hiring patterns, job separations, and wages. Numerous specifications utilizing a longitudinal matched employer-employee database including 70,000 establishments consistently show that managers are substantially more likely to hire workers of their own origin. Workers who share an origin with their managers earn higher wages and have lower separation rates than dissimilar workers, but this pattern is driven by differences in unobserved worker characteristics. Our findings indicate that the sorting patterns are more likely to be explained by profit-maximizing concerns than by preference-based discrimination.

1 - 16 of 16
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf