Digitala Vetenskapliga Arkivet

Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm. KTH.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Jazz. KTH.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production. KTH.
    Misgeld, Olof
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. KTH.
    Mattias, Sköld
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting. KTH.
    Student involvement in sound and music computing research: Current practices at KTH and KMH2019In: Combined proceedings of the Nordic Sound and Music Computing Conference 2019 and the Interactive Sonification Workshop 2019, 2019, p. 36-42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To engage students in and beyond course activities has been a working practice both at KTH Sound and Music Computing group and at KMH Royal College of Music since many years. This paper collects experiences of involving students in research conducted within the two institutions.  We describe how students attending our courses are given the possibility to be involved in our research activities, and we argue that their involvement both contributes to develop new research and benefits the students in the short and long term.  Among the assignments, activities, and tasks we offer in our education programs are pilot experiments, prototype development, public exhibitions, performing, composing, data collection, analysis challenges, and bachelor and master thesis projects that lead to academic publications.

  • 2.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Jazz. 6511039338.
    Conference Reports: Seventh International Rhythm Changes Conference: Jazz Then & Now2023In: Puls: Journal for Ethnomusicology and Ethnochoreology, E-ISSN 2002-2972 , Vol. 8, p. 143-144Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Jazz.
    The Abelian Axioms – Om jazzmusikers improvisationsstrategier i en reell situation.2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I jazz är förmågan att improvisera grundläggande. Musikalisk improvisation är komplex och individuella val görs i ett avancerat samspel mellan musiker. Musikers syn på interaktion, lyssnande och personliga vägval är ännu relativt outforskat. Här undersöks jazzmusikers improvisationsstrategier. 12 I artikeln presenteras ett musikaliskt projekt med en professionell jazzkvartett där det utifrån musik komponerad specifikt för projektet, görs analyser av improvisationer samt intervjuer med musikerna. Därigenom ges fördjupad insikt i individuella improvisationsstrategier. Sammantaget bildar kompositionen – inspirerad av matematikern Niels Abels livshistoria samt de fem axiom inom den abstrakta matematiken som definierar en abelsk grupp – tillsammans med improvisationer och analys av dessa samt intervjuer med musikerna en verkberättelse i flera steg. Här behandlas axiom nr 4, ”Inverse” från kompositionsidé till färdig inspelning. Analysprocessen samt musikernas reflektioner kring improvisation och interaktion inom projektet diskuteras. De olika stegen i processen är: 1. Komposition. Kompositionen “Inverse” bygger på en spegling i c1 . Temat spelades två gånger i rubato för att sedan övergå till en i huvudsak fri improvisation där formen antyds genom att pianot linjerar ut de ackord som bildas i temat. 2. Repetition och inspelning. Musikerna fick noter i förväg. Notbilden var enkel och det behövdes få förberedelser, repetitionsprocessen blev kort. Inspelningen gjordes live i studio 1 på KMH med alla instrument separerade för att göra analysen enklare. Hela inspelningen (ca 2 timmar) filmades. 3. Analys av inspelad musik. All musik transkriberades med hjälp av olika verktyg som ScoreCloud, Logic X, Sonic Visualiser samt kontrollerades manuellt. ”Inverse” spelades hela tiden i rubato vilket gjorde analysen svårbemästrad. 4. Intervjuer med musiker. Semistrukturerade intervjuer utfördes med alla musiker över Zoom. Dessa transkriberades och kodades. Den första delen av intervjun gjordes efter genomlyssning och den andra delen efter att musikern följt en film med transkription och musik. Under presentationen diskuteras således en metodik för att konkret lyfta individuella musikers relation till sitt eget och sina medmusikers spel. 

  • 4.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Jazz.
    Holzapfel, André
    KTH, Skolan för elektroteknik och datavetenskap (EECS), Människocentrerad teknologi, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. (Sound and Music Computing)..
    Synchronization in a jazz trio during Accelerando and Ritardando.2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    A prevalent feature of Jazz performance is the maintenance of an intended constant tempo [1]. Whereas an increase in tempo may be valued as a means to increase the intensity, a decrease in tempo is a widely despised practice. Sometimes, however, a jazz group deliberately wants to change the tempo, such as during the piano solo in the song ’No blues’ with the Miles Davies Quintet [2]. Changing the tempo deliberately together as a band has been documented to be a challenging task [3]. Schulze et al. [4] presented two different working models used to understand how musicians relate to change of tempo where the timekeeper continuously is working with error corrections to adjust to some predetermined value of tempo.

    Aim

    This study investigates how well three different professional double-bass players were able to synchronize to a drummer whose performance involves continuous tempo changes. According to Hofmann et al., the tempo is mainly controlled by the timing of the drummers [5]. Our main aim is to gain first insights into the differences in synchronization for accelerando, stable tempo, and ritardando.

    Method

    The setting was a trio with piano, bass, and drums. The drummer listened to a pre-recorded click track (quarter notes), and the other musicians followed his playing. The recorded music was five choruses of minor blues, where the pre-recorded click specified the tempo. All performances were played in 4/4, started at tempo 100 bpm, then accelerated linearly during two choruses to 200 bpm, remained at this tempo one chorus, and ultimately slowed down (ritardando), during two choruses to 100 bpm. Three different takes were made in a row, and all instruments were recorded on separate tracks. The note onsets of the double bass and drums were manually annotated using Sonic Visualiser, and the differences between the click and onsets were calculated. As a reference, the note onsets in a blues with a constant tempo were also recorded and analyzed. Although the bass player only related to the drummer’s interpretation of the tempo, the analysis of onset differences was conducted for the relation metronome-drums and metronome-bass. The pianist was mainly included in the study to result in an ecologically valid performance setting.

    Results

    The results show a clear positive time difference (note onsets are after the metronome) during the accelerando and a negative time difference during the ritardando for both drummer and bassist due to the musician’s aim for error correction. During the chorus with a constant tempo, the discrepancies decreased and quickly resembled the reference steady-recording discrepancies. It is also clear that the musicians play closer to the click during an increase in tempo than during a decrease.

    Discussion

    Although the purpose was to make an ecologically valid recording, the musicians reported it intricate playing to pre-recorded clicks. When annotating published commercial recordings, it is obvious that accelerando and ritardando are often performed step by step rather than in a continuous, linear fashion.

    REFERENCES

    [1] B. C. Wesolowski, “Timing deviations in jazz performance: The relationships of selected musical variables on horizontal and vertical timing relations.” Psychology of Music 2016, Vol. 44, 2016, p. 75 –94.

    [2] M. Davies, “Live At The Plugged Nickel.” Columbia -CXK 66955, 1965.

    [3] B. Givan, “Rethinking interaction in jazz improvisation,” Music Theory Online, vol. 22, no. 3, 2016.

    [4] H.-H. Schulze, A. Cordes, and D. Vorberg, “Keeping synchrony while tempo changes: Accelerando and ritardando,” Music Perception, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 461– 477, 2005.

    [5] A. Hofmann, B. C. Wesolowski, and W. Goebl, “The Tight-interlocked Rhythm Section: Production and Perception of Synchronisation in Jazz Trio Performance.” Journal of New Music Research, 2017, pp. 1–13.

  • 5.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    KMH Royal College of Music in Stockholm.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    KMH Royal College of Music in Stockholm.
    Misgeld, Olof
    KMH Royal College of Music in Stockholm.
    Mattias, Sköld
    KMH Royal College of Music in Stockholm.
    Student involvement in sound and music computing research: Current practices at KTH and KMH2019In: Combined proceedings of the Nordic Sound and Music Computing Conference 2019 and the Interactive Sonification Workshop 2019, Stockholm, 2019, p. 36-42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To engage students in and beyond course activities has been a working practice both at KTH Sound and Music Computing group and at KMH Royal College of Music since many years. This paper collects experiences of involving students in research conducted within the two institutions. 

    We describe how students attending our courses are given the possibility to be involved in our research activities, and we argue that their involvement both contributes to develop new research and benefits the students in the short and long term.  Among the assignments, activities, and tasks we offer in our education programs are pilot experiments, prototype development, public exhibitions, performing, composing, data collection, analysis challenges, and bachelor and master thesis projects that lead to academic publications.

  • 6.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Jazz.
    Interdisciplinary Music Research - a Stockholm example2020Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborations between universities and institutions are a part of the commitment of higher education. However, finding relevant and practical openings can be challenging.

    A collaboration between KMH Royal College of Music and KTH Royal Institute of Technology Institute in Stockholm has provided for teachers at KMH to participate in Ph.D. training programs within the field of Sound and Music Computing at KTH. Currently, four teachers from Jazz, Folk Music, Composition and Music and Media departments are enrolled at KTH as part of their employment at KMH. This interdisciplinary collaboration aims at enhancing the research environment at KMH and also contribute towards establishing the third-cycle level at KMH, which is currently not available. Another goal is to promote collaborations between students of the two schools, on, for example, master's thesis, course projects, etc.

    The nature of the collaboration between music teachers and researchers within technology and design carries unique possibilities for developing interdisciplinary research that influences teaching practice and the academic environment of the two institutions.

    We present two ongoing doctoral projects within the field of jazz and folk music, their methodologies, and the preliminary outcomes. These projects approach artistic practice with experimental methods and performance analysis using methods from Motion Capture, computational sound analysis, and Music Information Retrieval. The Folk Music project focuses on the interaction between players and dancers aiming towards developing oral music theory. The Jazz project concerns method development for identifying jazz improvisation strategies.

    Download (pdf)
    Presentation
  • 7.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Jazz.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, Skolan för elektroteknik och datavetenskap (EECS), Människocentrerad teknologi, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. (Sound and Music Computing).
    Towards a cross-genre understanding of the beat.2021In: Proceedings: ICCIPEM 2021, Perspectives in Psychology of Music and Music Education, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract:In a recent experiment on enculturation and metrical perception, we compared responses of two groups of either folk or jazz musicians tapping the beat to music recordings of familiar and unfamiliar genres: jazz music and Scandinavian folk music. Responses were recorded in audio format, which facilitates analyses of stress patterns and using the responses as input for educational methods as we propose in this abstract. The musicians were all students at the same higher music institution. The study aimed to investigate how enculturation affected beat perception of subjects in a similar cultural background but with specializations in either one of the two genres. Computational metrics for the evaluation of beat tracking algorithms [1] and accent histograms were used in order to analyze differences in how the two groups tapped to the beat for each genre. The results showed differences in the group’s synchronization when tapping to the familiar and unfamiliar examples, as well as differences between the groups concerning the preferred metrical level, the accentuation of beat cycles and in response to the asymmetric beat cycles featured in the Scandinavian, triple meter tune types [2]. Understanding how the perception of rhythm can vary between groups of musicians [3] may enhance the capability to communicate and interact across genres, and as such these results are relevant for music education. In order to facilitate such cross-genre understanding, we outline a teaching methodology that uses tapping recordings in the context of a workshop, including one or several of these student groups.Drawing on our experiment, this workshop will focus on music examples where the groups tapping patterns differed significantly. Specifically, these examples include extremely slow or fast tempi in jazz, and folk tunes with asymmetric beat. Furthermore, they illustrate genre-specific approaches: solo playing or ensemble playing with leading and accompanying parts.In the proposed workshop setting, students will be instructed to tap the beat to music examples containing unfamiliar metrical structures. Additionally, students will be asked to play simple accompaniment parts along with the examples, and to play typical musical excerpts while applying alternative metrical interpretations. Subsequently, they will be asked to tap or play with the same recordings, but with added sounds of tapping responses obtained from groups of expert musicians.The sound of the tapping recordings is suited to be distinguished from the original recordings: for Scandinavian folk music performed on solo violin, the tapping will stand out in the lower register, similar to foot-tapping; for jazz ensemble, the tapping sounds will be filtered to resemble medium bright wood-sticks. Thus, this methodology, accompanied by discussions involving students and teachers, facilitates students gaining insights into how expert musicians respond to metrical structures in a non-familiar genre, and aims towards a practice-based understanding of playing with the beat in different musical contexts.The workshops will be recorded for later evaluation and students will be asked to comment on their responses during the different stages of the workshop. We aim to report first results from the application of the tapping responses in teaching contexts in our presentation.

    Bibliographic References:

    [1] Davies, M. E., Degara, N., & Plumbley, M. D. (2009). Evaluation methods for musical audio beat tracking algorithms. Queen Mary University of London, Centre for Digital Music, Tech. Rep. C4DM-TR-09-06.

    [2] Ahlbäck, S. (2003). About asymmetrical beat in the polska. The Polish dance in Scandinavia and Poland, 17, 165-180.

    [3] Polak, R., Jacoby, N., Fischinger, T., Goldberg, D., Holzapfel, A., & London, J. (2018). Rhythmic Prototypes Across Cultures. Music Perception, 36(1), 1–23.

  • 8.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KMH Royal College of Music.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KMH Royal College of Music.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Miniotaitė, Jūra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    A case study of deep enculturation and sensorimotor synchronization to real music2021In: Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Music Information Retrieval, ISMIR 2021, International Society for Music Information Retrieval, 2021, p. 460-467Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synchronization of movement to music is a behavioural capacity that separates humans from most other species. Whereas such movements have been studied using a wide range of methods, only few studies have investigated synchronisation to real music stimuli in a cross-culturally comparative setting. The present study employs beat tracking evaluation metrics and accent histograms to analyze the differences in the ways participants from two cultural groups synchronize their tapping with either familiar or unfamiliar music stimuli. Instead of choosing two apparently remote cultural groups, we selected two groups of musicians that share cultural backgrounds, but that differ regarding the music style they specialize in. The employed method to record tapping responses in audio format facilitates a fine-grained analysis of metrical accents that emerge from the responses. The identified differences between groups are related to the metrical structures inherent to the two musical styles, such as non-isochronicity of the beat, and differences between the groups document the influence of the deep enculturation of participants to their style of expertise. Besides these findings, our study sheds light on a conceptual weakness of a common beat tracking evaluation metric, when applied to human tapping instead of machine generated beat estimations.

  • 9.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Jazz.
    Miniotaitė, Jūra
    KTH, Skolan för elektroteknik och datavetenskap (EECS), Människocentrerad teknologi, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. (Sound and Music Computing).
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, Skolan för elektroteknik och datavetenskap (EECS), Människocentrerad teknologi, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. (Sound and Music Computing).
    A CASE STUDY OF DEEP ENCULTURATION AND SENSORIMOTOR SYNCHRONIZATION TO REAL MUSIC2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synchronization of movement to music is a behavioural capacity that separates humans from most other species. Whereas such movements have been studied using a wide range of methods, only few studies have investigated synchronisation to real music stimuli in a cross-culturally comparative setting. The present study employs beat tracking evaluation metrics and accent histograms to analyze the differences in the ways participants from two cultural groups synchronize their tapping with either familiar or unfamiliar music stimuli. Instead of choosing two apparently remote cultural groups, we selected two groups of musicians that share cultural backgrounds, but that differ regarding the music style they specialize in. The employed method to record tapping responses in audio format facilitates a fine-grained analysis of metrical accents that emerge from the responses. The identified differences between groups are related to the metrical structures inherent to the two musical styles, such as non-isochronicity of the beat, and differences between the groups document the influence of the deep enculturation of participants to their style of expertise. Besides these findings, our study sheds light on a conceptual weakness of a common beat tracking evaluation metric, when applied to human tapping instead of machine generated beat estimations.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf