Change search
Refine search result
1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Brorsson, A. L.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Olinder, A. Lindholm
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Soder Sjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Viklund, G.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    An intervention with a person-centered program, guided self-determination-young, in groups of adolescents starting on insulin pump: a randomized controlled trial2016In: Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, ISSN 1520-9156, E-ISSN 1557-8593, Vol. 18, no Suppl. 1, p. A104-A104Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2. Brorsson, Anna Lena
    et al.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Viklund, Gunnel
    Olinder, Anna Lindholm
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    A multicentre randomized controlled trial of an empowerment-inspired intervention for adolescents starting continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion: a study protocol2013In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 13, p. 212-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) treatment among children with type 1 diabetes is increasing in Sweden. However, studies evaluating glycaemic control in children using CSII show inconsistent results. The distribution of responsibility for diabetes self-management between children and parents is often unclear and needs clarification. There is much published support for continued parental involvement and shared diabetes management during adolescence. Guided Self-Determination (GSD) is an empowerment-based, person-centred, reflection and problem solving method intended to guide the patient to become self-sufficient and develop life skills for managing difficulties in diabetes self-management. This method has been adapted for adolescents and parents as Guided Self-Determination-Young (GSD-Y). This study aims to evaluate the effect of an intervention with GSD-Y in groups of adolescents starting on insulin pumps and their parents on diabetes-related family conflicts, perceived health and quality of life (QoL), and metabolic control. Here, we describe the protocol and plans for study enrolment.

    Methods/design:

    This study is designed as a randomized, controlled, prospective, multicentre study. Eighty patients between 12-18 years of age who are planning to start CSII will be included. All adolescents and their parents will receive standard insulin pump training. The education intervention will be conducted when CSII is to be started and at four appointments in the first 4 months after starting CSII. The primary outcome is haemoglobin A1c levels. Secondary outcomes are perceived health and QoL, frequency of blood glucose self-monitoring and bolus doses, and usage of carbohydrate counting. The following instruments will be used: Disabkids, 'Check your health', the Diabetes Family Conflict Scale and the Swedish Diabetes Empowerment Scale. Outcomes will be evaluated within and between groups by comparing data at baseline, and at 6 and 12 months after starting treatment.

    Discussion:

    In this study, we will assess the effect of starting an CSII together with the model of GSD to determine whether this approach leads to retention of improved glycaemic control, QoL, responsibility distribution and reduced diabetes-related conflicts in the family.

  • 3.
    Engström, Maria Svedbo
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Gothenburg; Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism. Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet Univ, Stockholm; Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Katarina
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Gothenburg; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Gothenburg.
    Borg, Sixten
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Hlth Econ Unit, Lund.
    Palaszewski, Bo
    Dept Data Management & Anal, Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg.
    Gudbjornsdottir, Soffia
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Gothenburg; Register Ctr Västra Götaland, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    A disease-specific questionnaire for measuring patient-reported outcomes and experiences in the Swedish National Diabetes Register: Development and evaluation of content validity, face validity, and test-retest reliability2018In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 101, no 1, p. 139-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe the development and evaluation of the content and face validity and test-retest reliability of a disease-specific questionnaire that measures patient-reported outcomes and experiences for the Swedish National Diabetes Register for adult patients who have type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

    Methods: In this methodological study, a questionnaire was developed over four phases using an iterative process. Expert reviews and cognitive interviews were conducted to evaluate content and face validity, and a postal survey was administered to evaluate test-retest reliability.

    Results: The expert reviews and cognitive interviews found the disease-specific questionnaire to be understandable, with relevant content and value for diabetes care. An item-level content validity index ranged from 0.6-1.0 and a scale content validity/average ranged from 0.7-1.0. The fourth version, with 33 items, two main parts and seven dimensions, was answered by 972 adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes (response rate 61%). Weighted Kappa values ranged from 0.31-0.78 for type 1 diabetes and 0.27-0.74 for type 2 diabetes.

