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  • 1.
    Arefalk, Gabriel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Andersen, Kasper
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    James, Stefan K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Varenhorst, Christoph
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Smokeless Tobacco (Snus) and Outcome of Myocardial Infarction: a SWEDEHEART StudyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Based on effects of nicotine and snus (a smokeless tobacco) on hemodynamics, pro-arrhythmia and remodelling, in combination with indications of increased risk for fatal myocardial infarction (MI) in snus users; we hypothesised that the outcome of an MI may be worse in snus users.

    Methods

    Data was extracted from the SWEDEHEART registry for all patients who underwent coronary angiography in Sweden due to MI between December 2009 and December 2014. In snus users (n=4,950) relative to snus non-users (n=55,412), we compared risks of a large MI (defined as hs-cTnT of  > 10,000 ng/L, cTnT > 10 μg/L or cTnI > 10 μg/L) and death in the acute (in-hospital) setting, and death+HF (a combined endpoint of all-cause death or hospitalization for heart failure) and all-cause death at short- (<28 days) and long-term follow-up. Relations of snus use to outcomes were also analysed in pre-specified subgroups of never, previous and current smokers.

    Results

    A large MI was diagnosed in 10,975 patients. During long-term follow-up (median 1.9 years), 7,758 either died (n=6,044) or were hospitalized due to heart failure (n=1,714). In models adjusting for age, gender, smoking, previous MI and occupational classification (employed, unemployed/sick leave and retired), snus use was not associated with risk of large MI (odds ratio 1.01; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93-1.09) or death+HF (long-term Cox proportional hazard ratio (HR) 0.99; 95% CI 0.90-1.10). Nonetheless, among never-smokers snus use was associated with an increased risk for death+HF (long-term HR 1.26, 95% CI 1.03-1.55), driven by a higher mortality risk (long-term HR for death of any cause 1.29, 95% CI 1.02-1.64).

    Conclusions

    In this study, snus use was unrelated to acute, short-term or long-term adverse outcomes after an MI. Among never-smokers, snus use was associated with an increased risk of post-MI death.

  • 2.
    Batra, Gorav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Friberg, Leif
    Erlinge, David
    James, Stefan K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Oldgren, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Antithrombotic therapy after myocardial infarction in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention2018In: European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy, ISSN 2055-6837, E-ISSN 2055-6845, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 36-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Optimal antithrombotic therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) and atrial fibrillation is uncertain. In this study, we compared antithrombotic regimes with regard to a composite cardiovascular outcome of all-cause mortality, MI or ischaemic stroke, and major bleeds.

    Methods and results: Patients between October 2005 and December 2012 were identified in Swedish registries, n = 7116. Landmark 0-90 and 91-365 days of outcome were evaluated with Cox-regressions, with dual antiplatelet therapy as reference. At discharge, 16.2% received triple therapy (aspirin, clopidogrel, and warfarin), 1.9% aspirin plus warfarin, 7.3% clopidogrel plus warfarin, and 60.8% dual antiplatelets. For cardiovascular outcome, adjusted hazard ratio with 95% confidence interval (HR) for triple therapy was 0.86 (0.70-1.07) for 0-90 days and 0.78 (0.58-1.05) for 91-365 days. A HR of 2.16 (1.48-3.13) and 1.61 (0.98-2.66) during 0-90 and 91-365 days, respectively, was observed for major bleeds. For aspirin plus warfarin, HR 0.82 (0.54-1.26) and 0.62 (0.48-0.79) was observed for cardiovascular outcome and 1.30 (0.60-2.85) and 1.01 (0.63-1.62) for major bleeds during 0-90 and 91-365 days, respectively. For clopidogrel plus warfarin, HR of 0.90 (0.68-1.19) and 0.68 (0.49-0.95) was observed for cardiovascular outcome and 1.28 (0.71-2.32) and 1.08 (0.57-2.04) for major bleeds during 0-90 and 91-365 days, respectively.

    Conclusion: Compared to dual antiplatelets, aspirin or clopidogrel plus warfarin therapy was associated with similar 0-90 days and lower 91-365 days of risk of the cardiovascular outcome, without higher risk of major bleeds. Triple therapy was associated with non-significant lower risk of cardiovascular outcome and higher risk of major bleeds.

  • 3.
    Batra, Gorav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Johanson, Per
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.;AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Oldgren, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    All types of atrial fibrillation in the setting of myocardial infarction are associated with impaired outcome2016In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 102, no 12, p. 926-933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To evaluate 90-day cardiovascular outcome in patients after myocardial infarction (MI) in relation to different subtypes of atrial fibrillation (AF) and MI. Methods We studied 155 071 hospital survivors of MI between 2000 and 2009 in Swedish registries. AF subtypes were defined according to history of AF and in-hospital ECG recordings. Clinical outcomes were evaluated with multivariable Cox models. Results AF was documented in 24 023 (15.5%) cases. The AF subtypes were new-onset AF with sinus rhythm at discharge (3.7%), new-onset AF with AF at discharge (3.9%), paroxysmal AF (4.9%) and chronic AF (3.0%). The event rate per 100 person-years for the composite cardiovascular outcome (all-cause mortality, MI or ischaemic stroke) was 90.9 in patients with any type of AF versus 45.2 in patients with sinus rhythm, adjusted hazard ratio with 95% CI (HR) 1.28 (1.19 to 1.37). There were no significant differences in the composite cardiovascular outcome between AF subtypes. AF was associated with higher risk of mortality, HR 1.59 (1.41 to 1.80), reinfarction, HR 1.14 (1.05 to 1.24), and ischaemic stroke, HR 2.29 (1.92 to 2.74), respectively. In subgroup analysis, AF was associated with a higher risk of composite cardiovascular outcome in the non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and STelevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) cohort, HR 1.24 (1.13 to 1.36) and HR 1.34 (1.21 to 1.48), respectively, with p value for interaction= 0.23. Conclusions AF is common in the setting of MI and is associated with a higher risk of composite cardiovascular outcome and the individual components; mortality, reinfarction and ischaemic stroke, respectively. No major difference in outcome was observed between AF subtypes. No difference in outcome for AF was observed between the NSTEMI and STEMI cohort.

  • 4.
    Blomberg, Hans
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Johansson, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Prehospital Trauma Life Support Training of Ambulance Caregivers and the Outcomes of Traffic-Injury Victims in Sweden2013In: Journal of the American College of Surgeons, ISSN 1072-7515, E-ISSN 1879-1190, Vol. 217, no 6, p. 1010-1019Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    There is limited evidence that the widely implemented Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) educational program improves patient outcomes. The primary aim of this national study in Sweden was to investigate the association between regional implementation of PHTLS training and mortality after traffic injuries.

    STUDY DESIGN:

    We extracted information from the Swedish National Patient Registry and the Cause of Death Registry on victims of motor-vehicle traffic injuries in Sweden from 2001 to 2004 (N = 28,041). During this time period, PHTLS training was implemented at a varying pace in different regions. To control for other influences on patient outcomes related to regional and hospital-level effects, such as variations in performance of trauma care systems, we used Bayesian hierarchical regression models to estimate odds ratios for prehospital mortality and 30-day mortality after hospital admission. We also controlled for the calendar year for each injury to account for period effects. We analyzed the time to death after hospital admission and time to return to work using Cox's proportional hazards frailty models.

    RESULTS:

    After multivariable adjustment, the odds ratio for prehospital mortality with PHTLS-trained prehospital staff was 1.54 (95% credibility interval, 1.07-2.13). For 30-day mortality among those surviving to hospital admission, the odds ratio was 0.85 (95% credibility interval, 0.45-1.48). There was no association between PHTLS training and time to death (hazard ratio = 0.99; 95% CI, 0.85-1.14) or time to return to work (hazard ratio = 0.98; 95% CI, 0.92-1.05).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    In this observational study, the implementation of PHTLS training did not appear to be associated with reduced mortality or ability to return to work after motor-vehicle traffic injuries.

  • 5. Bodegard, J.
    et al.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Östgren, C. J.
    Nilsson, P. M.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Changes in body mass index following newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and risk of cardiovascular mortality: A cohort study of 8486 primary-care patients2013In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 306-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    Elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study explored the association between BMI changes in the first 18 months of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and the risk of long-term CVD mortality.

    Methods

    A total of 8486 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and no previous history of CVD or cancer were identified from 84 primary-care centres in Sweden. During the first year after diagnosis, patients were grouped according to BMI change: 'Increase', or >= +1 BMI unit; 'unchanged', or between +1 and-1 BMI unit; and 'decrease', or <=-1 BMI unit. Associations between BMI change and CVD mortality, defined as death from stroke, myocardial infarction or sudden death, were estimated using adjusted Cox proportional hazards models (NCT 01121315).

    Results

    Baseline mean age was 60.0 years and mean BMI was 30.2 kg/m(2). Patients were followed for up to 9 years (median: 4.6 years). During the first 18 months, 53.4% had no change in their BMI, while 32.2% decreased and 14.4% increased. Compared with patients with unchanged BMI, those with an increased BMI had higher risks of CVD mortality (hazard ratio: 1.63, 95% CI: 1.11-2.39) and all-cause mortality (1.33, 1.01-1.76). BMI decreases had no association with these risks compared with unchanged BMI: 1.06 (0.76-1.48) and 1.06 (0.85-1.33), respectively.

    Conclusion

    Increased BMI within the first 18 months of type 2 diabetes diagnosis was associated with an increased long-term risk of CVD mortality. However, BMI decrease did not lower the long-term risk of mortality.

  • 6.
    Britton, Tom
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Erixon, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Oxelman, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Bayesian support is larger than bootstrap support in phylogenetic inference: a mathematical argument.2007In: Mathematical Medicine and Biology, ISSN 1477-8599, E-ISSN 1477-8602, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 401-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In phylogenetic inference, the support of an estimated phylogenetic tree topology and its interior branches is usually measured either with non-parametric bootstrap support (BS) values or with Bayesian posterior probabilities (BPPs). Extensive empirical evidence indicates that BPP values are systematically larger than BS when measured on the same data set, but there are no theoretical results supporting such a systematic difference. In the present note, we give a heuristic mathematical argument supporting the empirically observed phenomenon. The argument uses properties of the marginal and profile likelihoods of the normal distribution. The heuristic arguments are supported in a simulation study evaluating different steps in the argument.

  • 7.
    Eggers, Kai M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Jaffe, Allan S
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    A novel approach to cardiac troponins to improve the diagnostic work-up in chest pain patients2012In: Critical Pathways in Cardiology, ISSN 1535-282X, E-ISSN 1535-2811, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 199-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In patients with acute chest pain, current guidelines recommend serial measurements of cardiac troponins at predefined and partly late time points. Consequently, diagnostic assessment in these patients tends to be lengthy and often results in unnecessary admissions. We, therefore, evaluated whether an approach integrating troponin results into the clinical context provided by the individual patient's presentation might facilitate the early diagnostic work-up. In 197 chest pain patients, cardiac troponin I (cTnI; Stratus CS) was measured serially within 12 hours after hospital admission. In patient cohorts with different chances of having myocardial infarction (MI) according to clinical data, electrocardiographic findings, and admission biomarker results, pretest probabilities for MI were calculated and compared with posttest probabilities derived from subsequent cTnI results after admission. Elevated cTnI levels at 1 to 2 hours after admission revealed ≥95.0% posttest probabilities for MI in cohorts with intermediate or high chances of having MI. The posttest probabilities for the absence of MI were 94.7% to 98.2% in cohorts with low or intermediate chances of having MI when cTnI was negative at 2 hours. Troponin testing considering the individual patient's pretest probability of MI seems, in conclusion, to provide clinically useful information already 1 to 2 hours after admission. Such an approach has the potential to identify both patient cohorts in whom early discharge or admittance for further evaluation would be appropriate. This could facilitate the early diagnostic work-up of chest pain patients, thereby improving patient flow and reducing overcrowding in healthcare facilities.

  • 8.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Thiblin, Ingemar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Forensic Medicine.
    Prediction of mortality risk in victims of violent crimes2017In: Forensic Science International, ISSN 0379-0738, E-ISSN 1872-6283, Vol. 281, p. 92-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To predict mortality risk in victims of violent crimes based on individual injury diagnoses and other information available in health care registries.

    METHODS: Data from the Swedish hospital discharge registry and the cause of death registry were combined to identify 15,000 hospitalisations or prehospital deaths related to violent crimes. The ability of patient characteristics, injury type and severity, and cause of injury to predict death was modelled using conventional, Lasso, or Bayesian logistic regression in a development dataset and evaluated in a validation dataset.

    RESULTS: Of 14,470 injury events severe enough to cause death or hospitalization 3.7% (556) died before hospital admission and 0.5% (71) during the hospital stay. The majority (76%) of hospital survivors had minor injury severity and most (67%) were discharged from hospital within 1day. A multivariable model with age, sex, the ICD-10 based injury severity score (ICISS), cause of injury, and major injury region provided predictions with very good discrimination (C-index=0.99) and calibration. Adding information on major injury interactions further improved model performance. Modeling individual injury diagnoses did not improve predictions over the combined ICISS score.

    CONCLUSIONS: Mortality risk after violent crimes can be accurately estimated using administrative data. The use of Bayesian regression models provides meaningful risk assessment with more straightforward interpretation of uncertainty of the prediction, potentially also on the individual level. This can aid estimation of incidence trends over time and comparisons of outcome of violent crimes for injury surveillance and in forensic medicine.

  • 9.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Med Prod Agcy, Dept Sci Expertise, POB 26, SE-75103 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Holm, Lennart
    Med Prod Agcy, Dept Usage, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sjögren, Hans
    Med Prod Agcy, Dept Efficacy & Safety 1, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bardage, Carola
    Med Prod Agcy, Dept Usage, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Personne, Mark
    Med Prod Agcy, Swedish Poisons Informat Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sjöberg, Gunilla
    Med Prod Agcy, Swedish Poisons Informat Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Feltelius, Nils
    Med Prod Agcy, Dept Sci Expertise, POB 26, SE-75103 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Zethelius, Björn
    Med Prod Agcy, Dept Sci Expertise, POB 26, SE-75103 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Increased availability of paracetamol in Sweden and incidence of paracetamol poisoning: using laboratory data to increase validity of a population-based registry study2017In: Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, ISSN 1053-8569, E-ISSN 1099-1557, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 518-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To estimate the incidence trend and outcome of paracetamol poisoning, in relation to increased availability of paracetamol from non-pharmacy outlets in 2009.

    Method: Patients' serum paracetamol results over 14years (2000-2013) from 20 (out of 21) regions in Sweden were linked to national registers of hospital care, cause of death, and prescriptions. Paracetamol poisonings were defined by serum paracetamol levels, hospital diagnoses, or cause of death. The change in incidence of poisonings following increased availability of paracetamol was analysed by using segmental regression of time series.

    Results: Of the 12068 paracetamol poisonings, 85% were classified as intentional self-harm. Following increased availability from non-pharmacy outlets, there was a 40.5% increase in the incidence of paracetamol poisoning, from 11.5/100000 in 2009 to 16.2/100000 in 2013. Regression analyses indicated a change in the trend (p<0.0001) but not an immediate jump in the incidence (p=0.5991) following the increased availability. Adjusting for trends in hospital episodes for self-harm, suicides, and the sales volume of paracetamol did not influence the result. All-cause mortality at 30days (3.2%) did not change over time.

    Conclusions: The incidence of paracetamol poisoning in Sweden has increased since 2009, contrasting the decreased incidence in the period of 2007-2009. The change in trend was temporally associated with the introduction of availability of paracetamol from non-pharmacy outlets but did not appear to be related to sales volume of paracetamol or general trends in self-harm or suicides.

  • 10.
    Grimfjärd, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Vasteras Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden..
    Koul, Sasha
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden..
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Varenhorst, Christoph
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Low real-world early stent thrombosis rates in ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients and the use of bivalirudin, heparin alone or glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor treatment: A nationwide Swedish registry report2016In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 176, p. 78-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background In recent studies of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), bivalirudin compared with heparin has been associated with increased risk of stent thrombosis (ST). Our aim was to describe incidence and outcome of definite, early ST in a large contemporary primary PCI population divided in antithrombotic therapy subgroups. Methods and Results A prospective, observational cohort study of all 31,258 ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients who received a stent in Sweden from January 2007 to July 2014 in the SWEDEHEART registry was conducted. Patients were divided into 3 groups: bivalirudin, heparin alone, or glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor treated. Primary outcome measure was incidence of definite early ST (within 30 days of PCI). Secondary outcomes included all-cause mortality. Incidence of early ST was low, regardless of bivalirudin, heparin alone, or glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor treatment (0.84%, 0.94%, and 0.83%, respectively). All-cause mortality at 1 year was 20.7% for all ST patients (n = 265), compared with 9.1% in those without ST (n = 31,286; P < .001). Patients with ST days 2-30 had numerically higher all-cause mortality at 1 year compared with patients with ST days 0-1 (23% vs 16%, P =.20). Conclusion In this real-world observational study of 31,258 ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients, the incidence of early ST was low, regardless of antithrombotic treatment strategy. Early ST was associated with increased mortality. Numerically higher all-cause mortality at 1 year was noted with ST days 2-30 compared with ST days 0-1 post-PCI.

  • 11.
    Grimfjärd, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Västerås Univ, Dept Cardiol, Västerås, Sweden..
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Koul, Sasha
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Varenhorst, Christoph
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    James, Stefan K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Unfractionated heparin versus bivalirudin in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention: a SWEDEHEART study2017In: EuroIntervention, ISSN 1774-024X, E-ISSN 1969-6213, Vol. 12, no 16, p. 2009-2017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of the stud was to compare outcomes in unfractionated heparin (UM) and bivalirudintreated patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). Methods and results: This observational study contained 20,612 PPCT patients treated with either GM monotherapv or bivalirudin with or without concomitant UFE. Patients with oral anticoagulant or glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor (GPI) treatment were excluded. The primary outcome measure was definite early stent thrombosis (Si) that occurred at low and similar rates in UNA only and bivalirudin-treated patients: 0.9% vs. 0.8% (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.7-1.65). All-cause death at 30 days occurred in 6.9% vs. 5.4% of patients (adjusted HR 1.23, 95% Cl: 1.05-1.44) and within 365 days in 12.1% vs. 8.9% (adjusted HR 1.34, 95% CI: 1.19-1.52) in the two groups, respectively. The incidence of major bleeding within 30 days was 0.8% vs. 0.6% (adjusted HR 1.54, 95% CI: 0.97-2.45). The incidence of reinfarction within 365 days and stroke within 30 days was similar between groups. Conclusions: In this large, nationwide observational study we found low and similar rates of early ST in UFH only and bivalirudin-treated patients undergoing primary PCI. Mortality was higher in IJFH compared with bivalirudin-treated patients.

  • 12. Grundvold, I.
    et al.
    Bodegard, J.
    Nilsson, P. M.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Johansson, G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ostgren, C. J.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Body mass index and changes in weight are associated with risk of atrial fibrillation and cardiovascular mortality: a longitudinal cohort study of 7,169 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes2014In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 35, p. 539-539Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Grundvold, Irene
    et al.
    Bodegard, Johan
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Ostgren, Carl Johan
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Body weight and risk of atrial fibrillation in 7,169 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes; an observational study2015In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 14, p. 5-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Obesity, type 2 diabetes and atrial fibrillation (AF) are closely associated, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We aimed to explore associations between body mass index (BMI) or weight change with risk of AF in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A total of 7,169 participations with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes were stratified according to baseline BMI, and after a second BMI measurement within 18 months, further grouped according to relative weight change as "weight gain" (> 1 BMI unit), " stable weight" (+/- 1 BMI unit) and " weight loss" (< 1 BMI unit). The mean follow-up period was 4.6 years, and the risk of AF was estimated using adjusted Cox regression models. Results: Average age at diabetes diagnosis was 60 years and the patients were slightly obese (mean BMI 30.2 kg/m(2)). During follow-up, 287 patients developed incident AF, and those with overweight or obesity at baseline had 1.9 fold and 2.9-fold higher risk of AF, respectively, than those with normal BMI. The 14% of the patients with subsequent weight gain had 1.5-fold risk of AF compared with those with stable weight or weight loss. Conclusions: In patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes, baseline overweight and obesity, as well as modest weight increase during the first 18 months after diagnosis, were associated with a substantially increased risk of incident AF. Patients with type 2 diabetes may benefit from efforts to prevent weight gain in order to reduce the risk of incident AF.

  • 14. Hemingway, Harry
    et al.
    Asselbergs, Folkert W
    Danesh, John
    Dobson, Richard
    Maniadakis, Nikolaos
    Maggioni, Aldo
    van Thiel, Ghislaine Jm
    Cronin, Maureen
    Brobert, Gunnar
    Vardas, Panos
    Anker, Stefan D
    Grobbee, Diederick E
    Denaxas, Spiros
    James, Stefan K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Oldgren, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Big data from electronic health records for early and late translational cardiovascular research: challenges and potential2017In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Cohorts of millions of people's health records, whole genome sequencing, imaging, sensor, societal and publicly available data present a rapidly expanding digital trace of health. We aimed to critically review, for the first time, the challenges and potential of big data across early and late stages of translational cardiovascular disease research.

    Methods and results: We sought exemplars based on literature reviews and expertise across the BigData@Heart Consortium. We identified formidable challenges including: data quality, knowing what data exist, the legal and ethical framework for their use, data sharing, building and maintaining public trust, developing standards for defining disease, developing tools for scalable, replicable science and equipping the clinical and scientific work force with new inter-disciplinary skills. Opportunities claimed for big health record data include: richer profiles of health and disease from birth to death and from the molecular to the societal scale; accelerated understanding of disease causation and progression, discovery of new mechanisms and treatment-relevant disease sub-phenotypes, understanding health and diseases in whole populations and whole health systems and returning actionable feedback loops to improve (and potentially disrupt) existing models of research and care, with greater efficiency. In early translational research we identified exemplars including: discovery of fundamental biological processes e.g. linking exome sequences to lifelong electronic health records (EHR) (e.g. human knockout experiments); drug development: genomic approaches to drug target validation; precision medicine: e.g. DNA integrated into hospital EHR for pre-emptive pharmacogenomics. In late translational research we identified exemplars including: learning health systems with outcome trials integrated into clinical care; citizen driven health with 24/7 multi-parameter patient monitoring to improve outcomes and population-based linkages of multiple EHR sources for higher resolution clinical epidemiology and public health.

    Conclusion: High volumes of inherently diverse ('big') EHR data are beginning to disrupt the nature of cardiovascular research and care. Such big data have the potential to improve our understanding of disease causation and classification relevant for early translation and to contribute actionable analytics to improve health and healthcare.

  • 15. Jaafar, G.
    et al.
    Persson, G.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Sandblom, G.
    Outcomes of antibiotic prophylaxis in acute cholecystectomy in a population-based gallstone surgery registry2014In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 101, no 2, p. 69-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis (AP) on postoperative infections in acute cholecystectomy.

    Methods

    The study was based on acute cholecystectomies registered in the nationwide Swedish Register for Gallstone Surgery and Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (GallRiks) between 2006 and 2010. The association between AP and the risk of postoperative infectious complications was tested in a multivariable regression analysis, with stepwise addition of age, sex, duration of operation, indication for surgery, surgical approach (laparoscopic versus open) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) fitness grade as co-variables. Postoperative infections requiring antibiotic treatment and postoperative abscesses were defined as outcome measures.

    Results

    AP was given to 9549 (68<bold>6</bold> per cent) of 13 911 patients. Postoperative infections requiring antibiotic treatment occurred following 1070 procedures (7<bold>7</bold> per cent), including 805 patients (8<bold>4</bold> per cent) who received AP (P < 0<bold>001</bold> versus patients without AP). Postoperative abscesses developed after 273 procedures (2<bold>0</bold> per cent), including 208 patients (2<bold>2</bold> per cent) who received AP (P = 0<bold>007</bold>). In univariable analysis, the odds ratio for development of infectious complications necessitating treatment with antibiotics was 1<bold>42</bold> (95 per cent confidence interval 1<bold>23</bold> to 1<bold>64</bold>) for those who received APversus those who did not, and for postoperative abscesses it was 1<bold>47</bold> (1<bold>11</bold> to 1<bold>95</bold>). In multivariable analysis, adjusting for confounders, the odds ratios were 0<bold>93</bold> (0<bold>79</bold> to 1<bold>10</bold>) and 0<bold>88</bold> (0<bold>64</bold> to 1<bold>21</bold>) respectively.

    Conclusion

    The present study suggests that AP provides no benefit in acute cholecystectomy. No benefit from antibiotics

  • 16.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Danderyd Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindholm, Daniel P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Hasvold, Lars Pål
    AstraZeneca Nord, Med Dept, Oslo, Norway.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Bodegård, Johan
    AstraZeneca Nord, Med Dept, Oslo, Norway.
    Andersson, Karolina Sundell
    AstraZeneca R&D, Global Med Affairs CardioVasc Renal & Metab, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thuresson, Marcus
    Statisticon, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linkopings Univ, Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Impact of ischaemic heart disease severity and age on risk of cardiovascular outcome in diabetes patients in Sweden: a nationwide observational study2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 4, article id e027199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To compare short-term cardiovascular (CV) outcome in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients without ischaemic heart disease (IHD), with IHD but no prior myocardial infarction (MI), and those with prior MI; and assess the impact on risk of age when initiating first-time glucose-lowering drug (GLD). Design Cohort study linking morbidity, mortality and medication data from Swedish national registries. Participants First-time users of GLD during 2007-2016. Outcomes Predicted cumulative incidence for the CV outcome (MI, stroke and CV mortality) was estimated. A Cox model was developed where age at GLD start and CV risk was modelled. Results 260 070 first-time GLD users were included, 221 226 (85%) had no IHD, 16 294 (6%) had stable IHD-prior MI and 22 550 (9%) had IHD+ MI. T2D patients without IHD had a lower risk of CV outcome compared with the IHD populations (+/- prior MI), (3-year incidence 4.78% vs 5.85% and 8.04%). The difference in CV outcome was primarily driven by a relative greater MI risk among the IHD patients. For T2D patients without IHD, an almost linear association between age at start of GLD and relative risk was observed, whereas in IHD patients, the younger (< 60 years) patients had a relative greater risk compared with older patients. Conclusions T2D patients without IHD had a lower risk of the CV outcome compared with the T2D populations with IHD, primarily driven by a greater risk of MI. For T2D patients without IHD, an almost linear association between age at start of GLD and relative risk was observed, whereas in IHD patients, the younger patients had a relative greater risk compared with older patients. Our findings suggest that intense risk prevention should be the key strategy in the management of T2D patients, especially for younger patients.

  • 17.
    Johansson, Jakob
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Blomberg, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Karlsten, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) training of ambulance caregivers and impact on survival of trauma victims2012In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 83, no 10, p. 1259-1264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) course has been widely implemented and approximately half a million prehospital caregivers in over 50 countries have taken this course. Still, the effect on injury outcome remains to be established. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between PHTLS training of ambulance crew members and the mortality in trauma patients.

    METHODS:

    A population-based observational study of 2830 injured patients, who either died or were hospitalized for more than 24h, was performed during gradual implementation of PHTLS in Uppsala County in Sweden between 1998 and 2004. Prehospital patient records were linked to hospital-discharge records, cause-of-death records, and information on PHTLS training and the educational level of ambulance crews. The main outcome measure was death, on scene or in hospital.

    RESULTS:

    Adjusting for multiple potential confounders, PHTLS training appeared to be associated with a reduction in mortality, but the precision of this estimate was poor (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.42-1.19). The mortality risk was 4.7% (36/763) without PHTLS training and 4.5% (94/2067) with PHTLS training. The predicted absolute risk reduction is estimated to correspond to 0.5 lives saved annually per 100,000 population with PHTLS fully implemented.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    PHTLS training of ambulance crew members may be associated with reduced mortality in trauma patients, but the precision in this estimate was low due to the overall low mortality. While there may be a relative risk reduction, the predicted absolute risk reduction in this population was low.

  • 18.
    Kalkan, A.
    et al.
    AstraZeneca, Sodertalje, Sweden..
    Bodegard, J.
    AstraZeneca, Sodertalje, Sweden..
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ostgren, C.
    Linkoping Univ, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Nilsson, P. M.
    Lund Univ, Malmo, Sweden..
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Ekman, M.
    AstraZeneca, Sodertalje, Sweden..
    Healthcare utilisation and costs following initiation of insulin treatment in type 2 diabetes: a long-term follow-up in clinical practice2015In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 58, no Suppl. 1, p. S482-S483Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Kalkan, Almina
    et al.
    AstraZeneca Nord Balt, Sodertalje, Sweden..
    Bodegard, Johan
    AstraZeneca Nord Balt, Sodertalje, Sweden..
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Peter Nilsson
    Lund Univ, Malmo, Sweden..
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Ekman, Manias
    AstraZeneca Nord Balt, Sodertalje, Sweden..
    Increased healthcare utilization costs following initiation of insulin treatment in type 2 diabetes: A long-term follow-up in clinical practice2017In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 184-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To compare long-term changes in healthcare utilization and costs for type 2 diabetes patients before and after insulin initiation, as well as healthcare costs after insulin versus non-insulin anti-diabetic (NIAD) initiation. Methods: Patients newly initiated on insulin (n = 2823) were identified in primary health care records from 84 Swedish primary care centers, between 1999 to 2009. First, healthcare costs per patient were evaluated for primary care, hospitalizations and secondary outpatient care, before and up to seven years after insulin initiation. Second, patients prescribed insulin in second line were matched to patients prescribed NIAD in second line, and the healthcare costs of the matched groups were compared. Results: The total mean annual healthcare cost increased from 1656 per patient 2 years before insulin initiation to 3814 seven years after insulin initiation. The total cumulative mean healthcare cost per patient at year 5 after second-line treatment was 13,823 in the insulin group compared to 9989 in the NIAD group. Conclusions: Initiation of insulin in type 2 diabetes patients was followed by increased healthcare costs. The increases in costs were larger than those seen in a matched patient population initiated on NIAD treatment in second-line. (C) 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Primary Care Diabetes Europe. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license.

  • 20.
    Lindholm, Daniel
    et al.
    AstraZeneca R&D, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sarno, Giovanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Hasvold, Lars Pal
    AstraZeneca, Dept Med, Sodertalje, Sweden.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Danderyd Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Combined association of key risk factors on ischaemic outcomes and bleeding in patients with myocardial infarction2019In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 105, no 15, p. 1175-1181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: In patients with myocardial infarction (MI), risk factors for bleeding and ischaemic events tend to overlap, but the combined effects of these factors have scarcely been studied in contemporary real-world settings. We aimed to assess the combined associations of established risk factors using nationwide registries.

    Methods: Using the Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies registry, patients with invasively managed MI in 2006-2014 were included. Six factors were assessed in relation to cardiovascular death (CVD)/MI/stroke, and major bleeding: age >= 65, chronic kidney disease, diabetes, multivessel disease, prior bleeding and prior MI.

    Results: We studied 100 879 patients, of whom 20 831 (20.6%) experienced CVD/MI/stroke and 5939 (5.9%) major bleeding, during 3.6 years median follow-up. In adjusted Cox models, all factors were associated with CVD/MI/stroke, and all but prior MI were associated with major bleeding. The majority (53.5%) had >= 2 risk factors. With each added risk factor, there was a marked but gradual increase in incidence of the CVD/MI/stroke. This was seen also for major bleeding, but to a lesser extent, largely driven by prior bleeding as the strongest risk factor.

    Conclusions: The majority of patients with MI had two or more established risk factors. Increasing number of risk factors was associated with higher rate of ischaemic events. When excluding patients with prior major bleeding, bleeding incidence rate increased only minimally with increasing number of risk factors. The high ischaemic risk in those with multiple risk factors highlights an unmet need for additional preventive measures.

  • 21.
    Lund, Lars H.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ståhlberg, Marcus
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Effect of expanding evidence and evolving clinical guidelines on the prevalence of indication for cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with heart failure2018In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 769-777Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To assess the prevalence of indication for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with heart failure (HF) and reduced ejection fraction (EF) when recommendations from evolving European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines are considered.

    Methods and results: Unique patients (n=17 193) with EF <= 39% and key data available for evaluation of CRT indication from the Swedish HF Registry were included. Indication for CRT was defined as either CRT implanted or CRT device absent but fulfilling criteria for class I-IIa recommendations in ESC guidelines published between 2005/2007 and 2016. Prevalence was calculated as the ratio of patients with CRT indication to the study population. The prevalence of CRT indication increased from 24.5% when the 2005/2007 ESC guidelines were considered to a peak of 30.0% when the 2013 ESC guidelines were considered (P<0.001, 22.4% relative increase). Compared to the 2013 ESC guidelines, the prevalence declined significantly when the 2016 ESC guidelines were used as determinant for CRT indication (26.8%, 10.7% relative reduction, P<0.001). Actual CRT utilization was 6.8%.

    Conclusion: Among patients with HF and reduced EF, the prevalence of CRT indication increased significantly comparing recommendations from ESC guidelines published between 2005/2007 and 2013, but then declined when the 2016 ESC guidelines were considered. The 2005-2013 increase may reflect the expansion of documented CRT efficacy to New York Heart Association class II, whereas the subsequent drop likely results from the more stringent criteria for QRS duration in the 2016 ESC guidelines. Actual CRT utilization is lower than indicated, regardless of which guidelines are considered.

  • 22. Lund, Lars H.
    et al.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Hallberg, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Dahlstrom, Ulf
    Edner, Magnus
    Association of Spironolactone Use With All-Cause Mortality in Heart Failure A Propensity Scored Cohort Study2013In: Circulation Heart Failure, ISSN 1941-3289, E-ISSN 1941-3297, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 174-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-In 3 randomized controlled trials in heart failure (HF), mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists reduced mortality. The net benefit from randomized controlled trials may not be generalizable, and eplerenone was, but spironolactone was not, studied in mild HF. We tested the hypothesis that spironolactone is associated with reduced mortality also in a broad unselected contemporary population with HF and reduced ejection fraction, in particular New York Heart Association (NYHA) I-II. Methods and Results-We prospectively studied 18 852 patients (age 71+/-12 years; 28% women) with NYHA I-IV and ejection fraction <40% who were registered in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry between 2000 and 2012 and who were (n=6551) or were not (n=12 301) treated with spironolactone. We derived propensity scores for spironolactone treatment based on 41 covariates. We assessed survival by Cox regression with adjustment for propensity scores and with matching based on propensity score. We performed sensitivity and residual confounding analyses and analyzed the NYHA I-II and III-IV subgroups separately. One-year survival was 83% versus 84% in treated versus untreated patients (log rank P<0.001). After adjustment for propensity scores, the hazard ratio for spironolactone was 1.05 (95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.11; P=0.054). Spironolactone interacted with NYHA (P<0.001). In the NYHA I-II subgroup, after adjustment for propensity scores, the hazard ratio for spironolactone was 1.11 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.21; P=0.019). Conclusions-In an unselected contemporary population of HF with reduced ejection fraction, spironolactone was not associated with reduced mortality. The net benefits of spironolactone may be lower outside the clinical trial setting and in milder HF.

  • 23. Ostgren, C. J.
    et al.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lohm, L.
    Nilsson, P. M.
    Johansson, G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Associations of HbA1c and educational level with risk of cardiovascular events in 32871 drug-treated patients with Type2 diabetes: a cohort study in primary care2013In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 30, no 5, p. E170-E177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To explore the association of HbA1c and educational level with risk of cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with Type2 diabetes. Methods A cohort of 32871 patients with Type2 diabetes aged 35years and older identified by extracting data from electronic patient records for all patients who had a diagnosis of Type2 diabetes and had glucose-lowering agents prescribed between 1999 and 2009 at 84 primary care centres in Sweden. Associations of mean HbA1c levels and educational level with risks of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality were analysed. Results The associations of HbA1c with risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality were J-shaped, with the lowest risk observed for cardiovascular mortality at an HbA1c level of 51mmol/mol (6.8%) for subjects on oral agents and 56mmol/mol (7.3%) in insulin-treated patients. The lowest risk observed for all-cause mortality was at an HbA1c level of 51mmol/mol (6.8%) for subjects on oral agents and 56mmol/mol (7.3%) in insulin-treated patients. There was an increased risk for cardiovascular death [hazard ratio1.6 (1.22.1), P=0.0008] at the lowest HbA1c decile for subjects in the low education category. For subjects with higher education there was no evident J curve for cardiovascular death [hazard ratio1.2 (0.81.6), P=0.3873]. Conclusions Our results lend support to the recent American Diabetes Association/ European Association for the Study of Diabetes position statement that emphasizes the importance of additional factors, including the propensity for hypoglycaemia, which should influence HbA1c targets and treatment choices for individual patients. 

  • 24. Persson, G.
    et al.
    Stromberg, J.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Sandblom, G.
    Risk of bleeding associated with use of systemic thromboembolic prophylaxis during laparoscopic cholecystectomy2012In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 99, no 7, p. 979-986Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The extent to which systemic perioperative thromboembolic prophylaxis affects peroperative and postoperative bleeding during cholecystectomy is not known. This article reports on risk of bleeding in a national cohort of cholecystectomies.

    Methods: All cholecystectomies registered in the Swedish Register of Gallstone Surgery and Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (GallRiks) between 2005 and 2010 were reviewed. Peroperative bleeding was defined as bleeding that could not be controlled by standard surgical techniques, necessitated conversion to an open procedure or required peroperative blood transfusion. Postoperative bleeding was defined as bleeding that necessitated reoperation, transfusion or a prolonged hospital stay. Risk estimates were performed using univariable and multiple logistic regression, and reported as odds ratios (ORs).

    Results: A total of 51 621 procedures were registered in GallRiks. Some 48 010 patients were included in the analyses, of whom 21 259 (44.3 per cent) received thromboembolic prophylaxis. Peroperative bleeding complications occurred in 400 (1.9 per cent) and postoperative bleeding in 296 (1.4 per cent) given thromboembolic prophylaxis, compared with 189 (0.7 per cent) and 195 (0.7 per cent) respectively without thromboprophylaxis. After adjusting for age, sex, indication for surgery, American Society of Anesthesiologists grade, mode of admission, operative approach, duration of surgery and hospital volume, the OR for peroperative or postoperative bleeding complications in the group receiving prophylaxis was 1.35 (95 per cent confidence interval 1.17 to 1.55). However, in a subgroup analysis the risk was increased in laparoscopic surgery only. At 30-day follow-up, a total of 74 patients (0.2 per cent) had developed postoperative thromboembolism, 43 (0.2 per cent) of those who received thromboembolic prophylaxis compared with 31 (0.1 per cent) of those who did not.

    Conclusion: Thromboprophylaxis in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy increased the risk of bleeding, but the occurrence of thromboembolic events was not significantly reduced. Identification of high- and low-risk patients is needed to guide clinical decisions regarding medical thromboprophylaxis.

  • 25. Sabale, U.
    et al.
    Bodegard, J.
    Sundstrom, J.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ostgren, C. J.
    Nilsson, P.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Henriksson, M.
    Health Care Utilization Following Newly-Diagnosed Type-2 Diabetes In Sweden: A Follow-Up Of 38,956 Patients In A Real Clinical Setting2013In: Value in Health, ISSN 1098-3015, E-ISSN 1524-4733, Vol. 16, no 7, p. A451-A451Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26. Sabale, U.
    et al.
    Bodegard, J.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Oestgren, C. J.
    Nilsson, P.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Henriksson, M.
    Association Of Changes In Body Weight With Health Care Costs Among Patients With Newly-Diagnosed Type-2 Diabetes In Sweden2014In: Value in Health, ISSN 1098-3015, E-ISSN 1524-4733, Vol. 17, no 7, p. A338-A338Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Sabale, U.
    et al.
    AstraZeneca, Sodertalje, Sweden..
    Bodegard, J.
    AstraZeneca, Sodertalje, Sweden..
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ostgren, C.
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Nilsson, P. M.
    Lund Univ, Malmo, Sweden..
    Johansson, G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ekman, M.
    AstraZeneca, Sodertalje, Sweden..
    Weight change over time and its link to healthcare costs among newly-diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients in Sweden2015In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 58, no Suppl. 1, p. S26-S27Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Sabale, Ugne
    et al.
    AstraZeneca Nord Balt, SE-15185 Sodertalje, Sweden..
    Bodegard, Johan
    AstraZeneca Nord Balt, SE-15185 Sodertalje, Sweden..
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Ostgren, Carl Johan
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Peter
    Lund Univ, Malmo, Sweden..
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Henriksson, Martin
    AstraZeneca Nord Balt, SE-15185 Sodertalje, Sweden..
    Healthcare utilization and costs following newly diagnosed type-2 diabetes in Sweden: A follow-up of 38,956 patients in a clinical practice setting2015In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 330-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To describe healthcare resource use patterns and estimate healthcare costs of newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in Sweden. Methods: Patients with a newly diagnosed T2DM between 1999 and 2009 were identified from 84 Swedish primary care centres. Healthcare resource use data, excluding pharmaceuticals, were extracted from electronic patient records and a national patient register, and reported as per patient mean number of primary care contacts, laboratory tests and hospitalizations. Per patient mean healthcare costs are reported as annual and cumulative costs. Results: During a median (maximum) of 4.6 (9.0) years follow-up; 38,956 patients (183,513 patient years) on average made 81 primary care contacts, was hospitalized 2.14 times, and took 31 laboratory tests. Mean per patient annual healthcare costs were (sic)4128 (95% CI, 4054-4199) the first year after diagnosis, (sic)2708 (95% CI, 2641-2776) the second year, and (sic)3030 (95% CI, 2854-3204) in year 9 (2012 values). Mean per patient cumulative healthcare costs were (sic)26,503 (95% CI, 26,025-26,970) at 9 years of follow-up. Hospitalizations accounted for the majority of healthcare costs. Conclusions: Although newly diagnosed T2DM patients require a substantial amount of healthcare services in primary care, hospitalizations account for the majority of healthcare costs.

  • 29.
    Sabale, Ugne
    et al.
    AstraZeneca Nord Balt, Sodertalje, Sweden..
    Bodegard, Johan
    AstraZeneca Nord Balt, Sodertalje, Sweden..
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Ekman, Mattias
    AstraZeneca Nord Balt, Sodertalje, Sweden..
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Care Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Peter
    Lund Univ, Skeine Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Weight change patterns and healthcare costs in patients with newly-diagnosed type-2 diabetes in Sweden2017In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 217-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To describe weight-change pathways in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and associated healthcare costs using repeated BMI measurements and healthcare utilization data.

    Methods: Patients with newly-diagnosed T2D with body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) at diagnosis and subsequent measures at year 1-3 were identified. Based on three-year BMI change, patients were assigned to one of 27 BMI change pathways defined by annual BMI change: BMI NE arrow (>= 1 BMI unit increase), BMI -> (<1 BMI unit change), and BMI SE arrow (>= 1 BMI unit decrease). Mean annual and three-year cumulative healthcare costs were estimated for each pathway by combining Swedish unit costs with resource use from primary care and national patient registers.

    Results: Cohort consisted of 15,819 patients; 44% women, mean age of 61 years, HbA1c of 6.7% (50 mmol/mol), BMI of 30.6 kg/m(2). Most common BMI pathways (mean costs): BMI ->->-> ((sic)5,311), BMI SE arrow ->->((sic)5,461), and BMI ->->SE arrow((sic)6,281). General trends: BMI)->->-> linked to lowest, BMI NE arrow ->NE arrow linked to highest costs.

    Conclusion: In patients with newly -diagnosed T2D, weight stability was the most common BMI change pattern over 3 years and associated with lowest healthcare costs. Relationship between weight change and healthcare costs appears complex warranting further investigation.

  • 30.
    Sundström, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology.
    Björkelund, Cecilia
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med Primary Hlth Care, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Hansson, Per-Olof
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Högman, Marieann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Koupil, Ilona
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Community Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Lagerros, Ylva Trolle
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Unit Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Dept Endocrinol Metab & Diabet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Leppert, Jerzy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med Epidemiol & Social, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umea Univ, Sch Dent, Dept Odontol, Umea, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden;Orebro Univ, Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, Orebro, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden;Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden.
    Olsson, Håkan
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Canc Epidemiol, Lund, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Rosengren, Annika
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sandin, Sven
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Psychiat, New York, NY 10029 USA;Seaver Autism Ctr Res & Treatment Mt Sinai, New York, NY USA.
    Snäckerström, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Stenbeck, Magnus
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden;Umea Univ, Heart Ctr, Umea, Sweden.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden;Inst Populat Based Canc Res, Dept Res, Canc Registry Norway, Oslo, Norway;Univ Helsinki, Fac Med, Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Genet Epidemiol Grp, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Tromso, Arctic Univ Norway, Dept Community Med, Tromso, Norway.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Fortier, Isabel
    McGill Univ, Res Inst, Hlth Ctr, Montreal, PQ, Canada.
    Heller, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Storgärds, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Rationale for a Swedish cohort consortium2019In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 124, no 1, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We herein outline the rationale for a Swedish cohort consortium, aiming to facilitate greater use of Swedish cohorts for world-class research. Coordination of all Swedish prospective population-based cohorts in a common infrastructure would enable more precise research findings and facilitate research on rare exposures and outcomes, leading to better utilization of study participants' data, better return of funders' investments, and higher benefit to patients and populations. We motivate the proposed infrastructure partly by lessons learned from a pilot study encompassing data from 21 cohorts. We envisage a standing Swedish cohort consortium that would drive development of epidemiological research methods and strengthen the Swedish as well as international epidemiological competence, community, and competitiveness.

  • 31.
    Sundström, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Sheikhi, Reza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Oestgren, Carl J.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Bodegard, Johan
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Blood pressure levels and risk of cardiovascular events and mortality in type-2 diabetes: cohort study of 34 009 primary care patients2013In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 1603-1610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    The optimal blood pressure (BP) in persons with type-2 diabetes is debated. We investigated shapes of the associations of SBP and DBP levels with risk of cardiovascular events and mortality in a large primary care-based sample of diabetic patients.

    Methods:

    We investigated all 34009 consecutive cardiovascular disease-free type-2 diabetes patients aged 35 years or older (mean age 64 years) at 84 primary care centers in central Sweden between 1999 and 2008. We followed this cohort until the end of 2009 in national registries for the incidence of major cardiovascular events (a composite endpoint of myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, or cardiovascular mortality) or total mortality.

    Results:

    During up to 11 years of follow-up, 6344 patients (18.7%) had a first cardiovascular event, and 6235 died (18.3%). The associations of annually updated SBP and DBP with risk of major cardiovascular events were U-shaped. The lowest risk of cardiovascular events was observed at a SBP of 135-139mmHg and a DBP of 74-76mmHg, and the lowest mortality risk at a SBP of 142-150mmHg and a DBP of 78-79mmHg, in both antihypertensive drug-untreated and drug-treated persons.

    Conclusion:

    In a large primary care-based sample of patients with type-2 diabetes, associations of SBP and DBP with risk of major cardiovascular events and mortality were U-shaped. This may have implications for risk stratification of persons with diabetes.

  • 32.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics, Mathematical Statistics.
    Likelihood based methods in phylogenetics2004Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
  • 33.
    Varenhorst, Christoph
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Hasvold, Pal
    AstraZeneca Nord Baltic, Sodertalje, Sweden.;AstraZeneca R&D, Molndal, Sweden..
    Johansson, Saga
    AstraZeneca R&D, Molndal, Sweden..
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Albertsson, Per
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Leosdottir, Margret
    Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Hambraeus, Kristina
    Falun Cty Hosp, Falun, Sweden..
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Solna Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Sect Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Culprit and Nonculprit Recurrent Ischemic Events in Patients With Myocardial Infarction: Data From SWEDEHEART (Swedish Web System for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-Based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies)2018In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 7, no 1, article id e007174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Long-term disease progression after myocardial infarction (MI) is inadequately understood. We evaluated the pattern and angiographic properties (culprit lesion [CL]/non-CL [NCL]) of recurrent MI (re-MI) in a large real-world patient population. Methods and Results-Our observational study used prospectively collected data in 108 615 patients with first-occurrence MI enrolled in the SWEDEHEART (Swedish Web System for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-Based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies) between July 1, 2006 and November 29, 2014. During follow-up (median, 3.2 years), recurrent hospitalization for MI occurred in 11 117 patients (10.2%). Of the patients who underwent coronary angiography for the index MI, a CL was identified in 44 332 patients. Of those patients, 3464 experienced an re-MI; the infarct originated from the NCL in 1243 patients and from the CL in 655 patients. In total, 1566 re-MIs were indeterminate events and could not be classified as NCL or CL re-MIs. The risk of re-MI within 8 years related to the NCL was 0.06 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05-0.06), compared with 0.03 (95% CI, 0.02-0.03) for the CL. There were no large differences in baseline characteristics of patients with subsequent NCL versus CL re-MIs. Independent predictors of NCL versus CL re-MI were multivessel disease (odds ratio, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.87-2.82), male sex (odds ratio, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.09-1.71), and a prolonged time between the index and re-MI (odds ratio, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.10-1.22). Conclusions-In a large cohort of patients with first-occurrence MI undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, the risk of re-MI originating from a previously untreated lesion was twice higher than the risk of lesions originating from a previously stented lesion.

  • 34.
    Wernroth, Mona-Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Fall, Katja
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Clin Epidemiol & Biostat, Orebro, Sweden..
    Fang, Fang
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Almqvist, Catarina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Lung & Allergy Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fall, Tove
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Dog Exposure During the First Year of Life and Type 1 Diabetes in Childhood2017In: JAMA pediatrics, ISSN 2168-6203, E-ISSN 2168-6211, Vol. 171, no 7, p. 663-669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE The association between early exposure to animals and type 1 diabetes in childhood is not clear. OBJECTIVE To determine whether exposure to dogs during the first year of life is associated with the development of type 1 diabetes in childhood. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A nationwide cohort study utilizing high-quality Swedish national demographic and health registers was conducted. A total of 840 593 children born in Sweden from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2010, were evaluated. Type 1 diabetes was identified using diagnosis codes from hospitals and dispensed prescriptions of insulin. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess the association between exposure to dogs and risk of type 1 diabetes in childhood. The possible association was further investigated by performing dose-response and breed group-specific analyses. The cohort was followed up until September 30, 2012. Data analysis was conducted from October 15, 2015, to February 8, 2017. EXPOSURES Having a parent who was registered as a dog owner during the child's first year of life. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Childhood-onset type 1 diabetes. RESULTS Of the 840 593 children reviewed, 408 272 (48.6%) were girls; mean (SD) age at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was 5.1 (2.6) years. Dog exposure was identified in 102 035 children (12.1%). Follow-up started at age 1 year, and the children were followed up for as long as 10.7 years (median, 5.5 years). During follow-up, 1999 children developed type 1 diabetes. No association was found between exposure to dogs (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.00; 95% CI, 0.86-1.16) and type 1 diabetes in childhood. The size of the dog (adjusted HR per 10-cm increase in height, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.86-1.06) or number of dogs in the household (1 dog: adjusted HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.91-1.26; 2 dogs: 0.79; 95% CI, 0.54-1.15; >= 3 dogs: 0.50; 95% CI, 0.23-1.12; compared with nonexposed children) also was not associated with type 1 diabetes risk. An analysis of children whose parent had type 1 diabetes (210 events) yielded an adjusted HR of 0.71 (95% CI, 0.43-1.17) for dog exposure. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In a nationwide study, no evidence supporting an association of register-derived measures of dog exposure with childhood type 1 diabetes was identified.

  • 35.
    Åkerblom, Axel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    James, Stefan K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Koutouzis, Michail
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Oldgren, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Eptifibatide Is Noninferior to Abciximab in Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Results From the SCAAR (Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry)2010In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 56, no 6, p. 470-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The aim of this study was to test the noninferiority of eptifibatide relative to abciximab in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Background Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors are recommended by international guidelines in patients with acute coronary syndromes undergoing PCI. Abciximab is recommended with a higher level of evidence than eptifibatide in patients with STEMI. No large, prospective, randomized trial comparing abciximab and eptifibatide has been published. Methods All (n = 11,479) STEMI patients in Sweden who underwent primary PCI and received either eptifibatide or abciximab from 2004 to 2007 were derived from the SCAAR ( Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry). The primary end point was death or myocardial infarction (MI) during 1-year follow-up, with adjustment for baseline differences with a multivariate logistic regression analysis including propensity score. The pre-specified noninferiority margin was set to 1.29. Results The combined end point occurred in 353 of 2,355 patients (15.0%) treated with eptifibatide and in 1,432 of 9,124 patients (15.7%) treated with abciximab. The unadjusted odds ratio ( OR) for eptifibatide versus abciximab was 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.84 to 1.08). Multivariate adjustment (n = 11,317) confirmed noninferiority, with an OR of 0.94 ( 95% CI: 0.82 to 1.09). The adjusted secondary end points of death and MI separately also showed noninferiority, with ORs of 0.99 ( 95% CI: 0.82 to 1.19) and 0.88 ( 95% CI: 0.73 to 1.05), respectively. Conclusions This large registry study suggests that eptifibatide is noninferior to abciximab in patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI with respect to death or MI during 1 year, thereby supporting the use of either drug in clinical practice.

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