Change search
Refine search result
1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Al-Anati, Lauy
    et al.
    Viluksela, Matti
    Strid, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Swedish Toxicology Sciences Research Center (Swetox), Sweden.
    Andersson, Patrik L.
    Stenius, Ulla
    Högberg, Johan
    Hydroxyl metabolite of PCB 180 induces DNA damage signaling and enhances the DNA damaging effect of benzo[a]pyrene2015In: Chemico-Biological Interactions, ISSN 0009-2797, E-ISSN 1872-7786, Vol. 239, p. 164-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-dioxin-like (NDL) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and their hydroxyl metabolites (OH-PCBs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants in human tissues and blood. The toxicological impact of these metabolites is poorly understood. In this study rats were exposed to ultrapure PCB180 (10-1000 mg/kg bw) for 28 days and induction of genotoxic stress in liver was investigated. DNA damage signaling proteins (pChk1Ser317 and gamma H2AXSer319) were increased dose dependently in female rats. This increase was paralleled by increasing levels of the metabolite 3'-OH-PCB180. pChk1 was the most sensitive marker. In in vitro studies HepG2 cells were exposed to 1 mu M of PCB180 and 3'-OH-PCB180 or the positive control benzo[a]pyrene (BaP, 5 mu M). 3'-OH-PCB180, but not PCB180, induced CYP1A1 mRNA and gamma H2AX. CYP1A1 mRNA induction was seen at 1 h, and gamma H2AX at 3 h. The anti-oxidant N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC) completely prevented, and 17 beta-estradiol amplified the gamma H2AX induction by 3'-OH-PCB180. As 3'-OH-PCB180 induced CYP1A1, a major BaP-metabolizing and activating enzyme, interactions between 3'-OH-PCB180 and BaP was also studied. The metabolite amplified the DNA damage signaling response to BaP. In conclusion, metabolism of PCB180 to its hydroxyl metabolite and the subsequent induction of CYP1A1 seem important for DNA damage induced by PCB180 in vivo. Amplification of the response with estradiol may explain why DNA damage was only seen in female rats.

  • 2.
    Bradshaw, Clare
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Södertörn University College, Sweden.
    Strid, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    von Stedingk, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin
    Effects of benthos, temperature, and dose on the fate of hexabromocyclododecane in experimental coastal ecosystems2015In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 1246-1257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors studied the fate of the brominated flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) added in a particulate suspension to experimental ecosystems assembled from brackish (Baltic Sea) coastal bays. Two experiments examined how benthic macrofauna (over 21 d) and increased temperature (14 d) affected HBCDD concentrations and fractionation of , , and diastereomers in the water, sediment, and biota. A third experiment run over 3 seasons (231 d), studied the effect of HBCDD dose on the same endpoints. In all treatments of the 3 experiments, HBCDD partitioned mainly to the sediment, and this proportion increased with time. Presence of macrofauna tended to increase the HBCDD concentration in the sediment and decreased its concentration in the water. Increased temperature (+5 degrees C) decreased the amount of HBCDD in sediment and water but not in the filter- and deposit-feeding infaunal bivalves (Macoma balthica). The partitioning between water, sediment, and biota was not concentration dependent. In all treatments, sediment became enriched in -HBCDD, M. balthica in -HBCDD, and water in - and -HBCDD. Bioaccumulation of HBCDD in M. balthica was high in all experiments (log biota-sediment accumulation factor [BSAF] > 1.25), the diastereomer contributing the most (log BSAF 2.1-5.2). There is a risk of trophic transfer of HBCDD from benthic to pelagic food webs, as well as secondary poisoning of marine consumers. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:1246-1257.

  • 3.
    Fängström, Britta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Strid, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Grandjean, Philippe
    Weihe, Pál
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    A retrospective study of PBDEs and PCBs in human milk from the Faroe Islands2005In: Environmental health, ISSN 1476-069X, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 4, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in wildlife and humans remain a cause of global concern, both in regard to traditional POPs, such as the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and emerging POPs, such as the polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). To determine the time related concentrations, we analyzed human milk for these substances at three time points between 1987 and 1999. Polychlorobiphenylols (OH-PCBs), the dominating class of PCB metabolites, some of which are known to be strongly retained in human blood, were also included in the assessment.

