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  • 1.
    Ahlsten, G
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Nowinski, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Mikrocefali och makrocefali2017In: Barnneurologi / [ed] Martin Jägervall och Johan Lundgren, Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, 1, p. 223-228Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ahlsten, Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology. Dept of Pediatrics, Uppsala Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Pelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery. Dept of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wesslén, Nils
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery. Dept of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Hans
    Dept of Neuroscience, Neurophysiology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westbom, L
    Dept of Pediatrics, Univeristy Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Dorsal Rhizotomy for Spasticity Management in Cerbral Palsy2018In: Cerebral Palsy / [ed] F. Miller et al, Springer International Publishing AG , 2018, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) is a neurosurgical procedure for the relief of spasticity interfering with motor function in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). The goal of the treatment is to improve function as well as reduce pain and discomfort related to severely increased spasticity. SDR is an ablative procedure that results in lifelong effects on function in the central nervous system. One must also be aware that performing SDR does not guarantee that other treatments for spasticity or orthopedic corrective procedures can be avoided. For SDR to be an effective treatment, it must be combined with specific physiotherapy over a long period of time. Today there exists a good body of evidence that SDR is an effective means of treating patients with the CP subtype spastic diplegia, as long as selection criteria are rigorously adhered to. The procedure is also safe with little risk of short or long-term complications. Further studies on long-term effects late in adulthood will show if the treatment effects are stable over time.

  • 3.
    Borgestig, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Sandqvist, Jan
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Ahlsten, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Gaze-based assistive technology in daily activities in children with severe physical impairments-An intervention study.2017In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 129-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To establish the impact of a gaze-based assistive technology (AT) intervention on activity repertoire, autonomous use, and goal attainment in children with severe physical impairments, and to examine parents' satisfaction with the gaze-based AT and with services related to the gaze-based AT intervention.

    METHODS: Non-experimental multiple case study with before, after, and follow-up design. Ten children with severe physical impairments without speaking ability (aged 1-15 years) participated in gaze-based AT intervention for 9-10 months, during which period the gaze-based AT was implemented in daily activities.

    RESULTS: Repertoire of computer activities increased for seven children. All children had sustained usage of gaze-based AT in daily activities at follow-up, all had attained goals, and parents' satisfaction with the AT and with services was high.

    DISCUSSION: The gaze-based AT intervention was effective in guiding parents and teachers to continue supporting the children to perform activities with the AT after the intervention program.

  • 4.
    Dahl, Margareta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ahlsten, G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Risk factors for obesity in children with myelomeningocele.2002In: Eur J of Ped Surg, no 12 suppl 1, p. 62-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Dahl, Margareta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ahlsten, G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Utilization of medical care among children with spina bifida2005In: Cerebrospinal Fluid Research, 2005, 2 (Suppl I ): From 49th Annual Meeting of the Society for Research into Hydrocephalus and Spina Bifida, Barcelona, Spain, 29 june-2 juli 2005, 2005, p. 55-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Dahl, Margareta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ahlsten, G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Gustafsson, J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Proos, LA
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Tuvemo, T
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Oral presentation: Early puberty in boys with myelomeningocele. Risk factors for early puberty2007In: Cerebrospinal Fluid Research, 2007, 4 (Suppl I ): From 51st Annual Meeting of the Society for Research into Hydrocephalus and Spina Bifida, Heidelberg, Germany 27-30 June, 2007, p. 37-Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Dahl, Margareta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ahlsten, G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Norrlin, S
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Early neurlogical dysfunction above cele level in children with spina bifida cystica: Follow up at 12 years of age.2003In: Eur J of Ped Surg, no 13, p. 53-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Dahl, Margareta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ahlsten, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Spina bifida occulta in children: presentationand outcome2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Dahl, Margareta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Norrlin, S
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Butler, A
    Ahlsten, G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Oral presentation: Global assessment of function in adolescents with myelomeningocele2007In: Cerebrospinal Fluid Research, 2007, 4 (Suppl I )S:40: From 51st Annual Meeting of the Society for Research into Hydrocephalus and Spina Bifida, Heidelberg, Germany 27-30 June, 2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Ehrstedt, Christoffer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ahlsten, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Strömberg, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Lindskog, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Casar Borota, Olivera
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Somatostatin receptor expression and mTOR pathway activation in glioneuronal tumours of childhoodManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Ehrstedt, Christoffer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Casar Borota, Olivera
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Strömberg, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Ahlsten, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Glioneuronal tumors in childhood - Before and after surgery. A long-term follow-up study2017In: Epilepsy & Behavior, ISSN 1525-5050, E-ISSN 1525-5069, Vol. 72, p. 82-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To give a detailed description of the long-term outcome of a cohort of children with glioneuronal tumors regarding pre-and postsurgical factors, including "dual" and "double" pathology, seizure freedom, and psychosocial outcome.

    Methods: During a fifteen-year period (1995-2009), all patients (age 0-17.99 years) with a glioneuronal brain tumor diagnosed and treated at Uppsala University Children's Hospital were identified from the National Brain Tumor Registry and the National Epilepsy Surgery Registry. Hospital medical records were reviewed and neuroradiological and neuropathological findings were re-evaluated. A cross-sectional long-term follow-up prospective evaluation, including an interview, neurologic examination, and electroencephalogram, was accomplished in patients accepting participants in the study.

    Results: A total of 25 out of 28 (89%) eligible patientswere included. The M: F ratiowas 1.5: 1. Mean follow-up time after surgery was 12.1 years (range 5.0-19.3). Twenty patients were adults (N18 years) at follow-up. Seizure freedomwas achieved in 64%. Gross total resection (GTR) was the only preoperative factor significantly correlating to seizure freedom (p= 0.027). Thirty-eight percent were at some time postoperatively admitted for a psychiatric evaluation. There was a trend towards both higher educational level and employment status in adults who became seizure free.

    Conclusion: Long-termoutcome is good regarding seizure freedom if GTR can be achieved, but late seizure recurrence can occur. "Dual" and "double" pathology is uncommon and does not influence seizure outcome. Obtaining seizure freedomseems to be important for psychosocial outcome, but there is a risk for psychiatric comorbidities and long-term follow-up by a multi-professional team is advisable.

  • 12.
    Ehrstedt, Christoffer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Kristiansen, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Ahlsten, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Casar Borota, Olivera
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Dahl, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Libard, Sylwia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Strömberg, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Clinical characteristics and late effects in CNS tumours of childhood: Do not forget long term follow-up of the low grade tumours2016In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 580-587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate clinical characteristics and late effects of CNS tumours in childhood with a special focus on low-grade tumours, especially low-grade astrocytoma and glib neuronal tumours. Methods: A retrospective population based study was performed at Uppsala University Children's Hospital, a tertiary referral centre for children with CNS tumours. Patients were identified from the National Brain Tumour Registry and the National Epilepsy Surgery Registry. Hospital medical records were analysed for patients with a follow up of >= 5 years after diagnosis. A re-evaluation of the neuro-pathological diagnosis was performed. Results: A total of 193 patients (age 0-17.99 years) during a twelve-year period (1995-2006) were included; 149 survived >= 5 years. Three larger subgroups could be identified: astrocytic, embryonal and glioneuronal tumours. A supratentorial location was found in 52%. Medical late effects were mainly neurological and endocrinological, affecting 81% and 26% of surviving patients. Cognitive late effects were a frequent finding in the whole group but also in low-grade astrocytoma and glioneuronal tumours (53% and 67%). Thirty per cent had some kind of pedagogic support in school. Conclusion: Late effects are common in long-term survivors of CNS tumours in childhood. Low-grade astrocytoma and glioneuronal tumours are no exception, and the findings support the need for long-term follow up.

  • 13.
    Ehrstedt, Christoffer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Rydell, Ann-Margret
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hallsten, Marina Gabert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Strömberg, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Ahlsten, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Cognition, Health-Related Quality Of Life and Mood in Children and Young Adults Diagnosed with a Glioneuronal Tumor in Childhood2018In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, p. 161-161Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Ehrstedt, Christoffer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology. Uppsala Univ, Childrens Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rydell, Ann-Margret
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hallsten, Marina Gabert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology. Uppsala Univ, Childrens Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology. Uppsala Univ, Childrens Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ahlsten, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology. Uppsala Univ, Childrens Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Cognition, health-related quality of life, and mood in children and young adults diagnosed with a glioneuronal tumor in childhood2018In: Epilepsy & Behavior, ISSN 1525-5050, E-ISSN 1525-5069, Vol. 83, p. 59-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate long-term cognitive outcome, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and psychiatric symptoms in children and young adults diagnosed with a glioneuronal tumor in childhood.

    Methods: Twenty-eight children and adolescents (0-17.99 years) with a minimum postoperative follow-up time of five years were eligible for the study; four persons declined participation. A cross-sectional long-term follow-up evaluation was performed using the following study measures: Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-IV) or Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-IV), Reys Complex Figure Test (RCFT), Short Form 36 version 2 (SF-36v2), Short Form 10 (SF-10), Quality of Life in Epilepsy 31 (QOLIE-31), Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS) or Beck Youth Inventory Scales (BYI), and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Historical WISC-III and RCFT data were used to compare cognitive longitudinal data.

    Results: Mean follow-up time after surgery was 12.1 years. Sixty-three percent (15/24) were seizure-free. Despite a successive postoperative gain in cognitive function, a significant reduction relative to norms was seen in the seizure-free group with respect to perceptual reasoning index (PRI), working memory index (WMI), and full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ). Seizure freedom resulted in acceptable HRQoL. Thirty-two percent and 16% exceeded the threshold level of possible anxiety and depression, respectively, despite seizure freedom.

    Conclusion: Although lower than in corresponding reference groups, cognitive outcome and HRQoL are good provided that seizure freedom or at least a low seizure severity can be achieved. There is a risk of elevated levels of psychiatric symptoms. Long-term clinical follow-up is advisable.

  • 15.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Special Educ, S-11418 Stockholm, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, S-58183 Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Ahlsten, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Wandin, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Swedish Natl Ctr Rett Syndrome & Related Disorder, S-83223 Froson, Sweden.
    Rytterström, Patrik
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, S-58183 Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Borgestig, Maria
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, S-58183 Norrkoping, Sweden.;Orebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Hlth Sci, S-70281 Orebro, Sweden..
    Eye-Gaze Control Technology as Early Intervention for a Non-Verbal Young Child with High Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report2018In: TECHNOLOGIES, ISSN 2227-7080, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assistive technology (AT) can be used as early intervention in order to reduce activity limitations in play and communication. This longitudinal case study examines eye-gaze control technology as early intervention for a young child with high spinal cord injury without the ability to make sounds. The young child was followed by repeated measures concerning performance and communication from baseline at 9 months to 26 months, and finalized at 36 months by field observations in the home setting. The results showed eye-gaze performance and frequency of use of eye-gaze control technology increased over time. Goals set at 15 months concerning learning and using the AT; naming objects and interactions with family was successfully completed at 26 months. Communicative functions regarding obtaining objects and social interaction increased from unintentional actions to purposeful choices and interactions. At 36 months, the toddler was partly independent in eye gazing, used all activities provided, and made independent choices. In conclusion, the results show that a 9-month-old child with profound motor disabilities can benefit from eye-gaze control technology in order to gradually perform activities, socially interact with family members, and make choices.

  • 16.
    Lidström, H.
    et al.
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Ahlsten, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Hemmingsson, H.
    Department of Societal and Welfare Studies, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    The influence of ICT on the activity patterns of children with physical disabilities outside school2011In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 313-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:To investigate the outside school activity patterns of children with physical disabilities, and specifically their information and communication technology (ICT) usage compared with that of non-disabled children. In addition, the aim was to investigate the children's opinions on computer use and the associations between their use of the Internet and their interaction with peers. Methods: Questionnaire on activities outside school, answered by 215 children and youths with physical disabilities, mean age 12 years 10 months, attending mainstream schools. For group comparisons with non-disabled children, data from the survey 'Kids and Media' were used. Results  In the analysis, two sets of activity patterns were identified, depending on whether the child was disabled or not and on the gender of the child. A higher proportion of children with physical disabilities were engaged in ICT activities, while non-disabled children tended to be engaged in a broader range of activities outside school. The activity pattern was more uniform for boys and girls with disabilities than for their non-disabled peers. Use of the Internet was positively associated with peer interaction. Conclusion: Outside school, the activity patterns of children and youths with physical disabilities seem to be characterized by a focus on ICT activities, which enable children to compensate for their impairment because it suits all. In addition, digital skills developed outside school engage children with physical disabilities, giving them increased access to society and for educational purposes.

  • 17.
    Norrlin, S
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Automatic control.
    Karlsson, A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Automatic control.
    Ahlsten, G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Automatic control.
    Lanshammar, H
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Automatic control.
    C:son Silander, H
    Dahl, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Automatic control. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Force measurements of postural sway and raptid arm lift in seated children with and without MMC2002In: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 197-202Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Norrlin, S
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Strinnholm, M
    Butler, A
    Stagling, E
    Bergh, M
    Rönnblom, E
    Ahlsten, G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Dahl, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Independence and perceived quality of life in young adults with myelomeningocele. Function, needs and recommendations for what to do2007In: Cerebrospinal Fluid Research, 2007, 4 (Suppl I ) Poster presentation, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Nowinski, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Ahlsten, G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    Kraniosynostos2017In: Barnneurologi / [ed] Martin Jägervall; Johan Lundgren, Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, 1, p. 229-235Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Proos, LA
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Dahl, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ahlsten, G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Tuvemo, T
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Gustafsson, J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Early puberty is associated with increased intracranial pressure perinatally in boys with myelomeningocele.1997In: Hormon Research, Vol. 48, p. 129-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Proos, Lemm A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Tuvemo, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ahlsten, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Dahl, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Increased perinatal intracranial pressure and brainstem dysfunction predict early puberty in boys with myelomeningocele2011In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 100, no 10, p. 1368-1372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children with myelomeningocele (MMC) run an increased risk of developing early or precocious puberty (E/PP).

    Aim: To identify risk factors for E/PP in boys with MMC.

    Methods: Boys born between 1970 and 1992, treated for MMC at the University Children's Hospital, Uppsala, were identified. Thirty-eight boys were eligible to be included. Medical records were examined retrospectively. Early puberty was defined as pubertal signs before the age of 10 years and 2 months. Precocious puberty was defined as the appearance of these signs before 9 years of age. Increased intracranial pressure perinatally was defined as wide sutures, bulging fontanelles and increased/increasing head circumference at birth and/or during the first week after birth. Early brainstem dysfunction was defined as severe and persistent feeding and respiratory problems before the age of 3 months despite proper control of the hydrocephalus.

    Results: Of the 38 boys, 8 (21%) had E/PP, which was strongly associated with increased intracranial pressure perinatally and also with early brainstem dysfunction. Multivariate regression analysis showed early brainstem dysfunction to have the highest explanatory value regarding the occurrence of early puberty.

    Conclusion: Increased intracranial pressure perinatally and brainstem dysfunction early in life are strong predictors of E/PP in boys with MMC.

  • 22. Sommerfelt, K
    et al.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Ulleråker, University Hospital.
    Skranes, J
    Andersson, H W
    Ahlsten, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Ellertsen, B
    Markestad, T
    Jacobsen, G
    Hoffman, H J
    Bakketeig, L S
    Neuropsychologic and Motor Function in Small-for-Gestation Preschoolers2002In: Pediatric Neurology, ISSN 0887-8994, E-ISSN 1873-5150, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 186-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate neuropsychologic and motor performance in term small-for-gestation preschool children. A patient-based sample of 311 5-year-old children with birth weights less than the fifteenth percentile for gestation was compared with a random sample of 321 appropriate-for-gestation control subjects. The main assessment tools were subscales from the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence Revised, subscales from the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, tests of manual dexterity and figure copying, and the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales. The small-for-gestation children had mean scores on tests of visuospatial and visuomotor abilities that were one fourth standard deviation lower than appropriate-for-gestation control subjects and slightly lower scores on manual dexterity. The small-for-gestation children were comparable to appropriate-for-gestation children regarding motor performance. We therefore conclude that the neuropsychologic and neuromotor performance in preschool years of term small-for-gestation children is reassuring.

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