    Conclusions: This study describes the initial development of a disease-specific questionnaire in conjunction with the NDR. Content and face validity were confirmed and test-retest reliability was satisfactory. Practice implications: With the development of this questionnaire, the NDR becomes a clinical tool that contributes to further understanding the perspectives of adult individuals with diabetes.

  • 4.
    Engström, Maria Svedbo
    et al.
    Gothenburg Univ, Inst Med, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism. Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet Univ, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia
    Gothenburg Univ, Inst Med, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Register Ctr Vastra Gotaland, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    What is important for you?: A qualitative interview study of living with diabetes and experiences of diabetes care to establish a basis for a tailored Patient-Reported Outcome Measure for the Swedish National Diabetes Register2016In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 3, article id e010249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives There is a growing emphasis on the perspective of individuals living with diabetes and the need for a more person-centred diabetes care. At present, the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR) lacks patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) based on the perspective of the patient. As a basis for a new PROM, the aim of this study was to describe important aspects in life for adult individuals with diabetes. Design Semistructured qualitative interviews analysed using content analysis. Setting Hospital-based outpatient clinics and primary healthcare clinics in Sweden. Participants 29 adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) (n=15) and type 2 DM (n=14). Inclusion criteria: Swedish adults (18years) living with type 1 DM or type 2 DM (duration 5years) able to describe their situation in Swedish. Purposive sampling generated heterogeneous characteristics. Results To live a good life with diabetes is demanding for the individual, but experienced barriers can be eased by support from others in the personal sphere, and by professional support from diabetes care. Diabetes care was a crucial resource to nurture the individual's ability and knowledge to manage diabetes, and to facilitate life with diabetes by supplying support, guidance, medical treatment and technical devices tailored to individual needs. The analysis resulted in the overarching theme To live a good life with diabetes' constituting the two main categories How I feel and how things are going with my diabetes' and Support from diabetes care in managing diabetes' including five different categories. Conclusions Common aspects were identified including the experience of living with diabetes and support from diabetes care. These will be used to establish a basis for a tailored PROM for the NDR.

  • 5.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    et al.
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Dept Hlth Care Sci, POB 11189, SE-10061 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Palliat Res Ctr, Dept Hlth Care Sci, Stockholm, Sweden;Dalen Hosp, Capio Palliat Care, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Winnberg, Elisabeth
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Dept Hlth Care Sci, POB 11189, SE-10061 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism. Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Sci, Falun, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Fac Hlth Care & Nursing, Gjovik, Norway.
    Goliath, Ida
    Ersta Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Med Management Ctr, Learning Informat Management & Eth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Momeni, Pardis
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Dept Hlth Care Sci, POB 11189, SE-10061 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kneck, Åsa
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Dept Hlth Care Sci, POB 11189, SE-10061 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Skott, Maria
    Stockholm Cty Hosp, Northern Stockholm Psychiat, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Dept Res, Kalmar, Sweden;Linnaeus Univ, Fac Hlth & Life Sci, Kalmar, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Adaptation and evaluation of the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire for use in the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care2018In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 74, no 8, p. 1839-1850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To adapt the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire (FIAQ) for use in the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care and to evaluate its validity and reliability.

    Background: Involvement in the professional care has proven to be important for family members. However, they have described feelings of alienation in relation to how they experienced the professionals' approach. To explore this issue, a broad instrument that can be used in different care contexts is needed.

    Design: A psychometric evaluation study, with a cross-sectional design.

    Method: The content validity of the FIAQ was evaluated during 2014 by cognitive interviews with 15 family members to adults in different care contexts. Psychometric evaluation was then conducted (2015-2016). A sample of 325 family members participated, 103 of whom in a test-retest evaluation. Both parametric and non-parametric methods were used.

    Results: The content validity revealed that the questionnaire was generally understood and considered to be relevant and retrievable by family members in the contexts of the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care. Furthermore, the FIAQ (Revised), demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties in terms of data quality, homogeneity, unidimensionality (factor structure), internal consistency and test-retest reliability.

    Conclusion: The study provides evidence that the FIAQ (Revised) is reliable and valid for use in further research and in quality assessment in the contexts of the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care.

  • 6.
    Gardulf, Ann
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Immunol,Unit Clin Nursing Res & Clin Res, SE-14186 Stockholm, Sweden.;Japanese Red Cross Inst Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan..
    Nilsson, Jan
    Japanese Red Cross Inst Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan.;Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Fac Hlth Sci & Technol, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Florin, Jan
    Dalama Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism. Dalama Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    Lepp, Margret
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Hlth & Care Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Ostfold Univ Coll, Holden, Norway..
    Lindholm, Christina
    Sophiahemmet Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Fac Hlth Sci & Technol, Karlstad, Sweden.;Hedmark Univ Coll, Hedmark, Norway..
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Fac Hlth Sci & Technol, Karlstad, Sweden.;Cty Council Varmland, Primary Care Res Unit, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Fac Hlth Sci & Technol, Karlstad, Sweden.;Hedmark Univ Coll, Hedmark, Norway..
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Gavle, Sweden..
    Johansson, Eva
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Dept Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden..
    The Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale: Self-reported competence among nursing students on the point of graduation2016In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 36, p. 165-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: International organisations, e.g. WHO, stress the importance of competent registered nurses (RN) for the safety and quality of healthcare systems. Low competence among RNs has been shown to increase the morbidity and mortality of inpatients. Objectives: To investigate self-reported competence among nursing students on the point of graduation (NSPGs), using the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale, and to relate the findings to background factors. Methods and participants; The NPC Scale consists of 88 items within eight competence areas (CAs) and two overarching themes. Questions about socio-economic background and perceived overall quality of the degree programme were added. In total, 1086 NSPGs (mean age, 28.1[20-56] years, 87.3% women) from 11 universities/university colleges participated. Results: NSPGs reported significantly higher scores for Theme I "Patient-Related Nursing" than for Theme II "Organisation and Development of Nursing Care". Younger NSPGs (20-27 years) reported significantly higher scores for the CAs "Medical and Technical Care" and "Documentation and Information Technology". Female NSPGs scored significantly higher for "Value-Based Nursing". Those who had taken the nursing care programme at upper secondary school before the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programme scored significantly higher on "Nursing Care", "Medical and Technical Care", "Teaching/Learning and Support", "Legislation in Nursing and Safety Planning" and on Theme I. Working extra paid hours in healthcare alongside the BSN programme contributed to significantly higher self-reported scores for four CAs and both themes. Clinical courses within the BSN programme contributed to perceived competence to a significantly higher degree than theoretical courses (932% vs 875% of NSPGs). Summary and conclusion: Mean scores reported by NSPGs were highest for the four CAs connected with patient-related nursing and lowest for CAs relating to organisation and development of nursing care. We conclude that the NPC Scale can be used to identify and measure aspects of self-reported competence among NSPGs.

  • 7. Garmo, A.
    et al.
    Hornsten, A.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Diabetes Nursing Research.
    "The pump was a saviour for me.": 'Patients' experiences of insulin pump therapy2013In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 717-723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim The present study formed part of a larger study examining the potential long-term effects of glycaemic control and treatment satisfaction in people with Type1 diabetes mellitus who changed from multiple daily insulin injections to insulin pump therapy. Individuals (n=46) who made the transition between May 1999 and February 2004 participated. The aim of the study was to describe experiences of the impact of insulin pump therapy in adults with Type1 diabetes mellitus after >5years' use of an insulin pump. Method During spring 2009, 16 of the individuals were interviewed through a narrative approach on the effects of insulin pump therapy on daily life. The interviews were analysed using content analysis. Results The overarching theme revealed that insulin pump therapy was experienced as both a shackle and a lifeline. Six sub-themes emerged: subjected vs. empowered; dependent vs. autonomous; vulnerable vs. strengthened; routinized vs. flexible; burdened vs. relieved; and stigmatized vs. normalized. Conclusions Users of insulin pump therapy have different views about and experience of having used the technical equipment over years. Both positive and negative views emerged. However, it is difficult to identify any general trends that cover all views and can predict which individuals will be able to manage pump therapy in the best way. Even so, the sub-themes and theme that emerged could be used by physicians and diabetes specialist nurses when counselling and planning educational programmes aimed at supporting self-management among people with insulin pump treatment.

  • 8.
    Granström, Therese
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism. Dalarna Univ, Falun, Sweden..
    Forsman, Henrietta
    Dalarna Univ, Falun, Sweden..
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Granstam, Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Univ Cty Council Vastmanland, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Patient reported outcomes and visual function among patients with diabetes related macular edema2016In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 25, p. 130-131Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Granström, Therese
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    Forsman, Henrietta
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Jani, Siba
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Raghib, Aseel Modher
    Dalarna Cty Hosp, Dept Ophthalmol, Falun, Sweden..
    Granstam, Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Department of Ophthalmology, Västmanland County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Visual functioning and health-related quality of life in diabetic patients about to undergo anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment for sight-threatening macular edema2015In: Journal of diabetes and its complications, ISSN 1056-8727, E-ISSN 1873-460X, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 1183-1190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To examine patient-reported outcome (PRO) in a selected group of Swedish patients about to receive anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment for diabetic macular edema (DME). Material and methods: In this cross-sectional study, 59 patients with diabetes mellitus, who regularly visited the outpatient eye-clinics, were included. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected and the patients completed PRO measures before starting anti-VEGF treatment. PRO measures assessed eye-specific outcomes (NEI-VFQ-25) and generic health-related quality of life (SF-36). Results: The participants consisted of 30 men and 29 women (mean age, 68.5 years); 54 (92%) patients had type 2 diabetes; 5 (9%) patients had moderate or severe visual impairment; 28 (47%) were classified as having mild visual impairment. Some of the patients reported overall problems in their daily lives, such as with social relationships, as well as problems with impaired sight as a result of reduced distance vision. Conclusions: Further studies are needed to investigate PRO factors related to low perceived general health in this patient population. It is important to increase our understanding of such underlying mechanisms to promote improvements in the quality of patient care.

  • 10.
    Granström, Therese
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism. Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.
    Forsman, Henrietta
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    Olinder, Anna Lindholm
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism. Söder Sjukhuset, Sachs Children & Youth Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.;Söder Sjukhuset, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Res & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gkretsis, Dimitrios
    Dalarna Cty Hosp, Dept Ophthalmol, Falun, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Jan W.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Granstam, Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Vastmanland Cty Hosp, Dept Ophthalmol, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Patient-reported outcomes and visual acuity after 12 months of anti-VEGF-treatment for sight-threatening diabetic macular edema in a real world setting2016In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 121, p. 157-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To examine objective visual acuity measured with ETDRS, retinal thickness (OCT), patient reported outcome and describe levels of glycated hemoglobin and its association with the effects on visual acuity in patients treated with anti-VEGF for visual impairment due to diabetic macular edema (DME) during 12 months in a real world setting.

    Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 58 patients (29 females and 29 males; mean age, 68 years) with type 1 and type 2 diabetes diagnosed with DME were included. Medical data and two questionnaires were collected; an eye-specific (NEI VFQ-25) and a generic health-related quality of life questionnaire (SF-36) were used.

    Results: The total patient group had significantly improved visual acuity and reduced retinal thickness at 4 months and remains at 12 months follow up. Thirty patients had significantly improved visual acuity, and 27 patients had no improved visual acuity at 12 months. The patients with improved visual acuity had significantly improved scores for NEI VFQ-25 subscales including general health, general vision, near activities, distance activities, and composite score, but no significant changes in scores were found in the group without improvements in visual acuity.

    Conclusions: Our study revealed that anti-VEGF treatment improved visual acuity and central retinal thickness as well as patient-reported outcome in real world 12 months after treatment start.

  • 11. Graue, M
    et al.
    Iversen, M
    Sigurdardottir, AK
    Zoffman, V
    Smide, Bibbi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Leksell, Janet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Diabetes nursing research in the Nordic countries2013In: European Diabetes Nursing, ISSN 1551-7853, E-ISSN 1551-7861, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 46-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New knowledge from research studies is important as a foundation for high-quality care in practice as well as crucial to further stimulate research in the future.

    The aims of this study were to determine the total number of peer-reviewed articles on diabetes research reported by nurses in four Nordic countries (Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden) from 1979–2009, and to identify the time periods in which they had been published, different study designs and the number of publications related to nurse authors.

    We performed an electronic search for potentially relevant scientific articles between 1 January 1979 and 31 December 2009 using the MEDLINE, Medline in process, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Cochrane databases. The studies focused either on the diabetes population or on diabetes health care professionals.

    We included 164 scientific articles; 132 resulting from electronic search and 32 from manual search. They were published in 63 different scientific journals, with 52 (32%) published in nursing journals and typically by authors with university degrees. Only one in four authors had published five or more articles. The majority of the studies originated from a single country, with 23 (14%) including co-authors from another country.

    It was concluded that research in diabetes reported by nurses has increased considerably after the year 2000. Further action is needed to build stronger national groups of researchers. International collaborative research networks facilitate funding opportunities and contribute to further development of professional research competence.

  • 12.
    Husdal, Rebecka
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Karlsson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Eliasson, Björn
    Jansson, Stefan
    Jerden, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.
    Stålhammar, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Steen, Lars
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Svensson, Ann-Marie
    Thors Adolfsson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Resources and organisation in primary health care are associated with HbA1c level: A nationwide study of 230958 people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.2018In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 23-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To examine the association between personnel resources and organisational features of primary health care centres (PHCCs) and individual HbA1c level in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

    METHODS: People with T2DM attending 846 PHCCs (n=230958) were included in this cross-sectional study based on PHCC-level data from a questionnaire sent to PHCCs in 2013 and individual-level clinical data from 2013 for people with T2DM reported in the Swedish National Diabetes Register, linked to individual-level data on socio-economic status and comorbidities. Data were analysed using a generalized estimating equations linear regression models.

    RESULTS: After adjusting for PHCC- and individual-level confounding factors, personnel resources associated with lower individual HbA1c level were mean credits of diabetes-specific education among registered nurses (RNs) (-0.02mmol/mol for each additional credit; P<0.001) and length of regular visits to RNs (-0.19mmol/mol for each additional 15min; P<0.001). Organisational features associated with HbA1c level were having a diabetes team (-0.18mmol/mol; P<0.01) and providing group education (-0.20mmol/mol; P<0.01).

    CONCLUSIONS: In this large sample, PHCC personnel resources and organisational features were associated with lower HbA1c level in people with T2DM.

  • 13.
    Husdal, Rebecka
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Eliasson, Björn
    Jansson, Stefan
    Jerdén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Stålhammar, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Steen, Lars
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Adolfsson, Eva Thors
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Resource allocation and organisational features in Swedish primary diabetes care: Changes from 2006 to 20132017In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 20-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To compare the resource allocation and organisational features in Swedish primary diabetes care for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) between 2006 and 2013.

    METHODS: Using a repeated cross-sectional study design, questionnaires covering personnel resources and organisational features for patients with T2DM in 2006 and 2013 were sent to all Swedish primary health care centres (PHCCs) during the following year. In total, 684 (74.3%) PHCCs responded in 2006 and 880 (76.4%) in 2013.

    RESULTS: Compared with 2006, the median list size had decreased in 2013 (p<0.001), whereas the median number of listed patients with T2DM had increased (p<0.001). Time devoted to patients with T2DM and diabetes-specific education levels for registered nurses (RNs) had increased, and more PHCCs had in-house psychologists (all p<0.001). The use of follow-up systems and medical check-ups had increased (all p<0.05). Individual counselling was more often based on patients' needs, while arrangement of group-based education remained low. Patient participation in setting treatment targets mainly remained low.

    CONCLUSIONS: Even though the diabetes-specific educational level among RNs increased, the arrangement of group-based education and patient participation in setting treatment targets remained low. These results are of concern and should be prioritised as key features in the care of patients with T2DM.

  • 14.
    Husdal, Rebecka
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism. Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Sci, Falun, Sweden..
    Thors Adolfsson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Hosp Vastmanland, Dept Primary Hlth Care, Reg Vastmanland, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Organisation of diabetes care is associated with systolic blood pressure level: a cross-sectional study of 230,958 people with type 2 diabetes2017In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 60, no S1, p. S298-S299, article id 657Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15. Johansson, Karin
    et al.
    Oesterberg, Sofia Almerud
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Berglund, Mia
    Manoeuvring between anxiety and control: Patients' experience of learning to live with diabetes: A lifeworld phenomenological study2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, article id 27147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that people with diabetes want their lives to proceed as normally as possible, but some patients experience difficulty in reaching their desired goals with treatment. The learning process is a complex phenomenon interwoven into every facet of life. Patients and healthcare providers often have different perspectives in care which gives different expectations on what the patients need to learn and cope with. The aim of this study, therefore, is to describe the experience of learning to live with diabetes. Interviews were conducted with 12 patients afflicted with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The interviews were then analysed with reference to the reflective lifeworld research approach. The analysis shows that when the afflicted realize that their bodies undergo changes and that blood sugar levels are not always balanced as earlier in life, they can adjust to their new conditions early. The afflicted must take responsibility for balancing their blood sugar levels and incorporating the illness into their lives. Achieving such goals necessitates knowledge. The search for knowledge and sensitivity to changes are constant requirements for people with diabetes. Learning is driven by the tension caused by the need for and dependence on safe blood sugar control, the fear of losing such control, and the fear of future complications. The most important responsibilities for these patients are aspiring to understand their bodies as lived bodies, ensuring safety and security, and acquiring the knowledge essential to making conscious choices.

  • 16.
    Julin, Bettina
    et al.
    Ivbar Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Willers, Carl
    Ivbar Inst, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism. Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Peter
    Karolinska Inst, Med Management Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden; Swedish Inst Hlth Econ, Lund, Sweden.
    Muth, Karin Looström
    Alingsås Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Alingsås, Sweden.
    Svensson, Ann-Marie
    Ctr Registers, Natl Diabet Register, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lilja, Mikael
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Unit Res Educ & Dev Östersund, Umeå, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    Association between sociodemographic determinants and health outcomes in individuals with type 2 diabetes in Sweden2018In: Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews, ISSN 1520-7552, E-ISSN 1520-7560, Vol. 34, no 4, article id e2984Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Concurrent multifactorial treatment is needed to reduce consequent risks of diabetes, yet most studies investigating the relationship between sociodemographic factors and health outcomes have focused on only one risk factor at a time. Swedish health care is mainly tax‐funded, thus providing an environment that should facilitate equal health outcomes in patients, independent of background, socioeconomic status, or health profile. This study aimed at investigating the association between several sociodemographic factors and diabetes‐related health outcomes represented by HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, low‐density lipoprotein cholesterol, predicted 5‐year risk of cardiovascular disease, and statin use.

    Methods: This large retrospective registry study was based on patient‐level data from individuals diagnosed with type 2 diabetes during 2010 to 2011 (n = 416,228) in any of 7 Swedish regions (~65% of the Swedish population). Health equity in diabetes care analysed through multivariate regression analyses on intermediary outcomes (HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, and low‐density lipoprotein), predicted 5‐year risk of cardiovascular disease and process (i.e., statin use) after 1‐year follow‐up, adjusting for several sociodemographic factors.

    Results: We observed differences in intermediary risk measures, predicted 5‐year risk of cardiovascular disease, and process dependent on place of birth, sex, age, education, and social setting, despite Sweden's articulated vision of equal health care.

    Conclusions: Diabetes patients' health was associated with sociodemographic prerequisites. Furthermore, in addition to demographics (age and sex) and disease history, educational level, marital status, and region of birth are important factors to consider when benchmarking health outcomes, e.g., average HbA1c level, and evaluating the level of health equity between organizational units or between different administrative regions.

  • 17.
    Leksell, Janeth
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Funnell, Martha
    Sandberg, Gun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Smide, Bibbi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Viklund, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Psychometric properties of the Swedish Diabetes Empowerment Scale2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 247-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was conducted to determine the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Diabetes Empowerment Scale (Swe-DES-23). Research design and methods:  A convenience sample of 195 patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes completed the Swe-DES-23 questionnaire. To establish discriminant validity, Swe-DES subscales were compared with the Semantic Differential in Diabetes scale (SDD) and a general health scale (EVGFP). Construct validity was tested using factor analyses. To determine unidimensionality of the subscales, inter-item correlations were calculated. Internal consistency was tested by the use of the Crohnbach-α coefficient. Results:  The factor analysis resulted in four factors (empowerment subscales) with eigenvalues >1.0, explaining 60% of the variance. The four empowerment subscales: goal achievement, self-awareness, stress management and readiness to change showed Crohnbach-α values ranging from 0.68 to 0.91. Patients with good self-reported health and low burden of diabetes scored significantly higher on almost all empowerment subscales. Only weak correlations were found between metabolic control and the empowerment subscales. Conclusions:  The SWE-DES-23 scale had acceptable validity and reliability and, thus, could be a suitable tool in evaluating empowerment-based education programmes. Further testing is needed to shorten the questionnaire.

  • 18.
    Leksell, Janeth
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Sandberg, Gun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Experiences of an educational programme for individuals with blindness caused by diabetes2006In: European Diabetes Nursing, ISSN 1551-7853, E-ISSN 1551-7861, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 86-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Individuals with blindness caused by diabetes face problems in their daily life that are related to both conditions. Hopefully some of these problems can be solved and simplified through a suitable educational programme.

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the educational programme 'I'm the boss' is suitable for blind individuals with diabetes, and to discover whether and how the programme inspired the participants in developing self-management skills.

    Methods: An ophthalmologic centre and two medical centres in a well-defined geographic area were screened for blind individuals with diabetes, resulting in the participation of nine individuals in the educational programme. The programme consisted of six three-hour-long weekly sessions based on empowerment and problem-based learning. Empowerment was measured using the Swedish version of the diabetes empowerment scale (Swe-DES-23). After completion of the programme, the participants were interviewed (focus group and individual interviews). The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Findings: The evaluation of the educational programme showed that almost half the participants improved their diabetes empowerment in the subscales ‘self-awareness’ and ‘ability to manage stress’. The qualitative data corresponded well with the quantitative data in terms of increasing participants' self-efficacy and knowledge. The learning process was experienced as flexible and the content as stimulating and creative.

    Conclusion: It is concluded that the programme seems suitable for blind individuals with diabetes, and in collaboration with others allows space for innovation and self-realisation

  • 19.
    Lindholm Olinder, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Fischier, Johan
    Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fries, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Alfonsson, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Elvingson, Veronika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Eriksson, Jan W
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    A randomised wait-list controlled clinical trial of the effects of acceptance and commitment therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes: a study protocol2015In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 14, article id 61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    In order to manage the acute and long-term effects of living with a chronic disease such as diabetes, both medical treatment and good psychosocial support are needed. In this study, we wish to examine whether a psychological group intervention targeting people with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes can be helpful in augmenting quality of life while also lowering participants' HbA1c level. The group intervention will consist of a brief treatment developed from a branch of cognitive behavioural therapy called acceptance and commitment therapy, which is part of the so-called third wave of cognitive behavioural therapy. Common for these third-wave therapies, the focus is less on the content and restructuring of thoughts and more on the function of behaviour. Here, we describe the protocol and plans for study enrolment.

    METHODS/DESIGN

    This on-going study is designed as a randomised wait-list controlled trial. Eighty patients aged 26-55 years and with an HbA1c level >70 mmol/mol at the time of enrolment will be included.

    DISCUSSION

    In this study, we will assess the effect of starting acceptance and commitment therapy group treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes and its effect on glycaemic control and well-being.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION

    Current controlled trials: ISRCTN17006837, registered 12(th) January 2015.

  • 20.
    Wikblad, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Smide, Bibbi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Leksell, Janeth K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Check your health validity and reliability of a measure of health and burden of diabetes2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 139-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Check Your Health was constructed as four-two-sided vertical thermometers (0-100) measuring physical and emotional health, social well-being and quality of life today and before onset of diabetes. Burden of diabetes was calculated as the difference between the two scores (today and before onset of diabetes). The aim was to examine concurrent and discriminant validity and reliability of Check Your Health in a convenience sample of 180 people with diabetes, who visited the diabetes clinic during a 3-month period. A randomly selected subsample of 43 of the 180 patients responded to the questionnaire twice (test-retest). Besides Check Your Health, three additional questionnaires were mailed to the patients, the EVGFP scale (EVGFP stands for Excellent-Very good-Good-Fair-Poor health) for measuring concurrent validity, the Diabetes Empowerment Scale (Swe-DES-23) and an attitude measure, Semantic Differential in Diabetes (SDD) for calculation of discriminant validity. There was significant agreement between Check Your Health and the five EVGFP health groups. The instrument discriminated well between patients with and without late diabetic complications. The measure on burden of diabetes showed that the higher the burden of diabetes, the lower the quality of life. The same pattern was found for both Swe-DES 23 and SDD; the higher the burden, the lower the sense of empowerment and the lower the burden, the more positive the attitudes towards diabetes. Check Your Health showed good stability (0.88-0.68). The results indicate that Check Your Health can be used as an acceptable and sufficiently accurate method for detecting health distress in people with diabetes.

  • 21.
    Willers, Carl
    et al.
    Ivbar Inst, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Iderberg, Hanna
    Karolinska Inst, Med Management Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden;Ivbar Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Axelsen, Mette
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Internal Med, Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research.
    Julin, Bettina
    Ivbar Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism. Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Dalarna, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Agneta
    Hassleholm Hosp, Hassleholm, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Peter
    Karolinska Inst, Med Management Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden;Swedish Inst Hlth Econ, Lund, Sweden.
    Muth, Karin Loostrom
    Alingsas Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Alingsas, Sweden.
    Svensson, Ann-Marie
    Swedish Natl Diabet Register, Vastra Gotalandsreg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lilja, Mikael
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Unit Res Educ & Dev, Ostersund Hosp, Umea, Sweden.
    Sociodemographic determinants and health outcome variation in individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus: A register-based study2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 6, article id e0199170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Socioeconomic status, origin or demographic attributes shall not determine the quality of healthcare delivery, according to e.g. United Nations and European Union rules. Health equity has been defined as the absence of systematic disparities and unwarranted differences between groups defined by differences in social advantages. A study was performed to investigate whether this was applicable to type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) care in a setting with universal, tax-funded healthcare. Methods This retrospective registry-study was based on patient-level data from individuals diagnosed with T1D during 2010-2011 (n = 16,367) in any of seven Swedish county councils (covering -65% of the Swedish population). Health equity in T1D care was analysed through multivariate regression analyses on absolute HbA1c level at one-year follow-up, one-year change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and one-year change in cardiovascular risk score, using selected sociodemographic dimensions as case-mix factors. Results Higher educational level was consistently associated with lower levels of HbA1c, and so was being married. Never married was associated with worse eGFR development, and lower educational level was associated with higher cardiovascular risk. Women had higher HbA1c levels than men, and glucose control was significantly worse in patients below the age of 25. Conclusion Patients' sociodemographic profile was strongly associated with absolute levels of risk factor control in T1 D, but also with an increased annual deterioration in eGFR. Whether these systematic differences stem from patient-related problems or healthcare organisational shortcomings is a matter for further research. The results, though, highlight the need for intensified diabetes management education and secondary prevention directed towards T1D patients, taking sociodemographic characteristics into account.

1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf