Digitala Vetenskapliga Arkivet

Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Andersson, Marica
    et al.
    Svensson, Ola
    Swartz, Terese
    Manera, Jack L.
    Bertram, Michael G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Monash University, Australia; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Blom, Eva-Lotta
    Increased noise levels cause behavioural and distributional changes in Atlantic cod and saithe in a large public aquarium - A case study2023In: Aquaculture, Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 2693-8847, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 447-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Investigating the effects of underwater noise on aquatic animals is a research field that is receiving rapidly increasing attention. Despite this, surprisingly few studies have addressed the potential impacts of noise in a marine animal husbandry setting. In this regard, the behaviour of fish in public aquariums can be used as an indicator of well-being, and noise is known to cause behavioural changes. This case study investigates the behaviour of cod (Gadus morhua) and saithe (Pollachius virens) in a large public aquarium when exposed to increased noise levels originating from an aquarium renovation carried out by construction divers. Swimming behaviour, group formation and vertical distribution, along with yawning and scratching frequencies of the fish, were analysed from video recordings made before, during and after the exposure to increased noise levels. The same parameters were also analysed to evaluate potential effects of the presence of divers when not making renovation noise, compared to fish behaviour prior to the renovation. There was a slight change in the depth distribution of both species and a decrease in the number of scratches in cod due to the presence of divers that were not making renovation noise. In the presence of construction noises in the tank, however, both cod and saithe showed a wider array of behavioural changes, including increased swimming speed, changes in depth distribution and increased yawning frequencies. The results from this case study demonstrate that an underwater renovation with increased noise levels impacts fish behaviour and suggests that underwater noise should be considered during the management of aquatic environments, including public aquaria.

  • 2. Ilbeigi, Kayhan
    et al.
    Barata, Carlos
    Barbosa, João
    Bertram, Michael G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; Monash University, Australia.
    Caljon, Guy
    Costi, Maria Paola
    Kroll, Alexandra
    Margiotta-Casaluci, Luigi
    Thoré, Eli S. J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Bundschuh, Mirco
    Assessing Environmental Risks during the Drug Development Process for Parasitic Vector-Borne Diseases: A Critical Reflection2024In: ACS - Infectious Diseases, E-ISSN 2373-8227Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parasitic vector-borne diseases (VBDs) represent nearly 20% of the global burden of infectious diseases. Moreover, the spread of VBDs is enhanced by global travel, urbanization, and climate change. Treatment of VBDs faces challenges due to limitations of existing drugs, as the potential for side effects in nontarget species raises significant environmental concerns. Consequently, considering environmental risks early in drug development processes is critically important. Here, we examine the environmental risk assessment process for veterinary medicinal products in the European Union and identify major gaps in the ecotoxicity data of these drugs. By highlighting the scarcity of ecotoxicological data for commonly used antiparasitic drugs, we stress the urgent need for considering the One Health concept. We advocate for employing predictive tools and nonanimal methodologies such as New Approach Methodologies at early stages of antiparasitic drug research and development. Furthermore, adopting progressive approaches to mitigate ecological risks requires the integration of nonstandard tests that account for real-world complexities and use environmentally relevant exposure scenarios. Such a strategy is vital for a sustainable drug development process as it adheres to the principles of One Health, ultimately contributing to a healthier and more sustainable world.

  • 3. Lennox, Robert J.
    et al.
    Aarestrup, Kim
    Alós, Josep
    Arlinghaus, Robert
    Aspillaga, Eneko
    Bertram, Michael G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; Monash University, Australia.
    Birnie-Gauvin, Kim
    Brodin, Tomas
    Cooke, Steven J.
    Dahlmo, Lotte S.
    Dhellemmes, Félicie
    Gjelland, Karl Ø.
    Hellström, Gustav
    Hershey, Henry
    Holbrook, Christopher
    Klefoth, Thomas
    Lowerre-Barbieri, Susan
    Monk, Christopher T.
    Nilsen, Cecilie Iden
    Pauwels, Ine
    Pickholtz, Renanel
    Prchalová, Marie
    Reubens, Jan
    Říha, Milan
    Villegas-Ríos, David
    Vollset, Knut Wiik
    Westrelin, Samuel
    Baktoft, Henrik
    Positioning aquatic animals with acoustic transmitters2023In: Methods in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2041-210X, Vol. 14, no 10, p. 2514-2530Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]
    1. Geolocating aquatic animals with acoustic tags has been ongoing for decades, relying on the detection of acoustic signals at multiple receivers with known positions to calculate a 2D or 3D position, and ultimately recreate the path of an aquatic animal from detections at fixed stations.
    2. This method of underwater geolocation is evolving with new software and hardware options available to help investigators design studies and calculate positions using solvers based predominantly on time-difference-of-arrival and time-of-arrival.
    3. We provide an overview of the considerations necessary to implement positioning in aquatic acoustic telemetry studies, including how to design arrays of receivers, test performance, synchronize receiver clocks and calculate positions from the detection data. We additionally present some common positioning algorithms, including both the free open-source solvers and the ‘black-box’ methods provided by some manufacturers for calculating positions.
    4. This paper is the first to provide a comprehensive overview of methods and considerations for designing and implementing better positioning studies that will support users, and encourage further knowledge advances in aquatic systems.
  • 4. Lennox, Robert J.
    et al.
    Afonso, Pedro
    Birnie-Gauvin, Kim
    Dahlmo, Lotte S.
    Nilsen, Cecilie I.
    Arlinghaus, Robert
    Cooke, Steven J.
    Souza, Allan T.
    Jarić, Ivan
    Prchalova, Marie
    Říha, Milan
    Westrelin, Samuel
    Twardek, William
    Aspillaga, Eneko
    Kraft, Sebastian
    Šmejkal, Marek
    Baktoft, Henrik
    Brodin, Tomas
    Hellström, Gustav
    Villegas-Rios, David
    Vollset, Knut Wiik
    Adam, Timo
    Sortland, Lene K.
    Bertram, Michael G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; Monash University, Australia.
    Crossa, Marcelo
    Vogel, Emma F.
    Gillies, Natasha
    Reubens, Jan
    Electronic tagging and tracking aquatic animals to understand a world increasingly shaped by a changing climate and extreme weather events2024In: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 0706-652X, E-ISSN 1205-7533, Vol. 81, no 3, p. 326-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite great promise for understanding the impacts and extent of climate change and extreme weather events on aquatic animals, their species, and ecological communities, it is surprising that electronic tagging and tracking tools, like biotelemetry and biologging, have not been extensively used to understand climate change or develop and evaluate potential interventions that may help adapt to its impacts. In this review, we provide an overview of methodologies and study designs that leverage available electronic tracking tools to investigate aspects of climate change and extreme weather events in aquatic ecosystems. Key interventions to protect aquatic life from the impacts of climate change, including habitat restoration, protected areas, conservation translocations, mitigations against interactive effects of climate change, and simulation of future scenarios, can all be greatly facilitated by using electronic tagging and tracking. We anticipate that adopting animal tracking to identify phenotypes, species, or ecosystems that are vulnerable or resilient to climate change will help in applying management interventions such as fisheries management, habitat restoration, invasive species control, or enhancement measures that prevent extinction and strengthen the resilience of communities against the most damaging effects of climate change. Given the scalability and increasing accessibility of animal tracking tools for researchers, tracking individual organisms will hopefully also facilitate research into effective solutions and interventions against the most extreme and acute impacts on species, populations, and ecosystems.

  • 5. Pease, Jessica E.
    et al.
    Losee, James P.
    Caromile, Stephen
    Madel, Gabriel
    Lucero, Michael
    Kagley, Anna
    Bertram, Michael G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; Monash University, Australia.
    Martin, Jake M.
    Quinn, Thomas P.
    Palm, Daniel
    Hellstrom, Gustav
    Comparison of triploid and diploid rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fine-scale movement, migration and catchability in lowland lakes of western Washington2023In: Movement Ecology, E-ISSN 2051-3933, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fisheries managers stock triploid (i.e., infertile, artificially produced) rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in North American lakes to support sport fisheries while minimizing the risk of genetic introgression between hatchery and wild trout. In Washington State, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) allocates approximately US $3 million annually to stock hatchery-origin rainbow trout in > 600 lakes, yet only about 10% of them are triploids. Many lakes in Washington State drain into waters that support wild anadromous steelhead O. mykiss that are listed as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. As a result, there is a strong interest in understanding the costs and benefits associated with stocking sterile, triploid rainbow trout as an alternative to traditional diploids. The objectives of this study were to compare triploid and diploid rainbow trout in terms of: (1) contribution to the sport fishery catch, (2) fine-scale movements within the study lakes, (3) rate of emigration from the lake, and (4) natural mortality. Our results demonstrated that triploid and diploid trout had similar day-night distribution patterns, but triploid trout exhibited a lower emigration rate from the lake and lower catch rates in some lakes. Overall, triploid rainbow trout represent a viable alternative to stocking of diploids, especially in lakes draining to rivers, because they are sterile, have comparable home ranges, and less often migrate.

  • 6. Schaeffer, Andreas
    et al.
    Groh, Ksenia J.
    Sigmund, Gabriel
    Azoulay, David
    Backhaus, Thomas
    Bertram, Michael G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; Monash University, Australia.
    Almroth, Bethanie Carney
    Cousins, Ian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science.
    Ford, Alex T.
    Grimalt, Joan O.
    Guida, Yago
    Hansson, Maria C.
    Jeong, Yunsun
    Lohmann, Rainer
    Michaels, David
    Mueller, Leonie
    Muncke, Jane
    Oberg, Gunilla
    Orellana, Marcos A.
    Sanganyado, Edmond
    Schaefer, Ralf Bernhard
    Sheriff, Ishmail
    Sullivan, Ryan C.
    Suzuki, Noriyuki
    Vandenberg, Laura N.
    Venier, Marta
    Vlahos, Penny
    Wagner, Martin
    Wang, Fang
    Wang, Mengjiao
    Soehl, Anna
    Ågerstrand, Marlene
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science.
    Diamond, Miriam L.
    Scheringer, Martin
    Conflicts of Interest in the Assessment of Chemicals, Waste, and Pollution2023In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 57, no 48, p. 19066-19077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pollution by chemicals and waste impacts human and ecosystem health on regional, national, and global scales, resulting, together with climate change and biodiversity loss, in a triple planetary crisis. Consequently, in 2022, countries agreed to establish an intergovernmental science-policy panel (SPP) on chemicals, waste, and pollution prevention, complementary to the existing intergovernmental science-policy bodies on climate change and biodiversity. To ensure the SPP's success, it is imperative to protect it from conflicts of interest (COI). Here, we (i) define and review the implications of COI, and its relevance for the management of chemicals, waste, and pollution; (ii) summarize established tactics to manufacture doubt in favor of vested interests, i.e., to counter scientific evidence and/or to promote misleading narratives favorable to financial interests; and (iii) illustrate these with selected examples. This analysis leads to a review of arguments for and against chemical industry representation in the SPP's work. We further (iv) rebut an assertion voiced by some that the chemical industry should be directly involved in the panel's work because it possesses data on chemicals essential for the panel's activities. Finally, (v) we present steps that should be taken to prevent the detrimental impacts of COI in the work of the SPP. In particular, we propose to include an independent auditor's role in the SPP to ensure that participation and processes follow clear COI rules. Among others, the auditor should evaluate the content of the assessments produced to ensure unbiased representation of information that underpins the SPP's activities.

  • 7.
    Villén, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Nekoro, Marmar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy. Swedish Knowledge Center on Pharmaceuticals in the Environment, Swedish Medical Products Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kälvemark Sporrong, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Håkonsen, Helle
    Bertram, Michael G.
    Wettermark, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy. Pharmacy Center, Institute of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Estimating environmental exposure to analgesic drugs: A cross-sectional study of drug utilization patterns in the area surrounding Sweden's largest drinking water source2023In: Environmental Advances, E-ISSN 2666-7657, Vol. 12, article id 100384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Use of pharmaceuticals is continuously increasing globally and their residues are recognized as a risk for theenvironment. The aim of this study was to investigate drug utilization patterns of analgesics in relation toenvironmental hazard in the region surrounding Sweden’s largest drinking water source, Lake Mälaren. This wasexamined using sales data on pharmaceuticals from the Swedish E-health Agency. The total sales of analgesics(non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, paracetamol, other non-opioid analgesics, and opioids) for both humanand veterinary use in the region were analyzed for the years 2016 to 2020, in relation to the inherent environmental hazard for each active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). We found that a total of 454 tons of analgesicswere sold in the region during these 5 years. Classifications of environmental hazard were available for 16 out ofthe 45 studied APIs, accounting for 98.8% of the total mass in kilograms. Paracetamol, ibuprofen, and acetylsalicylic acid, which are all classified as low-hazard compounds, were the most commonly sold APIs. Diclofenac, the only pharmaceutical classified as high-hazard, was the fifth most commonly sold API, with a total soldmass of 2321 kg. The majority of the total sold mass of analgesics originated from dispensed prescriptions forhuman use in urban areas. Visualization of drug sales for humans and animals in different settings can be used toidentify the environmental burden of pharmaceuticals. Based on our study, we suggest that additional measuresto reduce the impacts of pharmaceuticals on the environment should primarily be directed to prescribing physicians in urban areas and campaigns targeted at the high over-the-counter sales of diclofenac. Moreover, it isimportant to address the fact that many pharmaceuticals currently have limited data on environmental hazard. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf