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  • 1.
    Almqvist Gref, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Falkenberg Hansen, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sonification as Catalyst in Training Manual Wheelchair Operation for Sports and Everyday Life2016In: Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Conference, SMC 2016, Sound and Music Computing , 2016, p. 9-14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a study on sonification of manual wheelchair movements is presented. The aim was to contribute to both rehabilitation contexts and in wheelchair sports contexts, by providing meaningful auditory feedback for training of manual wheelchair operation. A mapping approach was used where key parameters of manual wheelchair maneuvering were directly mapped to different sound models. The system was evaluated with a qualitative approach in experiments. The results indicate that there is promise in utilizing sonification for training of manual wheelchair operation but that the approach of direct sonification, as opposed to sonification of the deviation from a predefined goal, was not fully successful. Participants reported that there was a clear connection between their wheelchair operation and the auditory feedback, which indicates the possibility of using the system in some, but not all, wheelchair training contexts.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Anindita, Puspita Parahita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Design Approaches to Alert Sounds for Interactions in Shops2021In: Nordic Sound and Music Computing Conference, Zenodo , 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Arfvidsson, Gustav Frisk
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Ljungdahl Eriksson, Martin
    Lidbo, Håkan
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Design considerations for short alerts and notification sounds in a retail environment2021In: Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Conference, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design and noticeability of alert sounds have been widely researched and reported, and not least, notification sounds are ubiquitous in both software and hardware product development. In an ongoing research project concerning the retail industry, we aim at designing short alert sounds that only grab attention from one group of customers, while others do not register the alerts: this particular aspect has to our knowledge not yet been studied. To establish design guidelines for such alert sounds, we conducted an experiment where test subjects would experience ordinary shopping activity including background music and an ambient soundscape in a virtual reality clothing store, but with added alert sounds. We tested, specifically, six differently designed sound alerts belonging to two classes: contextual-specific congruent sounds, and incongruent sounds that did not fit the sonic context. The results disproved our assumptions that incongruent sounds would outperform the congruent and thus in the context more anticipated sounds. The findings suggest that alert sounds can be designed with subtlety and still be noticeable and that customers will not necessarily be annoyed. We present here a first approach towards design guidelines for short alert sounds in a shop environment.

     

  • 4.
    Askenfelt, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Granqvist, Svante
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hellmer, Kahl
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Orlarey, Y.
    Fober, D.
    Perifanos, K.
    Tambouratzis, G.
    Makropoulo, E.
    Chryssafidou, E.
    Arnaikos, L.
    Rattasepp, K.
    Dima, G.
    VEMUS, Virtual European Music School or A young person's interactive guide to making music2008In: Proceedings of the 28th ISME World Conference, 2008, p. 218-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5. Atienza, Ricardo
    et al.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Playing the design: Creating soundscapes through playful interaction2023In: SMC 2023 - Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Conference 2023, Sound and Music Computing Network , 2023, p. 362-369Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study takes inspiration from provocative design methods to gain knowledge on sound preferences regarding future vehicles’ designed sounds. A particular population subset was a triggering component of this study: people with hearing impairments. To that aim, we have developed a public installation in which to test a hypothetical futuristic city square. It includes three electrical vehicles whose sound can be designed by the visitor. The interface allows the user to interact and play with a number of provided sonic textures within a real-time web application, thus “playing” the design. This opens a design space of three distinct sounds that are mixed into an overall soundscape presented in a multichannel immersive environment. The paper describes the design processes involved. 

  • 6. Atienza, Ricardo
    et al.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production. Royal College of Music.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    KTH, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Playing the design: Creating soundscapes through playful interaction2023In: SMC 2023 - Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Conference 2023, Sound and Music Computing Network , 2023, p. 362-369Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study takes inspiration from provocative design methods to gain knowledge on sound preferences regarding future vehicles’ designed sounds. A particular population subset was a triggering component of this study: people with hearing impairments. To that aim, we have developed a public installation in which to test a hypothetical futuristic city square. It includes three electrical vehicles whose sound can be designed by the visitor. The interface allows the user to interact and play with a number of provided sonic textures within a real-time web application, thus “playing” the design. This opens a design space of three distinct sounds that are mixed into an overall soundscape presented in a multichannel immersive environment. The paper describes the design processes involved. 

  • 7.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Askenfelt, Anders
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Friberg, Anders
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Ternström, Sten
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Sound and Music Computing at KTH2012In: SMC Sweden 2012 Sound and Music Computing, Understanding and Practicing in Sweden: proceedings / [ed] Roberto Bresin, Kjetil Falkenberg Hansen, Stockholm: Department of Speech, Music and Hearing, Royal Institute of Technology , 2012, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 33-35Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Askenfelt, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Friberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hansen, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Ternström, Sten
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Sound and Music Computing at KTH2012In: Trita-TMH, ISSN 1104-5787, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 33-35Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The SMC Sound and Music Computing group at KTH (formerly the Music Acoustics group) is part of the Department of Speech Music and Hearing, School of Computer Science and Communication. In this short report we present the current status of the group mainly focusing on its research.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Falkenberg Hansen, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Månsson, Lisa
    Tardat, Bruno
    Musikcyklarna/Music bikes: An installation for enabling children to investigate the relationship between expressive music performance and body motion2014In: Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Sweden Conference 2014, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2014, p. 1-2Conference paper (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH.
    Falkenberg Hansen, Kjetil
    KTH.
    Dahl, S.
    Rath, M.
    Marshall, M.
    Moynihan, B.
    Devices for manipulation and control of sounding objects: The Vodhran and the Invisiball2003In: The Sounding Object / [ed] Rocchesso, D., & Fontana, F., Mondo Estremo , 2003, p. 271-295Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology - Sound and Music Computing (SMC) Group2021In: Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Conferences 2021, Sound and Music Computing Network , 2021, p. xxv-xxviConference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Dahl, Sofia
    The Radio Baton as configurable musical instrument and controller2003In: Proc. Stockholm Music Acoustics Conference, 2003, Vol. 2, p. 689-691Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Max Mathews radio baton (RB) has been produced in about 40 pieces until today. It has usually been applied as an orchestra conducting system, as interactive music composition controller using typical percussionist gestures, and as a controller for sound synthesis models. In the framework of the Sounding Object EU founded project, the RB has found new applications scenarios. Three applications were based on this controller. This was achieved by changing the gesture controls. Instead of the default batons, a new radio sender that fits the fingertips was developed. This new radio sender allows musicians’ interaction based on hand gestures and it can also fit different devices. A Pd model of DJ scratching techniques (submitted to SMAC03) was controlled with the RB and the fingertip radio sender. This controller allows DJs a direct control of sampled sounds maintaining hand gestures similar to those used on vinyl. The sound model of a bodhran (submitted to SMAC03) was controlled with a traditional playing approach. The RB was controlled with a traditional bodhran double beater with one fingertip radio sender at each end. This allowed detection of the beater position on the RB surface, the surfaced corresponding to the membrane in the sound model. In a third application the fingertip controller was used to move a virtual ball rolling along the elastic surface of a box placed over the surface of the RB. The DJ console and the virtual bodhran were played in concerts.

  • 13.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Karjalainen, Matti
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Mäki-Patola, Teemu
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Kanerva, Aki
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Huovilainen, Antti
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Jordá, Sergi
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    Kaltenbrunner, Martin
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    Geiger, Günter
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    Bencina, Ross
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    de Götzen, Amalia
    University of Padua.
    Rocchesso, Davide
    IUAV University of Venice.
    Controlling sound production2008In: Sound to Sense, Sense to Sound: A state of the art in Sound and Music Computing / [ed] Polotti, Pietro; Rocchesso, Davide, Berlin: Logos Verlag , 2008, p. 447-486Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Dravins, Christina
    et al.
    The National Agency for Special Needs Education and Schools.
    Besouw, Rachel van
    ISVR, University of Southampton.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Kuške, Sandra
    Latvian Children's Hearing Centre.
    Exploring and enjoying non-speech sounds through a cochlear implant: The therapy of music2010In: 11th International Conference on Cochlear Implants and other Implantable Technologies: Stockholm Sweden, June 30-July 3, 2010, Stockholm: Karolinska University Hospital , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cochlear implant technology was initially designed to promote reception of speech sounds; however, music enjoyment remains a challenge. Music is an influential ingredient in our well-being, playing an important role in our cognitive, physical and social development. For many cochlear implant recipients it is not feasible to communicate how sounds are perceived, and consequently the benefits of music listening may be reduced. Non-speech sounds may also be important to persons with multiple functional deficits that relay on information additional to verbatim for participating in communication. Deaf-born children with multiple functional deficits constitute a special vulnerable group as lack of reaction to sound often is discouraging to caregivers. Individually adapted tools and methods for sound awareness may promote exploration and appreciation of the information mediated by the implant. Two current works involving habilitation through sound production and music will be discussed. First, the results from a pilot study aiming at finding musical toys that can be adapted to help children explore their hearing with engaging sounds and expressive interfaces will be presented. The findings indicate that children with multiple functional deficits can be more inclined to use the auditory channel for communication and play than the caregivers would anticipate. Second, the results of a recent questionnaire study, which compared the music exposure and appreciation of preschool cochlear implant recipients with their normally hearing peers will be presented. The data from this study indicate that preschool children with cochlear implants spend roughly the same amount of time interacting with musical instruments at home and watching television programmes and DVDs which include music. However, the data indicate that these children receive less exposure to recorded music without visual stimuli and show less sophisticated responses to music. The provision and supported use of habilitation materials which encourage interaction with music might therefore be beneficial.

  • 15.
    Dravins, Christina
    et al.
    The National Agency for Special Needs Education and Schools.
    van Besouw, Rachel
    ISVR, University of Southampton.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Kuske, Sandra
    Latvian Children's Hearing Centre.
    Exploring and enjoying non-speech sounds through a cochlear implant: the therapy of music2010In: 11th International Conference on Cochlear Implants and other Implantable Technologies, Karolinska University Hospital, 2010, p. 356-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cochlear implant technology was initially designed to promote reception ofspeech sounds; however, music enjoyment remains a challenge. Music is aninfluential ingredient in our well-being, playing an important role in ourcognitive, physical and social development. For many cochlear implantrecipients it is not feasible to communicate how sounds are perceived, andconsequently the benefits of music listening may be reduced. Non-speechsounds may also be important to persons with multiple functional deficitsthat relay on information additional to verbatim for participating incommunication. Deaf-born children with multiple functional deficitsconstitute a special vulnerable group as lack of reaction to sound oftenis discouraging to caregivers. Individually adapted tools and methods forsound awareness may promote exploration and appreciation of theinformation mediated by the implant.Two current works involving habilitation through sound production andmusic will be discussed. First, the results from a pilot study aiming atfinding musical toys that can be adapted to help children explore theirhearing with engaging sounds and expressive interfaces will be presented.The findings indicate that children with multiple functional deficits canbe more inclined to use the auditory channel for communication and playthan the caregivers would anticipate.Second, the results of a recent questionnaire study, which compared themusic exposure and appreciation of preschool cochlear implant recipientswith their normally hearing peers will be presented. The data from thisstudy indicate that preschool children with cochlear implants spendroughly the same amount of time interacting with musical instruments athome and watching television programmes and DVDs which include music.However, the data indicate that these children receive less exposure torecorded music without visual stimuli and show less sophisticatedresponses to music. The provision and supported use of habilitationmaterials which encourage interaction with music might therefore bebeneficial.

  • 16.
    Dubus, Gaël
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    An overview of sound and music applications for Android available on the market2012In: Proceedings of the 9th Sound and Music Computing Conference, 2012, p. 541-546Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a database of sound-based applications running on the Android mobile platform. The longterm objective is to provide a state-of-the-art of mobile applications dealing with sound and music interaction. After exposing the method used to build up and maintain the database using a non-hierarchical structure based on tags, we present a classification according to various categories of applications, and we conduct a preliminary analysis of the repartition of these categories reflecting the current state of the database.

  • 17.
    Dubus, Gaël
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    An overview of sound and music applications for Android available on the market2012In: Proceedings of the 9th Sound and Music Computing Conference, SMC 2012 / [ed] Serafin, Stefania, Sound and music Computing network , 2012, p. 541-546Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a database of sound-based applications running on the Android mobile platform. The longterm objective is to provide a state-of-the-art of mobile applications dealing with sound and music interaction. After exposing the method used to build up and maintain the database using a non-hierarchical structure based on tags, we present a classification according to various categories of applications, and we conduct a preliminary analysis of the repartition of these categories reflecting the current state of the database.

  • 18.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Falkenberg Hansen, Kjetil
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    University College of Opera, Sweden.
    Exploring the design space: Prototyping “The Throat v3” for the Elephant Man opera2011In: Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Conference, SMC 2011, Sound and music Computing network, Sound and music Computing network , 2011, p. 141-147Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing new technology for artistic practice requires other methods than classical problem solving. Some of the challenges involved in the development of new musical instruments have affinities to the realm of wicked problems. Wicked problems are hard to define and have many different solutions that are good or bad (not true or false). The body of possible solutions to a wicked problem can be called a design space and exploring that space must be the objective of a design process. In this paper we present effective methods of iterative design and participatory design that we have used in a project developed in collaboration between the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) and the University College of Opera, both in Stockholm. The methods are outlined, and examples are given of how they have been applied in specific situations. The focus lies on prototyping and evaluation with user participation. By creating and acting out scenarios with the user, and thus asking the questions through a prototype and receiving the answers through practice and exploration, we removed the bottleneck represented by language and allowed communication beyond verbalizing. Doing this, even so-called tacit knowledge could be activated and brought into the development process.

  • 19.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    NIME Design and Contemporary Music Practice: Benefits and Challenges2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the question of how the developmentof new musical artifacts can benet from deeply engagingwith contemporary musical practice. With the novel ideasproduced by the NIME community manifested in musicalinstruments in continuous use, new research questions canbe answered and new sources of knowledge can be explored.This can also be very helpful in evaluation, as it is possi-ble to evaluate the qualities of an instrument in a speciedcontext, rather than evaluating a prototyped instrument onthe basis of its unrealised potential. The information fromsuch evaluation can then be fed back into the developmentprocess, allowing researchers to probe musical practice itselfwith their designs.

  • 20.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    Univ Coll Opera, Stockholm.
    Artistically Directed Prototyping in Development and in Practice2012In: Journal of New Music Research, ISSN 0929-8215, E-ISSN 1744-5027, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 377-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of technology in artistic contexts presents interesting challenges regarding the processes in which engineers, artists and performers work together. The artistic intent and goals of the participants are relevant both when shaping the development practice, and in defining and refining the role of technology in practice. In this paper we present strategies for structuring the development process, based on iterative design and participatory design. The concepts are described in theory and examples are given of how they have been successfully applied. The cases make heavy use of different types of prototyping and this practice is also discussed. The development cases all relate to a single artifact, a gestural voice processing instrument called The Throat. This artifact has been in use since it was developed, and from that experience, three cases are presented. The focus of these cases is on how artistic vision through practice can recontextualize technology, and, without rebuilding it, redefine it and give it a new role to play.

  • 21.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    university College of Opera, Sweden.
    Artistically directed prototyping in development and in practice2012In: Journal of New Music Research, ISSN 0929-8215, E-ISSN 1744-5027, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 377-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of technology in artistic contexts presents interestingchallenges regarding the processes in which engineers, artists andperformers work together. The artistic intent and goals of the participantsare relevant both when shaping the development practice, and in definingand refining the role of technology in practice. In this paper wepresent strategies for structuring the development process, basedon iterative design and participatory design. The concepts are describedin theory and examples are given of how they have been successfullyapplied. The cases make heavy use of different types of prototypingand this practice is also discussed. The development cases all relateto a single artifact, a gestural voice processing instrument calledThe Throat. This artifact has been in use since it was developed,and from that experience, three cases are presented. The focus ofthese cases is on how artistic vision through practice can recontextualizetechnology, and, without rebuilding it, redefine it and give it anew role to play.

  • 22.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    University College of Opera, France .
    Exploring the design space: Prototyping “The Throat v3” for the Elephant Man opera2011In: Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Conference, SMC 2011, Sound and music Computing network , 2011, p. 141-147Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing new technology for artistic practice requires other methods than classical problem solving. Some of the challenges involved in the development of new musical instruments have affinities to the realm of wicked problems. Wicked problems are hard to define and have many different solutions that are good or bad (not true or false). The body of possible solutions to a wicked problem can be called a design space and exploring that space must be the objective of a design process. In this paper we present effective methods of iterative design and participatory design that we have used in a project developed in collaboration between the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) and the University College of Opera, both in Stockholm. The methods are outlined, and examples are given of how they have been applied in specific situations. The focus lies on prototyping and evaluation with user participation. By creating and acting out scenarios with the user, and thus asking the questions through a prototype and receiving the answers through practice and exploration, we removed the bottleneck represented by language and allowed communication beyond verbalizing. Doing this, even so-called tacit knowledge could be activated and brought into the development process.

  • 23.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    University College of Opera, France .
    Exploring the design space: Prototyping "The Throat V3"for the elephant man opera2011In: Proceedings of the 8th Sound and Music Computing Conference, SMC 2011, Padova, Italy: Padova University Press , 2011, p. 141-147Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing new technology for artistic practice requires other methods than classical problem solving. Some of the challenges involved in the development of new musical instruments have affinities to the realm of wicked problems. Wicked problems are hard to define and have many different solutions that are good or bad (not true or false). The body of possible solutions to a wicked problem can be called a design space and exploring that space must be the objective of a design process.In this paper we present effective methods of iterative design and participatory design that we have used in a project developed in collaboration between the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) and the University College of Opera, both in Stockholm. The methods are outlined, and examples are given of how they have been applied in specific situations.The focus lies on prototyping and evaluation with user participation. By creating and acting out scenarios with the user, and thus asking the questions through a prototype and receiving the answers through practice and exploration, we removed the bottleneck represented by language and allowed communication beyond verbalizing. Doing this, even so-called tacit knowledge could be activated and brought into the development process.

  • 24.
    Falkenberg Hansen, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    The acoustics and performance of DJ scratching, Analysis and modelling2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on the analysis and modeling of scratching, in other words, the DJ (disk jockey) practice of using the turntable as a musical instrument. There has been experimental use of turntables as musical instruments since their invention, but the use is now mainly ascribed to the musical genre hip-hop and the playing style known as scratching. Scratching has developed to become a skillful instrument-playing practice with complex musical output performed by DJs. The impact on popular music culture has been significant, and for many, the DJ set-up of turntables and a mixer is now a natural instrument choice for undertaking a creative music activity. Six papers are included in this thesis, where the first three approach the acoustics and performance of scratching, and the second three approach scratch modeling and the DJ interface. Additional studies included here expand on the scope of the papers.

    For the acoustics and performance studies, DJs were recorded playing both demonstrations of standard performance techniques, and expressive performances on sensor-equipped instruments. Analysis of the data revealed that there are both differences and commonalities in playing strategies between musicians, and between expressive intentions. One characteristic feature of scratching is the range of standard playing techniques, but in performances it seems DJs vary the combination of playing techniques more than the rendering of these techniques. The third study describes some of the acoustic parameters of typical scratch improvisations and looks at which musical parameters are typically used for expressive performances. Extracted acoustic and performance parameters from the data show the functional ranges within which DJs normally play.

    Unlike traditional musical instruments, the equipment used for scratching was not intended to be used for creating music. The interface studies focus on traditional as well as new interfaces for DJs, where parameter mappings between input gestures and output signal are described. Standard performance techniques have been modeled in software called Skipproof, based on results from the first papers. Skipproof was used for testing other types of controllers than turntables, where complex DJ gestures could be manipulated using simplified control actions, enabling even non-experts to play expressively within the stylistic boundaries of DJ scratching. The last paper describes an experiment of using an existing hardware platform, the Reactable, to help designing and prototyping the interaction between different sound models and instrument interfaces, including scratching and Skipproof.

    In addition to the included papers, studies were conducted of expressivity, description of the emotional contents of scratching, DJ playing activities, and the coupling between playing techniques and sample. The physical affordances of the turntable, mixer and samples, as well as genre conventions of hip-hop, are assumed to explain some of the findings that distinguish scratching from other instrumental sounds or practices.

    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 25.
    Falkenberg Hansen, Kjetil
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Complex Gestural Audio Control: The Case of Scratching2003In: The Sounding Object / [ed] Rocchesso, D., & Fontana, F., Mondo Estremo , 2003, p. 221-269Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Musikkommunikation och ljudinteraktion2021In: Introduktion till medieteknik / [ed] Pernilla Falkenberg Josefsson, Mikael Wiberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2021, p. 155-166Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm. KTH.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Jazz. KTH.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production. KTH.
    Misgeld, Olof
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. KTH.
    Mattias, Sköld
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting. KTH.
    Student involvement in sound and music computing research: Current practices at KTH and KMH2019In: Combined proceedings of the Nordic Sound and Music Computing Conference 2019 and the Interactive Sonification Workshop 2019, 2019, p. 36-42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To engage students in and beyond course activities has been a working practice both at KTH Sound and Music Computing group and at KMH Royal College of Music since many years. This paper collects experiences of involving students in research conducted within the two institutions.  We describe how students attending our courses are given the possibility to be involved in our research activities, and we argue that their involvement both contributes to develop new research and benefits the students in the short and long term.  Among the assignments, activities, and tasks we offer in our education programs are pilot experiments, prototype development, public exhibitions, performing, composing, data collection, analysis challenges, and bachelor and master thesis projects that lead to academic publications.

  • 28.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm. KTH.
    Latupeirissa, Adrian Benigno
    KTH.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production. KTH.
    Unproved methods from the frontier in the course curriculum: A bidirectional and mutually beneficial research challenge2020In: INTED2020 Proceedings, IATED , 2020, p. 7033-7038Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we report the experiences of students and teachers in a master course in Musical Communication and Music Technology at KTH Royal Institute of Technology. The students were exposed to vocal sketching [1], a novel sound design method, both as their course material and for the examination. The results in terms of learning outcome and course experience were confirmed and more than convincing, while the results in terms of validating the efficacy of the method were meagre.As part of our research, we designed an experiment where the students first interviewed preschool children who were asked to describe a fantasy musical instrument and then built it. The course schedule included lectures on voice sketching, sound synthesis, sound quality, new musical instruments, parameter mapping, and music programming. The project work and idea was presented during the first lecture, eight weeks before meeting the children. The interview took place in a workshop at the Swedish Museum for Performing Arts who had an exhibition of new musical instruments. Student/child pairs visited the exhibition in order to 1) familiarize themselves, 2) establish communication, and 3) get a common point of reference in terms of the exhibited instruments. After this process, the pairs completed an interview session inspired by [2]. The parents and teacher could join in if desired. The students got two weeks to build the instruments and present these at the museum. The purpose was not to evaluate the instruments, but to explore the vocal sketch method. The design and building phase was a prototyping task which the students were comfortable with. All design decisions needed to be set in relation to the course literature. All the presented projects followed a scenario- and contextual-inspired design approach [3] where a target solution needed to be established quickly grounded on a basic understanding of the agent (the child), its goals, and its presumed actions [4], and where the child mainly acted as informant [5]. While all the children could voice sketch, few actually did so in the interview. Despite this, the finished instruments matched the expectations of the children, and the course work satisfied the intended learning outcomes. As a research outcome, we suggest that future studies should include training vocal sketch techniques to produce suitable sounds. As for the pedagogical outcome, we are convinced from both the high quality of the works and the unusually positive course evaluations compared to previous years that the unproved research method was appropriate as course material. The bidirectional challenge in the research where students know that the method is experimental is hypothesized to further boost student motivation.

  • 29.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm. KTH.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production. KTH.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH.
    Creating digital musical instruments with and for children: Including vocal sketching as a method for engaging in codesign2020In: Human Technology, E-ISSN 1795-6889Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A class of master of science students and a group of preschool children codesigned new digital musical instruments based on workshop interviews involving vocal sketching, a method for imitating and portraying sounds. The aim of the study was to explore how the students and children would approach vocal sketching as one of several design methods. The children described musical instruments to the students using vocal sketching and other modalities (verbal, drawing, gestures). The resulting instruments built by the students were showcased at the Swedish Museum of Performing Arts in Stockholm. Although all the children tried vocal sketching during preparatory tasks, few employed the method during the workshop. However, the instruments seemed to meet the children’s expectations. Consequently, even though the vocal sketching method alone provided few design directives in the given context, we suggest that vocal sketching, under favorable circumstances, can be an engaging component that complements other modalities in codesign involving children.

  • 30.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Latupeirissa, Adrian Benigno
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Creating digital musical instruments with and for children: Including vocal sketching as a method for engaging in codesign2020In: Human Technology, E-ISSN 1795-6889, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 348-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A class of master of science students and a group of preschool children codesigned new digital musical instruments based on workshop interviews involving vocal sketching, a method for imitating and portraying sounds. The aim of the study was to explore how the students and children would approach vocal sketching as one of several design methods. The children described musical instruments to the students using vocal sketching and other modalities (verbal, drawing, gestures). The resulting instruments built by the students were showcased at the Swedish Museum of Performing Arts in Stockholm. Although all the children tried vocal sketching during preparatory tasks, few employed the method during the workshop. However, the instruments seemed to meet the children’s expectations. Consequently, even though the vocal sketching method alone provided few design directives in the given context, we suggest that vocal sketching, under favorable circumstances, can be an engaging component that complements other modalities in codesign involving children.

  • 31.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ljungdahl Eriksson, Martin
    Frid, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Otterbring, Tobias
    Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov
    Auditory notification of customer actions in a virtual retail environment: Sound design, awareness and attention2021In: Proceedings of International Conference on Auditory Displays ICAD 2021, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Oestreicher, Lars
    Educating for inclusion: Teaching Design for all in the wild as a motivator2023In: Proceedings of the Nordic Network for Disability Research, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33. Fober, D.
    et al.
    Letz, S.
    Orlarey, Y.
    Askenfelt, Anders
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Schoonderwaldt, Erwin
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Speech, Music and Hearing.
    IMUTUS: an interactive music tuition system2004In: Proc. of the Sound and Music Computing Conference (SMC 04), October 20-22, 2004, IRCAM, Paris, France, 2004, p. 97-103Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Friberg, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Fabiani, Marco
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Enabling emotional expression and interaction with new expressive interfaces2009In: Front. Hum. Neurosci. Conference Abstract: Tuning the Brain for Music, 2009, Vol. 9Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Frid, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Designing and reporting research on sound design and music for health: Methods and frameworks for impact2021In: Doing Research in Sound Design / [ed] Michael Filimowicz, Focal Press , 2021, p. 125-150Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents key methodological aspects to consider for researchers in the fields of sound design and music computing when evaluating and making strategic choices for conducting research targeting health, accessibility and disability. We present practical suggestions for how to effectively increase the impact in the research community based on existing methods commonly used in evidence-based research. Although many of the described models, frameworks and methods are not novel, they have so far only been extensively applied in music therapy studies and music medicine interventions, but not in sound design research nor music computing. The frameworks presented here are gathered from, primarily, practices concerning systematic reviews. We conclude with a discussion about the current state of the field and provide examples of how proposed frameworks and guidelines can be used when reporting results from quantitative research studies to systematic reviews.

  • 36.
    Frid, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Inst Rech & Coordinat Acoust Mus IRCAM, Sci & Technol Mus & Son STMS, UMR9912, Paris, France..
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Agres, Kat
    Natl Univ Singapore, Ctr Mus & Hlth, Yong Siew Toh Conservatory Mus, Singapore, Singapore..
    Lucas, Alex
    Queens Univ Belfast, Son Arts Res Ctr, Belfast, North Ireland..
    Editorial: New advances and novel applications of music technologies for health, well-being, and inclusion2024In: Frontiers in Computer Science, E-ISSN 2624-9898, Vol. 6, article id 1358454Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Frid, Emma
    et al.
    KTH.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production. KTH.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm. KTH.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH.
    Sound Forest - Evaluation of an Accessible Multisensory Music Installation2019In: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems / [ed] ACM, ACM: ACM Publications, 2019, Vol. 2019, p. 1-12, article id 677Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sound Forest is a music installation consisting of a room with light-emitting interactive strings, vibrating platforms and speakers, situated at the Swedish Museum of Performing Arts. In this paper we present an exploratory study focusing on evaluation of Sound Forest based on picture cards and interviews. Since Sound Forest should be accessible for everyone, regardless age or abilities, we invited children, teens and adults with physical and intellectual disabilities to take part in the evaluation. The main contribution of this work lies in its fndings suggesting that multisensory platforms such as Sound Forest, providing whole-body vibrations, can be used to provide visitors of diferent ages and abilities with similar associations to musical experiences. Interviews also revealed positive responses to haptic feedback in this context. Participants of diferent ages used diferent strategies and bodily modes of interaction in Sound Forest, with activities ranging from running to synchronized music-making and collaborative play.

  • 38.
    Frid, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KMH Royal College of Music, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sound Forest - Evaluation of an Accessible Multisensory Music Installation2019In: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM , 2019, p. 1-12, article id 677Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sound Forest is a music installation consisting of a room with light-emitting interactive strings, vibrating platforms and speakers, situated at the Swedish Museum of Performing Arts. In this paper we present an exploratory study focusing on evaluation of Sound Forest based on picture cards and interviews. Since Sound Forest should be accessible for everyone, regardless age or abilities, we invited children, teens and adults with physical and intellectual disabilities to take part in the evaluation. The main contribution of this work lies in its fndings suggesting that multisensory platforms such as Sound Forest, providing whole-body vibrations, can be used to provide visitors of diferent ages and abilities with similar associations to musical experiences. Interviews also revealed positive responses to haptic feedback in this context. Participants of diferent ages used diferent strategies and bodily modes of interaction in Sound Forest, with activities ranging from running to synchronized music-making and collaborative play.

  • 39.
    Frid, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ljungdahl Eriksson, Martin
    Otterbring, Tobias
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lidbo, Håkan
    Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov
    On Designing Sounds to Reduce Shoplifting in Retail Environments2021Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Gref, A. A.
    et al.
    KTH.
    Elblaus, L.
    KTH.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology. KTH.
    Sonification as catalyst in training manual wheelchair operation for sports and everyday life2016In: Proceedings of the 13th Sound and Music Computing Conference, SMC 2016: 31.8 - 3.9.2016, Hamburg, Germany / [ed] Grossmann R.; Hajdu G., Hamburg: Zentrum fur Mikrotonale Musik und Multimediale Komposition (ZM4) , 2016, p. 9-14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a study on sonification of manual wheelchair movements is presented. The aim was to contribute to both rehabilitation contexts and in wheelchair sports contexts, by providing meaningful auditory feedback for training of manual wheelchair operation. A mapping approach was used where key parameters of manual wheelchair maneuvering were directly mapped to different sound models. The system was evaluated with a qualitative approach in experiments. The results indicate that there is promise in utilizing sonification for training of manual wheelchair operation but that the approach of direct sonification, as opposed to sonification of the deviation from a predefined goal, was not fully successful. Participants reported that there was a clear connection between their wheelchair operation and the auditory feedback, which indicates the possibility of using the system in some, but not all, wheelchair training contexts.

  • 41.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    DJs and turntablism2015In: The Cambridge Companion to Hip-hop / [ed] Williams, Justin A., Cambridge University Press, 2015, p. 42-55Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Expressivity and musical shape in turntablism: Response to Greasley and Prior2013In: Empirical Musicology Review, E-ISSN 1559-5749, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 44-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This commentary to Greasley and Prior’s paper “Mixtapes and turntablism: DJs’ perspective on musical shape” extends the findings of the study by looking at the turntablism perspective. First, a general discussion on the study’s method and background is given. Then, the role of turntables as musical instruments in creating musical shape is outlined. Finally, some relationships between turntablism techniques, expressive performances and musical shape are presented. In general, the findings in the study support previously published studies in this insufficiently researched area.

  • 43.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sound and Music Computing.
    Expressivity and musical shape in turntablism: Response to Greasley and Prior2013In: Empirical Musicology Review, E-ISSN 1559-5749, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 44-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This commentary to Greasley and Prior's paper "Mixtapes and turntablism: DJs' perspective on musical shape" extends the findings of the study by looking at the turntablism perspective. First, a general discussion on the study's method and background is given. Then, the role of turntables as musical instruments in creating musical shape is outlined. Finally, some relationships between turntablism techniques, expressive performances and musical shape are presented. In general, the findings in the study support previously published studies in this insufficiently researched area.

  • 44.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Music Besides Grooves2002In: Pitch - Mutating Turntables: Argos Festival Catalogue 2002 / [ed] Depraetere, Frie; Willemsen, Paul, Argos Editions , 2002, p. 136-146Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Musical structure: A translation of István Ipolyi: Innføring i Musikkspråkets Opprinnelse og Struktur (1952)2006In: TMH-QPSR, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 35-43Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is an abbreviated and commented translation of Istv´an Ipolyi’s monogram on the origins and structure of the language of music. Theories of structure in music, based on musical analysis, support assumptions that the origins of music lie in our early and primitive forms of expression, as observed in both infants and animals. Several models of musical structure are presented, which can improve our understanding of expression in music. The monogram was written in Norwegian in 1952 and published by J. W. Eides Forlag in Bergen, Norway. The translator is a native Norwegian speaker.

  • 46.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Playing the turntable: An introduction to scratching2001In: KTH Speech, Music and Hearing Quarterly Progress and Status Report, Vol. 42, p. 69-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the popular and rarely studied art form of manipulating a vinyl record by rhythmically dragging and pushing it, commonly labelled “scratching”. With sufficient practise, a Disc Jockey (DJ) can have great control over the sounds and treat the turntable as an expressive musical instrument. Even though a digital-based model of scratching might seem preferable to the vulnerable vinyl record, the acoustical behaviour of the scratch has not been formally studied until now. To gain information of this behaviour a DJ was asked to perform some typical scratching patterns. These common playing techniques and the corresponding sounds have been analysed. Since the focus of the article is on the basics of how the instrument works, an overview on standardized equipment and alternative equipment is given.

  • 47.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    The acoustics and performance of DJ scratching: analysis and modeling2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on the analysis and modeling of scratching, in other words, the DJ (disk jockey) practice of using the turntable as a musical instrument. There has been experimental use of turntables as musical instruments since their invention, but the use is now mainly ascribed to the musical genre hip-hop and the playing style known as scratching. Scratching has developed to become a skillful instrument-playing practice with complex musical output performed by DJs. The impact on popular music culture has been significant, and for many, the DJ set-up of turntables and a mixer is now a natural instrument choice for undertaking a creative music activity. Six papers are included in this thesis, where the first three approach the acoustics and performance of scratching, and the second three approach scratch modeling and the DJ interface. Additional studies included here expand on the scope of the papers.

    For the acoustics and performance studies, DJs were recorded playing both demonstrations of standard performance techniques, and expressive performances on sensor-equipped instruments. Analysis of the data revealed that there are both differences and commonalities in playing strategies between musicians, and between expressive intentions. One characteristic feature of scratching is the range of standard playing techniques, but in performances it seems DJs vary the combination of playing techniques more than the rendering of these techniques. The third study describes some of the acoustic parameters of typical scratch improvisations and looks at which musical parameters are typically used for expressive performances. Extracted acoustic and performance parameters from the data show the functional ranges within which DJs normally play.

    Unlike traditional musical instruments, the equipment used for scratching was not intended to be used for creating music. The interface studies focus on traditional as well as new interfaces for DJs, where parameter mappings between input gestures and output signal are described. Standard performance techniques have been modeled in software called Skipproof, based on results from the first papers. Skipproof was used for testing other types of controllers than turntables, where complex DJ gestures could be manipulated using simplified control actions, enabling even non-experts to play expressively within the stylistic boundaries of DJ scratching. The last paper describes an experiment of using an existing hardware platform, the Reactable, to help designing and prototyping the interaction between different sound models and instrument interfaces, including scratching and Skipproof.

    In addition to the included papers, studies were conducted of expressivity, description of the emotional contents of scratching, DJ playing activities, and the coupling between playing techniques and sample. The physical affordances of the turntable, mixer and samples, as well as genre conventions of hip-hop, are assumed to explain some of the findings that distinguish scratching from other instrumental sounds or practices.

  • 48.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    The basics of scratching2002In: Journal of New Music Research, ISSN 0929-8215, E-ISSN 1744-5027, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 357-365Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    The basics of scratching2002In: Journal of New Music Research, ISSN 0929-8215, E-ISSN 1744-5027, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 357-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the popular and rarely studied art form of manipulating a vinyl record by rhythmically dragging and pushing it, commonly labelled “scratching.” With sufficient practice, a Disc Jockey (DJ) can have great control over the sound produced and treat the turntable as an expressive musical instrument. Even though a digital-based model of scratching might seem preferable to the vulnerable vinyl record, and such models are being manufactured today, the acoustical behaviour of the scratch has not been formally studied until now. To gain information of this behaviour, a DJ was asked to perform some typical scratching patterns. These common playing techniques and the corresponding sounds have been analysed. Since the focus of the article is on the basics of how the instrument works, an overview on standardized equipment and alternative equipment is also given.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Final draft version
  • 50.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Södertörn University.
    The turntable: The instrument of hip-hop2015In: The Cambridge Companion to Hip-Hop / [ed] Williams, Justin A., Cambridge University Press , 2015, p. 42-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
123 1 - 50 of 127
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