    Methods

    We obtained milk from the Faroe Islands, where the population is exposed to POPs from their traditional diet (which may include pilot whale blubber). In addition to three pools, nine individual samples from the last time point were also analyzed. After cleanup, partitioning of neutral and acidic compounds, and separation of chemical classes, the analyses were carried out by gas chromatography and/or gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Results

    Compared to other European populations, the human milk had high PCB concentrations, with pool concentrations of 2300 ng/g fat 1987, 1600 ng/g fat in 1994, and 1800 ng/g fat in 1999 (based on the sum of eleven major PCB congeners). The nine individual samples showed great variation in PCB concentrations. The OH-PCBs were present in trace amounts only, at levels of approximately 1% of the PCB concentrations. The PBDE concentrations showed a clear increase over time, and their concentrations in human milk from 1999 are among the highest reported so far from Europe, with results of individual samples ranging from 4.7 to 13 ng/g fat.

    Conclusion

    Although remote from pollution sources, the Faroe Islands show high concentrations of POPs in human milk, particularly PCBs, but also PBDEs. The PBDEs show increasing concentrations over time. The OH-PCB metabolites are poorly transferred to human milk, which likely is related to their acidic character.

  • 4. Qiu, Yanling
    et al.
    Strid, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Bignert, Anders
    Zhu, Zhiliang
    Zhao, Jianfu
    Athanasiadou, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Loannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Chlorinated and brominated organic contaminants in fish from Shanghai markets: A case study of human exposure2012In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 89, no 4, p. 458-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study were two favorite edible fish species for local residents, i.e., mandarin fish and crawfish, collected from the Shanghai market and analyzed for selected organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-PBDEs). Efforts were also made to identify the potential sources of these contaminants. Comparable concentrations of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) and HBCDD were found in muscle tissue of mandarin fish from Guangdong (GDF), the Pearl River Delta and from Taihu Lake (TLF), the Yangtze River Delta. Levels of chlordanes, PCBs and PBDEs were about one magnitude lower in TLF compared to GDF. The concentrations of OCPs in the butter-like gland of the crawfish (CFB) were 2-5 times of those in the crawfish muscle (CFM) while concentrations of PCBs, PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs were comparable. The different patterns and levels of chlorinated and brominated organo-halogen contaminants seen in mandarin fish from GDF and TLF indicates that different types of chemicals might be used in the two delta regions. The present study also shows a good correlation between the concentrations of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and pentachloroanisol (PCA) in fish for the first time. Fish consumption limits based on chemical contaminants with non-carcinogenic effects were calculated. The estimated maximum daily consumption limit for GDF,TLF, CFM and CFB were 1.5, 2.6, 3.7 and 0.08 kg, respectively, indicating no significant risk regarding the persistent organic pollutants measured in the present study.

  • 5.
    Rydén, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Strid, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Occurrence and potential human exposure to brominated flame retardants at a Swedish smelter handling electronic scrapManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Some well-known brominated flame retardants are common in electronic and electric devices, i.e. polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), nowadays particularly the commercial DecaBDE, and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), but others are used as well. The PBDEs are ubiquitous environmental contaminants while the TBBPA is primarily reported as a contaminant of the abiotic compartments. In this study, personnel at a smelter handling large quantities of shredded printed circuit boards were assessed for potential elevated concentrations of PBDEs, TBBPA and other BFRs. Also dust, sampled at a few sites around the plant, was analysed for BFRs. The dominating BFRs in the dust were decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) and TBBPA, while intermediate levels were indicated for bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and hexabromobenzene (HBB) and only low concentrations of decabromobiphenyl (BB-209) and 2,4,6-tribromophenol (2,4,6-TBP). The workers all showed similar concentrations of the PBDE congeners in serum as recently determined for a Swedish control group. TBBPA was below limit of detection while 2,3,4,6-tetrabromophenol was present in all workers at rather high concentrations. It is yet not known from where this exposure originate, since the compound is not related to BFRs in the dust from the electronic scrap. It is clear that the workers are well protected from the emissions from the printed circuit boards, even though the volumes of electronic scrap handled at the smelter has increased significantly.

  • 6.
    Strid, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Organohalogen contaminants in Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus)2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The remote sub-Arctic/Arctic environment has due to human activities become a sink for organohalogen contaminants (OHCs). These OHC include traditional contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), DDTs and technical mixtures of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), all included in the Stockholm Convention list of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Other OHCs, currently under evaluation to be included among the POPs i.e. short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) are also found in these environments as well as a whole range of other OHCs.

    The main objective of this thesis is to increase the knowledge about the presence of OHCs in a high trophic Arctic shark species, the Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus). The Greenland shark is an opportunistic feeder, occasionally feeding at the top of the Arctic marine food chain. Furthermore may this species have a life span in excess of 100 years and is probably among the oldest of any fish species. These traits make the shark prone to accumulate elevated concentrations of OHCs.

    This has shown to be true for the Greenland sharks studied and most of the targeted OHCs were determined in the species. The highest concentrations were observed for the DDTs, ranging up to 26 μg/g fat. Other OHCs reported that are of special interest are SCCPs and brominated flame retardants used as replacement products to PBDEs; pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE). Also a range of OHCs whose origin is assumed to be natural, were shown to be present in Greenland sharks.

    This thesis is stressing the fact that even though the use of certain OHCs has been banned for decades they are still present at high concentrations in the deep waters of the Arctic. Therefore it is of major importance to continue to monitor the fate of traditional and emerging OHCs in the environment, and for this purpose the Greenland shark is an excellent species.

  • 7.
    Strid, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanasiadou, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Svavarsson, Jörundur
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Brominated organic compounds in a high trophic Arctic fish species, Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus)2008In: 6:e Svensk-norskt miljökemiskt möte: SNMM 2008 22-24 September, 2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Strid, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanasiadou, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Svavarsson, Jörundur
    Bergman, Åke
    Brominated organic compounds in a high trophic arctic fish species, Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus)2008In: Organohalogen Compounds: pops in marine mammals: Levels, effects, trends, 2008, p. 817-820Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Strid, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Athanasiadou, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Svavarsson, Jörundur
    University of Iceland, Institute of Biology.
    Päpke, Olaf
    Eurofins GfA, Hamburg.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Neutral and phenolic brominated organic compounds of natural and anthropogenic origin in Northeast Atlantic Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus)2010In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 29, no 12, p. 2653-2659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, muscle and liver tissue from 10 female Greenland sharks (Somniosus microcephalus) collected in Icelandic waters were analyzed for neutral and phenolic brominated organic compounds, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and the structurally related methoxylated (MeO) and hydroxylated (OH) PBDEs. Hydroxylated PBDEs exist both as natural products and as metabolites of the anthropogenic PBDEs, whereas MeO-PBDEs appear to exclusively be of natural origin. Other compounds examined were 2′,6-dimethoxy-2,3′,4,5′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (2′,6-diMeO-BDE68), 2,2′-dimethoxy-3,3′,5,5′-tetrabromobiphenyl (2,2′-diMeO-BB80), 2,4,6-tribromoanisol (2,4,6-TBA) and 2,4,6-tribromophenol, all of natural origin, although 2,4,6-TBA and its phenolic counterpart may also be of anthropogenic origin. The major brominated organic compound was 6-MeO-BDE47, and ΣMeO-PBDE ranged from 49 to 210 ng/g fat in muscle and from 55 to 200 ng/g fat in liver tissue. Total concentrations of PBDEs were lower than ΣMeO-PBDE, in all but one sample, ranging between 7.3 to 190 and 9.9 to 200 ng/g fat in muscle and liver, respectively, and major congeners were BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-100. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers were analyzed using both high- and low-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) as a quality assurance, and the results from this comparison were acceptable. In accordance with previous work on Greenland sharks, no size/age-related accumulation was observed. Differences seen in concentrations were instead assumed to be a reflection of different feeding habits among the individuals. Phenolic compounds were only formed/retained in trace amounts in the Greenland shark. Among the phenolic compounds studied were 6-OH-BDE47, 2′-OH-BDE68, and 2,4,6-tribromophenol, all detected in liver and the latter two in muscle

  • 10.
    Strid, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bruhn, Christoffer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Sverko, Ed
    Svavarsson, Joerundur
    Tomy, Gregg
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Brominated and chlorinated flame retardants in liver of Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus): 2013In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 91, no 2, p. 222-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are known brominated flame retardants that have now been banned or phased out in many parts of the world. As a consequence, interest in the environmental occurrence of non-PBDE flame retardants has increased. In the present study several potential PBDE replacement products together with short chained chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) were assessed in Greenland sharks accidentally caught in waters around Iceland between 2001 and 2003. Non-PBDE flame retardants detected were pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) and 2,3,5,6-tetrabromo-p-xylene (TBX). The concentrations were lower than levels of BDE-47 but similar to other PBDE congeners previously reported in Greenland shark. The median concentrations of SCCPs was 430 ng g(-1) fat, similar to individual PCB congeners previously reported. This is the first report of SCCPs, BTBPE, PBEB and TBX in any shark species globally and confirms the usefulness of the Greenland shark as a screening species for environmental contamination in the Arctic and sub-Arctic environment.

  • 11.
    Strid, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bruhn, Christoffer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Sverko, Ed
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
    Svavarsson, Jörundur
    Institute of Biology, University of Iceland.
    Tomy, Gregg
    Fresh water institute, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Brominated and chlorinated flame retardants in liver of Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Strid, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Jörundsdóttir, Hrönn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Päpke, Olaf
    Eurofins-ERGO Research, Geierstrasse 1, D-223 05 Hamburg, Germany.
    Svavarsson, Jörundur
    Institute of Biology, University of Iceland, IS-101 Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Dioxins and PCBs in Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus) from the North-East Atlantic2007In: Marine Pollution Bulletin, ISSN 0025-326X, E-ISSN 1879-3363, Vol. 54, no 9, p. 1514-1522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus) is a high-trophic fish species present in Arctic waters. The present study aimed to determine concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDDs/Fs), dioxin-like (DL) PCBs and six non-dioxin-like (NDL) PCBs in muscle and liver from 10 female Greenland sharks collected between 2001 and 2003 from Icelandic waters. The mean total concentrations of PCDDs/Fs were 13 and 530 pg/g fat for muscle and liver, respectively, and show enrichment in the liver. Concentrations of DL-non-ortho PCBs were also higher in liver compared to muscle with mean concentrations of 7.8 and 0.36 ng/g fat, respectively. No enrichment in the liver was found for DL-mono-ortho- and NDL-PCBs. No correlation was found between the size range studied and total concentrations of the compounds analyzed. Total WHO-TEQs (PCDDs/Fs and DL-PCBs) ranged between 7.1–70 and 54–1500 pg/g fat in muscle and liver, respectively.

  • 13.
    Strid, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Smedje, Greta
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Lindgren, Torsten
    Lundgren, Håkan
    Jakobsson, Kristina
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Brominated flame retardant exposure of aircraft personnel2014In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 116, p. 83-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in aircraft is the result of high fire safety demands. Personnel working in or with aircraft might therefore be exposed to several BFRs. Previous studies have reported PBDE exposure in flight attendants and in passengers. One other group that may be subjected to significant BFR exposure via inhalation, are the aircraft maintenance workers. Personnel exposure both during flights and maintenance of aircraft, are investigated in the present study. Several BFRs were present in air and dust sampled during both the exposure scenarios; PBDEs, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis (2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane. PBDEs were also analyzed in serum from pilots/cabin crew, maintenance workers and from a control group of individuals without any occupational aircraft exposure. Significantly higher concentrations of PBDEs were found in maintenance workers compared to pilots/cabin crew and control subjects with median total PBDE concentrations of 19, 6.8 and 6.6 pmol g(-1) lipids, respectively. Pilots and cabin crew had similar concentrations of most PBDEs as the control group, except for BDE-153 and BDE-154 which were significantly higher. Results indicate higher concentrations among some of the pilots compared to the cabin crew. It is however, evident that the cabin personnel have lower BFR exposures compared to maintenance workers that are exposed to such a degree that their blood levels are significantly different from the control group.

  • 14.
    Strid, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Svavarsson, Jörundur
    Institute of Biology, University of Iceland.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Selected organochlorine pesticides, PCBs and their methyl sulfonyl metabolites in Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf