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  • 1.
    Ahl, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Sedin, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Seignez, Cedric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Schwan, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Kreuger, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Turning Up the Heat: Local Temperature Control During in vivo Imaging of Immune Cells2019In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 10, article id 2036Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intravital imaging is an invaluable tool for studying the expanding range of immune cell functions. Only in vivo can the complex and dynamic behavior of leukocytes and their interactions with their natural microenvironment be observed and quantified. While the capabilities of high-speed, high-resolution confocal and multiphoton microscopes are well-documented and steadily improving, other crucial hardware required for intravital imaging is often developed in-house and less commonly published in detail. In this report, we describe a low-cost, multipurpose, and tissue-stabilizing in vivo imaging platform that enables sensing and regulation of local tissue temperature. The effect of tissue temperature on local blood flow and leukocyte migration is demonstrated in muscle and skin. Two different models of vacuum windows are described in this report, however, the design of the vacuum window can easily be adapted to fit different organs and tissues.

  • 2.
    Benedict, Christian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Cedernaes, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Nilsson, Emil K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Hogenkamp, Pleunie S
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Massena, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Pettersson, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lannfelt, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Schiöth, Helgi B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Acute sleep deprivation increases serum levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 calcium binding protein B (S-100B) in healthy young men2014In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 195-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY OBJECTIVES:

    To investigate whether total sleep deprivation (TSD) affects circulating concentrations of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 calcium binding protein B (S-100B) in humans. These factors are usually found in the cytoplasm of neurons and glia cells. Increasing concentrations of these factors in blood may be therefore indicative for either neuronal damage, impaired blood brain barrier function, or both. In addition, amyloid β (Aβ) peptides 1-42 and 1-40 were measured in plasma to calculate their ratio. A reduced plasma ratio of Aβ peptides 1-42 to 1-40 is considered an indirect measure of increased deposition of Aβ 1-42 peptide in the brain.

    DESIGN:

    Subjects participated in two conditions (including either 8-h of nocturnal sleep [22:30-06:30] or TSD). Fasting blood samples were drawn before and after sleep interventions (19:30 and 07:30, respectively).

    SETTING:

    Sleep laboratory.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    15 healthy young men.

    RESULTS:

    TSD increased morning serum levels of NSE (P = 0.002) and S-100B (P = 0.02) by approximately 20%, compared with values obtained after a night of sleep. In contrast, the ratio of Aβ peptides 1-42 to 1-40 did not differ between the sleep interventions.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Future studies in which both serum and cerebrospinal fluid are sampled after sleep loss should elucidate whether the increase in serum neuron-specific enolase and S100 calcium binding protein B is primarily caused by neuronal damage, impaired blood brain barrier function, or is just a consequence of increased gene expression in non-neuronal cells, such as leukocytes.

  • 3.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Leukocytes in Angiogenesis: Learning from Transplanted Pancreatic Islets2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels, is a complex process involving several cell types and molecular signals. Excessive vascular growth is a problem in tumors, and insufficient vascularization hampers the function of transplanted insulin-producing pancreatic islets. Understanding the mechanisms behind blood vessel growth generates increased means to control angiogenesis. In this thesis a model of pancreatic islet transplantation to muscle has been used to study the involvement of leukocytes in the development of new vasculature.

    Transplantation of isolated islets of Langerhans into mouse muscle promoted revascularization of the grafts to a level comparable to native islets in the pancreas. The complete and functional vascular restoration resulted in improved blood glucose control compared to the clinical standard implantation site, the liver. This proved muscle as a transplantation site to be a clinically relevant option for the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

    The rapid islet revascularization process was found to be dependent on a distinct subset of neutrophils characterized by high expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and the enzyme matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). These cells were recruited to recently transplanted and hypoxic grafts by islet-secreted vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A). Leukocyte migration and interactions in the engraftment area were monitored using a high-speed confocal microscope followed by software tracking. New software was developed to visualize migration statistics. This tool revealed areas around the islet graft where neutrophil gathering coincided with sites of angiogenesis. Macrophages in the engraftment area positioned themselves close to the newly formed vasculature and were shown to have a stabilizing effect on the vessels. When macrophages were removed, no pericytes were recruited to the forming vasculature. The perivascular macrophages also began to express a pericyte marker when in the graft, suggesting a close relationship between these cell types or macrophage plasticity.

    In conclusion, this thesis presents muscle as a proangiogenic transplantation site for pancreatic islets for the treatment of type 1 diabetes, where the revascularization of the grafts was dependent on the recruitment and actions of specialized immune cells.

  • 4.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Intramuscular islet transplantation promotes restored islet vascularity2011In: Islets, ISSN 1938-2014, E-ISSN 1938-2022, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 69-71Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent publication, we reported that islets transplanted to mouse striated muscle became revascularized with intra-islet vessel densities comparable to native islets. Revascularization of islet grafts was completely dependent on recruited Gr-1+ leukocytes. Diabetic mice cured by transplantation of 300 islets into muscle handled glucose tolerance tests as healthy controls, whereas mice cured by intraportal islet transplantation into the liver had increased blood glucose values during the load. The translational impact of these observations were confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging of autotransplanted islets in the forearm muscle of pancreactomized patients, and higher blood perfusion of the grafts compared to adjacent muscle were found. In summary, the striated muscle is a promising site for islet transplantation which promotes full revascularization of implanted grafts. The proangiogenic role of recruited leukocytes during engraftment needs to be further characterized, and considered for immune suppression treatments.

  • 5.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Lomei, Jalal
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    O'Callaghan, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Kreuger, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Engblom, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Scientific Computing. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computational Science.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Vascular sprouts induce local attraction of proangiogenic neutrophils2017In: Journal of Leukocyte Biology, ISSN 0741-5400, E-ISSN 1938-3673, Vol. 102, p. 741-751Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    The neutrophil: one cell on many missions or many cells with different agendas?2018In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 371, no 3, p. 415-423Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The unique role of neutrophils in host defense is not only based on their abilities to kill bacteria but is also due to their abundance in circulation and their ability to quickly migrate and accumulate in great numbers at afflicted sites. The high number of circulating neutrophils is the result of regulated release of new neutrophils from bone marrow as well as from marginated pools to balance their recruitment to tissue. Marginated pools, such as the spleen and lung, have previously been attributed to passively delay neutrophil transit time due to their large capillary network, but recent reports demonstrate that they are comprised of neutrophils with specific functions. The spleen, for instance, holds neutrophil subpopulations at different anatomical locations with distinct functions important for, e.g., bacterial eradication, and the lung was recently shown to re-educate neutrophils that had trafficked from a site of sterile injury to home back to bone marrow for elimination. Further, recent reports demonstrate subpopulations of neutrophils with different actions during homeostasis, infection, tissue restitution and cancer. It is becoming increasingly clear that this cannot be due to different stages of neutrophil activation during their life span but instead points towards distinct subpopulations of neutrophils with different effector functions. Whether these cellular distinctions are due to different education or origin is, however, not yet known. Together, the accumulating information about the heterogeneous neutrophils presents important insights into their role in development of pathologies, as well as revealing novel targets in the form of certain subpopulations to treat disease.

  • 7.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    von Herrath, Matthias
    La Jolla Inst Allergy & Immunol, Type Diabet Ctr 1, La Jolla, CA 92037 USA;Novo Nordisk Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Regulatory Immune Mechanisms beyond Regulatory T Cells2019In: Trends in immunology, ISSN 1471-4906, E-ISSN 1471-4981, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 482-491Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In autoimmunity, aggressive immune responses are counteracted by suppressive rejoinders. For instance, FOXP3-expressing regulatory T cells (Tregs), have shown remarkable effects in limiting autoimmunity in preclinical models. However, early results from human Treg trials have not been as positive. Here, we highlight questions surrounding Treg transfers as putative treatments for autoimmunity. We discuss whether lack of antigenic recognition might be key to shifting cells from contributing to an aggressive autoresponse, to being part of a regulatory network. Moreover, we argue that identifying the physiological range of immunosuppression of Tregs might help potentiate their efficacy. We propose widening the view on immunoregulation by considering the participation of CD8(+) Tregs in this process, which could have major implications in autoimmunity.

  • 8.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Vågesjö, Evalina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Giraud, Antoine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Massena, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Powers, A. C.
    Opdenakker, G.
    Phillipson, M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    A distinct subset of proangiogenic CD11b(+)/Gr-1(+)/CXCR4(+)/MMP-9(hi) neutrophils are recruited by VEGF-A to transplanted hypoxic tissue2013In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0014-2972, E-ISSN 1365-2362, Vol. 43, no SI, p. 9-9Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Pettersson, Ulrika S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Massena, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Nilsson, Emil K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Acute sleep deprivation in healthy young men: Impact on population diversity and function of circulating neutrophils2014In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 41, p. 162-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lack of sleep greatly affects our immune system. The present study investigates the acute effects of total sleep deprivation on blood neutrophils, the most abundant immune cell in our circulation and the first cell type recruited to sites of infection. Thus, the population diversity and function of circulating neutrophils were compared in healthy young men following one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD) or after 8 h regular sleep. We found that neutrophil counts were elevated after nocturnal wakefulness (2.0 +/- 0.2 x 10(9)/l vs. 2.6 +/- 0.2 x 10(9)/l, sleep vs. TSD, respectively) and the population contained more immature CD16(dim)/CD62L(bright) cells (0.11 +/- 0.040 x 10(9)/l [5.5 +/- 1.1%] vs. 0.26 +/- 0.020 x 10(9)/l [9.9 +/- 1.4%]). As the rise in numbers of circulating mature CD16(bright)/CD62L(bright) neutrophils was less pronounced, the fraction of this subpopulation showed a significant decrease (1.8 +/- 0.15 x 10(9)/l [88 +/- 1.8%] vs. 2.1 +/- 0.12 x 10(9)/l [82 +/- 2.8%]). The surface expression of receptors regulating mobilization of neutrophils from bone marrow was decreased (CXCR4 and CD49d on immature neutrophils; CXCR2 on mature neutrophils). The receptor CXCR2 is also involved in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and in line with this, total neutrophils produced less ROS. In addition, following sleep loss, circulating neutrophils exhibited enhanced surface levels of CD11b, which indicates enhanced granular fusion and concomitant protein translocation to the membrane. Our findings demonstrate that sleep loss exerts significant effects on population diversity and function of circulating neutrophils in healthy men. To which extent these changes could explain as to why people with poor sleep patterns are more susceptible to infections warrants further investigation.  

  • 10.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Vandooren, Jennifer
    Liden, Majken
    Massena, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Reinert, RB
    Brissova, M
    Powers, AC
    Opdenakker, Ghislain
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    VEGF-A recruits a proangiogenic MMP-9-delivering neutrophil subset that induces angiogenesis in transplanted hypoxic tissue2012In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 120, no 23, p. 4653-4662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Recruitment and retention of leukocytes at a site of blood vessel growth are crucial for proper angiogenesis and subsequent tissue perfusion. Although critical for many aspects of regenerative medicine, the mechanisms of leukocyte recruitment to and actions at sites of angiogenesis are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the signals attracting leukocytes to avascular transplanted pancreatic islets and leukocyte actions at the engraftment site. Expression of the angiogenic stimulus VEGF-A by mouse pancreatic islets was elevated shortly after syngeneic transplantation to muscle. High levels of leukocytes, predominantly CD11b+/Gr-1+/CXCR4hi neutrophils, were observed at the site of engraftment, whereas VEGF-A–deficient islets recruited only half of the amount of leukocytes when transplanted. Acute VEGF-A exposure of muscle increased leukocyte extravasation but not the levels of SDF-1α. VEGF-A–recruited neutrophils expressed 10 times higher amounts of MMP-9 than neutrophils recruited to an inflammatory stimulus. Revascularization of islets transplanted to MMP-9–deficient mice was impaired because blood vessels initially failed to penetrate grafts, and after 2 weeks vascularity was still disturbed. This study demonstrates that VEGF-A recruits a proangiogenic circulating subset of CD11b+/Gr-1+ neutrophils that are CXCR4hi and deliver large amounts of the effector protein MMP-9, required for islet revascularization and functional integration after transplantation.

  • 11.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Waldén, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Sandberg, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Opdenakker, Ghislain
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Is Essential for Physiological Beta Cell Function and Islet Vascularization in Adult Mice2015In: American Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0002-9440, E-ISSN 1525-2191, Vol. 185, no 4, p. 1094-1103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The availability of paracrine factors in the islets of Langerhans, and the constitution of the beta cell basement membrane can both be affected by proteolytic enzymes. This study aimed to investigate the effects of the extraceaular matrix-degrading enzyme gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase-9 (Mmp-9) on islet function in mice. Islet function of Mmp9-deficient (Mmp9(-/-)) mice and their wild-type Littermates was evaluated both in vivo and in vitro. The pancreata of Mmp9(-/-) mice did not differ from wild type in islet mass or distribution. However, Mmp9(-/-) mice had an impaired response to a glucose toad in vivo, with lower serum insulin levels. The glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was reduced also in vitro in isolated Mmp9(-/-) islets. The vascular density of Mmp9(-/-) islets was lower, and the capillaries had fewer fenestrations, whereas the islet blood flow was threefold higher. These alterations could partly be explained by compensatory changes in the expression of matrix-related proteins. This in-depth investigation of the effects of the loss of MMP9(-/-) function on pancreatic islets uncovers a deteriorated beta cell function that is primarily due to a shift in the beta cell phenotype, but also due to islet vascular aberrations. This likely reflects the importance of a normal islet matrix turnover exerted by MMP-9, and concomitant release of paracrine factors sequestered on the matrix.

