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  • 1.
    Altmäe, Signe
    et al.
    Dept of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Fridén, Barbro
    Dept of Women´s and Children´s Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stavreus-Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Variation in Hyaluronan-Binding Protein 2 (HABP2) Promoter Region is Associated With Unexplained Female Infertility2011In: Reproductive Sciences, ISSN 1933-7191, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 485-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We set up to analyze polymorphisms in hyaluronan-binding protein 2 (HABP2) gene in healthy fertile women (n = 158) and in women with unexplained infertility (n = 116) and to investigate the potential role of HABP2 in receptive endometrium. Minor rs1157916 A and the major rs2240879 A alleles together with AA genotypes were significantly less frequent in infertile women than in controls. Immunohistochemistry analysis of endometrial HABP2 expression at the time of implantation identified significantly lower HABP2 protein level in infertile women in stroma and vessels than in fertile women. Migration assay analysis of cultured trophoblast and endothelial cells toward HABP2 protein referred to the function of HABP2 in endometrial endothelial cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that polymorphisms in the regulatory region of HABP2 gene could influence gene expression levels in the receptive endometrium and could thereby be one reason for infertility complications in women with unexplained infertility. Additionally, HABP2 protein involvement in endometrial angiogenesis is proposed.

  • 2.
    Altmäe, Signe
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salumets, Andres
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Bjuresten, Kerstin
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Wånggren, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Landgren, Britt-Marie
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hovatta, Outi
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stavreus-Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Tissue Factor and Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitors TFPI and TFPI2 in Human Secretory Endometrium - Possible Link to Female Infertility2011In: Reproductive Sciences, ISSN 1933-7191, E-ISSN 1933-7205, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 666-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate tissue factor (TF) and its inhibitors TFPI and TFPI2 in secretory endometrium of fertile women and in women with unexplained infertility in relation to endometrial receptivity. In addition, common variation in the regulatory area of TF and TFPI genes was studied. Immunostaining of TF and TFPI, together with the appearance of pinopodes, revealed similar expression pattern in fertile endometrium throughout the secretory phase, being highest at the time of implantation. When compared protein expression levels at the time of implantation, infertile women demonstrated significantly higher TFPI expression in luminal epithelium. Furthermore, polymorphism TF -603 A/G was associated with the endometrial protein level in infertile women, being highest in women with GG genotype, and variation TFPI -287 T/C was associated with unexplained infertility, where infertile women presented more frequently T allele than fertile women. Contrary to TF and TFPI, TFPI2 showed different mRNA and protein expression patterns in fertile endometrium, and no differences between fertile and infertile women were detected. We conclude that the TF pathway is involved in normal endometrial maturation, where TF and TFPI seem to have important roles at the time of embryo implantation. Higher TFPI expression level during the time of embryo implantation and TFPI -287 T allele could be risk factors for unexplained infertility. No distinct involvement of TFPI2 in the regulation of endometrial receptivity and unexplained infertility was found.

  • 3.
    Arnadottir, Ragnheidur
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Hudecova, Miriam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Stavreus-Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Kunovac-Kallak, Theodora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Poromaa, Inger Sundstrom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Steroid hormone receptor expression, proliferative activity and microvessel density in the endometrium of women with polycystic ovary syndrome2012In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 91, p. 64-64Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Axfors, Cathrine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Bränn, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Henriksson, Hanna E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Hellgren, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Reproductive Biology in Uppsala (CRU).
    Fransson, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research. Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lager, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Reproductive Biology in Uppsala (CRU).
    Iliadis, Stavros I
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Sylvén, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Papadopoulos, Fotios C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Cohort profile: the Biology, Affect, Stress, Imaging and Cognition (BASIC) study on perinatal depression in a population-based Swedish cohort2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 10, article id e031514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: With the population-based, prospective Biology, Affect, Stress, Imaging and Cognition (BASIC) cohort, we aim to investigate the biopsychosocial aetiological processes involved in perinatal depression (PND) and to pinpoint its predictors in order to improve early detection.

    PARTICIPANTS: From September 2009 to November 2018, the BASIC study at Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden, has enrolled 5492 women, in 6478 pregnancies, of which 46.3% first-time pregnancies and with an average age of 31.5 years. After inclusion around gestational week 16-18, participants are followed-up with data collection points around gestational week 32, at childbirth, as well as three times postpartum: after 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year. At the last follow-up, 70.8% still remain in the cohort.

    FINDINGS TO DATE: In addition to internet-based surveys with self-report instruments, participants contribute with biological samples, for example, blood samples (maternal and from umbilical cord), biopsies (umbilical cord and placenta) and microbiota samples. A nested case-control subsample also takes part in cognitive and emotional tests, heart rate variability tests and bioimpedance tests. Subprojects have identified various correlates of PND of psychological and obstetric origin in addition to factors of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and immune system.

    FUTURE PLANS: In parallel with the completion of data collection (final follow-up November 2019), BASIC study data are currently analysed in multiple subprojects. Since 2012, we are conducting an ongoing follow-up study on the participants and their children up to 6 years of age (U-BIRTH). Researchers interested in collaboration may contact Professor Alkistis Skalkidou (corresponding author) with their request to be considered by the BASIC study steering committee.

  • 5.
    Baumgart, J
    et al.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nilsson, K
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stavreus Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Kushnir, M M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. ARUP Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Department of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, USA.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Androgen levels during adjuvant endocrine therapy in postmenopausal breast cancer patients2014In: Climacteric, ISSN 1369-7137, E-ISSN 1473-0804, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 48-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To investigate plasma steroid hormone levels in postmenopausal breast cancer patients with and without adjuvant endocrine therapy and in healthy postmenopausal women.

    Methods

    Steroid hormone levels in postmenopausal breast cancer patients treated with aromatase inhibitors (n = 32) were compared with breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen (n = 34), breast cancer patients without adjuvant endocrine therapy (n = 15), and healthy postmenopausal women (n = 56). Pregnenolone, 17-hydroxypregnenolone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, 11-deoxycortisol, cortisol, cortisone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), androstenedione, total testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, estrone and estradiol were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Sex hormone binding globulin was measured by solid-phase chemiluminescent immunometric assays, and the free androgen index was calculated.

    Results

    Aromatase inhibitor users did not differ in dihydrotestosterone, total testosterone, androstenedione, DHEA, or free androgen index levels from healthy controls or untreated breast cancer patients. The highest total testosterone levels were found in tamoxifen-treated women, who had significantly higher plasma concentrations than both women treated with aromatase inhibitors and breast cancer patients without adjuvant treatment. Concentrations of cortisol and cortisone were significantly greater in aromatase inhibitor users as well as tamoxifen users, in comparison with healthy controls and untreated breast cancer patients. Aromatase inhibitor users had lower estrone and estradiol plasma concentrations than all other groups.

    Conclusion

    Adjuvant treatment with aromatase inhibitors or tamoxifen was associated with increased cortisol and cortisone plasma concentrations as well as decreased estradiol concentrations. Androgen levels were elevated in tamoxifen-treated women but not in aromatase inhibitor users.

  • 6.
    Baumgart, Juliane
    et al.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro.
    Stavreus-Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Sexual dysfunction in women on adjuvant endocrine therapy after breast cancer2013In: Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause, ISSN 1072-3714, E-ISSN 1530-0374, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 162-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The goal of this study was to investigate sexual function in postmenopausal breast cancer patients treated with aromatase inhibitors.

    METHODS:

    A population-based, cross-sectional study was conducted among postmenopausal breast cancer patients on adjuvant endocrine treatment and age-matched controls with and without estrogen treatment. Sexual function was assessed with a standardized questionnaire.

    RESULTS:

    In all, 42.4% of aromatase inhibitor-treated breast cancer patients were dissatisfied with their sex life in general, and 50.0% reported low sexual interest; this was significantly more common than in tamoxifen-treated patients and controls (P < 0.05). Aromatase inhibitor-treated patients reported insufficient lubrication in 73.9% and dyspareunia in 56.5% of cases, which were significantly more common than in controls, irrespective of hormonal use (P < 0.05). Tamoxifen-treated patients reported significantly more dyspareunia (31.3%; P < 0.05) but resembled controls in all other concerns.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Our findings suggest that sexual dysfunction in aromatase inhibitor-treated women is a greatly underestimated problem.

  • 7.
    Baumgart, Juliane
    et al.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Stavreus-Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Kask, Kristiina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Villman, Kenneth
    Department of Oncology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindman, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Kallak, Theodora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Urogenital disorders in women with adjuvant endocrine therapy after early breast cancer2011In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0002-9378, E-ISSN 1097-6868, Vol. 204, no 1, p. 26.e1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of urogenital symptoms and vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal breast cancer patients on adjuvant endocrine therapy. STUDY DESIGN: A population-based, cross-sectional study on postmenopausal breast cancer patients on adjuvant endocrine treatment and age-matched control subjects. Vaginal atrophy was assessed by gynecologic examination and atrophy-related symptoms by validated questionnaires. RESULTS: In all, 57.6% of aromatase inhibitor-treated and 32.4% of tamoxifen-treated breast cancer patients rated at least 1 vaginal atrophy symptom as moderate/severe, which was significantly more common than in control subjects (P < .01). Aromatase inhibitor-treated patients more often had moderate or severe vaginal atrophy (P < .05), a more atrophic cytohormonal evaluation, and significantly higher vaginal pH (P < .05) than all control subjects, irrespective of hormonal use. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that the frequency of vaginal atrophy symptoms, particularly in aromatase inhibitor-treated women, might have been underestimated in previous clinical trials.

  • 8.
    Bourlev, Vladimir
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology. Minist Healthcare Russian Federat, Natl Med Res Ctr Obstet Gynecol & Perinatol, Moscow, Russia.
    Moberg, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology.
    Ilyasova, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology. Minist Healthcare Russian Federat, Natl Med Res Ctr Obstet Gynecol & Perinatol, Moscow, Russia.
    Davey, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology.
    Vasoactive intestinal peptide is upregulated in women with endometriosis and chronic pelvic pain2018In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 80, no 3, article id e12857Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem: Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) causes compromised the quality of life in women with endometriosis and is often attributed to local inflammation and ingrowth of nerve fibers. In this pilot study, we aimed to investigate whether the inflammation‐related vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and interleukin (IL)‐6 were increased in affected patients.

    Method of study: Endometrial and endometriotic tissue biopsy specimens, and serum and peritoneal fluid (PF) samples, were obtained from 85 endometriosis patients and 53 controls. VIP and IL‐6 analysis and measurement of microvessel density in tissue were performed using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, RT‐qPCR, and ELISA.

    Results: Compared with controls, VIP transcript and protein levels were increased in endometrium from endometriosis patients and further elevated in patients with CPP. In addition, microvessel density, a measurement of angiogenic activity, was increased in the endometrium and in endometriosis lesions in the same subset of patients. Serum and PF levels of VIP and IL‐6 were higher in women with endometriosis and CPP compared with endometriosis patients who reported no chronic pain.

    Conclusion: Vasoactive intestinal peptide is upregulated in endometriosis patients reporting chronic pain. Increased microvessel density in tissue and peritoneal fluid concentrations of IL‐6 indicate an elevated inflammation in the pelvic microenvironment of these patients.

  • 9.
    Edvinsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Hellgren, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Reproductive Biology in Uppsala (CRU).
    Åkerud, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute.
    Fornes, Romina
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute.
    Spigset, Olav
    Department of Clinical Pharmacology, St. Olav University Hospital.
    Lager, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Olivier, Jocelien
    Neurobiology, unit Behavioral Neuroscience, Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences, University of Groningen, the Netherlands.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    The effect of antenatal depression and antidepressant treatment on placental tissue: a protein-validated gene expression studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Edvinsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Hellgren, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Åkerud, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Fornes, Romina
    Spigset, Olav
    Lager, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Olivier, Jocelien
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    The effect of antenatal depression and antidepressant treatment on placental tissue: a protein-validated gene expression study.2019In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 19, article id 479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Antenatal depression affects 10-20% of pregnant women. Around 2-4% of European pregnant women use antidepressant treatment, most commonly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Poor pregnancy outcomes, such as preterm birth and low birth weight, have been described in women with antenatal depression and in pregnant women on SSRI treatment. However, the effects of antenatal depression and antidepressant treatment on the placenta are largely unknown. The aim of this work was to compare placental gene and protein expression in healthy women, women with untreated antenatal depression and women on antidepressant treatment during pregnancy.

    METHODS: Placental samples from 47 controls, 25 depressed and 45 SSRI-treated women were analysed by means of qPCR using custom-designed TaqMan low-density arrays (TLDAs) for 44 genes previously known to be involved in the pathophysiology of depression, and expressed in the placenta. Moreover, placental protein expression was determined by means of immunohistochemistry in 37 healthy controls, 13 women with untreated depression and 21 women on antidepressant treatment. Statistical comparisons between groups were performed by one-way ANOVA or the Kruskal-Wallis test.

    RESULTS: Nominally significant findings were noted for HTR1A and NPY2R, where women with untreated depression displayed higher gene expression than healthy controls (p < 0.05), whereas women on antidepressant treatment had similar expression as healthy controls. The protein expression analyses revealed higher expression of HTR1A in placentas from women on antidepressant treatment, than in placentas from healthy controls (p < 0.05).

    CONCLUSION: The differentially expressed HTR1A, both at the gene and the protein level that was revealed in this study, suggests the involvement of HTR1A in the effect of antenatal depression on biological mechanisms in the placenta. More research is needed to elucidate the role of depression and antidepressant treatment on the placenta, and, further, the effect on the fetus.

  • 11.
    Edvinsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Olivier, Jocelien
    Univ Groningen, Groningen Inst Evolutionary Life Sci, Dept Neurobiol, Unit Behav Neurosci, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Hellgren, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Åkerud, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Victorin, Elisabeth Stener
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fornes, Romina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Spigset, Olav
    St Olavs Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Pharmacol, Trondheim, Norway;Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Clin & Mol Med, Trondheim, Norway.
    Lager, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Antenatal Depression and Placental Function: A Protein Validated Gene Expression Study2018In: Placenta, ISSN 0143-4004, E-ISSN 1532-3102, Vol. 69, p. E62-E62Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Henriksson, Hanna E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetric research.
    Sylvén, Sara M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetric research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Papadopoulos, Fotios
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetric research.
    Seasonal patterns in self-reported peripartum depressive symptoms2017In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 43, p. 99-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the peripartum period, the literature on seasonality in depression is still scarce and studies present varying findings. The aims of this study were to investigate whether seasonal patterns in postpartum depressive symptoms previously identified in a Swedish study could be replicated in a larger study, as well as to assess seasonal patterns in depressive symptoms during pregnancy.

    Methods: This was a nested case-control study comprised of 4129 women who participated in the BASIC project and gave birth at Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, between February 2010 and December 2015.

    Results: Women who gave birth in October-December 2011 had an increased odds of depressive symptoms at 6 weeks postpartum, when compared with women giving birth in April-June 2011 (aOR = 2.42; 95% CI: 1.12-5.26). The same pattern was found among women with a history of depression. No other seasonal patterns for depressive symptoms during pregnancy or at 6 weeks postpartum were identified.

    Conclusions: In general, no consistent seasonal patterns were found in peripartum depressive symptoms. Whether the seasonal patterns found in some studies during certain years may be due to other factors relating to specific years and seasons, such as extreme climatic conditions or other particular events, warrants further investigation.

  • 13.
    Kallak, Theodora K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Baumgart, Juliane
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Poromaa Sundström, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Stavreus Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Treatment with aromatase inhibitor acts indirectly through the estrogen receptor pathway causing decreased junction plakoglobin mRNA expression and vaginal atrophy2013In: Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause, ISSN 1072-3714, E-ISSN 1530-0374, Vol. 20, no 12, p. 1328-1328Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Baumgart, J.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stavreus-Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Moby, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Kask, Kristiina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Norjavaara, E.
    Gothenburg Pediatric Growth Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Kushnir, M. M.
    ARUP Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, Salt Lake City, USA.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Nilsson, K.
    The School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Higher than expected estradiol levels in aromatase inhibitor-treated, postmenopausal breast cancer patients2012In: Climacteric, ISSN 1369-7137, E-ISSN 1473-0804, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 473-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Vaginal estradiol is considered contraindicated in aromatase inhibitor (AI)-treated patients because of the risk of elevated estrogen levels. This leaves limited treatment options for patients experiencing gynecological symptoms. However, in clinical practice, no precise estimation has been performed of circulating estrogens and aromatase index in postmenopausal breast cancer patients on long-lasting AI or tamoxifen treatment. 

    Methods

    Steroid hormones were measured using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and extraction radioimmunoassay (RIA). Postmenopausal AI-treated patients (n =33) were compared with tamoxifen-treated patients (n =34) and controls without vaginal treatment (n =56), with vaginal estradiol (n =25), or with estriol (n =11) treatment. 

    Results

    By use of LC-MS/MS, median (range) estradiol plasma concentrations were 16.7 (2.4-162.6), 31.0 (13.4-77.1), 27.2 (7.8-115.8) and 33.3 (20.3-340.1) pmol/l in AI-treated breast cancer patients, tamoxifen-treated breast cancer patients, postmenopausal controls and postmenopausal controls on vaginal estradiol, respectively. The AI-treated group and subgroups had significantly lower estradiol and estrone concentrations than all other groups(p <0.05). There was extensive interindividual variation in estradiol concentration within the AI-treated group, measured using both LC-MS/MS (2.3-182.0 pmol/l) and extraction RIA (2.4-162.6 pmol/l). The AI-treated group had lower aromatase index compared to all other groups (p <0.05-0.001).  

    Conclusion

    Circulating estrogen levels may have been underestimated in previous longitudinal studies of AI-treated breast cancer patients. Additional studies are required to further evaluate the role of circulating estrogens in breast cancer patients suffering from gynecological symptoms.

  • 15.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Baumgart, Juliane
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Göransson, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Stavreus-Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Aromatase inhibitors affect vaginal proliferation and steroid hormone receptors2013In: Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause, ISSN 1072-3714, E-ISSN 1530-0374, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 383-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Women with breast cancer who are treated with aromatase inhibitors often experience vaginal atrophy symptoms and sexual dysfunction. This work aims to study proliferation and the presence and distribution of steroid hormone receptors in vaginal biopsies in relation to vaginal atrophy and vaginal pH in women with breast cancer who are on adjuvant endocrine treatment and in healthy postmenopausal women.

    METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study that compares postmenopausal aromatase inhibitor-treated women with breast cancer (n = 15) with tamoxifen-treated women with breast cancer (n = 16) and age-matched postmenopausal women without treatment (n = 19) or with vaginal estrogen therapy (n = 16). Immunohistochemistry was used to study proliferation and steroid hormone receptor staining intensity. Data was correlated with estrogen and androgen levels, vaginal atrophy scores, and vaginal pH.

    RESULTS: Aromatase inhibitor-treated women had a lower grade of proliferation, weaker progesterone receptor staining, and stronger androgen receptor staining, which correlated with plasma estrone levels, vaginal atrophy scores, and vaginal pH.

    CONCLUSIONS: Women with aromatase inhibitor-treated breast cancer exhibit reduced proliferation and altered steroid hormone receptor staining intensity in the vagina, which are related to clinical signs of vaginal atrophy. Although these effects are most probably attributable to estrogen suppression, a possible local inhibition of aromatase cannot be ruled out.

  • 16.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Hellgren, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Sandelin-Francke, Lotta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Ubhayasekera, Kumari
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Axelsson, Ove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Comasco, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neuro-psycho-pharmacology.
    Campbell, Rebecca E
    Centre for Neuroendocrinology, Department of Physiology, University of Otago School of Medical Sciences, Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Maternal and female fetal testosterone levels are associated with maternal age and gestational weight gain2017In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 177, no 4, p. 379-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Prenatal androgen exposure has been suggested to play a role in polycystic ovary syndrome. Given the limited information on what maternal characteristics influence maternal testosterone levels, and the even less explored routes by which female fetus androgen exposure would occur, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of maternal age, BMI, weight gain, depressed mood and aromatase SNPs on testosterone levels in maternal serum and amniotic fluid of female fetuses.

    METHODS: Blood samples from pregnant women (n = 216) obtained in gestational weeks 35-39, and pre-labor amniotic fluid samples from female fetuses (n = 56), taken at planned Caesarean section or in conjunction with amniotomy for induction of labor, were analyzed. Maternal serum testosterone and amniotic fluid testosterone and cortisol were measured by tandem mass spectrometry.

    RESULTS: Multiparity (β = -0.28, P < 0.001), self-rated depression (β = 0.26, P < 0.001) and weight gain (β = 0.18, P < 0.05) were independent explanatory factors for the maternal total testosterone levels. Maternal age (β = -0.34, P < 0.001), weight gain (β = 0.19, P < 0.05) and amniotic fluid cortisol levels (β = 0.44, P < 0.001) were independent explanatory factors of amniotic fluid testosterone in female fetuses, explaining 64.3% of the variability in amniotic fluid testosterone.

    WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: Young maternal age and excessive maternal weight gain may increase the prenatal androgen exposure of female fetuses. Further studies are needed to explore this finding.

  • 17.
    Kunovac Kallak, Theodora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Hormonal Regulation of Vaginal Mucosa2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Vaginal atrophy symptoms such as dryness, irritation, and itching, are common after menopause. Vaginal estrogen therapy is the most effective treatment but not appropriate for all women. Women with estrogen-responsive breast cancer treated with aromatase inhibitor (AI) treatment, suppressing estrogen levels, often suffer from more pronounced vaginal atrophy symptoms. However, vaginal estrogen treatment is not recommended, leaving them without effective treatment options. The aim of this thesis was to study the effect of long-term anti-estrogen therapy on circulating estrogen levels and biochemical factors in vaginal mucosa in relation to morphological changes and clinical signs of vaginal atrophy.

    Circulating estrogen levels were analyzed by use of mass spectrometry and radioimmunoassay. Immunohistochemistry was used to study vaginal proliferation and steroid hormone receptors in vaginal mucosa. Vaginal gene expression was studied by use of microarray technology and bioinformatic tools, and validated by use of quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. An estrogenic regulation of aquaporins and a possible role in vaginal dryness was investigated in vaginal mucosa and in Vk2E6E7 cells.

    Aromatase inhibitor-treated women had higher than expected estradiol and estrone levels but still significantly lower than other postmenopausal women. Aromatase was detected in vaginal tissue, the slightly stronger staining in vaginal mucosa from AI-treated women, suggest a local inhibition of vaginal aromatase in addition to the systemic suppression. Vaginal mucosa from AI-treated women had weak progesterone receptor, and strong androgen receptor staining intensity. Low estrogen levels lead to low expression of genes involved in cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation as well as weak aquaporin 3 protein immunostaining.

    The higher than expected estrogen levels in AI-treated women suggest that estrogen levels might previously have been underestimated. Systemic estrogen suppression by treatment with AIs, and possibly also by local inhibition of vaginal aromatase, results in reduced cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, and weak aquaporin 3 protein staining. Low proliferation and poor differentiation leads to fewer and less differentiated superficial cells affecting epithelial function and possibly also causing vaginal symptoms. Aquaporin 3 with a possible role in vaginal dryness, cell proliferation, and differentiation should be further explored for the development of non-hormonal treatment options for vaginal symptoms.

  • 18.
    Kunovac Kallak, Theodora
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Baumgart, Juliane
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Dept of Obstetrics & Gynecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden..
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Staverus-Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Estrogenic regulation of aquaporin 3 in vaginal mucosaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Kunovac Kallak, Theodora
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Baumgart, Juliane
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden..
    Åkerud, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Staverus-Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Vaginal gene expression during treatment with aromatase inhibitors2015In: Clinical Breast Cancer, ISSN 1526-8209, E-ISSN 1938-0666, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 527-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vaginal gene expression in aromatase inhibitor-treated women was compared with postmenopausal control women treated with vaginal estrogen therapy. Vaginal tissue from aromatase inhibitor-treated women had low expression of genes involved in cell differentiation, proliferation, and cell adhesion, and associated with vaginal discomfort. The presence of vaginal aromatase suggests that this is the result of local and systemic aromatase inhibition. Background: Aromatase inhibitor (AI) treatment suppresses estrogen biosynthesis and causes genitourinary symptoms of menopause such as vaginal symptoms, ultimately affecting the quality of life for many postmenopausal women with breast cancer. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine vaginal gene expression in women during treatment with AIs compared with estrogen-treated women. The secondary aim was to study the presence and localization of vaginal aromatase. Patients and Methods: Vaginal biopsies were collected from postmenopausal women treated with AIs and from age-matched control women treated with vaginal estrogen therapy. Differential gene expression was studied with the Affymetrix Gene Chip Gene 1.0 ST Array (Affymetrix Inc, Santa Clara, CA) system, Ingenuity pathway analysis, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. Results: The expression of 279 genes differed between the 2 groups; AI-treated women had low expression of genes involved in cell differentiation, proliferation, and cell adhesion. Some differentially expressed genes were found to interact indirectly with the estrogen receptor alpha. In addition, aromatase protein staining was evident in the basal and the intermediate vaginal epithelium layers, and also in stromal cells with a slightly stronger staining intensity found in AI-treated women. Conclusion: In this study, we demonstrated that genes involved in cell differentiation, proliferation, and cell adhesion are differentially expressed in AI-treated women. The expression of vaginal aromatase suggests that this could be the result of local and systemic inhibition of aromatase. Our results emphasize the role of estrogen for vaginal cell differentiation and proliferation and future drug candidates should be aimed at improving cell differentiation and proliferation. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 20.
    Murto, Tiina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Kunovac Kallak, Theodora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Hoas, Annica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Altmäe, Signe
    University of Granada, Competence Centre on Reproductive Medicine and Biology, Tartu.
    Salumets, Andres
    University of Tartu, Competence Centre on Reproductive Medicine and Biology, Tartu.
    Nilsson, Torbjörn K
    Umeå University.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Wånggren, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro University, Karolinska Institutet.
    Stavreus-Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Folic acid supplementation and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR)gene variations in relation to IVF pregnancy outcome2015In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 94, no 1, p. 65-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    To study folic acid intake, folate status and pregnancy outcome afterinfertility treatment in women with different infertility diagnoses in relation tomethylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C>T, 1298A>C and 1793G>A genevariations. Also the use of folic acid supplements, folate status and the frequency ofdifferent gene variations were studied in women undergoing infertility treatment andfertile women.

    Design:

    Observational study. Setting: University hospital. Population:Women undergoing infertility treatment and healthy, fertile, non-pregnant women.

    Methods:

    A questionnaire was used to assess general background data and use ofdietary supplements. Blood samples were taken to determine plasma folate andhomocysteine levels, and for genomic DNA extraction. A meta-analysis of four studieswas performed to assess pregnancy outcome in relation to MTHFR 677 TT vs. CC, and1298 CC vs. AA polymorphisms.

    Main outcome measures:

    Folic acid supplementintake, and plasma folate, homocysteine and genomic assays.

    Results:

    Women in theinfertility group used significantly more folic acid supplements and had better folatestatus than fertile women, but pregnancy outcome after fertility treatment was notdependent on folic acid intake, folate status or MTHFR gene variations. However, ameta-analysis demonstrated that MTHFR 1298AA polymorphism was related topregnancy outcome.

    Conclusion:

    Folic acid supplementation seems to play only a minorrole in the context of pregnancy outcome after in vitro fertilisation, and other variablesin folate metabolism are of more importance. In particular, MTHFR 1298AA genevariation appears to have a positive association with the success of fertility treatment

  • 21. Parn, Triin
    et al.
    Ruiz, Raul Grau
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Ruiz, Jonatan R.
    Davey, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Hreinsson, Julius
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Wånggren, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Salumets, Andres
    Sjostrom, Michael
    Stavreus-Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Ortega, Francisco B.
    Altmae, Signe
    Physical activity, fatness, educational level and snuff consumption as determinants of semen quality: findings of the ActiART study2015In: Reproductive Biomedicine Online, ISSN 1472-6483, E-ISSN 1472-6491, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 108-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the association between physical activity and other potential determinants, objectively measured by accelerometry, was examined. Sixty-two men attending an infertility clinic participated in the study. Obese men (body mass index >= 30) and those with a waist circumference 102 cm or more had lower semen volume than the other men (P < 0.05). Higher values in sperm parameters were observed in participants who completed university studies and those who did not consume snuff, compared with the other participants (P < 0.05). Finally, men who spent an average number of 10 min-bouts of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity had significantly better semen quality than those who engaged in low or high numbers of bouts of activity (P < 0.05). No associations were found for sedentary or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity time when it was not sustained over 10 min, i.e. not in bouts. Men who have average levels of physical activity over sustained periods of 10 min are likely to have better semen quality than men who engage in low or high levels of such activity. Similarly, high levels of total and central adiposity, low educational level and snuff consumption are negatively related to semen quality.

  • 22.
    Serapio, Solveig
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Second Trimester Maternal Leptin Levels Are Associated with Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain but not Birth Weight of the Infant2019In: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, E-ISSN 1663-2826, Vol. 92, no 2, p. 106-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Obesity is increasing among the pregnant population. Leptin has an important role in the regulation of energy balance and hunger. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between maternal leptin levels with maternal obesity, gestational weight gain (GWG), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the leptin gene, and the age-adjusted birth weight of the child.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Maternal leptin levels (n = 740) and SNPs (n = 504) were analyzed in blood samples taken within the Uppsala Biobank of Pregnant women at pregnancy weeks 16-19.

    RESULTS: Maternal leptin levels differed significantly between body mass index (BMI) groups. Normal weight women had the lowest median leptin levels and levels increased with each BMI group. Leptin SNP genotype was not associated with leptin levels or BMI. There was also no association between maternal leptin levels and age-adjusted birth weight of the child except for a negative association between leptin levels and birth weight in the morbid obese group.

    DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: Maternal BMI was identified as the best positive explanatory factor for maternal leptin levels. Leptin was a strong positive explanatory factor for GWG. Birth weight of children of uncomplicated pregnancies was, however, dependent on maternal height, BMI, GWG, and parity but not leptin levels, except for in morbid obese women where a negative association between maternal leptin levels and birth weight was found. We speculate that this indicates altered placental function, not manifested in pregnancy complication. We conclude that maternal leptin levels do not affect the birth weight of the child more than BMI, GWG, and parity.

  • 23.
    Stavreus-Evers, Anneli
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ha, Chunfang
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hospital Attached to Ningxia Medical College, Ningxia, China.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Altmäe, Signe
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Landgren, Britt-Marie
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rees, Margaret C P
    Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
    Low calcitonin receptor like receptor expression in endometrial vessels from women with unexplained infertility.2011In: Gynecological Endocrinology, ISSN 0951-3590, E-ISSN 1473-0766, Vol. 27, no 9, p. 655-660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adrenomedullin (AM) and its receptor subunit, calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) are known to be important for endothelial function. The genotypes and phenotypes of AM and CLR in the endometrium were studied in relation to unexplained infertility. Endometrial biopsies from 12 fertile and 11 infertile women and blood samples from 156 fertile and 106 infertile women were collected. Protein and mRNA expression of AM and CLR was determined using immunohistochemistry and real time PCR. Allele and genotype frequencies in the AM (rs4399321 and rs7944706) and CLR genes (rs696574, rs1528233 and rs3771073) were performed using Taqman genotyping assays. Unexplained infertility was characterised by lower number of vessels stained with CLR in endometrium compared to fertile controls. There was no difference in AM expression. This could not be explained by SNP analysis in the AM or CLR genes. Imbalance in the AM/CLR system might alter endothelial function in women with unexplained infertility.

  • 24.
    Valdimarsdottir, Ragnheidur
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Valgeirsdóttir, Heiddis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Elenis, Evangelia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Axelsson, Ove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Ubhayasekera, Kumari
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Piltonen, Terhi T
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Medical Research Center, PEDEGO Research Unit Oulu, Finland.
    Pigny, Pascal
    Laboratoire de Biochimie & Hormonologie, Centre de Biologie Pathologie, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire, CHU de Lille, Lille, France;Jean-Pierre Aubert Research Center (JPArc), Laboratory of Development and Plasticity of the Neuroendocrine Brain, Inserm, UMR-S 1172 Lille, France.
    Giacobini, Paolo
    Jean-Pierre Aubert Research Center (JPArc), Laboratory of Development and Plasticity of the Neuroendocrine Brain, Inserm, UMR-S 1172 Lille, France;University of Lille, FHU 1,000 Days for Health, School of Medicine Lille, France.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Pregnancy and neonatal complications in women with polycystic ovary syndrome in relation to second-trimester anti-Müllerian hormone levels2019In: Reproductive Biomedicine Online, ISSN 1472-6483, E-ISSN 1472-6491, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 141-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RESEARCH QUESTION: An association has been found between high anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels during pregnancy and the development of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-like phenotypic traits in mouse offspring. The aim of this study was to determine whether AMH levels are associated with maternal testosterone levels, and whether high AMH concentration influences the risk of developing PCOS-related adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    DESIGN: Maternal serum AMH, testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin levels were measured in blood samples taken in early second-trimester pregnancies from women with PCOS (n = 159) and healthy controls matched for body mass index (n = 320). Possible associations with preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, preterm birth and birthweight was explored by logistic and linear regression models.

    RESULTS: Women with PCOS had higher AMH, higher total testosterone levels and higher free androgen index than controls (P < 0.001 for all three parameters). Among women with PCOS, high testosterone levels (B = 2.7; β = 0.26; P = 0.001) and low first trimester body mass index (B = -0.5; β = -0.17; P = 0.043) remained independently associated with AMH. High AMH levels were associated with decreased risk of gestational hypertension (adjusted OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.34 to 0.87), but no association was found with other adverse pregnancy outcomes or birthweight.

    CONCLUSIONS: Women with PCOS had higher AMH levels during pregnancy compared with controls, but high AMH was not associated with increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes or birthweight.

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