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  • 1.
    Gurung, Rejina
    et al.
    Golden Community, Jawgal 11, Lalitpur, Nepal.
    Gurung, Abhishek
    Golden Community, Jawgal 11, Lalitpur, Nepal.
    Sunny, Avinash K.
    Golden Community, Jawgal 11, Lalitpur, Nepal.
    Basnet, Omkar
    Golden Community, Jawgal 11, Lalitpur, Nepal.
    Shrestha, Shree Krishna
    Pokhara Acad Hlth Sci, Ramghat 10, Pokhara, Nepal.
    Gomo, Oystein Herwig
    Laerdal Global Hlth, Laerdal Med, Stavanger, Norway.
    Myklebust, Helge
    Laerdal Global Hlth, Laerdal Med, Stavanger, Norway.
    Girnary, Sakina
    Laerdal Global Hlth, Laerdal Med, Stavanger, Norway.
    Ashish, K. C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Dag Hammarskjolds Vag 14B,Floor 1, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Effect of skill drills on neonatal ventilation performance in a simulated setting-observation study in Nepal2019In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Maintaining neonatal resuscitation skills among health workers in low resource settings will require continuous quality improvement efforts. We aimed to evaluate the effect of skill drills and feedback on neonatal resuscitation and the optimal number of skill drills required to maintain the ventilation skill in a simulated setting. Methods: An observational study was conducted for a period of 3 months in a referral hospital of Nepal. Sixty nursing staffs were trained on Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) 2.0 and daily skill drills using a high-fidelity manikin. The high-fidelity manikin had different clinical case scenarios and provided feedback as "well done" or "improvement required" based on the ventilation performance. Adequate ventilation was defined as bag-and-mask ventilation at the rate of 40-60 breaths per minute. The effective ventilation was defined as adequate ventilation with a "well done" feedback. We assessed the correlation of number skill drills and clinical case scenario with adequate ventilation rate using pearson's correlation. We assessed the correlation of number of skill dills performed by each participant with effective ventilation using Mann Whitney test. Results: Among the total of 60 nursing staffs, all of them were competent with an average score of 12.73 +/- 1.09 out of 14 (p < 0.001) on bag-and-mask ventilation skill checklist. Among the trained staff, 47 staffs participated in daily skill drills who performed a total of 331 skill drills and 68.9% of the ventilations were done adequately. Among the 47 nursing staffs who performed the skill drills, 228 (68.9%) drills were conducted at a ventilation rate of 40-60 breathes per minute. There was no correlation of the adequate ventilation with skill drill category (p = 0.88) and the level of skill performed (p = 0.28). Out of 47 participants performing the skill drills, 74.5% of them had done effective ventilation with a mean average of 8 skill drills (SD +/- 4.78) (p-value- 0.032). Conclusion: In a simulated setting, participants who had an average skill drill of 8 in 3 months had effective ventilation. We demonstrated optimal skill drill sessions for maintain the neonatal resuscitation competency. Further evaluation will be required to validate the findings in a scale up setting.

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