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  • 1.
    Brandtzæg, Siv Gøril
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Goring, PaulNorwegian University of Science and Technology.Watson, ChristineUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Travelling Chronicles: News and Newspapers from the Early Modern Period to the Eighteenth Century2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Travelling Chronicles presents fourteen episodes in the history of news, written by some of the leading scholars in the rapidly developing fields of news and newspaper studies. Ranging across eastern and western Europe and beyond, the chapters look back to the early modern period and into the eighteenth century to consider how the news of the past was gathered and spread, how news outlets gained respect and influence, how news functioned as a business, and also how the historiography of news can be conducted with the resources available to scholars today. Travelling Chronicles offers a timely analysis of early news, at a moment when historical newspaper archives are being widely digitalised and as the truth value of news in our own time undergoes intense scrutiny. 

  • 2.
    Maier, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Watson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Interkulturellt utbyte mellan Västeuropa och Moskvastaten: Frågor om modernisering och periodisering2015In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 81, no 2 (supplement 1), p. 80-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "Cross-Cultural Exchange in Early Modern Europe: Translations ofWest-European Newspapers into Russian (c. 1600-1725)" is a joint project between historians and philologists from Sweden, Russia and the USA. The project revolves around handwritten news translations, known as "Vesti-Kuranty", which were made in Moscow for the tsar and the boyars. One of our aims is to contribute to the task of publishing these manuscripts; another is to study linguistic and historical aspects of the texts.

    The period when these translations were made is often characterized as a time of changes in Russian history, which.leads to the question of periodization. The labels applied to European history, such as Medieval, Early Modern and Modern, cannot unreservedly be applied to Russian circumstances, and various approaches have been suggested. One central question is whether the reign of Peter I is to be considered a major divide. He is often seen as the great modernizer and westernizer, although it could perhaps be questioned whether these two concepts are synonymous.

    The eighteenth century is often regarded as a time of reforms and standardization efforts in Russian language history as well. In this field, as elsewhere in Russian society, there was a desire to change things in Peter I's time, but the changes were not implemented until the late eighteenth century.

  • 3.
    Watson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    A Letter from the King of Poland to His Queen: News about the Siege on Vienna in 16832014In: Early Modern Print Culture in Central Europe: Proceedings of the Young Scholars Section of the Wrocław Seminars September 2013 / [ed] Stefan Kiedroń, Anna-Maria Rimm, in co-operation with Patrycja Poniatowska, Wrocław: Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Wrocławskiego , 2014, p. 163-177Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the early days of printing, pamphlets were a common way of spreading information and influencing public opinion. One widely spread pamphlet in the late 17th century contained a letter from the Polish king Jan III Sobieski to his wife, relating the end of the siege on Vienna in 1683. This article examines three Polish versions of the text, four German translations, a previously unknown Latin translation, printed in a Cologne newspaper, and an English translation, made from Latin and printed as a pamphlet. Besides establishing the relationships between the various versions, I also comment on certain aspects of translation technique. Some versions show evidence of having been translated from manuscript originals rather than printed pamphlets. In other cases, the text has been shortened or expanded, sometimes adding details from other sources or from the translators’ background knowledge. The many versions of the text testify to its importance and show the complexity of early modern information networks.

  • 4.
    Watson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Den ryska översättningen av Maciej Stryjkowskis Kronika Polska: en del av den ryska kröniketraditionen?2010In: Slovo : Journal of Slavic Languages and Literatures, ISSN 0348-744X, E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 51, p. 83-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Russian translation of Maciej Stryjkowski’s Kronika Polska: a part of the Russian chronicle tradition?

    This is a study of selected chapters from the late 17th-century Russian translation of Maciej Stryjkowski’s Kronika Polska, Litewska, Żmódska i wszystkiej Rusi from 1582. The author used old Russian chronicles as sources for the chapters about Kievan Rus’, and in this paper, the translated text is compared to original Russian chronicles to determine if there are linguistic as well as thematic similarities between them. One syntactic construction and three lexical formulae, found in the translation, are compared with the Polish original, on the one hand, and with different Russian chronicles, on the other. A certain degree of influence from the chronicles can indeed be found.

  • 5.
    Watson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Maciej Stryjkowskis polska krönika i rysk 1600-talsöversättning2015In: Kungl. Humanistiska Vetenskaps-Samfundet i Uppsala. Årsbok. Annales Societatis Litterarum Humaniorium Regiae Upsaliensis, Vol. Årsbok 2013, p. 139-146Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Watson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    News from Uppsala2014In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 55, p. 215-217Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Watson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    News from Uppsala2013In: Slovo : Journal of Slavic Languages and Literatures, ISSN 0348-744X, E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 54, p. 181-183Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Watson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Paulina Lewin: Ukrainian Drama and Theater in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, Toronto: Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies Press, 2008.2011In: Slavic and East European Journal, ISSN 0037-6752, E-ISSN 2325-7687, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 318-319Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Watson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Polonisms in the Russian Translation of Maciej Stryjkowski's Kronika polska, litewska, żmódzka i wszystkiej Rusi2012In: История перевода: Межкультурные подходы к изучению: Материалы международного симпозиума, Москва, 15-17 сентября 2011 г. / [ed] Natalya Reinhold, Moscow, 2012, p. 213-224Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Watson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    The Treatment of Graphic Variation in Slavic and Latin Editorial Philology2014In: Studia Neophilologica, ISSN 0039-3274, E-ISSN 1651-2308, Vol. 86, no supp. 1, p. 187-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares some aspects of editorial principles in Latin and Slavic (Cyrillic) philology. The emphasis is on matters of graphic variation and orthography. In Latin philology, the main determining factor when choosing editorial principles is whether the text is classical or medieval. Slavic tradition, on the other hand, takes into consideration not only the age of the manuscript but also the intended readership of the edition: editions aimed at linguists follow other principles than those aimed at e.g. scholars of literature or history. Two aspects that are rarely discussed in connection with Latin texts, but that are important in Slavic editorial tradition, are the choice of font and the question of which letters or letter variants are to be rendered in editions. The different principles are illustrated, and some possible reasons for the differences between the Latin and the Slavic traditions are suggested.

  • 11.
    Watson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Tradition and Translation: Maciej Stryjkowski's Polish Chronicle in Seventeenth-Century Russian Manuscripts2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The object of this study is a translation from Polish to Russian of the Polish historian Maciej Stryjkowski’s Kronika Polska, Litewska, Żmódzka i wszystkiej Rusi, made at the Diplomatic Chancellery in Moscow in 1673–79. The original of the chronicle, which relates the origin and early history of the Slavs, was published in 1582. This Russian translation, as well as the other East Slavic translations that are also discussed here, is preserved only in manuscripts, and only small excerpts have previously been published.

    In the thesis, the twelve extant manuscripts of the 1673–79 translation are described and divided into three groups based on variant readings. It also includes an edition of three chapters of the translation, based on a manuscript kept in Uppsala University Library.

    There was no standardized written language in 17th-century Russia. Instead, there were several co-existing norms, and the choice depended on the text genre. This study shows that the language of the edited chapters contains both originally Church Slavonic and East Slavic linguistic features, distributed in a way that is typical of the so-called hybrid register. Furthermore, some features vary greatly between manuscripts and between scribes within the manuscripts, which shows that the hybrid register allowed a certain degree of variation.

    The translation was probably the joint work of several translators. Some minor changes were made in the text during the translation work, syntactic structures not found in the Polish original were occasionally used to emphasize the bookish character of the text, and measurements, names etc. were adapted to Russian norms. Nevertheless, influence from the Polish original can sometimes be noticed on the lexical and syntactic levels. All in all, this thesis is a comprehensive study of the language of the translated chronicle, which is a representative 17th-century text.

  • 12.
    Watson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Свидетельство одной рукописи XVII-го века о возможных лексических полонизмах2012In: И.И. Срезневский и русское историческое языкознание: К 200-летию со дня рождения И.И. Срезневского: Сборник статей Международной научной конференции, 26–28 сентября 2012 г. / [ed] И.М. Шеина, О.В. Никитин, Rjazan', 2012, p. 132-140Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13. Šamin, Stepan
    et al.
    Watson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Вымышленный «Указ турецкого султана»: европейская традиция и русский перевод 1697 г.2014In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 55, p. 169-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the centuries of conflict between the Ottoman Empire and various European states, polemical manuscripts, pamphlets and books on Turkish topics were common in Europe. Some texts reappeared at intervals, adapted to different circumstances. A certain category consisted of texts that were allegedly written by the Ottoman sultan himself. This paper deals with one such text, which proclaims to be an instruction from the sultan to his subjects on ceremonies and processions to be performed in order to please Allah. Variations of this text appeared in 1686–87, 1697–98 and 1716–17, in manuscripts and printed pamphlets in different languages. It was translated into Russian twice: in 1697 and 1716. The 1697 translation was only recently discovered among documents from Peter I’s Grand Embassy. This paper examines the textual relationships between the versions that appeared in different decades and their historical contexts, and contains an edition of the previously unpublished 1697 Russian translation.

1 - 13 of 13
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