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  • 1. Andersson, G
    et al.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    A critical review of the construct and its application in audiology. 2003In: Int J Audiol, Vol. 42, p. S97-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bäckström, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Prediction of psychological symptoms in family members of patients with burns 1 year after injury2013In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 384-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To report a study of predictors of psychological symptoms in family members of patients with burns.

    Background

    Family members are important as a source of social support for patients undergoing prolonged rehabilitation. Little is known about psychological symptoms of family members of patients with burns, especially in the long term.

    Design

    The design of the study was prospective and longitudinal.

    Methods

    Forty-four family members of adult patients treated in a burn centre between 2000-2007 completed questionnaires during care and at 3, 6, and 12 months after injury. Psychological symptoms were assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Predictors for anxiety and depression were explored in regression analyses.

    Results

    The mean scores indicated normal to mild symptoms in general. Moderate and severe symptom levels during care and at 12 months were demonstrated on the anxiety subscale by 15/44 and 5/39, respectively, and on the depression subscale by 5/44 and 0/39 of the family members, respectively. In the final regression models, the primary predictor was psychological symptoms at the previous assessment. Other predictors were previous life events, age, and the coping strategy avoidance.

    Conclusion

    Family members of patients with burns demonstrate normal to mild levels of psychological symptoms that decrease over time. One-third show moderate to severe anxiety symptoms during care and may benefit from counselling. Previous symptoms predict later symptoms, indicating that screening with a validated instrument is useful. The results provide guidance for nurses in assessing and planning adequate interventions for family members.

  • 3.
    Bäckström, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Öster, Caisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Health-related quality of life in family members of patients with burns2014In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 243-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A severe burn not only affects the patients, but may also have a great impact on the lives of family members. It is known that family members of patients with burns experience psychological distress, but health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has not been studied in this group. The aim was to study predictors of HRQoL in family members of patients with burns. Forty-four family members of adult patients treated in a burn center, between 2000 and 2007, completed questionnaires during care, and at 3, 6, and 12 months after injury. HRQoL was assessed with the EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D), which consists of the dimensions: mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain, and anxiety/depression. The questionnaire generates an EQ-5D index and a visual analog scale (VAS) score. Overall, the EQ-5D index was similar to that of the general population. A slight improvement in HRQoL was found in the VAS scores and in the anxiety/depression dimension over time. In regression models, HRQoL was primarily predicted by earlier life events, symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, and HRQoL, assessed during the patients’ hospitalization. In summary, HRQoL assessed with VAS scores increased slightly during the first year postburn, and early screening for life events and psychological symptoms, and HRQoL might be useful in identifying family members in need of support.

  • 4.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Forslin, Per
    Ljungstrand, Peter
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Strandlund, Carola
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Is the Internet-administered CIDI-SF Equivalent to a Clinician-administered SCID Interview?2002In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 183-189Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Cunningham, Janet L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Zanzi, Manuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ramklint, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    No regrets: Young adult patients in psychiatry report positive reactions to biobank participation2017In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 17, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Research in vulnerable individuals must insure voluntariness and minimize negative reactions caused by participation. This study aimed to describe consent and completion rate in young psychiatric patients in relation to study components, degree of disability and to compare response to research participation in patients and controls.

    METHODS: Between 2012 and 2015, 463 patients with psychiatric disorders between the ages of 18-25 from the Dept. of General Psychiatry at Uppsala University Hospital and 105 controls were recruited to donate data and samples to a biobank. Consent and completion in relation to questionnaires, biological sampling of blood, saliva or feces, were monitored. Both groups were also asked about their perceived disability and how research participation affected them.

    RESULTS: Most patients who participated consented to and completed questionnaires and blood sampling. The majority also consented to saliva sampling, while less than half consented to collect feces. Of those who gave consent to saliva and feces only half completed the sampling. Both patients and controls reported high voluntariness and were positive to research participation. Within the patient group, those with greater perceived disability reported greater distress while participating in research, but there was no difference in consent or completion rates or level of regret.

    CONCLUSIONS: With the described information procedures, psychiatric patients, regardless of perceived disability, reported high voluntariness and did not regret participation in biobanking. Compared to questionnaires and blood sampling, given consent was reduced for feces and completion was lower for both saliva and feces sampling.

  • 6.
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Kildal, Morten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Return to work and health-related quality of life after burn injury2007In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Although severe burn injury is associated with long-term rehabilitation and disability, research on returning to work in burn patients is limited. The aims of this study were: (i) to explore injury- and personality-related predictors of returning to work, and (ii) to compare health-related quality of life and health outcome in working versus non-working individuals.Design: Cross-sectional study.Subjects: Forty-eight former patients with pre-burn employment were evaluated on average 3.8 years after the burn.Methods: Data were collected from medical records and by a questionnaire in which the patients were asked about their main activity status described in the terms: work, studies, pension, disability pension, sick leave or unemployment. It also contained the Swedish universities Scales of Personality, SF-36, Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief, items assessing fear-avoidance, Impact of Event Scale-Revised and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale.Results: Thirty-one percent had not returned to work. In logistic regression, returning to work was associated with time since injury, the extent of full-thickness injuries, and the personality trait embitterment. Those who did not work had lower health-related quality of life, poorer burn-specific health, more fear-avoidance and more symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, but they did not differ from those who were working regarding general mood.Conclusion: Returning to work was explained by both injury severity and personality characteristics. Those who did not work were characterized by low health-related quality of life and poorer trauma-related physical and psychological health.

  • 7.
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Kildal, Morten
    Department of Surgical Sciences. Plastikkirurgi.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Department of Surgical Sciences. Plastikkirurgi.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Work status and burn specific health after work-related burn injury.2004In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 839-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Wikehult, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Major depression and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms following severe burn injury in relation to lifetime psychiatric morbidity2008In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, ISSN 0022-5282, Vol. 64, no 5, p. 1349-1356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Psychiatric history has been suggested to have an impact on long-term adjustment in burn survivors. A rigorous, prospective, longitudinal approach was used to study psychiatric history in a population-based burn sample and its impact on symptomatology of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at a 12-month follow-up. METHODS: Seventy-three consecutive patients admitted to the Uppsala Burn Unit were assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition for psychiatric disorders, of whom 64 were also assessed after 12 months. RESULTS: Forty-eight patients (66%) presented with at least one lifetime psychiatric diagnosis; major depression (41%), alcohol abuse or dependence (32%), simple phobia (16%), and panic disorder (16%) were most prevalent. At 12-months postburn, 10 patients (16%) met criteria for major depression, 6 (9%) for PTSD, and 11 (17%) for subsyndromal PTSD. Patients with lifetime anxiety disorder and with lifetime psychiatric comorbidity were more likely to be depressed at 12 months, whereas those with lifetime affective disorder, substance use disorder and psychiatric comorbidity were more likely to have symptoms of PTSD. CONCLUSIONS: Two-thirds of burn survivors exhibit a history of lifetime psychiatric disorders. Those with a psychiatric history have a higher risk of postburn psychiatric problems.

  • 9.
    Edvinsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Hellgren, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Gingnell, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala Univ, Dept Neurosci, Psychiat, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Different patterns of attentional bias in antenatal and postpartum depression2017In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 7, no 11, article id e00844Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundBiased information processing in attention, memory, and interpretation is proposed to be central cognitive alterations in patients with major depressive disorder, but studies in women with peripartum depression are scarce. Because of the many similarities with depression in nonperipartum states as regards symptom profile and risk factors, we hypothesized that women with antenatal and postpartum depression would display attentional bias to negatively and positively valenced words. MethodsOne hundred and seventy-seven pregnant and 157 postpartum women were included. Among these, 40 suffered from antenatal depressive disorder and 33 from postpartum depressive disorder. An emotional Stroop task with neutral, positive, negative, and negatively valenced obstetric words was used. ResultsNo significant difference in emotional interference scores was noted between women with antenatal depression and nondepressed pregnant women. In contrast, women with postpartum depression displayed shorter reaction times to both positive (p=.028) and negative (p=.022) stimuli, compared with neutral words. Pregnant women on antidepressant treatment displayed longer reaction times to negatively valenced obstetric words in comparison with untreated depressed women (p=.012), and a trend toward greater interference in comparison with controls (p=.061). ConclusionsIn contrast with the hypothesis, we found no evidence of attentional bias to emotionally valenced stimuli in women with untreated peripartum depression. However, the shorter reaction times to emotional stimuli in women with postpartum depression may indicate emotional numbing, which in turn, is a functional impairment that may have repercussions for child development and well-being. Our findings emphasize the need to identify and treat women with postpartum depression at the earliest possible time point to ensure swift recovery and support for the family.

  • 10.
    Kildal, Morten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. plastikkirurgi.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Department of Neuroscience. psykiatri, UAS.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. plastikkirurgi.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Department of Neuroscience. psykiatri, UAS.
    Coping strategies, injury characteristics and long-term outcome after burn injury.2005In: Injury, Int. J. Care Injured, Vol. 36, p. 511-518Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Kildal, Morten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Personality characteristics and perceived health problems after burn injuryIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Low, Aili
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Dyster Aas, Johan
    Department of Neuroscience.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Department of Neuroscience.
    Kildal, Morten
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. plastikkirurgi.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. plastikkirurgi.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Department of Neuroscience.
    Chronic nightmares after severe burns; risk factors and implications for treatment.2003In: J Burn Care Rehabil, Vol. 24, p. 260-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Low, Aili J. F.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Psychiatric morbidity predicts perceived burn-specific health 1 year after a burn2012In: General Hospital Psychiatry, ISSN 0163-8343, E-ISSN 1873-7714, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 146-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    Individual factors such as gender, age, coping and personality traits and injury-related factors such as injury severity have been implicated as risk factors for poor perceived health after burns. As psychiatric morbidity is common in individuals who sustain burns, the aim of this study was to examine the effect of preinjury psychiatric problems on perceived health after injury.

    Method:

    A total of 85 consecutive patients treated at a national burn center were prospectively assessed: the patients were interviewed during acute care with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders. One year after injury, perceived health was assessed with the Bum-Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B). Multiple regression analyses were used to evaluate the predictive effect of preinjury psychiatric history on perceived postinjury health.

    Results:

    Psychiatric morbidity, especially mood disorders, affected outcome for six of the nine BSHS-B subscales, with the covariates mainly being the length of hospital stay and total burn size.

    Conclusion:

    The results show that a history of preinjury psychiatric disorders, especially during the year before the burn, affects perceived outcome regarding both physical and psychological aspects of health 1 year after injury and that it is a risk factor for worse perceived outcome.

  • 14.
    Low, Aili Janina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Kildal, Morten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    The presence of nightmares as a screening tool for symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder in burn survivors2006In: Journal of Burn Care and Research, ISSN 1559-047X, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 727-733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recurrent nightmares can be a symptom of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study evaluated the method of asking burn survivors about nightmares as a screening tool for the presence of PTSD symptomatology. The presence of nightmares in 85 individuals treated at the Burn Center in Uppsala, Sweden, between 1996 and 2000 (23 women, 62 men, average age 47 years, average burn size 17% TBSA, average time after burn 3.6 years) was evaluated by one question from the Burn Specific Health Scale (BSHS) and by using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition criteria for nightmares. PTSD symptomatology was assessed with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised. Sensitivity, Specificity, Discriminant Ability, and Likelihood Ratios for a positive and a negative result were calculated to evaluate the screening questions. As many as 46% of the burn survivors reported nightmares of some frequency in the BSHS and as many as 28% when using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition criteria. Both approaches were useful tools for detecting or ruling out PTSD symptoms. The best Discriminant Ability was achieved with a screening test using the BSHS item "I have nightmares." Screening questions for presence of nightmares after burns can be useful in detecting PTSD symptomatology.

  • 15.
    Low, Aili
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Meyer, Walter J
    University of Texas Medical School of Biomedical Science at Galveston, Texas, USA.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Thomas, Christofer R
    The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Texas, USA.
    Psychiatric Disorders Associated with Burn Injury2012In: Total Burn Care, Elsevier, 2012, 4th ed, p. 733-741Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16. Orwelius, L.
    et al.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Fredrikson, M.
    Sjoberg, F.
    Long term health-related quality of life after burns is strongly dependent on pre-existing disease and psychosocial issues and less due to the burn itself2013In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 229-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is reduced after a burn, and is affected by coexisting conditions. The aims of the investigation were to examine and describe effects of coexisting disease on HRQoL, and to quantify the proportion of burned people whose HRQoL was below that of a reference group matched for age, gender, and coexisting conditions. Method: A nationwide study covering 9 years and examined HRQoL 12 and 24 months after the burn with the SF-36 questionnaire. The reference group was from the referral area of one of the hospitals. Results: The HRQoL of the burned patients was below that of the reference group mainly in the. mental dimensions, and only single patients were affected in the physical dimensions. The factor that significantly affected most HRQoL dimensions (n = 6) after the burn was unemployment, whereas only smaller effects could be attributed directly to the burn. Conclusion: Poor HRQoL was recorded for only a small number of patients, and the decline were mostly in the mental dimensions when compared with a group adjusted for age, gender, and coexisting conditions. Factors other than the burn itself, such as mainly unemployment and pre-existing disease, were most important for the long term HRQoL experience in these patients.

  • 17.
    Sgroi, Maria Ingelsson
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. psykatri UAS.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. psykiatri UAS.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. psykiatri UAs.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. plastikkirurgi.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fear-avoidance in recovered burn patients: association with psychological and somatic symptoms.2005In: Journal of Health Psychology, ISSN 1359-1053, E-ISSN 1461-7277, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 491-502Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Sveen, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linkoping, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Buhrman, Bo
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Internet-based information and support program for parents of children with burns: A randomized controlled trial2017In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 583-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and effects of an intemet-based information and self-help program with therapist contact for parents of children and adolescents with burns. The program aimed to reduce parents' symptoms of general and posttraumatic stress.

    Methods: Participants were parents of children treated for burns between 2009-2013 at either of the two specialized Swedish Burn centers. Sixty-two parents were included in a two-armed, randomized controlled trial with a six-week intervention group and a wait list control group, including a pre and post-assessment, as well as a 3 and 12-month follow-up. The intervention contained psychoeducation, exercises and homework assignments, and the intervention group received weekly written feedback from a therapist. The main outcome was stress (post-traumatic stress, general stress and parental stress).

    Results: The program had a beneficial effect on posttraumatic stress in the short term, but did not affect general stress or parental stress. The parents rated the program as being informative and meaningful, but some of them thought it was time-consuming.

    Conclusion: The program has the potential to support parents of children with burns. The intervention is easily accessible, cost-effective and could be implemented in bum care rehabilitation.

  • 19.
    Sveen, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Linköpings universitet.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Linköpings universitet.
    Buhrman, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Internet-based information and self-help program for parents of children with burns: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial2015In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 367-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    A burn is one of the most traumatic and painful injuries a child can experience and it is also a very stressful experience for the parents. Given the great psychological distress and perceived lack of multi-professional support experienced by the parents, there is a need for support during in-hospital treatment as well as during recovery. The aim of the study is to develop and evaluate an internet-based information and self-help program for parents of children who have been hospitalized for burn injury. The program aims to decrease parents' symptoms of stress.

    Methods

    Participants will consist of parents of children treated for burns between 2009 and 2013 at either of the two specialized Swedish Burn centers. The study is a two-armed randomized controlled trial with a six-week intervention group and an inactive control group, with a pre- and post-assessment, as well as a 3- and 12-month follow-up. The main outcome is stress (post-traumatic stress, general perceived stress and parental stress). The data will be analyzed with the intention-to-treat principle. The intervention is based on Cognitive-Behavior Therapy (CBT) and is inspired by Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). It is psycho-educational and provides basic skills training in communication and stress management.

    Conclusion

    We believe that this program will offer parents of children with burns information and support, decrease symptoms of stress, and that parents will perceive the program as useful. If the program is found to be beneficial, it could be implemented in burn care as it is accessible and cost-effective.

  • 20.
    Sveen, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Attentional bias and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder one year after burn injury2009In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 197, no 11, p. 850-855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trauma-related attentional bias is suggested to play a role in maintaining posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although being burn injured is a traumatic event for many patients, there are no prospective studies investigating attentional bias. The aims were to assess burn-specific attentional bias 1 year after burn, and its associations with risk factors for PTSD and symptoms of PTSD. A total of 38 adult patients with burns were assessed with a structured clinical interview and a Swedish version of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised up to 1-year after burn. The Emotional Stroop Task was used to assess attentional bias 1 year after burn. In total 29 participants displayed burn-specific attentional bias. This group had more previous life events, perceived life threat, larger burns, and higher PTSD symptom severity. In conclusion, the majority of the patients had burn-specific attentional bias 1 year after burn and this was related to symptoms of PTSD.

  • 21.
    Sveen, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    A prospective longitudinal study of posttraumatic stress disorder symptom trajectories after burn injury2011In: Journal of Trauma, ISSN 0022-5282, E-ISSN 1529-8809, Vol. 71, no 6, p. 1808-1815Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Psychologic problems are common after burns, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are some of the most prevalent. Risk factors for PTSD have been identified, but little is known about the onset and course of these symptoms. The objective was to investigate whether there are different PTSD symptom trajectories after burns.

    Methods: Ninety-five adults with burns were enrolled in a prospective study from in-hospital treatment until 12 months after burn. Symptoms of PTSD were assessed with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised and scores at 3, 6, and 12 months after the burn were used in a cluster analysis to detect trajectories. The trajectories were compared regarding known risk factors for PTSD using non-parametric analysis of variance.

    Results: Four clusters were identified: (1) resilient, with low levels of PTSD symptoms that decreased over time; (2) recovery, with high levels of symptoms that gradually decreased; (3) delayed, with moderate symptoms that increased over time; and (4) chronic, with high levels of symptoms over time. The trajectories differed regarding several risk factors for PTSD including life events, premorbid psychiatric morbidity, personality traits, avoidant coping, in-hospital psychologic symptoms, and social support. The resilient trajectory consistently had fewer of the risk factors and differed the most from the chronic trajectory.

    Conclusions: There are subgroups among patients with burns that have different patterns of PTSD symptom development. These findings may have implications for clinical practice, such as the timing of assessment and the management of patients who present with these symptoms.

  • 22.
    Sveen, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Huss, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the burn outcomes questionnaire for children aged 5 to 18 years2012In: Journal of burn care & research: official publication of the American Burn Association, ISSN 1559-047X, Vol. 33, no 6, p. e286-e294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although pediatric burn injuries are common, there is a lack of burn-specific health outcome measurements for children. The American Burn Association and the Shriners Hospitals for Children have developed the Burn Outcomes Questionnaire (BOQ), which is a parent-report questionnaire measuring the functional outcome after burn in children aged 5 to 18 years. The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the BOQ, assessing feasibility, reliability, and validity aspects. Participants were parents (n = 70) of children aged 5 to 18 years who were treated at the Uppsala or Linköping burn center between January 2000 and December 2008. For most subscales, feasibility was adequate and the internal consistency was good: Cronbach's α values were above 0.76 in all but 1 subscale, and mean interitem correlations ranged from 0.34 to 0.90. The test-retest reliability was significant in the majority of subscales. Evidence of validity was shown by associations among the BOQ subscales and between BOQ subscales and measures of burn severity, heat sensitivity, fear-avoidance beliefs, and parent reports of the child's psychological problems. In conclusion, with the exception of a few subscales, this study supports the continued evaluation of the Swedish version of BOQ as a tool to measure outcome after burn in children aged 5 to 18 years.

  • 23.
    Sveen, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Low, Aili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Validation of a Swedish version of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) in patients with burns2010In: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, ISSN 0887-6185, E-ISSN 1873-7897, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 618-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Impact of Event Scale (IES) and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) are often used as self-reportinstruments for symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, there are few validationsof the IES and the IES-R against structured clinical interviews. In this study the two scales, together withthe three subscales of the IES-R, were assessed for their agreement with a diagnosis of PTSD in patientswith burns 1 year after injury. Sixty patients with burns were evaluated 1 year after injury using theStructured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis I (SCID-I) psychiatric disorders and a Swedish versionof the IES-R. The total score of the IES-R had the best discriminant ability (0.89) with a sensitivity of 1.0and a specificity of 0.78. In conclusion, the total IES-R had good properties as a screening tool for PTSDand subsyndromal PTSD 1 year after burn injury.

  • 24.
    Sveen, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköpings universitet.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Huss, Fredrik
    LInköpings universitet.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköpings universitet.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Psychometric properties of the impact of event scale-revised in patients one year after burn injury2010In: Journal of Burn Care and Research, ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 310-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Burn injury can be a life-threatening and traumatic event. Despite considerable risk for psychological morbidity, few outcome measures have been evaluated. The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of a Swedish version of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) in patients 1 year after burn injury (N = 147). A principal component analysis was performed, and the results supported the three-factor structure of the IES-R. High internal consistency and intelligible associations with concurrent psychological symptoms and known risk factors for distress after trauma indicate satisfactory psychometric properties. Thus, the study supports the use of the IES-R as a screening tool for measuring traumatic distress after burn.

  • 25. Van Loey, Nancy E
    et al.
    Van de Schoot, Rens
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Faber, Albertus W
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    The Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief: Measurement invariant across European countries2013In: The journal of trauma and acute care surgery, ISSN 2163-0755, Vol. 74, no 5, p. 1321-1326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The Burn Specific Health Scale Brief (BSHS-B), which is the only multidimensional measure to evaluate burn-specific aspects of health status, has previously been validated in several languages across the world. However, the stability of the underlying construct was not cross-culturally evaluated. The current study reports on measurement invariance across two samples of Swedish- and Dutch- speaking patients with burns.

    METHODS:

    In a prospective study, 231 and 275 Swedish and Dutch-Belgian patients with burns, completed the BSHS-B at 9 or 12 months, respectively, after burn. Using a multigroup confirmatory factor analysis, measurement invariance across languages (Swedish and Dutch) was tested.

    RESULTS:

    The results of the confirmatory factor analysis in the total sample revealed that the scale structure for the earlier reported three-factor structure and the original nine-factor structure was adequate. However, an eight-factor structure in which hand function and simple abilities were merged provided the best fit. This structure was used to test measurement invariance across the two language groups. The two-group outcomes testing measurement invariance across Swedish- and Dutch-speaking patients indicated a stable, configural invariance.

    CONCLUSION:

    The BSHS-B seems to function uniformly across both language groups. The BSHS-B can be used to compare cross-cultural results in both countries.

    LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

    Prognostic study, level III.

  • 26.
    Wikehult, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Prediction of patient satisfaction with care one year after burn2009In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 194-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this prospective study was to find predictors of patient satisfaction with burn care. Sixty-nine consecutive adult patients undergoing acute treatment in a Burn Unit completed the following questionnaires: the Swedish universities Scales of Personality, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Socio-demographic data and burn severity were registered. One year later they completed the Patient Satisfaction-Results and Quality (PS-RESKVA) questionnaire containing four subscales: quality of contact with nursing staff (QCN), quality of contact with medical staff (QCM), adequate treatment information (INF), and global satisfaction with treatment (GS). Each subscale was treated as a dependent variable in separate multiple regression models. Overall, the explained variance was low to moderate (range adjusted R2 = 0.06-0.19). Variables remaining in the models were: intrusive symptoms, and the personality trait stress susceptibility for QCN; age, education, and symptoms of hyperarousal for QCM; trait irritability for INF; and age and the personality traits detachment and social desirability for GS. In conclusion, psychological and socio-demographic variables predicted satisfaction to some degree, whereas injury severity did not. The low amount of explained variance suggests that other factors, hypothetically related to care itself, determine patient satisfaction as assessed by the PS-RESKVA.

  • 27.
    Wikehult, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Hedlund, Mathilde
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Marsenic, Milica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Nyman, Sofi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Evaluation of negative emotional care experiences in burn care2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 14, p. 1923-1929Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM AND OBJECTIVE:

    To assess recollection of negative emotional experiences during burn care.

    BACKGROUND:

    Patients in intensive care frequently report negative emotional experiences. Patients with severe burns who are treated in intensive care units undergo painful care procedures, but there have been no recent evaluations of their care experiences.

    DESIGN:

    Former burn patients (n = 42) were randomly assigned to three groups: postal questionnaire, telephone interview and face-to-face interview.

    METHODS:

    Assessments included negative care experiences (feelings of uncertainty, powerlessness, being afraid, insecure, being a nuisance, or neglected), severity of injury, patient satisfaction, personality traits and psychological symptoms.

    RESULTS:

    Overall, the degree of recalled negative experiences was low and associated with greater severity of injury, more symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and lower satisfaction with care. The feeling of powerlessness was the most common, as 67% of participants had such feelings to some extent.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Overall, negative care experiences were uncommon and most prevalent among the severely injured. Such experiences were also associated with psychological symptoms and lower patient satisfaction.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    Although relatively uncommon, negative emotional care experiences should be monitored more closely during care.

  • 28.
    Wikehult, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Kildal, Morten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Patient satisfaction with burn care 1-6 years after injury2008In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 783-790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patient satisfaction is an important outcome in health care but has not been studied in relation to burn care. The aim was to explore factors related to satisfaction with care 1-6 years after a burn. Participants were 86 adult burn patients, injured on average 3.6 years previously. The Patient Satisfaction-Results and Quality (PS-RESKVA) was used to assess satisfaction. It has four subscales: Quality of contact with the nursing staff (QCN), Quality of contact with the medical staff (QCM), Adequate treatment information (INF) and Global satisfaction with treatment (GS). Further, data were gathered regarding personality traits and health. Average scores for QCN were significantly higher than scores for the other subscales, and INF received the lowest mean score. In multiple regressions, the PS-RESKVA subscales were associated with better interpersonal relationships (all PS-RESKVA subscales), more sensation seeking (QCM, INF, and GS) and less aggressiveness (QCM and GS). Other variables contributed to a lesser degree. Total amount of explained variance ranged between 18% and 25% for the PS-RESKVA subscales. In summary, satisfaction with burn care was only moderately explained by health and personality characteristics. Further, former patients rated satisfaction with nursing staff higher than other aspects of care, especially information routines.

  • 29.
    Wikehult, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, University hospital.
    Kildal, Morten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Lannerstam, Kurt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Fugl-Meyer, Axel R
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, University hospital.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Use of healthcare a long time after severe burn injury: relation to perceived health and personality characteristics2005In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, Vol. 27, no 15, p. 863-870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. The aim of the study was to evaluate which factors are associated with the use of healthcare a long time after severe burn injury.

    Method. After a review process based on clinical reasoning, 69 former burn patients out of a consecutive group treated at the Uppsala Burn Unit from 1980 – 1995 were visited in their homes and their use of care and support was assessed in a semi-structured interview. Post-burn health was assessed with the Burn-Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B) and personality was assessed with the Swedish universities Scales of Personality (SSP).

    Results.  The participants were injured on average eight years previously. Thirty-four had current contact with healthcare due to their burn injury and had significantly lower scores on three BSHS-B-domains: Simple Abilities, Work and Hand function, and significantly higher scores for the SSP-domain Neuroticism and the SSP-scales Stress Susceptibility, Lack of Assertiveness, and lower scores for Social Desirability. There was no relation to age, gender, time since injury, length of stay, or to the surface area burned.

    Conclusions. A routine screening of personality traits as a supplement to long-term follow-ups may help in identifying the patient's need for care.

  • 30.
    Willebrand, M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. psykiatri UAS.
    Andersson, G
    Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kildal, M
    Department of Surgical Sciences. plastic surgery.
    Ekselius, L
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. psykiatri UAS.
    Exploration of coping patterns in burned adults: cluster analysis of the coping with burns questionnaire (CBQ).2002In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 549-54Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 31.
    Willebrand, M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Andersson, G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kildal, Morten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. plastikkirurgi.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. plastikkirurgi.
    Ekselius, L
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. psykiatri UAS.
    Injury-related fear-avoidance, neuroticism and burn-specific health.2006In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 408-15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Book review: Body shame: conceptualisation, research and treatment.2003Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Psykiatri, UAS.
    Brännskadades återhämtning. Psykiska faktorer betydelsefulla2001Other (Other academic)
  • 34. Willebrand, Mimmie
    Brännskador och psykiska komplikationer2003Other (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Psykiatri, UAS.
    Coping with Physical Trauma: Development of a Specific Coping Instrument2006In: Advances in Psychology Research, Vol 43, Nova Science Publishers, Inc, , 2006, p. 105-125Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Presence of psychiatric morbidity and regrets about participation in trauma-related research: A pilot study2008In: General Hospital Psychiatry, ISSN 0163-8343, E-ISSN 1873-7714, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 476-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the characteristics of individuals who regret their participation in trauma-related research. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate (1) regret after participating in a longitudinal study after a burn and (2) associations with psychiatric morbidity prior to the burn. METHOD: Participants were recruited from a longitudinal study after a burn involving interviews, questionnaires, and psychological testing. Forty-two participants answered questions about regret and positive/negative consequences of participation. RESULTS: Thirty-eight participants reported no regret, while 3 reported the lowest level of regret (1 on a scale of 0-4). All 3 patients with slight regret had psychiatric morbidity prior to the burn. Among the 38 patients without regrets, 23 had prior psychiatric morbidity. Two individuals reported negative consequences of participation, both indicating that the study had elicited negative emotions. CONCLUSIONS: Regret and perceived negative consequences were infrequent. The results suggest that a longitudinal trauma-related research protocol is well tolerated by most patients with burns, despite the presence of prior psychiatric morbidity.

  • 37.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Psykiatri, UAS.
    Psykiska faktorer i anpassningen efter svår kroppsskada2005Other (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Psykiatri, UAS.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. psykiatri, UAS.
    Prediction of Psychological Health After an Accidental Burn2004In: The journal of Trauma injury, infection,and critical care, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 367-374Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Kildal, Morten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    A simplified domain structure of the Burn-Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B): A tool to improve its value in routine clinical work2008In: Journal of Trauma, ISSN 0022-5282, E-ISSN 1529-8809, Vol. 64, no 6, p. 1581-1586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Injury-specific instruments with good psychometric properties are valuable in the assessment of health status after trauma. Previous studies of burn-specific health have attempted to create broad domains such as physical and psychological health, but these domains have not been validated. In this study, burn-specific health domains were explored and validated by a factor analytic approach.

    Methods:

    Participants were 334 former burn patients injured between 1980 and 2000. Data were collected from medical charts and by a postal questionnaire, the Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B). The nine subscales of the BSHS-B were subjected to second-order factor analysis. The sample was split into two subsamples that were equal with respect to burn severity.

    Results:

    The factor structure was well replicated in each of the subsamples and in the total sample. Three internally consistent and well separated domains were derived: affect and relations (BSHS-B subscales interpersonal relationships, affect, sexuality), function (simple abilities, hand function), and skin involvement (heat sensitivity, treatment regimens, body image). The work subscale of the BSHS-B was excluded from the analysis because of consistent double loadings. The three domains had intelligible associations with injury-specific and sociodemographic variables.

    Conclusion:

    The underlying structure of the BSHS-B comprises three clinically meaningful health domains. The work subscale is not part of these domains and can be considered a separate outcome domain. The domain scores increase the understanding of outcome after burn injury and could prove useful in clinical use of the BSHS-B.

  • 40.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Kildal, Morten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Burn Specific Health up to 24 Months After the Burn: A Prospective Validation of the Simplified Model of the Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief2011In: Journal of Trauma, ISSN 0022-5282, E-ISSN 1529-8809, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 78-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Outcome after burn injury is a multidimensional concept, but few multidimensional, injury-specific outcome measures have been psychometrically evaluated. A recent cross-sectional study using the Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B) found three psychometrically sound health domains: function, skin involvement, and affect and relations. The aim of this study was to reexamine the psychometric properties of the BSHS-B using a prospective study design. Methods: Ninety-four consecutive adult patients with burns were included and asked to fill in questionnaires, the BSHS-B, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the short-form 36 (SF-36), at 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months postburn. Results: The factor structure was replicated and the three domains, function, skin involvement, and affect and relations, had excellent internal consistency. Over time the scores of function and skin involvement increased, indicating health improvement, whereas the domain affect and relations did not change over time. At 6 months and 12 months postburn, all domains were associated with burn severity. The function domain was highly associated with the SF-36 subscales physical functioning and role-physical, the affect and relations domain was highly associated with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the SF-36 subscales denoting psychological health, and the domain skin involvement was highly associated with subscales indicating role-concerns, social functioning, vitality, and mental health. Conclusion: The psychometric properties of the BSHS-B domains were excellent and they had intelligible concurrent associations with other measures. Thus, the simplified model of the BSHS-B is a reliable, valid, and useful tool in describing postburn health over time.

  • 41.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Kildal, Morten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Long-term assessment of personality after burn trauma in adults2002In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 190, no 1, p. 53-56Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42. Willebrand, Mimmie
    et al.
    Kildal, Morten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Development of the coping with burns questionnaire2001In: Personality and Individual Differences, Vol. 30, p. 1059-1072Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Low, Aili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Kildal, Morten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Pruritus, personality traits and coping in long-term follow-up of burn-injured patients2004In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 84, no 5, p. 375-80Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Pruritus is a major problem after burn injury; however, prevalence and predictors of prolonged pruritus are not known. The aims were to assess frequency of pruritus and the role of personality traits and coping in prolonged pruritus. The participants were burn patients injured 1-18 years earlier (n=248). Pruritus was assessed with an item from the Abbreviated Burn Specific Health Scale, personality was assessed with the Swedish universities Scales of Personality, and coping with the Coping with Burns Questionnaire. In all, 60% of the participants had pruritus at follow-up, however as the time after injury increased, the number of patients with persistent itch decreased. In logistic regression, 39% of the likelihood of having persistent pruritus was explained by greater extent of burn, less time after injury, and psychological features (being less assertive, and using more instrumental but less emotional support). In summary, chronic burn-related pruritus is rather common and psychological factors such as anxiety-related traits and coping are significantly associated with its presence.

  • 44.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Norlund, Fredrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kildal, Morten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Cognitive distortions in recovered burn patients: the emotional Stroop task and autobiographical memory test2002In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 465-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore cognitive distortions in recovered burn patients. Previous studies in trauma patients have shown trauma-specific attentional bias, long response latencies, and deficits in memory specificity. Eighteen former patients, burn injured 5-19 years ago and 18 matched controls performed the emotional Stroop task, including burn and general trauma-related words, and the autobiographical memory test (AMT). In addition, verbal fluency, life events, and current mood were assessed. Regarding the Stroop task, the recovered patients had longer response latencies to burn words than to neutral and trauma words, a difference not seen in the control subjects. Regarding the AMT, the memory specificity did not differ between the groups. Overall, the former patients had longer latencies than the controls and poorer verbal fluency. The present study showed that recovered burn patients display a moderate Stroop effect, i.e. an attentional bias, in spite of the fact that the injury occurred several years before the testing. This may imply that the recovered burn patients consider the burn an important issue in life. The post-burn patients also presented signs of a slight cognitive slowness as compared to the controls. This finding deserves further attention in the rehabilitation of burn patients.

  • 45.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala Univ Hosp, Burn Ctr, Dept Plast & Maxillofacial Surg, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Huss, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery. Uppsala Univ Hosp, Burn Ctr, Dept Plast & Maxillofacial Surg, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Parents' perceived quality of pediatric burn care.2018In: Journal of critical care, ISSN 0883-9441, E-ISSN 1557-8615, Vol. 43, p. 256-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To describe parents' perceived quality of pediatric burn care and evaluate factors associated with differences in perceived quality among parents.

    METHODS: 62 parents of children with burns were recruited on a Swedish national basis 0.8 to 5.6years after the child's injury. Measures were an adaptation of the Quality of Care Indices - Parent questionnaire consisting of 8 subscales and one overall question, the Impact of Event Scale -Revised, Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, and Injury-specific fear-avoidance.

    RESULTS: Ratings of quality of care were high, especially regarding Staff Attitudes, Medical Treatment, and Caring Processes. Overall satisfaction rated from 1 to 10 was on average 9.1 (SD=1.2). Overall satisfaction and specific indices of Quality of care were not associated with burn severity, parent gender, or parent age. However, Quality of care was associated with current symptoms of posttraumatic stress and depression, and parents of girls expressed being less satisfied with Participation.

    CONCLUSIONS: Parents' perceived quality of care is associated with psychological health, but not with characteristics of the child's injury or age. The results suggest that burn care can improve by involving parents of girls more and by being more attentive towards parents who themselves appear stressed or worried.

  • 46.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Injury-related fear-avoidance and symptoms of posttraumatic stress in parents of children with burns2016In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 414-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents of children with burns experience a range of psychological reactions and symptoms, and parents’ health is known to impact children's health. So far, there is little research into potential mechanisms that maintain parents’ symptoms. The aim was to investigate parental injury-related fear-avoidance, and its associations with injury severity and health measures. Parents (n = 107) of children aged 0.4–18 years that sustained burns 0.1–9.0 years previously completed questionnaires on fear-avoidance, posttraumatic stress, and health of the child. Analyses showed that the average level of fear-avoidance was low and positively associated with measures of injury severity and parents’ symptoms of posttraumatic stress, and negatively associated with parents’ ratings of their child's health. In two separate multiple regressions with parents’ symptoms of PTSD and the child's health as dependent variables, fear-avoidance made the largest contribution in both models while injury severity was non-significant. Results were not related to comorbid conditions of the child, scarring, or parent-related socio-demographic variables. In summary, injury-related fear-avoidance is more likely among parents whose children sustain more severe burns. In turn, fear-avoidance contributes significantly to parents’ symptoms of PTSD and to poorer health ratings regarding the child, irrespective of injury severity or child comorbidity.

  • 47.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Perceived support in parents of children with burns2016In: General Hospital Psychiatry, ISSN 0163-8343, E-ISSN 1873-7714, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 105-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Children sustaining burns that require treatment in a burn center have a need for multiprofessional aftercare services over a prolonged time. So far, there is little research into satisfaction with care and support after pediatric burns. The aim was to investigate parents’ perception of support after pediatric burn and associations with parent, child and injury characteristics.

    Method

    Parents (n= 101) of children aged 0.4–17.8 years completed questionnaires on support, parent’s psychological symptoms and health of the child. Time since injury was 0.1–9.0 years.

    Results

    Perceived lack of psychosocial, medical, societal or family support was reported by 21% of the parents. Lack of support was not associated with injury or sociodemographic characteristics, but it was significantly associated with parents’ symptoms of general anxiety, depression and injury-related fear avoidance, as well as parents’ ratings of their child’s general health and heat sensitivity.

    Conclusion

    Perceived support did not differ on account of burn severity or sociodemographic status. However, care providers should be more attentive to and supportive of parents signaling poorer general health in their child and cognitive beliefs that the child is at risk for harm when active and parents who themselves show signs of psychological symptoms.

  • 48.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ramklint, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Bergquist, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Huss, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Psychological problems in children with burns: Parents' reports on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire2011In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 37, no 8, p. 1309-1316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Burns may have a devastating effect on psychological health among children, although previous studies report difficulties as well as positive findings. The aims were to describe the rate of psychological problems in children with burns using a standardised instrument and to explore statistical predictors of these problems. Parents (n = 94) of children aged 3-18 years who sustained burns 0.3-9.0 years previously answered the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) covering Emotional symptoms, Conduct problems, Hyperactivity/Inattention, Peer relationship problems, Prosocial behaviour, and a Total difficulties score. Questions regarding parental psychological health and family situation were also included. The results for three of the SDQ subscales were close to the norm (10%) regarding the rate of cases where clinical problems were indicated, while the rate of cases indicated for Conduct, Peer problems and Total difficulties was 18-20%. Statistical predictors of the SDQ subscales were mainly parents' psychological symptoms, father's education, and changes in living arrangements. Visible scars were relevant for the Total difficulties score and Hyperactivity/Inattention. In summary, a slightly larger proportion of children with burns had psychological problems than is the case among children in general, and family variables exerted the most influence on parental reports of children's psychological problems.

  • 49.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Wikehult, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Acceptance of a trauma-focused survey: Do personality and health matter?2004In: General Hospital Psychiatry, ISSN 0163-8343, E-ISSN 1873-7714, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 70-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health evaluations after trauma are often performed by postal surveys, although previous studies show that some participants experience distress reactions afterwards. The aim was to explore how former burn patients react to filling in a trauma-related survey and whether the reactions are related to individual factors. The survey contained 307 questions, of which one was an open question to elicit reactions to participation. Personality was measured with the Swedish universities Scales of Personality, health with the Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief, and psychological health with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Impact of Event Scale-Revised. Participants were 78 (67%) adult burn patients, injured on average 3.9 years previously. Three groups of reactions were identified: positive/beneficial (55%), effort/time-consuming (32%), and negative/intrusive (13%). Only four participants expressed that the survey had been intrusive. Negative reactions were associated with maladaptive personality traits, poorer relationships, and more stress symptomatology, but not with burn severity or sociodemographic variables. Patients with self-inflicted injuries were evenly spread across the groups, but those with negative reactions were responsible for most of the group differences in individual factors. While a small subgroup reacted negatively, the majority accepted the trauma-focused survey and even found it beneficial.

  • 50.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Wikehult, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Social desirability, psychological symptoms and perceived health in burn injured patients2005In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 193, no 12, p. 820-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social desirability was previously seen as a nuisance in assessment, but today it is regarded as a personality trait with an influence on health. The aim was to explore relations between social desirability and health in former burn patients. Eighty-four burn patients injured on average 3.8 years ago responded to a questionnaire booklet. Social desirability was assessed with the social desirability subscale of the Swedish universities Scales of Personality, which is standardized in a normative sample. The results showed that a subgroup with high degree of social desirability displayed significantly poorer perceived health on the burn-specific health subscales heat sensitivity, work, and body image than normal responders did. There were no differences regarding age, education, injury-related variables, sick leave, or symptoms of anxiety and depression. In conclusion, participants with high social desirability were characterized by postburn problems in outdoor and work-related situations, and more self-consciousness about appearance.

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