  • 12.
    Christoffersson, Gustav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Zang, Guangxiang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Zhuang, Zhen W.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Simons, Michael
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Welsh, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Vascular adaptation to a dysfunctional endothelium as a consequence of Shb deficiency2012In: Angiogenesis, ISSN 0969-6970, E-ISSN 1573-7209, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 469-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A regulates angiogenesis, vascular morphology and permeability by signaling through its receptor VEGFR-2. The Shb adapter protein has previously been found to relay certain VEGFR-2 dependent signals and consequently vascular physiology and structure was assessed in Shb knockout mice. X-ray computed tomography of vessels larger than 24 mm diameter (micro-CT) after contrast injection revealed an increased frequency of 48-96 µm arterioles in the hindlimb calf muscle in Shb knockout mice. Intravital microscopy of the cremaster muscle demonstrated a less regular vasculature with fewer branch points and increased vessel tortuosity, changes that led to an increased blood flow velocity. Reduced in vivo angiogenesis was observed in Shb knockout MatrigelTM plugs. Unlike the wild-type situation, VEGF-A did not provoke a dissociation of VE-cadherin from adherens junctions in Shb knockout venules. The reduced angiogenesis and altered properties of junctions had consequences for two patho-physiological responses to arterial occlusion: vascular permeability was reduced in the Shb knockout cremaster muscle after ligation of one supplying artery and heat-induced blood flow determined by Laser-Doppler measurements was decreased in the hindlimb after ligation of the femoral artery. Consequently, the Shb knockout mouse exhibited structural and functional (angiogenesis and vascular permeability) vascular abnormalities that have implications for understanding the function of VEGF-A under physiological conditions.

  • 13.
    Drott, Carl Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Olerud, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Emanuelsson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Christoffersson, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism.
    Sustained Beta-Cell Dysfunction but Normalized Islet Mass in Aged Thrombospondin-1 Deficient Mice2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 10, p. e47451-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pancreatic islet endothelial cells have in recent years been shown to support beta-cell mass and function by paracrine interactions. Recently, we identified an islets endothelial-specific glycoprotein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), that showed to be of importance for islet angiogenesis and beta-cell function in young mice. The present study aimed to investigate long-term consequences for islet morphology and beta-cell function of TSP-1 deficiency. Islet and beta-cell mass were observed increased at 10-12 weeks of age in TSP-1 deficient mice, but were normalized before 16 weeks of age when compared to wild-type controls. Islet vascularity was normal in 10-12 and 16-week-old TSP-1 deficient animals, whereas islets of one-year-old animals lacking TSP-1 were hypervascular. Beta-cell dysfunction in TSP-1 deficient animals was present at similar magnitudes between 10-12 and 52 weeks of age, as evaluated by glucose tolerance tests. The insulin secretion capacity in vivo of islets in one-year-old TSP-1 deficient animals was only similar to 15% of that in wild-type animals. Using a transplantation model, we reconstituted TSP-1 in adult TSP-deficient islets. In contrast to neonatal TSP-1 deficient islets that we previously reported to regain function after TSP-1 reconstitution, adult islets failed to recover. We conclude that TSP-1 deficiency in islets causes changing vascular and endocrine morphological alterations postnatally, but is coupled to a chronic beta-cell dysfunction. The beta-cell dysfunction induced by TSP-1 deficiency is irreversible if not substituted early in life.

  • 14.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lau, J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Quach, My
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Ullsten, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. La Jolla Inst Allergy & Immunol, La Jolla, CA USA..
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Rapid Restoration of Vascularity and Oxygenation in Mouse and Human Islets Transplanted to Omentum May Contribute to Their Superior Function Compared to Intraportally Transplanted Islets2016In: American Journal of Transplantation, ISSN 1600-6135, E-ISSN 1600-6143, Vol. 16, no 11, p. 3246-3254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transplantation of islets into the liver confers several site-specific challenges, including a delayed vascularization and prevailing hypoxia. The greater omentum has in several experimental studies been suggested as an alternative implantation site for clinical use, but there has been no direct functional comparison to the liver. In this experimental study in mice, we characterized the engraftment of mouse and human islets in the omentum and compared engraftment and functional outcome with those in the intraportal site. The vascularization and innervation of the islets transplanted into the omentum were restored within the first month by paralleled ingrowth of capillaries and nerves. The hypoxic conditions in the islets early posttransplantation were transient and restricted to the first days. Newly formed blood vessels were fully functional, and the blood perfusion and oxygenation of the islets became similar to that of endogenous islets. Furthermore, islet grafts in the omentum showed at 1 month posttransplantation functional superiority to intraportally transplanted grafts. We conclude that in contrast to the liver the omentum provides excellent engraftment conditions for transplanted islets. Future studies in humans will be of great interest to investigate the capability of this site to also harbor larger grafts without interfering with islet functionality.

  • 15.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Lau, Joey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Quach, My
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Restored Vascular Density and Blood Fow in Mouse and Human Islets Experimentally Transplanted to The Greater Omentum2013In: Transplantation, ISSN 0041-1337, E-ISSN 1534-6080, Vol. 96, no 6, p. S18-S18Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Espes, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Lau, Joey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Quach, My
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Restoration of Islet Vascularity and Oxygenation in Mouse and Human Islets Experimentally Transplanted to the Omentum: A Basis for Superior Function when Compared to Intraportally Transplanted Islets2016In: American Journal of Transplantation, ISSN 1600-6135, E-ISSN 1600-6143Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Grapensparr, Liza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Bioengineering with Endothelial Progenitor Cells Improves the Vascular Engraftment of Transplanted Human Islets2018In: Cell Transplantation, ISSN 0963-6897, E-ISSN 1555-3892, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 948-956Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pancreatic islets isolated for transplantation are disconnected from their vascular supply and need to establish a new functional network posttransplantation. Due to poor revascularization, prevailing hypoxia with correlating increased apoptosis rates in experimental studies can be observed for months posttransplantation. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are bone marrow-derived cells that promote neovascularization. The present study tested the hypothesis that EPCs, isolated from human umbilical cord blood, could be coated to human islet surfaces and be used to promote islet vascular engraftment. Control or EPC bioengineered human islets were transplanted into the renal subcapsular space of nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Four weeks posttransplantation, graft blood perfusion and oxygen tension were measured using laser Doppler flowmetry and Clark microelectrodes, respectively. Vessel functionality was also assessed by in vivo confocal imaging. The vascular density and the respective contribution of human and recipient endothelium were assessed immunohistochemically by staining for human and mouse CD31. Islet grafts with EPCs had substantially higher blood perfusion and oxygen tension than control transplants. Furthermore, analysis of the vascular network of the grafts revealed that grafts containing EPC bioengineered islets had a superior vascular density compared with control grafts, with functional chimeric blood vessels. We conclude that a simple procedure of surface coating with EPCs provides a possibility to improve the vascular engraftment of transplanted human islets. Established protocols are also easily applicable for intraportal islet transplantation in order to obtain a novel directed cellular therapy at the site of implantation in the liver.

  • 18.
    Lomei, Jalal
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Pro-angiogenic neutrophils are potentiated by hypoxiaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Hypoxia, shortage of oxygen in tissues, is closely related to injury, inflammation and tissue damage. One way to overcome this issue is increasing angiogenesis, growing new blood vessels from preexist-ing ones, at the site of hypoxia. Considerable number of cells, factors and signaling pathways are involved in regulating angiogenesis.

    Neutrophils have been detected at the site of hypoxia and it has been shown that a subpopulation of these cells, pro-angiogenic neutrophils, PANs is actively involved in increasing angiogenesis. In this study, the effect of hypoxia on PANs was studied by co-culturing PANs with growing endothelial cells using in vitro angiogenesis assay and hypoxic and normoxic incubator. Moreover, life spans of neutrophils and PANs, as well as expression of PANs specific markers have been investigated under hypoxia and normoxia.  

    Our data shows that the ability of PANs, to induce angiogenesis was increased under hypoxic conditions. Moreover larger number of PANs survived while co-culturing with active growing endothelial cells. We thereby conclude that the hypoxic microenvironment primes pro-angiogenic neutrophils increase their pro-angiogenic ability.

  • 19.
    Lomei, Jalal
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Seignez, Cedric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Giraud, Antoine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Herrera Hidalgo, Carmen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Shibuya, Masabumi
    Jobu University, Gunma, Japan..
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Characterization of pro-angiogenic neutrophilsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The roles of neutrophils in immune defense have been investigated for decades. These cells are well equipped to protect the body in several ways against invaders such as microorganism. Recently it has been reported that neutrophils also contribute to angiogenesis; they are recruited to the site of hypoxia where they can promote blood vessel formation, as demonstrated both in vivo and in vitro. We found that these neutrophils with proangiogenic actions form a specific subset of the circulating neutrophils. The proangiogenic neutrophils (PANs) exclusively express the adhesion molecule CD49d and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1), and contribute to angiogenesis by delivering MMP-9 (matrix metalloproteinase 9). In this study, PANs were compared to classic neutrophils in respect to physical features as well as functionality. We found that PANs in humans were smaller and in human and mice PANs had higher granularity compared to the classic neutrophils. Moreover, they were more efficient phagocytes than classic neutrophils. In the aortic ring model of angiogenesis, vessel neo-formation was increased by the presence of pro-angiogenic neutrophils. Finally, by using neutrophils from mice with impaired VEGFR1 receptor (Flt-1 tk-/- mice) we demonstrated the role of VEGFR1 in neutrophil recruitment towards angiogenic endothelium. Together these results show clear differences between the pro-angiogenic subpopulation and the classic neutrophils, which further solidify the conclusion of a specific neutrophil subpopulation.

  • 20.
    Massena, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Gustafsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Kutschera, Simone
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Welsh, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    The mechanisms of VEGF-A-induced recruitment of pro-angiogenic neutrophils2013In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0014-2972, E-ISSN 1365-2362, Vol. 43, no SI, p. 27-27Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Massena, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Seignez, Cédric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Gustafsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Binet, François
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Herrera Hidalgo, Carmen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Giraud, Antoine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Lomei, Jalal
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Weström, Simone
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology.
    Shibuya, Masabumi
    Jobu Univ, Gakubunkan Inst Physiol & Med, Gunma, Japan.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Gerwins, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Welsh, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Kreuger, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Identification and characterization of VEGF-A-responsive neutrophils expressing CD49d, VEGFR1, and CXCR4 in mice and humans2015In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 126, no 17, p. 2016-2026Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is upregulated during hypoxia and is the major regulator of angiogenesis. VEGF-A expression has also been found to recruit myeloid cells to ischemic tissues where they contribute to angiogenesis. This study investigates the mechanisms underlying neutrophil recruitment to VEGF-A as well as the characteristics of these neutrophils. A previously undefined circulating subset of neutrophils shown to be CD49d(+)VEGFR1(high)CXCR4(high) was identified in mice and humans. By using chimeric mice with impaired VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1) or VEGFR2 signaling (Flt-1tk(-/-), tsad(-/-)), we found that parallel activation of VEGFR1 on neutrophils and VEGFR2 on endothelial cells was required for VEGF-A-induced recruitment of circulating neutrophils to tissue. Intravital microscopy of mouse microcirculation revealed that neutrophil recruitment by VEGF-A versus by the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2 [CXCL2]) involved the same steps of the recruitment cascade but that an additional neutrophil integrin (eg, VLA-4 [CD49d/CD29]) played a crucial role in neutrophil crawling and emigration to VEGF-A. Isolated CD49d(+) neutrophils featured increased chemokinesis but not chemotaxis compared with CD49d(-) neutrophils in the presence of VEGF-A. Finally, by targeting the integrin α4 subunit (CD49d) in a transplantation-based angiogenesis model that used avascular pancreatic islets transplanted to striated muscle, we demonstrated that inhibiting the recruitment of circulating proangiogenic neutrophils to hypoxic tissue impairs vessel neoformation. Thus, angiogenesis can be modulated by targeting cell-surface receptors specifically involved in VEGF-A-dependent recruitment of proangiogenic neutrophils without compromising recruitment of the neutrophil population involved in the immune response to pathogens.

  • 22.
    Parv, Kristel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Herrera Hidalgo, Carmen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Seignez, Cedric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Elucidating the dynamics and role of peri-vascular macrophages2018In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0014-2972, E-ISSN 1365-2362, Vol. 48, no S1, p. 82-83Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Petersson, Joel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Carlström, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Schreiber, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Jägare, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Roos, Stefan
    Jansson, Emmelie Å.
    Persson, A. Erik G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Lundberg, Jon O.
    Holm, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Gastroprotective and blood pressure lowering effects of dietary nitrate are abolished by an antiseptic mouthwash2009In: Free Radical Biology & Medicine, ISSN 0891-5849, E-ISSN 1873-4596, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 1068-1075Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, it has been suggested that the supposedly inert nitrite anion is reduced in vivo to form bioactive nitric oxide with physiological and therapeutic implications in the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems. Intake of nitrate-rich food such as vegetables results in increased levels of circulating nitrite in a process suggested to involve nitrate-reducing bacteria in the oral cavity. Here we investigated the importance of the oral microflora and dietary nitrate in regulation of gastric mucosal defense and blood pressure. Rats were treated twice daily with a commercial antiseptic mouthwash while they were given nitrate-supplemented drinking water. The mouthwash greatly reduced the number of nitrate-reducing oral bacteria and as a consequence, nitrate-induced increases in gastric NO and circulating nitrite levels were markedly reduced. With the mouthwash the observed nitrate-induced increase in gastric mucus thickness was attenuated and the gastroprotective effect against an ulcerogenic compound was lost. Furthermore, the decrease in systemic blood pressure seen during nitrate supplementation was now absent. These results suggest that oral symbiotic bacteria modulate gastrointestinal and cardiovascular function via bioactivation of salivary nitrate. Excessive use of antiseptic mouthwashes may attenuate the bioactivity of dietary nitrate.

  • 24.
    Pettersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Santos, S. M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Jansson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Henriksnäs, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Altered leukocyte recruitment during inflammation in type 1 and type 2 diabetes models2010In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 53, no Suppl. 1, p. S174-S175Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Pettersson, Ulrika Sofia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Massena, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Ahl, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Jansson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Henriksnäs, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Increased Recruitment but Impaired Function of Leukocytes during Inflammation in Mouse Models of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 7, p. e22480-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Patients suffering from diabetes show defective bacterial clearance. This study investigates the effects of elevated plasma glucose levels during diabetes on leukocyte recruitment and function in established models of inflammation.

    Methodology/Principal Findings

    Diabetes was induced in C57Bl/6 mice by intravenous alloxan (causing severe hyperglycemia), or by high fat diet (moderate hyperglycemia). Leukocyte recruitment was studied in anaesthetized mice using intravital microscopy of exposed cremaster muscles, where numbers of rolling, adherent and emigrated leukocytes were quantified before and during exposure to the inflammatory chemokine MIP-2 (0.5 nM). During basal conditions, prior to addition of chemokine, the adherent and emigrated leukocytes were increased in both alloxan- (62±18% and 85±21%, respectively) and high fat diet-induced (77±25% and 86±17%, respectively) diabetes compared to control mice. MIP-2 induced leukocyte emigration in all groups, albeit significantly more cells emigrated in alloxan-treated mice (15.3±1.0) compared to control (8.0±1.1) mice. Bacterial clearance was followed for 10 days after subcutaneous injection of bioluminescent S. aureus using non-invasive IVIS imaging, and the inflammatory response was assessed by Myeloperoxidase-ELISA and confocal imaging. The phagocytic ability of leukocytes was assessed using LPS-coated fluorescent beads and flow cytometry. Despite efficient leukocyte recruitment, alloxan-treated mice demonstrated an impaired ability to clear bacterial infection, which we found correlated to a 50% decreased phagocytic ability of leukocytes in diabetic mice.

    Conclusions/Significance

    These results indicate that reduced ability to clear bacterial infections observed during experimentally induced diabetes is not due to reduced leukocyte recruitment since sustained hyperglycemia results in increased levels of adherent and emigrated leukocytes in mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Instead, decreased phagocytic ability observed for leukocytes isolated from diabetic mice might account for the impaired bacterial clearance.

  • 26.
    von Herrath, Matthias
    et al.
    Novo Nordisk Res Ctr Seattle Inc, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Pagni, Philippe P.
    Novo Nordisk Res Ctr Seattle Inc, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Grove, Kevin
    Novo Nordisk Res Ctr Seattle Inc, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Tang-Christensen, Mads
    Novo Nordisk AS, Malov, Denmark.
    Karlsen, Allan Ertmann
    Novo Nordisk AS, Malov, Denmark.
    Petersen, Jacob Sten
    Novo Nordisk AS, Malov, Denmark.
    Case Reports of Pre-clinical Replication Studies in Metabolism and Diabetes2019In: Cell Metabolism, ISSN 1550-4131, E-ISSN 1932-7420, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 795-802Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent articles have highlighted the lack of reproducibility of data from scientific publications. Here we would argue that a better way to describe and also tackle this matter is to use the term "lack of robustness," since it points toward potential solutions. Presenting several case reports, we highlight examples with common underlying issues from Novo Nordisk's experience: animal model variability, reagent quality, and inter-lao variability. We discuss means to prevent these issues and argue for increased collaborative work and transparent manuscript revision procedures. Collectively, we believe these measures will help promote a more rapid and efficient self-corrective process in diabetes drug target research.

  • 27.
    Vågesjö, Evalina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Holm, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Strategic recruitment of proangiogenic leukocytes to the ischemic hindlimb increases functional tissue perfusion2013In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0014-2972, E-ISSN 1365-2362, Vol. 43, no SI, p. 27-27Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Holm, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Strategical steering of the immune system: induction of leukocyte vascular chaperoning increases functional blood flow responses in ischemic muscle2014In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 28, no 1, article id 670.6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Waldén, Tomas B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Immunological shielding by induced recruitment of regulatory T lymphocytes delays rejection of islets transplanted to muscle2015In: Cell Transplantation, ISSN 0963-6897, E-ISSN 1555-3892, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 263-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The only clinically available curative treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus is replacement of the pancreatic islets by allogeneic transplantation, which requires immunosuppressive therapies. Regimens used today are associated with serious adverse effects and impaired islet engraftment and function. The aim of the current study was to induce local immune privilege by accumulating immune-suppressive regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) at the site of intramuscular islet transplantation to reduce the need of immunosuppressive therapy during engraftment. Islets were co-transplanted with a plasmid encoding the chemokine CCL22 into muscle of MHC-mismatched mice, after which pCCL22 expression and leukocyte recruitment were studied in parallel with graft functionality. Myocyte pCCL22 expression and secretion resulted in local accumulation of Tregs. When islets were co-transplanted with pCCL22, significantly fewer effector T lymphocytes wereobserved in close proximity to the islets, leading to delayed graft rejection.As a result, diabeticrecipients co-transplanted with islets and pCCL22 intramuscularly became normoglycemic for ten consecutive days, while grafts co-transplanted with control plasmid muscle were rejected immediately leaving recipients severely hyperglycemic. Here, we propose a simple method to initially shield MHC-mismatched islets by the recruitment of endogenous Tregs during engraftment in order to improve early islet survival. Using this approach, the very high doses of systemic immunosuppression used initially following transplantation can thereby be avoided.

  • 30.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Waldén, Tomas B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Immunological Shielding by Induced Recruitment of Regulatory T-Lymphocytes Delays Rejection of Islets Transplanted in Muscle2015In: Cell Transplantation, ISSN 0963-6897, E-ISSN 1555-3892, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 263-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The only clinically available curative treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus is replacement of the pancreatic islets by allogeneic transplantation, which requires immunosuppressive therapies. Regimens used today are associated with serious adverse effects and impaired islet engraftment and function. The aim of the current study was to induce local immune privilege by accumulating immune-suppressive regulatory T-lymphocytes (Tregs) at the site of intramuscular islet transplantation to reduce the need of irnmunosuppressive therapy during engraftment. Islets were cotransplanted with a plasmid encoding the chemokine CCL22 into the muscle of MHC-mismatched mice, after which pCCL22 expression and leukocyte recruitment were studied in parallel with graft functionality. Myocyte pCCL22 expression and secretion resulted in local accumulation of Tregs. When islets were cotransplanted with pCCL22, significantly fewer effector T-lymphocytes were observed in close proximity to the islets, leading to delayed graft rejection. As a result, diabetic recipients cotransplanted with islets and pCCL22 intramuscularly became normoglycemic for 10 consecutive days, while grafts cotransplanted with control plasmid were rejected immediately, leaving recipients severely hyperglycemic. Here we propose a simple method to initially shield MHC-mismatched islets by the recruitment of endogenous Tregs during engraftment in order to improve early islet survival. Using this approach, the very high doses of systemic immunosuppression used initially following transplantation can thereby be avoided.

  • 31.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Seignez, Cedric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Herrera Hidalgo, Carmen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Giraud, Antoine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Rundqvist, H.
    Karolinska Inst, Cell & Mol Biol Dept, Solna, Sweden.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Holm, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Johnson, R.
    Karolinska Inst, Cell & Mol Biol Dept, Solna, Sweden; Univ Cambridge, Physiol Dev & Neurosci Dept, Cambridge, England.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Perivascular macrophages regulate blood flow following tissue damage2018In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0014-2972, E-ISSN 1365-2362, Vol. 48, no S1, p. 44-45Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Seignez, Cedric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Eriksson, Ulf J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Holm, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Uncovering a new role for immune cells: macrophages assist in regulation of blood flow in ischemic muscleManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Zang, Guangxiang
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Christoffersson, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Tian, Geng
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Harun-Or-Rashid, Mohammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Developmental Neuroscience.
    Vågesjö, Evelina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Phillipson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Barg, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Tengholm, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Welsh, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Aberrant association between vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and VE-cadherin in response to vascular endothelial growth factor-a in Shb-deficient lung endothelial cells2013In: Cellular Signalling, ISSN 0898-6568, E-ISSN 1873-3913, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 85-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vascular permeability is a hallmark response to the main angiogenic factor VEGF-A and we have previously described a reduction of this response in Shb knockout mice. To characterize the molecular mechanisms responsible for this effect, endothelial cells were isolated from lungs and analyzed in vitro. Shb deficient endothelial cells exhibited less migration in a scratch wound-healing assay both under basal conditions and after vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) stimulation, suggesting a functional impairment of these cells in vitro. Staining for VE-cadherin and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) showed co-localization in adherens junctions and in intracellular sites such as the perinuclear region in wild-type and Shb knockout cells. VEGF-A decreased the VE-cadherin/VEGFR-2 co-localization in membrane structures resembling adherens junctions in wild-type cells whereas no such response was noted in the Shb knockout cells. VE-cadherin/VEGFR-2 co-localization was also recorded using spinning-disc confocal microscopy and VEGF-A caused a reduced association in the wild-type cells whereas the opposite pattern was observed in the Shb knockout cells. The latter expressed slightly more of cell surface VEGFR-2. VEGF-A stimulated extracellular-signal regulated kinase, Akt and Rac1 activities in the wild-type cells whereas no such responses were noted in the knockout cells. We conclude that aberrant signaling characteristics with respect to ERK, Akt and Rac1 are likely explanations for the observed altered pattern of VE-cadherin/VEGFR-2 association. The latter is important for understanding the reduced in vivo vascular permeability response in Shb knockout mice, a phenomenon that has patho-physiological relevance.

1 - 33 of 33
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