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  • 1. Aaditya, V. B.
    et al.
    Bharathesh, B. M.
    KTH.
    Harshitha, R.
    Chaluvaraju, B. V.
    Raghavendra, U. P.
    Murugendrappa, M. V.
    Study of dielectric properties of polypyrrole/titanium dioxide and polypyrrole/titanium dioxide-MWCNT nano composites2018In: Journal of materials science. Materials in electronics, ISSN 0957-4522, E-ISSN 1573-482X, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 2848-2859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The polypyrrole/titanium dioxide nano composites and polypyrrole/titanium dioxide-MWCNT nano composites were synthesized by chemical polymerization technique in the presence of an ammonium persulphate (oxidizing agent). Different concentrations viz. 15, 30, 45 and 60 wt% of titanium dioxide (TiO2) as well as mixture of TiO2-MWCNT in polypyrrole (PPy) respectively were used in the present study. The nano composites have almost spherical type shaped particles which have cluster formation as confirmed from SEM photos. The XRD graphs reveal that the PPy/TiO2 (PT) nano composites have shown the semi-crystalline nature and also, the graphs indicate the changeover of the structure of PPy/TiO2-MWCNT (PTM) nano composites from amorphous to semi-crystalline nature. From the FTIR figures, shift in wavenumber towards lower side is noticed in the case of PT and PTM nano composites when compared to PPy. The dielectric properties such as dielectric constant, dielectric loss and tangent loss have shown good behavior. This reveals that, the TiO2 as well as mixture of TiO2-MWCNT particles have shown strong dependence on PPy and helps to form good composites. So, the nano composites are good dielectric materials.

  • 2. Abate, M.
    et al.
    De Jong, Gerard
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    The optimal shipment size and truck size choice - The allocation of trucks across hauls2014In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 59, p. 262-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a growing interest in understanding how firms allocate their trucks across hauls, and how this allocation changes under various economic environments. This study investigates how variations in route/haul, carrier and vehicle characteristics affect the optimal vehicle size choice and the associated choice of shipment size. We show that the two choices are derived from the same optimization problem. There can be a continuum of shipment sizes, but decision-makers in freight transport have to choose from a limited number of vehicle alternatives. Therefore, we use a discrete-continuous econometric model where shipment size is modeled as a continuous variable, and vehicle size/type choice as a discrete variable. The results indicate that when faced with higher demand, and during longer trips firms are more likely to use heavier vehicles and ship in larger quantities which suggest that firms are realizing economies of scale and economies of distance. The study also discusses the effect of vehicle operating cost on the vehicle selection process and its policy implications.

  • 3.
    Abbas, Ghazanfar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology. COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Pakistan.
    Raza, Rizwan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology. COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Pakistan.
    Ahmad, M. Ashfaq
    Khan, M. Ajmal
    Hussain, M. Jafar
    Ahmad, Mukhtar
    Aziz, Hammad
    Ahmad, Imran
    Batool, Rida
    Altaf, Faizah
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Electrochemical investigation of mixed metal oxide nanocomposite electrode for low temperature solid oxide fuel cell2017In: International Journal of Modern Physics B, ISSN 0217-9792, Vol. 31, no 27, article id 1750193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zinc-based nanostructured nickel (Ni) free metal oxide electrode material Zn-0.60/CU0.20Mn0.20 oxide (CMZO) was synthesized by solid state reaction and investigated for low temperature solid oxide fuel cell (LTSOFC) applications. The crystal structure and surface morphology of the synthesized electrode material were examined by XRD and SEM techniques respectively. The particle size of ZnO phase estimated by Scherer's equation was 31.50 nm. The maximum electrical conductivity was found to be 12.567 S/cm and 5.846 S/cm in hydrogen and air atmosphere, respectively at 600 degrees C. The activation energy of the CMZO material was also calculated from the DC conductivity data using Arrhenius plots and it was found to be 0.060 and 0.075 eV in hydrogen and air atmosphere, respectively. The CMZO electrode-based fuel cell was tested using carbonated samarium doped ceria composite (NSDC) electrolyte. The three layers 13 mm in diameter and 1 mm thickness of the symmetric fuel cell were fabricated by dry pressing. The maximum power density of 728.86 mW/cm(2) was measured at 550 degrees C.

  • 4.
    Abbas, Ghazanfar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Raza, Rizwan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Ashfaq, M.
    Chaudhry, M. Ashraf
    Khan, Ajmal
    Ahmad, Imran
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Electrochemical study of nanostructured electrode for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (LTSOFC)2014In: International journal of energy research (Print), ISSN 0363-907X, E-ISSN 1099-114X, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 518-523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zn-based nanostructured Ba0.05Cu0.25Fe0.10Zn0.60O (BCFZ) oxide electrode material was synthesized by solid-state reaction for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell. The cell was fabricated by sandwiching NK-CDC electrolyte between BCFZ electrodes by dry press technique, and its performance was assessed. The maximum power density of 741.87 mW-cm(-2) was achieved at 550 degrees C. The crystal structure and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and SEM. The particle size was calculated to be 25 nm applying Scherer's formula from XRD data. Electronic conductivities were measured with the four-probe DC method under hydrogen and air atmosphere. AC Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy of the BCFZ oxide electrode was also measured in hydrogen atmosphere at 450 degrees C.

  • 5. Abbott, Andrew
    et al.
    Addicoat, Matthew
    Aldous, Leigh
    Bhuin, Radha Gobinda
    Borisenko, Natalia
    Lopes, Jose Nuno Canongia
    Clark, Ryan
    Coles, Samuel
    Gomes, Margarida Costa
    Cross, Benjamin
    Everts, Jeffrey
    Firestone, Millicent
    Gardas, Ramesh
    Gras, Matthieu
    Halstead, Simon
    Hardacre, Christopher
    Holbrey, John
    Itoh, Toshiyuki
    Ivanistsev, Vladislav
    Jacquemin, Johan
    Jessop, Philip
    Jones, Robert
    Kirchner, Barbara
    Li, Sichao
    KTH.
    Lynden-Bell, Ruth
    MacFarlane, Doug
    Maier, Florian
    Mezger, Markus
    Padua, Agilio
    Pavel, Octavian D.
    Perkin, Susan
    Purcell, Simon
    Rutland, Mark
    Slattery, John M.
    Suzer, Sefik
    Tamura, Kazuhisa
    Thomas, Morgan L.
    Tiwari, Shraeddha
    Tsuzuki, Seiji
    Uralcan, Betul
    Wallace, William
    Watanabe, Masayoshi
    KTH.
    Wishart, James
    Ionic liquids at interfaces: general discussion2018In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 206, p. 549-586Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Abbott, BP
    et al.
    Axelsson, Magnus
    KTH.
    Larsson, S
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Li, Liang
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Zweizig, John G.
    et al.,
    SUPPLEMENT: "LOCALIZATION AND BROADBAND FOLLOW-UP OF THE GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE TRANSIENT GW150914" (2016, ApJL, 826, L13)2016In: Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series, ISSN 0067-0049, E-ISSN 1538-4365, Vol. 225, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Abdellaoui, G.
    et al.
    Capel, Francesca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Carlson, Per
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Fuglesang, Christer
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Larsson, O.
    KTH. RIKEN, Wako, Japan.
    Zuccaro Marchi, A.
    et.al.,
    Cosmic ray oriented performance studies for the JEM-EUSO first level trigger2017In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, p. 150-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    JEM-EUSO is a space mission designed to investigate Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos (E > 5.10(19) eV) from the International Space Station (ISS). Looking down from above its wide angle telescope is able to observe their air showers and collect such data from a very wide area. Highly specific trigger algorithms are needed to drastically reduce the data load in the presence of both atmospheric and human activity related background light, yet retain the rare cosmic ray events recorded in the telescope. We report the performance in offline testing of the first level trigger algorithm on data from JEM-EUSO prototypes and laboratory measurements observing different light sources: data taken during a high altitude balloon flight over Canada, laser pulses observed from the ground traversing the real atmosphere, and model landscapes reproducing realistic aspect ratios and light conditions as would be seen from the ISS itself. The first level trigger logic successfully kept the trigger rate within the permissible bounds when challenged with artificially produced as well as naturally encountered night sky background fluctuations and while retaining events with general air-shower characteristics.

  • 8. Abdollahi, S.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Albert, A.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Baldini, L.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Bissaldi, E.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonino, R.
    Bottacini, E.
    Brandt, T. J.
    Bruel, P.
    Buson, S.
    Caragiulo, M.
    Cavazzuti, E.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Ciprini, S.
    Costanza, F.
    Cuoco, A.
    Cutini, S.
    D'Ammando, F.
    de Palma, F.
    Desiante, R.
    Digel, S. W.
    Di Lalla, N.
    Di Mauro, M.
    Di Venere, L.
    Donaggio, B.
    Drell, P. S.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Focke, W. B.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Green, D.
    Guiriec, S.
    Harding, A. K.
    Jogler, T.
    Johannesson, G.
    Kamae, T.
    Kuss, M.
    Larsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Latronico, L.
    Li, J.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lubrano, P.
    Magill, J. D.
    Malyshev, D.
    Manfreda, A.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    Meehan, M.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Negro, M.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Paneque, D.
    Perkins, J. S.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Pivato, G.
    Principe, G.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Sgro, C.
    Simone, D.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Spada, F.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Strong, A. W.
    Tajima, H.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Torres, D. F.
    Troja, E.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Zaharijas, G.
    Zimmer, S.
    Search for Cosmic-Ray Electron and Positron Anisotropies with Seven Years of Fermi Large Area Telescope Data2017In: Physical Review Letters, ISSN 0031-9007, E-ISSN 1079-7114, Vol. 118, no 9, article id 091103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has collected the largest ever sample of high-energy cosmic-ray electron and positron events since the beginning of its operation. Potential anisotropies in the arrival directions of cosmic-ray electrons or positrons could be a signature of the presence of nearby sources. We use almost seven years of data with energies above 42 GeV processed with the Pass 8 reconstruction. The present data sample can probe dipole anisotropies down to a level of 10(-3). We take into account systematic effects that could mimic true anisotropies at this level. We present a detailed study of the event selection optimization of the cosmic-ray electrons and positrons to be used for anisotropy searches. Since no significant anisotropies have been detected on any angular scale, we present upper limits on the dipole anisotropy. The present constraints are among the strongest to date probing the presence of nearby young and middle-aged sources.

  • 9.
    Abdullah Asif, Farazee Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Semere, Daniel Tesfamariam
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Nicolescu, Cornel Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Haumann, M.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    METHODS ANALYSIS OF REMANUFACTURING OPTIONS FOR REPEATED LIFECYCLE OF STARTERS AND ALTERNATORS2010In: 7th International DAAAM Baltic Conference"INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING"22-24 April 2010, Tallinn, Estonia / [ed] R. Kyttner, Estonia: Tallinn University of Technology , 2010, p. 340-345Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Design for Repeatedly Utilization (DFRU) is a proposed conceptto be used in the product realizationprocess to ensure optimum useable life (forinstance in terms of economy, resourceusage, environmental impact etc.) ofproducts or parts of products enablingmultiple lifecycle. In the DFRU approachproducts are restored as new like productsthrough remanufacturing processes. Theterm remanufacturing has been interpreteddifferently by different researchers and theindustries that are involved inremanufacturing business use differentapproaches to remanufacture theirproducts. In this paper the starter motorand alternator of automotives has beenused to demonstrate the novel concepts.The purpose of this paper is to expresswhat remanufacturing means in ourconcept, model their major lifecycleaspects and create a simulation modelfrom it. This is a preliminary work towardsdefining and specifying the processes,methods and design properties in DFRU.The work will be further extended to aholistic business model which can facilitateDFRU approach in an efficient way. Infuture the model will be developed andadopted to create new models for otherproducts appropriate for remanufacturingand eventually DFRU.

  • 10. Abramowski, A.
    et al.
    Acero, F.
    Aharonian, F.
    Akhperjanian, A. G.
    Anton, G.
    Balzer, A.
    Barnacka, A.
    de Almeida, U. Barres
    Becherini, Y.
    Becker, J.
    Behera, B.
    Bernloehr, K.
    Birsin, E.
    Biteau, J.
    Bochow, A.
    Boisson, C.
    Bolmont, J.
    Bordas, P.
    Brucker, J.
    Brun, F.
    Brun, P.
    Bulik, T.
    Bueching, I.
    Carrigan, S.
    Casanova, S.
    Cerruti, M.
    Chadwick, P. M.
    Charbonnier, A.
    Chaves, R. C. G.
    Cheesebrough, A.
    Clapson, A. C.
    Coignet, G.
    Cologna, G.
    Conrad, Jan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Dalton, M.
    Daniel, M. K.
    Davids, I. D.
    Degrange, B.
    Deil, C.
    Dickinson, Hugh J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Djannati-Atai, A.
    Domainko, W.
    Drury, L. O 'C.
    Dubus, G.
    Dutson, K.
    Dyks, J.
    Dyrda, M.
    Egberts, K.
    Eger, P.
    Espigat, P.
    Fallon, L.
    Farnier, C.
    Fegan, S.
    Feinstein, F.
    Fernandes, M. V.
    Fiasson, A.
    Fontaine, G.
    Foerster, A.
    Fuessling, M.
    Gallant, Y. A.
    Gast, H.
    Gerard, L.
    Gerbig, D.
    Giebels, B.
    Glicenstein, J. F.
    Glueck, B.
    Goret, P.
    Goering, D.
    Haeffner, S.
    Hague, J. D.
    Hampf, D.
    Hauser, M.
    Heinz, S.
    Heinzelmann, G.
    Henri, G.
    Hermann, G.
    Hinton, J. A.
    Hoffmann, A.
    Hofmann, W.
    Hofverberg, P.
    Holler, M.
    Horns, D.
    Jacholkowska, A.
    de Jager, O. C.
    Jahn, C.
    Jamrozy, M.
    Jung, I.
    Kastendieck, M. A.
    Katarzynski, K.
    Katz, U.
    Kaufmann, S.
    Keogh, D.
    Khangulyan, D.
    Khelifi, B.
    Klochkov, D.
    Kluzniak, W.
    Kneiske, T.
    Komin, Nu
    Kosack, K.
    Kossakowski, R.
    Laffon, H.
    Lamanna, G.
    Lennarz, D.
    Lohse, T.
    Lopatin, A.
    Lu, C. -C
    Marandon, V.
    Marcowith, A.
    Masbou, J.
    Maurin, D.
    Maxted, N.
    Mayer, M.
    McComb, T. J. L.
    Medina, M. C.
    Mehault, J.
    Moderski, R.
    Moulin, E.
    Naumann, C. L.
    Naumann-Godo, M.
    de Naurois, M.
    Nedbal, D.
    Nekrassov, D.
    Nguyen, N.
    Nicholas, B.
    Niemiec, J.
    Nolan, S. J.
    Ohm, S.
    Wilhelmi, E. de Ona
    Opitz, B.
    Ostrowski, M.
    Oya, I.
    Panter, M.
    Arribas, M. Paz
    Pedaletti, G.
    Pelletier, G.
    Petrucci, P. -O
    Pita, S.
    Puehlhofer, G.
    Punch, M.
    Quirrenbach, A.
    Raue, M.
    Rayner, S. M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Renaud, M.
    de los Reyes, R.
    Rieger, F.
    Ripken, Joachim
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Rob, L.
    Rosier-Lees, S.
    Rowell, G.
    Rudak, B.
    Rulten, C. B.
    Ruppel, J.
    Sahakian, V.
    Sanchez, D. A.
    Santangelo, A.
    Schlickeiser, R.
    Schoeck, F. M.
    Schulz, A.
    Schwanke, U.
    Schwarzburg, S.
    Schwemmer, S.
    Sheidaei, F.
    Skilton, J. L.
    Sol, H.
    Spengler, G.
    Stawarz, L.
    Steenkamp, R.
    Stegmann, C.
    Stinzing, F.
    Stycz, K.
    Sushch, I.
    Szostek, A.
    Tavernet, J. -P
    Terrier, R.
    Tluczykont, M.
    Valerius, K.
    van Eldik, C.
    Vasileiadis, G.
    Venter, C.
    Vialle, J. P.
    Viana, A.
    Vincent, P.
    Voelk, H. J.
    Volpe, F.
    Vorobiov, S.
    Vorster, M.
    Wagner, S. J.
    Ward, M.
    White, R.
    Wierzcholska, A.
    Zacharias, M.
    Zajczyk, A.
    Zdziarski, A. A.
    Zech, A.
    Zechlin, H. -S
    Search for dark matter annihilation signals from the Fornax galaxy cluster with H.E.S.S.2012In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 750, no 2, p. 123-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Fornax galaxy cluster was observed with the High Energy Stereoscopic System for a total live time of 14.5 hr, searching for very high energy (VHE; E > 100GeV) gamma-rays from dark matter (DM) annihilation. No significant signal was found in searches for point-like and extended emissions. Using several models of the DM density distribution, upper limits on the DM velocity-weighted annihilation cross-section <sigma upsilon > as a function of the DM particle mass are derived. Constraints are derived for different DM particle models, such as those arising from Kaluza-Klein and supersymmetric models. Various annihilation final states are considered. Possible enhancements of the DM annihilation gamma-ray flux, due to DM substructures of the DM host halo, or from the Sommerfeld effect, are studied. Additional gamma-ray contributions from internal bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton radiation are also discussed. For a DM particle mass of 1 TeV, the exclusion limits at 95% of confidence level reach values of <sigma upsilon >(95% C.L.) similar to 10(-23) cm(3) s(-1), depending on the DM particle model and halo properties. Additional contribution from DM substructures can improve the upper limits on <sigma upsilon > by more than two orders of magnitude. At masses around 4.5 TeV, the enhancement by substructures and the Sommerfeld resonance effect results in a velocity-weighted annihilation cross-section upper limit at the level of <sigma upsilon >(95% C.L.) similar to 10(-26) cm(3) s(-1).

  • 11.
    Abrehdary, Majid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geodesy and Satellite Positioning. Univ Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, L. E.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geodesy and Satellite Positioning.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geodesy and Satellite Positioning. Univ Gavle, Sweden.
    Sampietro, D.
    Towards the Moho depth and Moho density contrast along with their uncertainties from seismic and satellite gravity observations2017In: Journal of Applied Geodesy, ISSN 1862-9016, E-ISSN 1862-9024, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 231-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a combined method for estimating a new global Moho model named KTH15C, containing Moho depth and Moho density contrast (or shortly Moho parameters), from a combination of global models of gravity (GOCO05S), topography (DTM2006) and seismic information (CRUST1.0 and MDN07) to a resolution of 1 degrees x 1 degrees based on a solution of Vening Meinesz-Moritz' inverse problem of isostasy. This paper also aims modelling of the observation standard errors propagated from the Vening Meinesz-Moritz and CRUST1.0 models in estimating the uncertainty of the final Moho model. The numerical results yield Moho depths ranging from 6.5 to 70.3 km, and the estimated Moho density contrasts ranging from 21 to 650 kg/m(3), respectively. Moreover, test computations display that in most areas estimated uncertainties in the parameters are less than 3 km and 50 kg/m(3), respectively, but they reach to more significant values under Gulf of Mexico, Chile, Eastern Mediterranean, Timor sea and parts of polar regions. Comparing the Moho depths estimated by KTH15C and those derived by KTH11C, GEMMA2012C, CRUST1.0, KTH14C, CRUST14 and GEMMA1.0 models shows that KTH15C agree fairly well with CRUST1.0 but rather poor with other models. The Moho density contrasts estimated by KTH15C and those of the KTH11C, KTH14C and VMM model agree to 112, 31 and 61 kg/m(3) in RMS. The regional numerical studies show that the RMS differences between KTH15C and Moho depths from seismic information yields fits of 2 to 4 km in South and North America, Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia and Antarctica, respectively.

  • 12. Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Diaz-Olivazrez, Jose A.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Yang, Liyun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Seoane, Fernando
    Teriö, Heikki
    Mediavilla Martinez, Cesar
    Aso, Santiago
    Tiemann, Christian
    Big Data & Wearable Sensors Ensuring Safety and Health @Work2017In: GLOBAL HEALTH 2017, The Sixth International Conference on Global Health Challenges, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    —Work-related injuries and disorders constitute a major burden and cost for employers, society in general and workers in particular. We@Work is a project that aims to develop an integrated solution for promoting and supporting a safe and healthy working life by combining wearable technologies, Big Data analytics, ergonomics, and information and communication technologies. The We@Work solution aims to support the worker and employer to ensure a healthy working life through pervasive monitoring for early warnings, prompt detection of capacity-loss and accurate risk assessments at workplace as well as self-management of a healthy working life. A multiservice platform will allow unobtrusive data collection at workplaces. Big Data analytics will provide real-time information useful to prevent work injuries and support healthy working life

  • 13.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Dizon, M
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Johansson, M
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems. Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Evaluation of Atrial Fibrillation Detection by using Heart Rate Variability analysis2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14. Ackermann, M.
    et al.
    Ajello, M.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Bissaldi, E.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonino, R.
    Bottacini, E.
    Brandt, T. J.
    Bregeon, J.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caragiulo, M.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Castro, D.
    Cavazzuti, E.
    Cecchi, C.
    Charles, E.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiaro, G.
    Ciprini, S.
    Cohen, J. M.
    Costantin, D.
    Costanza, F.
    Cutini, S.
    D'Ammando, F.
    de Palma, F.
    Desiante, R.
    Digel, S. W.
    Di Lalla, N.
    Di Mauro, M.
    Di Venere, L.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Ferrara, E. C.
    Franckowiak, A.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Green, D.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grondin, M. -H
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hays, E.
    Hewitt, J. W.
    Horan, D.
    Hou, X.
    Johannesson, G.
    Kamae, T.
    Kuss, M.
    La Mura, G.
    Larsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Li, J.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lubrano, P.
    Magill, J. D.
    Maldera, S.
    Malyshev, D.
    Manfreda, A.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Negro, M.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Orienti, M.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Paliya, V. S.
    Paneque, D.
    Perkins, J. S.
    Persic, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Petrosian, V.
    Piron, F.
    Porter, T. A.
    Principe, G.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Razzaque, S.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Sgro, C.
    Simone, D.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Spada, F.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Suson, D. J.
    Tak, D.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Troja, E.
    Vianello, G.
    Wood, K. S.
    Wood, M.
    Search for Extended Sources in the Galactic Plane Using Six Years of Fermi-Large Area Telescope Pass 8 Data above 10GeV2017In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 843, no 2, article id 139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The spatial extension of gamma-ray source is an essential ingredient to determine its spectral properties, as well as its potential multiwavelength counterpart. The capability to spatially resolve gamma-ray sources is greatly improved by the newly delivered Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) Pass 8 event-level analysis, which provides a greater acceptance and an improved point-spread function, two crucial factors for the detection of extended sources. Here, we present a complete search for extended sources located within 7 degrees from the Galactic plane, using 6 yr of Fermi-LAT data above 10 GeV. We find 46 extended sources and provide their morphological and spectral characteristics. This constitutes the first catalog of hard Fermi-LAT extended sources, named the Fermi Galactic Extended Source Catalog, which allows a thorough study of the properties of the Galactic plane in the sub-TeV domain.

  • 15. Adrian, K.
    et al.
    Chocron, P.
    Confalonieri, R.
    Ferrer, X.
    Giraldez-Cru, J.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Link prediction in evolutionary graphs the case study of the CCIA network2016In: 19th International Conference of the Catalan Association for Artificial Intelligence, CCIA 2016, IOS Press, 2016, p. 187-196Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studying the prediction of new links in evolutionary networks is a captivating question that has received the interest of different disciplines. Link prediction allows to extract missing information and evaluate network dynamics. Some algorithms that tackle this problem with good performances are based on the sociability index, a measure of node interactions over time. In this paper, we present a case study of this predictor in the evolutionary graph that represents the CCIA co-authorship network from 2005 to 2015. Moreover, we present a generalized version of this sociability index, that takes into account the time in which such interactions occur. We show that this new index outperforms existing predictors. Finally, we use it in order to predict new co-authorships for CCIA 2016.

  • 16.
    Afrasiabi, Roodabeh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Söderberg, Lovisa M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Joensson, Haakan N.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Björk, Per
    Svahn Andersson, Helene
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Linnros, Jan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Integration of a Droplet-Based Microfluidic System and Silicon Nanoribbon FET Sensor2016In: Micromachines, ISSN 2072-666X, E-ISSN 2072-666X, Vol. 7, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a novel microfluidic system that integrates droplet microfluidics with a silicon nanoribbon field-effect transistor (SiNR FET), and utilize this integrated system to sense differences in pH. The device allows for selective droplet transfer to a continuous water phase, actuated by dielectrophoresis, and subsequent detection of the pH level in the retrieved droplets by SiNR FETs on an electrical sensor chip. The integrated microfluidic system demonstrates a label-free detection method for droplet microfluidics, presenting an alternative to optical fluorescence detection. In this work, we were able to differentiate between droplet trains of one pH-unit difference. The pH-based detection method in our integrated system has the potential to be utilized in the detection of biochemical reactions that induce a pH-shift in the droplets.

  • 17.
    Afzal, Muhammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Xia, Chen
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology. Hubei University, China.
    Lanthanum-doped Calcium Manganite (La0.1Ca0.9MnO3) Cathode for Advanced Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC)2016In: MATERIALS TODAY-PROCEEDINGS, ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV , 2016, Vol. 3, no 8, p. 2698-2706Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present here a new perovskite oxide with low lanthanum content doped in calcium manganite, La0.1Ca0.9MnO3 (LCM) as a functional material for low temperature solid oxide fuel cell (LTSOFC) and electrolyte-layer free fuel cell (EFFC). The LCM introduces an intrinsic mixed-ion and electron conduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis shows high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity with an extremely low activation energy which enables an excellent cathode activity. Fuel cells using LCM as cathode with oxide ion conducting electrolyte samarium doped ceria (SDC) and NCAL as an anode, demonstrate a maximum power density of 650 mW cm(-2) at 550 degrees C, which is higher than most of the cathode materials reported for SOFC at this temperature. For EFFC, maximum power density of 750 mW cm(-2) is achieved using LCM as a semiconductor material with SDC ion conducting material. The present work highlights the development of new active air electrode especially for developing low temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

  • 18.
    Ahl, Amanda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Eklund, Johanna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Lundqvist, Per
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Yarime, M.
    Balancing formal and informal success factors perceived by supply chain stakeholders: A study of woody biomass energy systems in Japan2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 175, p. 50-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small-scale woody biomass energy systems have an inherent ability to aid in emissions reduction while stimulating local economies and, as collective energy systems, are strongly connected to supply chain design based on local conditions and stakeholder integration. Despite an abundance of forest area alongside the promotion of biomass in energy policies, however, woody biomass utilization still remains low in Japan. The woody biomass supply chain, considered as a socio-technical system, involves a complex, cross-sectoral stakeholder network in which inter-organizational dynamics necessitates well-organized management based on an understanding of formal factors such as technology, as well as informal factors such as social relations and culture. In this paper, success factor perceptions from across the woody biomass supply chain are investigated based on semi-structured interviews with four stakeholders in the Kyushu region of Japan. Identified success factors here are: 1) respect of values & traditions, 2) transportation infrastructure, 3) business model integration, 4) relationship & trust, 5) local vitalization and 6) biomass quality control. A convergence as well as divergence of perceptions are observed, involving both formal and informal dimensions. Aiming to balance perceptions and to enable long-term success of woody biomass in Japan, a series of policy implications are drawn, including cross-ministerial integration, knowledge building on wood logistics, forest certification, local coordinators, biomass quality control standards and a feed-in-tariff for heat. This paper suggests a new arena of policy-making based on the importance of considering both informal and formal dimensions in energy policy.

  • 19.
    Ahmed, Furqan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Alfredo Dowhuszko, Alexis
    Tirkkonen, Olav
    Self-Organizing Algorithms for Interference Coordination in Small Cell Networks2017In: IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology, ISSN 0018-9545, E-ISSN 1939-9359, Vol. 66, no 9, p. 8333-8346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses novel joint (intracell and intercell) resource allocation algorithms for self-organized interference coordination in multicarrier multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) small cell networks. The proposed algorithms enable interference coordination autonomously, over multiple degrees of freedom, such as base station transmit powers, transmit precoders, and user scheduling weights. A generic a-fair utility maximization framework is considered to analyze performance-fairness tradeoff and to quantify the gains achievable in interference-limited networks. The proposed scheme involves limited inter-base station signaling in the form of two step (power and precoder) pricing. Based on this decentralized coordination, autonomous power and precoder update decision rules are considered, leading to algorithms with different characteristics in terms of user data rates, signaling load, and convergence speed. Simulation results in a practical setting show that the proposed pricing-based self-organization can achieve up to 100% improvement in cell-edge data rates when compared to baseline optimization strategies. Furthermore, the convergence of the proposed algorithms is also proved theoretically.

  • 20. Ahnen, Max L.
    et al.
    Larsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics. Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Li, Liang
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics. Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zottmann, N.
    et al.,
    VERY HIGH ENERGY γ-RAYS from the UNIVERSE'S MIDDLE AGEMAGIC: DETECTION of the z = 0.940 BLAZAR PKS 1441+25 with MAGIC2015In: Astrophysical Journal Letters, ISSN 2041-8205, E-ISSN 2041-8213, Vol. 815, no 2, article id L23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1441+25 at a redshift of z = 0.940 is detected between 40 and 250 GeV with a significance of 25.5σ using the MAGIC telescopes. Together with the gravitationally lensed blazar QSO B0218+357 (z = 0.944), PKS 1441+25 is the most distant very high energy (VHE) blazar detected to date. The observations were triggered by an outburst in 2015 April seen at GeV energies with the Large Area Telescope on board Fermi. Multi-wavelength observations suggest a subdivision of the high state into two distinct flux states. In the band covered by MAGIC, the variability timescale is estimated to be 6.4 ±1.9 days. Modeling the broadband spectral energy distribution with an external Compton model, the location of the emitting region is understood as originating in the jet outside the broad-line region (BLR) during the period of high activity, while being partially within the BLR during the period of low (typical) activity. The observed VHE spectrum during the highest activity is used to probe the extragalactic background light at an unprecedented distance scale for ground-based gamma-ray astronomy.

  • 21.
    Alam, Assad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Behere, Sagar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Björk, Mattias
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Garcia Alonso, Liliana
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Khaksari, Farzad
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Signal Processing.
    Khan, Altamash
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Signal Processing.
    Kjellberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Liang, Kuo-Yun
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Lyberger, Rickard
    Scania CV AB.
    Mårtensson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Nilsson, John-Olof
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Signal Processing.
    Pettersson, Henrik
    Scania CV AB.
    Pettersson, Simon
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Stålklinga, Elin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Sundman, Dennis
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Signal Processing.
    Zachariah, Dave
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Signal Processing.
    Cooperative driving according to Scoop2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Scania are entering the GCDC 2011 under the name Scoop –Stockholm Cooperative Driving. This paper is an introduction to their team and to the technical approach theyare using in their prototype system for GCDC 2011.

  • 22.
    Almeida, Diogo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL. KTH.
    Ambrus, Rares
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Caccamo, Sergio
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Chen, Xi
    KTH.
    Cruciani, Silvia
    Pinto Basto De Carvalho, Joao F
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Haustein, Joshua
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Marzinotto, Alejandro
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Vina, Francisco
    KTH.
    Karayiannidis, Yannis
    KTH.
    Ögren, Petter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Optimization and Systems Theory.
    Jensfelt, Patric
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Team KTH’s Picking Solution for the Amazon Picking Challenge 20162017In: Warehouse Picking Automation Workshop 2017: Solutions, Experience, Learnings and Outlook of the Amazon Robotics Challenge, 2017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In this work we summarize the solution developed by Team KTH for the Amazon Picking Challenge 2016 in Leipzig, Germany. The competition simulated a warehouse automation scenario and it was divided in two tasks: a picking task where a robot picks items from a shelf and places them in a tote and a stowing task which is the inverse task where the robot picks items from a tote and places them in a shelf. We describe our approach to the problem starting from a high level overview of our system and later delving into details of our perception pipeline and our strategy for manipulation and grasping. The solution was implemented using a Baxter robot equipped with additional sensors.

  • 23.
    Amer, Wadi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Lars, Pettersson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Structural response of a high profile arch flexible culvert in sloping terrain using finite element modeling2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flexible culverts are generally considered cost-effective structures for their simplicity in construction and the short time involved in the erection process. This has constantly motivated practitioners to explore the different areas of application including their performance in sloping environment. Yet, the complex nature of the interaction between the soil and steel materials marks a challenge, where the performance of these structures is fundamentally influenced by the quality of the backfill soil and its configuration around the conduit/arch. Surface slopes may affect the structural response by inducing an asymmetrical soil support and an unbalanced earth loading.

    The use of numerical simulation is utilized to provide insights about the performance of flexible culvert in sloping environment, where a case study of a high profile arch is investigated under different construction schemes. The paper focuses mainly on predicting the structural behavior of soil loading effects. The study includes the influence of different slopes in combination with various depths of soil cover.

    The results enabled to realize the importance of soil configuration around the steel arch and its influence on the structural response. While the presence of surface slopes emphasizes the susceptibility of flexible culverts with low depths of soil cover, higher covers may help in reducing the effect of steep slopes. Sectional forces were found to increase with the increase of surface slopes. The study also highlighted recent research efforts on the topic and briefly discussed some design implications when building flexible culverts in sloping terrain.

  • 24.
    Anand, Srinivasan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Desieres, Y.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics. CEA LETI MINATEC, Grenoble, France.
    Visser, D.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Chen, D-Y
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Optical Coatings and Films Based on Photonic Semiconductor Nanostructure Assemblies2017In: 2017 19TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON TRANSPARENT OPTICAL NETWORKS (ICTON), IEEE , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photonic semiconductor nanostructure assemblies offer unique possibilities for light manipulation as well as for tailoring light-matter interaction by appropriate choice of their geometrical and material properties. The material-structure combination offers a variety of options for wavelength specific applications, deriving from the electronic properties of semiconductors and optical properties of individual and assemblies of nanostructures (particles, disks, pillars/wires etc.). We present an overview of our research on optical coatings based on semiconductor nanostructure assemblies focusing on their optical properties, different fabrication technologies and selected application examples. Design and simulations of the optical coatings are performed by finite difference time domain calculations, and are used as a guideline for fabrication. We discuss different routes for fabrication of nanostructured optical films/coatings including directed assembly and patterning of nanoparticles from solution phase, solution synthesis, combination of dry etching and colloidal lithography, transfer printing, and generation of flexible polymer films with embedded nanostructures. The fabricated films are validated by optical measurements and some device specific properties such as omni-directional broad-band anti-reflection in solar cells and efficient light extraction in light emitting diodes are demonstrated.

  • 25.
    Anastasiou, Alexandros
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Borsten, L.
    Duff, M. J.
    Hughes, M. J.
    Marrani, A.
    Nagy, S.
    Zoccali, M.
    Twin supergravities from Yang-Mills theory squared2017In: Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, ISSN 2470-0010, E-ISSN 2470-0029, Vol. 96, no 2, article id 026013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We consider "twin supergravities"-pairs of supergravities with N+ and N- supersymmetries, N+ > N-, with identical bosonic sectors-in the context of tensoring super Yang-Mills multiplets. It is demonstrated that the pairs of twin supergravity theories are related through their left and right super YangMills factors. This procedure generates newtheories from old ones. In particular, the matter coupled N(-)twins in D = 3, 5, 6 and the N- = 1 twins inD = 4 have not, as far as we are aware, been obtained previously using the double-copy construction, adding to the growing list of double-copy constructible theories. The use of fundamental matter multiplets in the double-copy construction leads us to introduce a bifundamental scalar that couples to the well-known biadjoint scalar field. It is also shown that certain matter coupled supergravities admit more than one factorization into left and right super Yang-Mills-matter theories.

  • 26.
    Andersson, Evert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Carlsson, U.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Lukaszewicz, Piotr
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Leth, Siv
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    On the environmental performance of a high-speed train2014In: International Journal of Rail transportation, ISSN 2324-8378, E-ISSN 2324-8386, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 59-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental performance is one of the major considerations of future high-speed trains. Two main issues have been closely investigated in the Green Train programme, namely (1) energy use and (2) external noise. Analysis, development and testing in the Green Train programme have focused primarily on speeds up to 250 km/h, although the energy issues have also been studied at top speeds up to 320 km/h. The energy use is estimated for both long-distance trains with few stops and for fast regional services with relatively tight underway stops. These estimations result in an energy use of 46–62 Wh per passenger-km – or 30–40 Wh per seat-km – accounted as electricity taken from the public electric power grid. Improved aerodynamic performance, efficient space utilization, electric regenerative brakes, eco-driving advice and improved energy efficiency in the propulsion system make this possible. Trackside noise has also been analysed and tested in the programme. In order to maintain the same or lower noise level at 250 km/h as at lower speeds with current trains, a number of measures are proposed. These include bogie skirts, wheel absorbers and careful aerodynamic design of the front area and of all protruding objects. In sensitive residential areas, further improvement may be achieved with rail absorbers or low trackside screens.

  • 27.
    Andersson, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Mathematics (Div.).
    Backdahl, Thomas
    Blue, Pieter
    A NEW TENSORIAL CONSERVATION LAW FOR MAXWELL FIELDS ON THE KERR BACKGROUND2017In: Journal of differential geometry, ISSN 0022-040X, E-ISSN 1945-743X, Vol. 105, no 2, p. 163-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new, conserved, symmetric tensor field for a source-free Maxwell test field on a four-dimensional spacetime with a conformal Killing-Yano tensor, satisfying a certain compatibility condition, is introduced. In particular, this construction works for the Kerr spacetime.

  • 28. Andersson, Marlene
    et al.
    Jia, Qiupin
    Abella, Ana
    Lee, Xiau-Yeen
    Landreh, Michael
    Purhonen, Pasi
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Hebert, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology.
    Tenje, Maria
    Robinson, Carol V.
    Meng, Qing
    Plaza, Gustavo R.
    Johansson, Jan
    Rising, Anna
    Biomimetic spinning of artificial spider silk from a chimeric minispidroin2017In: Nature Chemical Biology, ISSN 1552-4450, E-ISSN 1552-4469, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 262-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein we present a chimeric recombinant spider silk protein (spidroin) whose aqueous solubility equals that of native spider silk dope and a spinning device that is based solely on aqueous buffers, shear forces and lowered pH. The process recapitulates the complex molecular mechanisms that dictate native spider silk spinning and is highly efficient; spidroin from one liter of bacterial shake-flask culture is enough to spin a kilometer of the hitherto toughest as-spun artificial spider silk fiber.

  • 29.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    KTH.
    Johansson, Sara
    Lööf, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Firm performance and international trade - evidence from a small open economy2012In: The Regional Economics of Knowledge and Talent: Local Advantage in a Global Context, Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. , 2012, p. 320-342Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Andreasson, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Sjödin, Emma
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Sandberg, Henrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Johansson, Karl H.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Coherence in Synchronizing Power Networks with Distributed Integral Control2017In: 2017 IEEE 56th Annual Conference on Decision and Control, CDC 2017, IEEE , 2017, p. 6683-6688Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We consider frequency control of synchronous generator networks and study transient performance under both primary and secondary frequency control. We model random step changes in power loads and evaluate performance in terms of expected deviations from a synchronous frequency over the synchronization transient; what can be thought of as lack of frequency coherence. We compare a standard droop control strategy to two secondary proportional integral (PI) controllers: centralized averaging PI control (CAPI) and distributed averaging PI control (DAPI). We show that the performance of a power system with DAPI control is always superior to that of a CAPI controlled system, which in turn has the same transient performance as standard droop control. Furthermore, for a large class of network graphs, performance scales unfavorably with network size with CAPI and droop control, which is not the case with DAPI control. We discuss optimal tuning of the DAPI controller and describe how internodal alignment of the integral states affects performance. Our results are demonstrated through simulations of the Nordic power grid.

  • 31.
    Andreasson, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Tegling, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Sandberg, Henrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Johansson, Karl H.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Elect Engn, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, ACCESS Linnaeus Ctr, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Performance and Scalability of Voltage Controllers in Multi-Terminal HVDC Networks2017In: 2017 AMERICAN CONTROL CONFERENCE (ACC), IEEE , 2017, p. 3029-3034Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we compare the transient performance of a multi-terminal high-voltage DC (MTDC) grid equipped with a slack bus for voltage control to that of two distributed control schemes: a standard droop controller and a distributed averaging proportional-integral (DAPI) controller. We evaluate performance in terms of an H-2 metric that quantifies expected deviations from nominal voltages, and show that the transient performance of a droop or DAPI controlled MTDC grid is always superior to that of an MTDC grid with a slack bus. In particular, by studying systems built up over lattice networks, we show that the H-2 norm of a slack bus controlled system may scale unboundedly with network size, while the norm remains uniformly bounded with droop or DAPI control. We simulate the control strategies on radial MTDC networks to demonstrate that the transient performance for the slack bus controlled system deteriorates significantly as the network grows, which is not the case with the distributed control strategies.

  • 32.
    Annell, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH.
    Gratner, Alexander
    KTH.
    Svensson, Lars
    KTH.
    Probabilistic Collision Estimation System for Autonomous Vehicles2016In: 2016 IEEE 19TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS (ITSC), IEEE, 2016, p. 473-478Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nearly 1.3 million people die each year in traffic-related accidents, whereas an additional 20-50 million people are injured. Introducing autonomous vehicles would aim to reduce these numbers by removing the driver from the loop entirely and thus removing the human error. Intersections are considered a complex traffic situation for autonomous vehicles. Functions which could accurately foresee future events in those situations, mimicking the situation awareness of humans, would improve autonomous systems and increase traffic safety. To address this a system is designed with two main functionalities: estimate the movements of a observed vehicles in a general traffic situation and predict the probability of a collision, given the current ego trajectory. This system could either be used as information and feedback for a trajectory planner or as a support for decision making at higher level system monitoring. The main contributions are the robust system design, that robustly and consistently estimates the likelihood of a collision and thus preventing future collision, and the intention estimation which determines the probability of which route through an intersection an observed vehicle will take through an intersection by using its current state. The system is validated by controlling the ego vehicle's velocity with a Velocity Planning Controller to avoid colliding. It is shown that in terms of robustness to noise the system successfully avoids collision.

  • 33.
    Anoshkin, Ilya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Nefedova, Irina
    Dmitri, Lioubtchenko
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Nefedov, Igor
    Räisänen, Antti
    Single walled carbon nanotube quantification method employing the Raman signal intensity2017In: Carbon, ISSN 0008-6223, E-ISSN 1873-3891, Vol. 116, p. 547-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new technique for measuring the number of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and their concentration in a carbon nanotube layer is developed in this work. It is based on the G peak intensity of the Raman spectrum, together with precise mass and optical absorbance measurements. The dependence of the number of the carbon nanotubes on the phonon scattering intensity is observed. This method opens an opportunity for the quantitative mapping of sp2 carbon atom distribution in the SWCNT layers with a resolution limited by the focused laser spot size.

  • 34. Antikhovich, I. V.
    et al.
    Kharitonov, Dima S.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Belarusian State Technological University, Belarus.
    Chernik, A. A.
    Dobryden, Illia B.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Corrosion Resistance of Nickel Coatings Deposited from Low-Temperature Nickel-Plating Electrolytes2017In: Russian journal of applied chemistry, ISSN 1070-4272, E-ISSN 1608-3296, Vol. 90, no 4, p. 566-573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The corrosion resistance of nickel coatings on a copper substrate, plated from low-temperature electrolytes based on acetates, tartrates, and isobutyrates, was studied by the methods of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and polarization curves. The tests were performed in a 0.3% NaCl solution. The nickel coatings exhibit high chemical activity, dissolving in the NaCl solution. The electrochemical step is the limiting step of the corrosion process.

  • 35.
    Asplund-Samuelsson, Johannes
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Janasch, Markus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hudson, Elton P.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Thermodynamic analysis of computed pathways integrated into the metabolic networks of E. coli and Synechocystis reveals contrasting expansion potential2018In: Metabolic engineering, ISSN 1096-7176, E-ISSN 1096-7184, Vol. 45, p. 223-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introducing biosynthetic pathways into an organism is both reliant on and challenged by endogenous biochemistry. Here we compared the expansion potential of the metabolic network in the photoautotroph Synechocystis with that of the heterotroph E. coli using the novel workflow POPPY (Prospecting Optimal Pathways with PYthon). First, E. coli and Synechocystis metabolomic and fluxomic data were combined with metabolic models to identify thermodynamic constraints on metabolite concentrations (NET analysis). Then, thousands of automatically constructed pathways were placed within each network and subjected to a network-embedded variant of the max-min driving force analysis (NEM). We found that the networks had different capabilities for imparting thermodynamic driving forces toward certain compounds. Key metabolites were constrained differently in Synechocystis due to opposing flux directions in glycolysis and carbon fixation, the forked tri-carboxylic acid cycle, and photorespiration. Furthermore, the lysine biosynthesis pathway in Synechocystis was identified as thermodynamically constrained, impacting both endogenous and heterologous reactions through low 2-oxoglutarate levels. Our study also identified important yet poorly covered areas in existing metabolomics data and provides a reference for future thermodynamics-based engineering in Synechocystis and beyond. The POPPY methodology represents a step in making optimal pathway-host matches, which is likely to become important as the practical range of host organisms is diversified. 

  • 36.
    Axelsson, Karolin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Konstanzer, Vera
    KTH.
    Rajarao, Gunaratna Kuttuva
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Terenius, Olle
    Seriot, Lisa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Nordenhem, Henrik
    Nordlander, Goran
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry. Tartu University, Estonia.
    Antifeedants Produced by Bacteria Associated with the Gut of the Pine Weevil Hylobius abietis2017In: Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0095-3628, E-ISSN 1432-184X, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 177-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pine weevil, Hylobius abietis, is a severe forest pest insect as it feeds on newly planted conifer seedlings. To identify and develop an antifeedant could be one step towards the protection of seedlings from feeding damage by the pine weevil. With the aim to trace the origin of the antifeedants previously found in feces of the pine weevil, we investigated the culturable bacteria associated with the gut and identified the volatiles they produced. Bacterial isolates were identified by 16S ribosomal RNA gene analysis. The volatile emissions of selected bacteria, cultivated on NB media or on the grated phloem of Scots pine twigs dispersed in water, were collected and analyzed by solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The bacterial isolates released a variety of compounds, among others 2-methoxyphenol, 2-phenylethanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-octen-3-ol, 3-octanone, dimethyl disulfide, and dimethyl trisulfide. A strong antifeedant effect was observed by 2-phenylethanol, which could thus be a good candidate for use to protect planted conifer seedlings against feeding damage caused by H. abietis.

  • 37. Aziz, F.
    et al.
    Ouazzani, N.
    Mandi, L.
    Muhammad, M.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Uheida, Abdusalam
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Composite nanofibers of polyacrylonitrile/natural clay for decontamination of water containing Pb(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and pesticides2017In: Separation science and technology (Print), ISSN 0149-6395, E-ISSN 1520-5754, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 58-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composite nanofibers containing polyacrylonitrile and natural clay particles were fabricated and investigated for the removal of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption behavior of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) can be well described by the Langmuir adsorption model and high loading capacities at pH 7 were obtained. The kinetics of the adsorption process showed that equilibrium was attained after 60 min and the experimental data followed a pseudo-first-order model. The nanocomposites were also tested for photocatalytic degradation of Monocrotophos pesticides in which high degradation efficiency (>90%) was obtained in less than 60 min.

  • 38.
    Baath, Jenny Arnling
    et al.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Div Ind Biotechnol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Martinez-Abad, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Jennie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Larsbrink, Johan
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Div Ind Biotechnol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Olsson, Lisbeth
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Div Ind Biotechnol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mannanase hydrolysis of spruce galactoglucomannan focusing on the influence of acetylation on enzymatic mannan degradation2018In: Biotechnology for Biofuels, ISSN 1754-6834, E-ISSN 1754-6834, Vol. 11, article id 114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Galactoglucomannan (GGM) is the most abundant hemicellulose in softwood, and consists of a backbone of mannose and glucose units, decorated with galactose and acetyl moieties. GGM can be hydrolyzed into fermentable sugars, or used as a polymer in films, gels, and food additives. Endo-beta-mannanases, which can be found in the glycoside hydrolase families 5 and 26, specifically cleave the mannan backbone of GGM into shorter oligosaccharides. Information on the activity and specificity of different mannanases on complex and acetylated substrates is still lacking. The aim of this work was to evaluate and compare the modes of action of two mannanases from Cellvibrio japonicus (CjMan5A and CjMan26A) on a variety of mannan substrates, naturally and chemically acetylated to varying degrees, including naturally acetylated spruce GGM. Both enzymes were evaluated in terms of cleavage patterns and their ability to accommodate acetyl substitutions. Results: CjMan5A and CjMan26A demonstrated different substrate preferences on mannan substrates with distinct backbone and decoration structures. CjMan5A action resulted in higher amounts of mannotriose and mannotetraose than that of CjMan26A, which mainly generated mannose and mannobiose as end products. Mass spectrometric analysis of products from the enzymatic hydrolysis of spruce GGM revealed that an acetylated hexotriose was the shortest acetylated oligosaccharide produced by CjMan5A, whereas CjMan26A generated acetylated hexobiose as well as diacetylated oligosaccharides. A low degree of native acetylation did not significantly inhibit the enzymatic action. However, a high degree of chemical acetylation resulted in decreased hydrolyzability of mannan substrates, where reduced substrate solubility seemed to reduce enzyme activity. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that the two mannanases from C. japonicus have different cleavage patterns on linear and decorated mannan polysaccharides, including the abundant and industrially important resource spruce GGM. CjMan26A released higher amounts of fermentable sugars suitable for biofuel production, while CjMan5A, producing higher amounts of oligosaccharides, could be a good candidate for the production of oligomeric platform chemicals and food additives. Furthermore, chemical acetylation of mannan polymers was found to be a potential strategy for limiting the biodegradation of mannan-containing materials.

  • 39. Bai, Q.
    et al.
    Guo, Z.
    Li, H.
    Yang, Xiaohu
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    Jin, L.
    Yan, J.
    Experimental investigation on the solidification behavior of phase change materials in open-cell metal foams2017In: Energy Procedia, Elsevier Ltd , 2017, p. 3703-3708Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presented an experimental investigation on solidification behavior of fluid saturated in highly porous open-cell copper foams. Particular attention has been made on the effect of pore parameters (pore density and porosity) on the solidification behavior. A purposely-designed apparatus was built for experimental observations. Results showed that the copper foam had a great effect on solidification and the full solidification time can be saved up to 50%, especially preventing the decrease in solidification rate during the later stage of phase change. The smaller the porosity is, the faster the solidification rate will be. Pore density was found to have little influence upon the solidification rate. In addition, the local natural convection does exist but it has a slight effect on solidification, leading to the slant of the solid-liquid interface.

  • 40. Bakaev, A.
    et al.
    Terentyev, D.
    Chang, Z.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Reactor Physics.
    Posselt, M.
    Olsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Reactor Physics.
    Zhurkin, E. E.
    Effect of isotropic stress on dislocation bias factor in bcc iron: an atomistic study2018In: Philosophical Magazine, ISSN 1478-6435, E-ISSN 1478-6443, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 54-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of externally applied stress on the dislocation bias factor (BF) in bcc iron has been studied using a combination of atomistic static calculations and finite element integration. Three kinds of dislocations were considered, namely, a0/2〈1 1 1〉{1 1 0} screw, a0/2〈1 1 1〉{1 1 0} edge and a0〈1 0 0〉{0 0 1} edge dislocations. The computations reveal that the isotropic crystal expansion leads to an increasing or constant dislocation bias, depending on the Burgers vector and type of dislocation. On the other hand, compressive stress reduces the dislocation bias for all the dislocations studied. Variation of the dislocation BF depending on dislocation type and Burgers vector is discussed by analysing the modification of the interaction energy landscape and the capture efficiency values for the vacancy and self-interstitial atom. 

  • 41.
    Balieu, Romain
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Kringos, Nicole
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Chen, Feng
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Córdoba, E.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Multiplicative viscoelastic-viscoplastic damage-healing model for asphalt-concrete materials2016In: RILEM Bookseries, Springer Netherlands , 2016, p. 235-240Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A viscoelastic-viscoplastic model based on a thermodynamic approach is developed under finite strain in this paper. By introducing a damage evolution, the proposed model is able to reproduce the behavior of Asphalt-Concrete materials until the complete fracture. Moreover, a recoverable part of the degradation is introduced to reproduce the self-healing observed under a sufficiently long rest period. The proposed model is implemented into a Finite Element code and good correlations between the numerical responses and the experiments have been observed. 

  • 42. Barekatain, M.
    et al.
    Marti, Miquel
    KTH. Polytechnic University of Catalonia, Spain.
    Shih, H. -F
    Murray, Samuel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Nakayama, K.
    Matsuo, Y.
    Prendinger, H.
    Okutama-Action: An Aerial View Video Dataset for Concurrent Human Action Detection2017In: 30th IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Workshops, CVPRW 2017, IEEE Computer Society, 2017, Vol. 2017, p. 2153-2160Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite significant progress in the development of human action detection datasets and algorithms, no current dataset is representative of real-world aerial view scenarios. We present Okutama-Action, a new video dataset for aerial view concurrent human action detection. It consists of 43 minute-long fully-annotated sequences with 12 action classes. Okutama-Action features many challenges missing in current datasets, including dynamic transition of actions, significant changes in scale and aspect ratio, abrupt camera movement, as well as multi-labeled actors. As a result, our dataset is more challenging than existing ones, and will help push the field forward to enable real-world applications.

  • 43.
    Baroffio, C. A.
    et al.
    Agroscope, Rte Eterpys 18, CH-1964 Conthey, Switzerland..
    Sigsgaard, L.
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Plant & Environm Sci, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark..
    Ahrenfeldt, E. J.
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Plant & Environm Sci, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark..
    Borg-Karlson, A. -K
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Bruun, S. A.
    NIBIO Norwegian Inst Bloecon Res, NO-1431 As, Norway.;NMBU Norwegian Univ Life Sci, Fac Environm Sci & Nat Resource Management, NO-1432 As, Norway..
    Cross, J. V.
    NIAB EMR, New Rd, Kent ME19 6BJ, England..
    Fountain, M. T.
    NIAB EMR, New Rd, Kent ME19 6BJ, England..
    Hall, D.
    Univ Greenwich, Nat Resources Inst, Cent Ave, Chatham ME4 4TB, Kent, England..
    Mozuraitis, R.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Ralle, B.
    LPPRC Latvian Plant Protect Res Ctr, Struktoru Lela 14 A, LV-1039 Riga, Latvia..
    Trandem, N.
    NIBIO Norwegian Inst Bloecon Res, NO-1431 As, Norway.;NMBU Norwegian Univ Life Sci, Fac Environm Sci & Nat Resource Management, NO-1432 As, Norway..
    Wibe, A.
    NORSOK Norwegian Ctr Organ Agr, Gunnars Vei 6, NO-6630 Tingvoll, Norway..
    Combining plant volatiles and pheromones to catch two insect pests in the same trap: Examples from two berry crops2018In: Crop Protection, ISSN 0261-2194, E-ISSN 1873-6904, Vol. 109, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most horticultural crops are attacked by more than one insect pest. As broad-spectrum chemical control options are becoming increasingly restricted, there is a need to develop novel control methods. Semiochemical attractants are available for three important horticultural pests, strawberry blossom weevil, Anthonomus rubi Herbst (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), European tarnished plant bug, Lygus rugulipennis Poppius (Hemiptera: Miridae) and raspberry beetle, Byturus tomentostts deGeer (Coleoptera: Byturidae). Traps targeting more than one pest species would be more practical and economical for both monitoring and mass trapping than traps for single-species. In this study we aimed to (1) improve the effectiveness of existing traps for insect pests in strawberry and raspberry crops by increasing catches of each species, and (2) test if attractants for two unrelated pest species could be combined to capture both in the same trap without decreasing the total catches. Field tests were carried out in four European countries and different combinations of semiochemicals were compared. A volatile from strawberry flowers, 1,4 dimethoxybenzene (DMB), increased the attractiveness of the aggregation pheromone to both sexes of A. rubi. The host-plant volatile, phenylacetaldehyde (PAA), increased the attraction of female L. rugulipennis to the sex pheromone, and, in strawberry, there was some evidence that adding DMB increased catches further. Traps baited with the aggregation pheromone of A. rubi, DMB, the sex pheromone of L rugulipennis and PAA attracted both target species to the same trap with no significant difference in catches compared to those single-species traps. In raspberry, catches in traps baited with a combination of A. rubi aggregation pheromone, DMB and the commercially available lure for B. tomentosus, based on raspberry flower volatiles, were similar to those in single-species traps. In both crops the efficiency of the traps still needs improvement, but the multi species traps are adequate for monitoring and should not lead to confusion for the user as the target species are easy to distinguish from each other.

  • 44.
    Barreto, Sergio
    et al.
    EPFL.
    Shereen, Ezzeldin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Network and Systems engineering.
    Pignati, Marco
    EPFL.
    Dán, György
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Network and Systems engineering.
    Le Boudec, Jean-Yves
    EPFL.
    Paolone, Mario
    EPFL.
    A Continuum of Undetectable Timing-Attacks on PMU-based Linear State-Estimation2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Barrientos, Javier
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Garcilaso, Victoria
    Venezia, Baldassarre
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Aho, Atte
    Antonio Odriozola, Jose
    Boutonnet, Magali
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Technology.
    Jaras, Sven
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Over Zr-Promoted Co/gamma-Al2O3 Catalysts2017In: Topics in catalysis, ISSN 1022-5528, E-ISSN 1572-9028, Vol. 60, no 17-18, p. 1285-1298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two Zr-modified alumina supports were synthetized containing the same amount of Zr but a different distribution of this modifier over the alumina surface. These supports, together with the unmodified alumina carrier, were used to prepare three cobalt-based catalysts which were characterized and tested under relevant Fischer-Tropsch conditions. The three catalysts presented very similar porosity and cobalt dispersion. The addition of Zr nor its distribution enhanced the catalyst reducibility. The catalyst activity was superior when using a carrier consisting of large ZrO2 islands over the alumina surface. The use of a carrier with a homogeneous Zr distribution had however, a detrimental effect. Moreover, a faster initial deactivation rate was observed for the Zr-promoted catalysts, fact that may explain this contradictory effect of Zr on activity. Finally, the addition of Zr showed a clear enhancement of the selectivity to long chain hydrocarbons and ethylene, especially when Zr was well dispersed.

  • 46.
    Barrientos, Javier
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Technology.
    Gonzalez, Niklas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Boutonnet, Magali
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Technology.
    Jaras, Sven
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Deactivation of Ni/gamma-Al2O3 Catalysts in CO Methanation: Effect of Zr, Mg, Ba and Ca Oxide Promoters2017In: Topics in catalysis, ISSN 1022-5528, E-ISSN 1572-9028, Vol. 60, no 17-18, p. 1276-1284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Catalyst deactivation is one of the major concerns in the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) via CO methanation. Catalysts in this application need to be active at low temperatures, resistant to polymeric carbon formation and stable at high temperatures and steam partial pressures. In the present work, a series of alumina-supported nickel catalysts promoted with Zr, Mg, Ba or Ca oxides were investigated. The catalysts were tested under low temperature CO methanation conditions in order to evaluate their resistance to carbon formation. The catalysts were also exposed to accelerated ageing conditions at high temperatures in order to study their thermal stability. The aged catalysts lost most of their activity mainly due to sintering of the support and the nickel crystallites. Apparently, none of these promoters had a satisfactory effect on the thermal resistance of the catalyst. Nevertheless, it was found that the presence of Zr can reduce the rate of polymeric carbon formation.

  • 47.
    Bartie, Phil
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS. Edinburgh University.
    Mackaness, William
    Edinburgh University.
    Minock, Michael
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Mollevik, Johan
    Umeå University.
    SpaceBook D3.3.2: Final Populated City Model Component2013Report (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Baum, Sebastian
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Visinelli, Luca
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Freese, Katherine
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Stengel, Patrick
    Dark matter capture, subdominant WIMPs, and neutrino observatories2017In: Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, ISSN 2470-0010, E-ISSN 2470-0029, Vol. 95, no 4, article id 043007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), which are among the best motivated dark matter (DM) candidates, could make up all or only a fraction of the total DM budget. We consider a scenario in which WIMPs are a subdominant DM component; such a scenario would affect both current direct and indirect bounds on the WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section. In this paper we focus on indirect searches for the neutrino flux produced by annihilation of subdominant WIMPs captured by the Sun or the Earth via either spin-dependent or spin-independent scattering. We derive the annihilation rate and the expected neutrino flux at neutrino observatories. In our computation, we include an updated chemical composition of the Earth with respect to the previous literature, leading to an increase of the Earth's capture rate for spin-dependent scattering by a factor of 3. Results are compared with current bounds from Super-Kamiokande and IceCube. We discuss the scaling of bounds from both direct and indirect detection methods with the WIMP abundance.

  • 49.
    Beaussant Törne, Karin Beaussant
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics. Abbott, St Paul, MN USA.
    Khan, Fareed Ashraf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Ornberg, Andreas
    Weissenrieder, Jonas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Zn-Mg and Zn-Ag degradation mechanism under biologically relevant conditions2018In: Surface Innovations, ISSN 2050-6252, E-ISSN 2050-6260, Vol. 6, no 1-2, p. 81-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zinc (Zn) alloys form a promising new class of biodegradable metals that combine suitable mechanical properties with the favorable degradation properties of pure zinc. However, the current understanding of the influence of alloying elements on the corrosion of zinc alloys, in biologically relevant media, is limited. The authors studied the degradation of three alloys, zinc-4 wt% silver (Ag), zinc-0.5 wt% magnesium (Mg) and zinc-3 wt% magnesium by in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). After exposure for 1 h or 30 d, the samples were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The presence of secondary phases in the alloy microstructure induced selective corrosion and increased the degradation rate. EIS analysis revealed an increase in surface inhomogeneity already at short (hours) immersion times. The microgalvanic corrosion of the zinc-silver alloy resulted in enrichment of the AgZn3 phase at the sample surface. The enrichment of silver and potential release of AgZn3 particles may result in complications during the tissue regeneration. The zinc-magnesium alloy surface was depleted of the magnesium-rich phase after 8-12 d. The selective dissolution caused local precipitation of corrosion products and a thicker corrosion layer with larger pore size consistent with increased corrosion rate.

  • 50.
    Becerra, Marley
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering.
    Pettersson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering.
    Bianchetti, Romeo
    ABB Corporate Research, Switzerland.
    On the Radiation Losses Introduced by the Vapour Layer Formed By Arc-Induced Ablation of Polymers in Air2016Conference paper (Refereed)
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