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  • 1.
    Creed, Irena F.
    et al.
    Univ Saskatchewan, Sch Environm & Sustainabil, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
    Bergstrom, Ann-Kristin
    Umea Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Umea, Sweden.
    Trick, Charles G.
    Western Univ, Interfac Program Publ Hlth, London, ON, Canada;Western Univ, Dept Biol, London, ON, Canada.
    Grimm, Nancy B.
    Arizona State Univ, Sch Life Sci, Tempe, AZ USA.
    Hessen, Dag O.
    Univ Oslo, Sect Aquat Biol & Toxicol, Oslo, Norway.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umea Univ, Climate Impacts Res Ctr, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Umea, Sweden.
    Kidd, Karen A.
    Univ New Brunswick, Dept Biol, St John, NB, Canada;Univ New Brunswick, Canadian Rivers Inst, St John, NB, Canada.
    Kritzberg, Emma
    Lund Univ, Dept Biol, Lund, Sweden.
    McKnight, Diane M.
    Univ Colorado, INSTAAR, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Freeman, Erika C.
    Western Univ, Dept Geog, London, ON, Canada.
    Senar, Oscar E.
    Western Univ, Dept Geog, London, ON, Canada.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umea Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Umea, Sweden.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umea Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Umea, Sweden.
    Berggren, Martin
    Lund Univ, Dept Phys Geog & Ecosyst Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Cherif, Mehdi
    Umea Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Umea, Sweden.
    Giesler, Reiner
    Umea Univ, Climate Impacts Res Ctr, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Umea, Sweden.
    Hotchkiss, Erin R.
    Virginia Polytech Inst & State Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA.
    Kortelainen, Pirkko
    Finnish Environm Inst, Helsinki, Finland.
    Palta, Monica M.
    Arizona State Univ, Sch Life Sci, Tempe, AZ USA.
    Vrede, Tobias
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Sci & Assessment, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Global change-driven effects on dissolved organic matter composition: Implications for food webs of northern lakes2018In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 3692-3714Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Northern ecosystems are experiencing some of the most dramatic impacts of global change on Earth. Rising temperatures, hydrological intensification, changes in atmospheric acid deposition and associated acidification recovery, and changes in vegetative cover are resulting in fundamental changes in terrestrial-aquatic biogeochemical linkages. The effects of global change are readily observed in alterations in the supply of dissolved organic matter (DOM)-the messenger between terrestrial and lake ecosystems-with potentially profound effects on the structure and function of lakes. Northern terrestrial ecosystems contain substantial stores of organic matter and filter or funnel DOM, affecting the timing and magnitude of DOM delivery to surface waters. This terrestrial DOM is processed in streams, rivers, and lakes, ultimately shifting its composition, stoichiometry, and bioavailability. Here, we explore the potential consequences of these global change-driven effects for lake food webs at northern latitudes. Notably, we provide evidence that increased allochthonous DOM supply to lakes is overwhelming increased autochthonous DOM supply that potentially results from earlier ice-out and a longer growing season. Furthermore, we assess the potential implications of this shift for the nutritional quality of autotrophs in terms of their stoichiometry, fatty acid composition, toxin production, and methylmercury concentration, and therefore, contaminant transfer through the food web. We conclude that global change in northern regions leads not only to reduced primary productivity but also to nutritionally poorer lake food webs, with discernible consequences for the trophic web to fish and humans.

  • 2. Soares, Ana R. A.
    et al.
    Berggren, Martin
    Indirect link between riverine dissolved organic matter and bacterioplankton respiration in a boreal estuary2019In: Marine Environmental Research, ISSN 0141-1136, E-ISSN 1879-0291, Vol. 148, p. 39-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing loading of terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter tends to enhance bacterioplankton respiration (BR) in boreal estuaries, but knowledge on the mechanisms behind this effect is not complete. We determined the stable isotopic signature of the reactive estuarine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the Ore estuary (Baltic Sea) by using the Keeling plot method. The delta C-13 ratio of the estuarine labile DOC varied from -26.0 parts per thousand to -18.7 parts per thousand with most values resembling those typical for DOC of coastal phytoplanktonic origin (-18 to -24 parts per thousand), while being distinctly higher than those of DOC from terrestrial sources (-28 parts per thousand to 27 parts per thousand). Furthermore, the delta C-13 of the respired carbon was positively correlated to DOC concentrations, indicating that carbon of marine origin increasingly dominated the reactive substrates when input of organic matter into the estuary became higher. This suggests that riverine organic matter mainly affects BR indirectly, by providing nutrients that stimulate the production of phytoplankton-derived reactive DOC in the estuary. Thus, riverine derived DOC per se may not be as important for coastal CO2 emissions as previously thought.

  • 3. Soares, Ana R. A.
    et al.
    Lapierre, Jean-Francois
    Selvam, Balathandayuthabani P.
    Lindström, Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Berggren, Martin
    Controls on Dissolved Organic Carbon Bioreactivity in River Systems2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 14897Article in journal (Refereed)
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