Digitala Vetenskapliga Arkivet

Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Adermon, Adrian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Ek, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Graetz, Georg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Yakymovych, Yaroslav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Understanding occupational wage growthManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a new identification strategy, we jointly estimate the growth in occupationalwage premia as well as time-varying occupation-specific life-cycle profiles for Swedishworkers 1996–2013. We document a substantial increase in between-occupation wageinequality due to differential growth in premia. The association of wage premiumgrowth and employment growth is positive, suggesting that premium growth ispredominantly driven by demand side factors. We also find that wage growth dueto occupation-specific skill acquisition was more dispersed in the early years of thesample period. Our results are robust to allowing for occupation-level changes inreturns to cognitive and psycho-social skills.

  • 2.
    Athey, Susan
    et al.
    Stanford Graduate School of Business.
    Simon, Lisa K.
    Revelio Labs.
    Skans, Oskar N.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Labor Studies (UCLS).
    Vikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Yakymovych, Yaroslav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Worker attributes, aggregate conditions and the impact of adverse labor market shocksManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies heterogeneity in the impact of job displacement using rich administrative data from Sweden. We use generalized random forests to identify, based on worker characteristics, groups of workers who are most vulnerable to displacement and document substantial variation in displacement losses. The hardest-hit decile of workers loses over eight times as much in terms of earnings in the short run as the most resilient decile of workers. While we construct groups based on short-term impact, substantial group differences in outcomes persist at least ten years after displacement. We assess the relative importance of different factors, finding that worker attributes and semi-aggregate local and industry conditions interact to generate predictable variation in post-displacement earnings losses. Age and education level are strong predictors of earnings losses, with older and less-educated workers losing six times as much as younger and highly educated workers. Nevertheless, the losses of the most resilient quartile of old low-educated workers and the least resilient quartile of young highly-educated workers are similar in size. Much of this remaining heterogeneity is related to industry and location-specific characteristics. Working in manufacturing and living in a rural area  are strong predictors of severe displacement losses, conditional on individual attributes. Losses are twice as large for workers displaced under bad as compared to good industry and location conditions. Our analysis of how to target interventions towards the most affected workers suggests that no simple rule is as effective at identifying vulnerable workers as the more flexible generalized random forest, but targeting older workers displaced from manufacturing plants achieves the closest result.

  • 3.
    Yakymovych, Yaroslav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Consequences of job loss for routine workersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Routine-biased technological change has led to the worsening of labour market prospects for workers in exposed occupations as their work has increasingly been done by machines. Routine workers who have lost their jobs in mass displacement events are likely to have been a particularly affected group, due to potential difficulties in finding new employment that matches their skills and experience. In this study, the annual earnings, employment, monthly wages and days of unemployment of displaced routine workers are compared to those of displaced non-routine workers using Swedish matched employer-employee data. The results show substantial routine-occupation penalties among displaced workers, which persist in the medium to long term. Compared to displaced non-routine workers, displaced routine workers lose an additional year’s worth of pre-displacement earnings and spend 180 more days in unemployment. A possible channel for this effect is the loss of occupation- and industry-specific human capital, as routine workers are unable to find jobs similar to those they had before becoming displaced. I do not find evidence that switching to a non-routine occupation reduces routine workers’ losses, but rather there are indications that switchers do worse in the short-to-medium run. The findings suggest that the effects of labour-replacing technological change on the most exposed individuals can be severe and difficult to ameliorate.

  • 4.
    Yakymovych, Yaroslav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Who (Mis)uses the Sickness Insurance System?: Evidence from a Randomised ExperimentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sickness insurance guarantees employees the right to take leave from work when they are sick, but is vulnerable to excessive use as monitoring of absent recipients is difficult and costly. In terms of costs, it would be preferable to focus monitoring on those individuals whose sickness absence it affects the most. This paper studies this question in the setting of a large-scale randomised experiment where medical certificate requirements were relaxed for some workers. I employ a machine learning method, the causal forest, to identify heterogeneous effects on the duration of workers’ sickness absence spells. This allows me to compute individualised treatment effect estimates based on a large number of worker characteristics and their potentially complex relationships with each other and with sickness absence duration. The individuals who are most sensitive to monitoring are characterised by a history of extensive sick leave uptake, low socioeconomic status, and male gender. The results suggest that a targeted policy can achieve the same reduction in monitoring costs as took place during the experiment at a 41 percent smaller loss in terms of increased sickness absence.

  • 5.
    Yakymovych, Yaroslav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Workers and Occupations in a Changing Labour Market: The Heterogeneous Effects of Mass Layoffs and Social Safety Nets2022Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Essay I: Sickness insurance guarantees employees the right to take leave from work when they are sick, but is vulnerable to excessive use. This paper studies which workers react to changes in monitoring by physicians in a large-scale randomised experiment. I use a causal forest to identify heterogeneous effects on the duration of workers’ sickness absence spells. Those who are most sensitive to monitoring have a history of extensive sick leave uptake, low socioeconomic status, and male gender. A targeted monitoring policy is estimated to be 40 percent more efficient than a random one.

    Essay II: Routine-biased technological change has depressed prospects for workers in exposed occupations, with those displaced in mass layoffs particularly affected. I compare labour market outcomes of displaced routine workers to those of displaced non-routine workers using Swedish microdata. The results show substantial and persistent routine penalties among displaced workers. A possible channel is the loss of occupation- and industry-specific human capital, as routine workers are unable to find jobs similar to those they had before displacement. I do not find evidence that switching to a non-routine occupation reduces routine workers’ losses.

    Essay III (with Susan Athey, Lisa Simon, Oskar Nordström Skans and Johan Vikström): We study heterogeneity in the impact of job loss in mass layoffs using generalized random forests. We identify the groups of workers who are hit the hardest and document substantial and persistent variation in displacement losses. Worker attributes and semi-aggregate local and industry conditions interact to generate this heterogeneity. Old and less-educated workers lose six times as much as young and highly educated workers. Nevertheless, there is overlap among the losses of these two groups, much of which is related to industries and locations. Working in manufacturing and living in a rural area are strong predictors of severe displacement losses. No simple rule is as effective at identifying vulnerable workers as the more flexible generalized random forest.

    Essay IV (with Adrian Adermon, Simon Ek and Georg Graetz): Using a new identification strategy, we jointly estimate growth in occupational wage premia and time-varying occupation-specific lifecycle profiles for Swedish workers in 1996–2013. We document a substantial increase in between-occupation wage inequality due to differential growth in premia. The association of wage premium growth and employment growth is positive, suggesting that premium growth is predominantly driven by demand side factors. Wage growth due to occupation-specific skill acquisition was more dispersed in the early years of the sample period. Our results are robust to allowing for occupation-level changes in returns to cognitive and psycho-social skills.

    Download full text (pdf)
    UUThesis_Y-Yakymovych-2022
    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf