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  • 1. Dorais, Michael
    et al.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Shriner, Christina
    Evidence for a Single Clay/Temper Source for the Manufacture of Middle and Late Helladic Aeginetan Pottery from Asine, Greece2004In: Geoarchaeology, ISSN 0883-6353, E-ISSN 1520-6548, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 657-684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an effort to further characterize the Middle and Late Helladic pottery industry on Aegina, we have analyzed amphibole in 23 sherds imported to the coastal settlement of Asine. The sherds derive from vessels of different classes and shapes and range in age from MH I-II to LH IIIB-IIIC Early. All sherds come from vessels that carry manufacturing marks, and their amphiboles have compositions that are incompatible with those of Methana, Poros, and Melos. Twenty of the sherds have amphiboles that are identical in composition and overlap a narrow range of amphibole compositions found in specific lava flows on the northern portion of Aegina. Given that the dacites across Aegina contain amphiboles with a wide range in compositions, we suggest that the narrow range of amphibole compositions in the sherds indicates that they were derived from either a specific clay source on the island, located in a stream system southeast of the prehistoric settlement at Kolonna, or that the potters used a specific temper source along the same stream system. Multiple clay or temper sources would have produced sherds with a broader range of amphibole compositions reflecting the diversity of amphibole compositions found on Aegina. One sherd has amphibole compositions indicative of an additional Aeginetan component that is not found in the other sherds. Two sherds have amphiboles with compositions that do not match any known reference amphiboles for Aegina, Methana, Poros, or Melos. These may have been derived from still unsampled dacites on Aegina or have been manufactured from materials located outside the Saronic Gulf.

  • 2.
    Finné, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturgeografi och kvartärgeologi (INK).
    Holmgren, Karin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturgeografi och kvartärgeologi (INK).
    Sundqvist, Hanna S.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturgeografi och kvartärgeologi (INK).
    Weiberg, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Climate in the eastern Mediterranean, and adjacent regions, during the past 6000 years: A review2011In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 38, no 12, p. 3153-3173Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The eastern Mediterranean, with its long archaeological and historical records, provides a unique opportunity to study human responses to climate variability. We review paleoclimate data and reconstructions from the region with a focus on the last 6000 years. We aim to provide an up-to-date source of information on climate variability and to outline present limitations and future opportunities. The review work is threefold: (1) literature review, (2) spatial and temporal analysis of proxy records, and (3) statistical estimation of uncertainties in present paleoclimate reconstructions (temperature, °C). On a regional scale the review reveals a wetter situation from 6000 to 5400 yrs BP (note: all ages in this paper are in calibrated years before present (i.e. before 1950), abbreviated yrs BP, unless otherwise stated). This is followed by a less wet period leading up to one of fully-developed aridity from c. 4600 yrs BP. There is a need for more high-resolution paleoclimate records, in order to (i) better understand regional patterns and trends versus local climate variability and to (ii) fill the gap of data from some regions, such as the Near East, Greece and Egypt. Further, we evaluate the regional occurrence of a proposed widespread climate event at 4200 yrs BP. This proposed climate anomaly has been used to explain profound changes in human societies at different locations in the region around this time. We suggest that although aridity was widespread around 4200 yrs BP in the eastern Mediterranean region, there is not enough evidence to support the notion of a climate event with rapidly drying conditions in this region.

  • 3. Galik, A.
    et al.
    Forstenpointner, G.
    Weissengruber, G.E.
    Thanheiser, U.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Smetana, R.
    Gauss, W.
    Bioarchaeological investigations at Kolonna, Aegina (Early Helladic III to Late Helladic III)2013In: Diet, Economy and Society in the Ancient Greek World: Towards a Better Integration of Archaeology and Science. Proceedings of the International Conference Held at the Netherlands Institute at Athens on 22-24 March 2010 / [ed] S. Voutsaki and S.M. Valamoti, Leuven: Peeters Publishers, 2013, p. 163-172Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4. Gauss, Walter
    et al.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Smetana, Rudolfine
    The Middle Helladic Large Building Complex at Kolonna. A Preliminary View2011In: Our Cups are Full: Pottery and Society in the Aegean Bronze Age: Papers Presented to Jeremy B. Rutter on the Occasion of his 65th Birthday / [ed] W. Gauss, M. Lindblom, R.A.K. Smith, J.C. Wright, Oxford: Archaeopress , 2011, p. 76-87Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces the so-called Large Building Complex at Kolonna, Aegina for the first time in a comprehensive way. The “Large Building Complex” is the thus far largest building found at Kolonna, except the fortification wall. The Building was constructed at the beginning of the Middle Helladic period (MH I/II) and remained in use until the beginning of the Late Helladic period (LH I/II ). Within its long history, it underwent a series of changes and modifications. Size and dimensions as well as the rich finds from its interior clearly indicate that the “Large Building Complex” is the unambiguous residential building from Middle Helladic Kolonna

  • 5. Gauss, Walter
    et al.
    Lindblom, MichaelUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.Smith, R. Angus K.Wright, James C.
    Our Cups Are Full: Pottery and Society in the Aegean Bronze Age: Papers Presented to Jeremy B. Rutter on the Occasion of his 65th Birthday2011Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 6. Gauss, Walter
    et al.
    Smetana, Rudolfine
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Pruckner, Katharina
    Kiriatzi, Evangelia
    Steier, Peter
    Weniger, Franz
    Wild, Eva-Maria
    Stratigraphic Project Aegina Kolonna2008Other (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Aeginetan Potters' Marks at Asine. A Pilot Study2002In: New Research on Old Material from Asine and Berbati: In Celebration of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Swedish Institute at Athens / [ed] B. Wells, Stockholm, 2002, p. 31-42Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Early Mycenaean Mortuary Meals at Lerna VI with Special Emphasis on their Aeginetan Components2007In: Middle Helladic Pottery and Synchronisms: Proceedings of the International Workshop held at Salzburg October 31st - November 2nd, 2004 / [ed] F. Felten, W. Gauss & R. Smetana, Wien, 2007, p. 115-135Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The integrative role played by feasting in the creation and maintenance of hierarchical social relations is well documented in the archaeological and ethnographic record. During the past decade, several archaeological contexts from the Bronze Age Aegean have been interpreted as remains of such activities. It is argued that a large portion of the mortuary remains from the two shaft graves at Lerna VI represent clear examples of this phenomenon already at the beginning of the Mycenaean period. Arguments for such an interpretation are presented here, followed by an overview of the Aeginetan component in the assemblage.

  • 9.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Funerary meals at the LH I shaft graves at Lerna2008In: Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies of the University of London, ISSN 0076-0730, E-ISSN 2041-5370, Vol. 51, p. 191-192Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Manufacture and Markings: Aeginetan Pots and Prefiring marks2003In: Argosaronikos: 1st International Conference on the History and Archaeology of the Argo-Saronic Gulf / [ed] E. Konsolaki, Athens, 2003, p. 33-39Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Marks and makers: Appearance, distribution and function of Middle and Late Helladic manufacturers' marks on Aeginetan pottery2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is an attempt to analyse the systematic marking of vessels produced on the island of Aegina in the Middle and Late Helladic periods. It deals with both the form and function of the marks, applied during the manufacture of functionally different vases.

    The first two chapters provide a background to the investigation. Chapters 3 and 4 present the morphological characteristics and the spatial and chronological contexts of the marks, both as a collective phenomenon and as individual mark types. The marks are analysed in relation to each other, as is their distribution between different ceramic classes, the vessel shapes and their extension in time and space. Chapter 5 finally envisages the possible organisation of pottery production on Aegina. The potters and their marks are viewed in their socio-economic context, as part of an extensive economic network.

    The longevity and intensity of the Gold Mica pottery production have enabled an evaluation to be made of a larger corpus of pre-firing marks in the Aegean than ever before. More than eleven hundred marked vessels from some twenty settlements, including Kolonna, have been taken into account. The results of the investigation support the attribution of Gold Mica vessels to Aegina and the existence at Kolonna of a very homogeneous and probably also nucleated, production environment.

    Several ethnographic analogies suggest that pre-firing marks on pottery are typically devised as a means of regulating economic interests among different producers within a community. There are several circumstances that lend support to this interpretation also at Middle and Late Helladic Kolonna. The technological, spatial and chronological contexts of most mark types conform very well to those expected for small workgroups and reflect their organisation and economic interests. The prefiring marks most likely served their purpose when several independent actors used the same working spaces and installations or performed different tasks.

    An elite with the means of amassing and maintaining an economic and political supremacy was in all likelihood present at Kolonna already at the beginning of the Middle Helladic period. If we accept the idea that Aeginetan pre-firing marks functioned as identification tags of persons or groups involved in pottery manufacture, we must also consider the possibility that the marks functioned as a means of regulating obligations between rulers and dependent potters.

  • 12.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Natan Valmins utgrävningar av Malthi iMessenien, Grekland, 1927-19342002Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Prefiring Potters’ Marks2007In: Midea. The Megaron Complex and Shrine Area: Excavations on the Lower Terraces 1994–1997 / [ed] G. Walberg, Philadelphia, 2007, p. 165-168Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    The Definition of Late Helladic I Revisited2010In:  :  , 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In an endnote of Dickinson’s (1974) paper on the definition of Late Helladic I, the author

    referred to the ongoing work at Ayios Stephanos as potentially important for our

    understanding of the origin of Lustrous Mycenaean Decorated (LDM) pottery. The final

    publication of the potterysequence at the settlement justifies a review of how this “transition

    to Mycenaean” is identified. The possibility to split LH I into at least two parts –an early

    “becoming” with limited means of recognition outside Laconia, and a later “being”

    identifiable over considerable areas of the Greek Mainland –leave us with the conclusion that

    the “becoming” and hence beginning of LH I cannot be monitored outside ist initial core area

    with the same set of diagnostic tools (as the later ‘being’ stage). In published deposits from

    the NE Peloponnese LDM pottery appears in analytically meaningful quantities only in the

    later phase. The pottery from the Lerna shaft grave fills is used to show that LH I Late on the

    NE Peloponnese is contemporary with the volcanic destruction level (VDL) at Akrotiri and

    the mature LM IA. Because of the large size of the Lerna shaft graves assemblages, their

    well-defined ceramic range, and intersecting position between southern and central Greece,

    they offers additional tools to sequence and evaluate LH I/LC I in other deposits.

  • 15.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    The Early Helladic Period2011In: Mastos in the Berbati Valley: An Intensive Archaeological Survey / [ed] Michael Lindblom & Berit Wells, Stockholm: Eddy.se ab , 2011, p. 53-75Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    The Middle Helladic period2011In: Mastos in the Berbati Valley: An Intensive Archaeological Survey / [ed] Michael Lindblom & Berit Wells, Stockholm: Eddy.se ab , 2011, p. 77-96Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Lindblom, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Gauss, Walter
    Kiriatzi, Evangelia
    Some Reflections on Ceramic Technology Transfer at Bronze Age Kastri on Kythera, Kolonna on Aegina, and Lerna in the Argolid2015In: The Transmission of Technical Knowledge in the Production of Ancient Mediterranean Pottery: Proceedings of the International Conferenceat the Austrian Archaeological Institute at Athens 23rd – 25th November 2012 / [ed] W. Gauss, G. Klebinder-Gauss & C. von Rüden, 2015, p. 225-237Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of novel ideas and skills in pottery manufacture at the settlements of Kastri, Kolonna, and Lernaare used to illustrate how different potting traditions in the Bronze Age Aegean intersected. The insertion of foreignceramic traits into previously established production environments are discussed as examples of acceptance (Kastri),rejection (Kolonna), and mediation (Lerna) in an attempt to nuance the complex process of ›Minoanization‹ in theAegean Bronze Age.

  • 18.
    Lindblom, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Manning, Sturt
    Malcolm and Carolyn Wiener Laboratory for Aegean and Near Eastern Dendrochronology, Cornell Tree Ring Laboratory.
    The Chronology of the Lerna Shaft Graves2011In: Our Cups are full: Pottery and Society in the Aegean Bronze Age: Papers Presented to Jeremy B. Rutter on the Occasion of his 65th Birthday / [ed] W. Gauss, M. Lindblom, R.A.K. Smith, J.C. Wright, Oxford: Archaeoppress , 2011, p. 140-153Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The chronology of the two Lerna shaft grave fills is explored. It is concluded that the assemblages derive from either a single, one-time event approximately contemporary with the Late Minoan IA Mature volcanic destruction level at Akrotiri, or two events so close in time that they can only tentatively be separated by ceramic or radiocarbon study. In the latter case, shaft grave 1 is slightly older than shaft grave 2. Because of their large size, well-defined ceramic range, and intersecting position between southern and Central Greece, the two assemblages offer additional tools to sequence and evaluate Late Helladic/Late Cycladic I deposits elsewhere

  • 19.
    Lindblom, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Mommsen, Hans
    Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn.
    Whitbread, Ian
    School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester.
    Bichrome Pottery in the MBA-LBA Central AegeanManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Lindblom, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Nordquist, Gullög Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Mommsen, Hans
    Univ Bonn, Helmholtz Inst Strahlen & Kernphys, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn, Germany.
    Two Early Helladic II terracotta rollers from Asine and their glyptic context2018In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 11, p. 81-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two Early Helladic II terracotta rollers from the Third Terrace at Asine are presented. The objects, used to impress relief decoration on pithoi and hearths, are unique in that no other examples are known from the Early Bronze Age Aegean. Their origin is discussed based on chemical characterization and their depositional contexts are reviewed from an archaeological perspective. Although there are no known impressions from these rollers on pithoi and hearths at Asine, it is shown that their owners surrounded themselves with different objects featuring similar glyptic impressions. Two such impressions find identical parallels at Tiryns and the combined evidence strongly suggest that Asine was the home for one or several potters who produced Early Helladic impressed hearths and pithoi.*

  • 21.
    Lindblom, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Wells, Berit
    Conclusions2011In: Mastos in the Berbati Valley: An Intensive Archaeological survey / [ed] Michael Lindblom & Berit Wells, Stockholm: Eddy.se ab , 2011, p. 177-179Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Lindblom, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Wells, Berit
    Mastos in the Berbati Valley: An Intensive Archaeological Survey2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents the results of a small but intensive surface survey conducted on the Mastos Hill in the Berbati Valley in 1999. While remains from the Early and Late Helladic period were known from previous excavations on its southern and eastern slopes, this is the first analysis of the entire hill. It includes a digital documentation of the local topography as well as an account of the archaeological remains retrieved in the field. The study fills a gap in different data sets and results gained through old excavations and the extensive 1988–1990 Berbati-Limnes survey. The introductory chapter summarizes previous work in the valley, discusses its ancient routes of communication and outlines the method employed in the archaeological survey. This is followed by an account of the topographical survey and the geographical information system used. In the six following chapters the archaeological remains are presented and analyzed in a diachronic fashion. It is concluded that the hill was predominantly settled in prehistory with the exception of a small stronghold in medieval times on its top terrace. A detailed petrographic study of ceramics found at different locales in the valley is also included.

  • 23.
    Weiberg, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    The Early Helladic II–III Transition at Lerna and Tiryns Revisited: Chronological Difference or Synchronous Variability?2014In: Hesperia, ISSN 0018-098X, E-ISSN 1553-5622, Vol. 83, no 3, p. 383-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lerna and the Lower Citadel of Tiryns are key sites for understanding the Early Helladic II–III transition in the northeastern Peloponnese. We argue that the differences between the two settlements do not reflect chronological variation, but rather the ways in which each settlement responded to events ca. 2200 b.c. The ceramic and architectural sequences are used to illustrate the divergent strategies practiced by the inhabitants of each site. Lerna III–IV epitomizes the renegotiation of social values during a period when centralized decision-making and coordination of economic activities was disintegrating. Activities in the coeval Lower Citadel of Tiryns, on the other hand, reflect the maintenance of continuity in a domestic setting.

  • 24.
    Weiberg, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Finné, Martin
    Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm University.
    Holmgren, Karin
    Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm University.
    Svunna landskap2010In: Hellenika, ISSN 0348-0100, Vol. 132, p. 14-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Weiberg, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Nordquist, Gullög
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Social and Environmental Dynamics in Bronze and Iron Age Greece2010In: The Urban Mind: Cultural and Environmental Dynamics / [ed] Paul J.J. Sinclair, Gullög Nordquist, Frands Herschend & Christian Isendahl, Uppsala: Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University , 2010, p. 149-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors present an overview of cultural and social resilience during more than two thousand years of fluctuating environmental circumstances in the Greek Bronze and Iron Ages. Central for discussions are four case studies focusing on discontinuities during periods of heightened societal stress combined with suggested climatic or environmental instability.

    Topics under discussion are how past environmental changes and cultural responses interact. Attempts to reconstruct human sustainability in the light of shifting environmental circumstances should aim to establish a firm sequence of events. Other important factors are discrepancies and inadequacies of environmental and archaeological datasets in the Aegean, and intra-regional variation where small-scale environmental changes have affected even neighbouring valley systems in different ways. Human decision-making and agency have been continually underestimated and under-explored, and the actual outcome of events after episodes or processes of environmental change lies in how they were perceived and dealt with by the people affected. All four case studies contain discussions on societal complexity, whether waxing or waning, and overexploitation with resulting degradation of lands is a factor for three of the four case studies. A significant change around 2200 and 1100 BCE is the disappearance on a supra-regional scale of common features in material culture, and the shift to regionalism and small-scale life, while a reverse development can be seen around 1600 BCE and 700 BCE. 

  • 26. Wild, Eva-Maria
    et al.
    Gauss, Walter
    Forstenpointner, Gerhard
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Smetana, Rudolfine
    Steier, Peter
    Thanheiser, Ursula
    Weninger, Franz
    14C dating of the Early to Late Bronze Age stratigraphic sequence of Aegina Kolonna, Greece2010In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms, ISSN 0168-583X, E-ISSN 1872-9584, Vol. 268, no 7-8, p. 1013-1021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aegina Kolonna, located in the center of the Saronic Gulf in the Aegean Mediterranean (Greece), is one of the major archaeological sites of the Aegean Bronze Age with a continuous stratigraphic settlement sequence from the Late Neolithic to the Late Bronze Age. Due to its position next to the maritime cross roads between central mainland Greece, the northeast Peloponnese, the Cyclades and Crete, the island played an important role in the trade between these regions. In the course of new excavations, which focused on the exploration of the Early, Middle and Late Bronze Age at Kolonna, several short lived samples from different settlement phases have been 14C-dated with the AMS method at the VERA laboratory. Bayesian sequencing of the 14C data according to the stratigraphic position of the samples in the profile was performed to enable estimates of the transition time between the cultural phases. The Aegina Kolonna 14C sequence is one of the longest existing so far for the Aegean Bronze Age, and therefore of major importance for the absolute Bronze Age chronology in this region. Preliminary results indicate that the Middle Helladic period seems to have started earlier and lasted longer than traditionally assumed. Further, at the present stage of our investigation we can give also a very tentative time frame for the Santorini volcanic eruption which seems to be in agreement with the science derived VDL date.

  • 27.
    Worsham, Rebecca
    et al.
    Smith Coll, Dept Class Languages & Literatures, 10 Elm St, Northampton, MA 01063 USA.
    Lindblom, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Zikidi, Claire
    Fteris 12, Kryoneri 14568, Attica, Greece.
    Preliminary report of the Malthi Archaeological Project, 2015-20162018In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 11, p. 7-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article offers preliminary results and tentative interpretations of new work at the previously excavated settlement of Malthi in Messenia, south-west Pelopponese. The work included an intensive survey of the site architecture, as well as test excavations of spaces within and outside of the fortification wall. We propose updated observations on the chronology and phasing of the site based on pottery dates from the new excavation and comment on the preserved architecture as it compares to other settlements of the period. The settlement appears to have been first inhabited in the second half of the Middle Helladic period. Little, if any, architecture from this phase can be securely identified today. At the beginning of the Late Helladic period a fortification was erected, and the entire layout of the site was transformed. The construction likely took place as a single project, as argued by the original excavator, and so indicates a significant investment of labor and capital. Such an undertaking speaks not only to local access to wealth at this time, but also compares well with changes in other Early Mycenaean communities. For yet unknown reasons, the settlement was abandoned no later than in Late Helladic IIIA1.*

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