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  • 1. Angelaki, Vicky
    Adaptation and Environment: Landscape, Community and Politics in Henrik Ibsen’s Rosmersholm by Duncan Macmillan (2019)2020In: The Oxford Handbook of Politics and Performance / [ed] Gluhovic, M., S. M. Rai, S. Jestrovic and M. Saward, Oxford University Press, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2. Angelaki, Vicky
    Alles Weitere kennen Sie aus dem Kino: Martin Crimp at the Cutting Edge of Representation2014In: Contemporary theatre review (Hardback), ISSN 1026-7166, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 315-330Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Angelaki, Vicky
    Breaking Down Barriers High and Low: The Case of the UK’s National Theatre2009In: High Culture and/versus Popular Culture / [ed] Coelsch-Foisner, S. and D. Flothow, Universitätsverlag Winter, 2009, p. 85-93Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Angelaki, Vicky
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Contemporary British Theatre: Breaking New Ground2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 5. Angelaki, Vicky
    Ethics Take Centre Stage: Issues and Representation for Today’s Political Theatre2010In: Ethical Encounters: Boundaries of Theatre, Performance and Philosophy / [ed] Meyer-Dinkgräfe, D. and D. Watt (eds.), Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2010, p. 199-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6. Angelaki, Vicky
    From History to ‘Ourstories’ in Martin Crimp’s Metanarratives2015In: Journal of Contemporary Drama in English, ISSN 2195-0156, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 142-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A careful consideration of Crimp’s choices throughout his career, especially since he expanded the scope of his work from translations to versions, adaptations and, later, libretti or “texts for music” (Angel-Perez 2014: 356), reveals that from the mid-1990s onwards he has taken a keen interest in the history of the narrative – whether as myth, dramatic text or popular story – alongside the history of civilization as embodied experience. Arguably, Crimp’s attachment to projects that could be seen as vehicles either for international directors (Benedict Andrews, Luc Bondy, Katie Mitchell) or composers (George Benjamin) has furnished the playwright with a richer understanding of how history is conceptualized as an active process in contemporary performance making, as well as of the gravitas and opportunities it carries. This is particularly notable when considering that the work of practitioners such as those mentioned above has also often operated on a delicate balance between the past and the present. Verbal and cultural sensibilities cannot be eradicated for the purposes of any new text, so a new version or adaptation cannot be dealt with merely as a vehicle for engaging in contemporary politics. That is, the older text’s rhythm, agenda and specificity cannot be sacrificed to create a reduced emergent product that only serves to vent present frustrations. Rather, the preexisting text must be paid due attention no less because allegory is a demanding process that requires sophisticated depths of mediation.

  • 7. Angelaki, Vicky
    Introduction2013In: Contemporary British Theatre: Breaking New Ground / [ed] Angelaki, V., Palgrave Macmillan, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8. Angelaki, Vicky
    Introduction: Dealing with Martin Crimp2014In: Contemporary theatre review (Hardback), ISSN 1026-7166, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 309-314Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Angelaki, Vicky
    Lessons from Harold Pinter2010In: Studies in Theatre & Performance, ISSN 1468-2761, E-ISSN 2040-0616, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 267-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The text pays homage to Harold Pinter. It is not intended to be strictly in the format of the traditional academic article but, rather, blurs boundaries as it offers a perspective that emphasizes the sense of encounter with the writer in different ways. The purpose of the article is to add to the texts that have been written on Pinter from December 2008 onwards, considering his accomplishment as a writer and his strong political voice but also tracing the impact that his work has had on individual theatre scholars, using anecdotal incidents as the pathway to a broader narrative. It considers Pinter as a playwright, public speaker and, indeed, as a teacher—in the most meaningful and perhaps less obvious sense of the word.

  • 10.
    Angelaki, Vicky
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Luc Bondy at the Wiener Festwochen2016In: Contemporary theatre review (Hardback), ISSN 1026-7166, Vol. 23, no 3Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 11. Angelaki, Vicky
    Martin Crimp and Border Crossing: The Australian Turn2011In: Contemporary theatre review (Hardback), ISSN 1026-7166Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Angelaki, Vicky
    University of Reading, UK.
    Performing Migration in Vienna: The Volkstheater Trilogy2019In: Performing Ethos: International Journal of Ethics in Theatre & Performance, ISSN 1757-1979, E-ISSN 1757-1987, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 9-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is concerned with the example of Vienna's Volkstheater in asking how major European cultural institutions might affectively and effectively engage with the refugee crisis and asylum seeking especially following what has become known as the 'Long Summer of Migration' (2015). It discusses what we might describe as the 'Migration Trilogy' of pieces co-developed by Yael Ronen and the performer ensembles involved, namely, the plays Lost and Found, Niemandsland and Gutmenschen.

  • 13. Angelaki, Vicky
    Performing Phenomenology: The Theatre of Martin Crimp2007In: Theatres of Thought, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2007, p. 6-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14. Angelaki, Vicky
    Politics for the Middle Classes: Contemporary Audiences and the Violence of Now2013In: Contemporary British Theatre: Breaking New Ground / [ed] Angelaki, V., Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, p. 57-78Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a statement when her tenure as the new artistic director of the Royal Court Theatre, succeeding Dominic Cooke, was announced, Vicky Featherstone observed: ‘[t]hese are challenging times. Now more than ever we need places where reflection, question and visceral experience can elevate the daily and the private and remind us of our humanity and universality’.1 She added: ‘[t]he fearlessness and skill of our playwrights, [… along] with our complex and thrilling contemporary culture is a powerful combination’.2 Further to the key staples of the perspective she brings to a seminal new writing venue within the United Kingdom but also further afield, responsible for fostering the careers of many major playwrights of the recent and contemporary period, Featherstone used her early statement to reinforce the very significance of the playwright. At a time when debates relating to heavily mediatized performance and presumed tensions between playwright and director auteur are raging on, Featherstone allowed no ambiguity as to where she positions herself artistically. Through her words she emphasized that the Royal Court is not scared to advocate and support the primacy of the author. ‘It is the playwrights who find a story, form and structure […] and who breathe the life into ideas, thus demanding their urgent work be realized for an audience’, Featherstone continued.

  • 15. Angelaki, Vicky
    Social and Political Theatre in 21st-Century Britain: Staging Crisis2017Book (Refereed)
  • 16. Angelaki, Vicky
    Structuring Consciousness through Objects: Fluctuating Roles and Selves in Crimp, Pinter and Ionesco2007In: Consciousness, Theatre, Literature and the Arts / [ed] Meyer-Dinkgräfe, D., Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2007, p. 126-133Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17. Angelaki, Vicky
    Subtractive Forms and Composite Contents: Martin Crimp’s Fewer Emergencies2008In: Contemporary Drama in English 15. / [ed] Redling, E. and P. Schnierer, Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier, 2008, p. 31-46Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18. Angelaki, Vicky
    Taking a Bite of the Big Apple: Martin Crimp’s The Treatment2008In: Hunger on the Stage / [ed] Angel- Perez, E. and A. Poulain, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2008, p. 257-267Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19. Angelaki, Vicky
    The (In)Human Condition: Animality in Simon Stephens’s Three Kingdoms2016In: Sillages Critiques, ISSN 1969-6302, Vol. 20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines Simon Stephens's seminal play Three Kingdoms (2012), a defining moment in his enduring working relationship with director Sebastian Nübling and a decidedly internationalist staging effort that enabled cross-collaboration between artists based in Britain, Estonia and Germany. The particular focus of the article is the depiction of animality in Simon Stephens's play and the rich signification that it accomplishes in a piece that effectively proceeds from the detective fiction genre to offer wide-ranging, bold and experimental theatrical representation. As the article argues, this is achieved through the poignant relevance to contemporary social concerns that animality allows on both a literal and metaphorical level. There is an imaginary binary at the heart of the problematics that Stephens exposes: between the European East and West, but also between human and animal. As the article goes on to demonstrate, Stephens, Nübling and their international team of collaborators arrive at a staging method that is both aesthetically intuitive and politically astute in order to offer rigorous stage commentary on the state of sex trade - and especially sex slavery - in our time. In so doing, they also powerfully question the primacy of humans over animals, raising important points as to vulnerability and transgression, the assumption of authority over nature, and also to humans in positions of power versus humans in positions of vulnerability.

  • 20.
    Angelaki, Vicky
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    The Plays of Martin Crimp: Making Theatre Strange2012Book (Refereed)
  • 21. Angelaki, Vicky
    The Private and the Public Wars: A Play by Martin Crimp2006In: Platform: Postgraduate e-Journal of Theatre and Performing Arts, ISSN 1751-0171, E-ISSN 1751-0171, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 32-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will focus on Martin Crimp's Cruel and Tender, first performed at the Young Vic in the spring of 2004. The play is representative of Crimp's tendency to explore the fields of the private and the public in equal degrees, navigating both territories in the same text. It is, perhaps, features such as this that have triggered comparisons between Crimp and Pinter and it is true that, like Pinter, Crimp is a master of language and subterranean action. In this paper, I will argue that Crimp is equally effective in depicting private and public conflicts and I will demonstrate this by exploring the techniques which he employs in order to communicate the characters' tension and aggression, concluding that his subtle methods are highly effective. In terms of theory I will focus on Stanton Garner's Bodied Spaces, a phenomenological approach to performance. In doing so my purpose is mainly to indicate the value of phenomenology as a theoretical approach to Crimp's theatre for which Cruel and Tender will serve as an example.

  • 22. Angelaki, Vicky
    The Space and Culture of Translation: Ferdinand Bruckner’s Pains of Youth by Martin Crimp and Katie Mitchell2016In: Journal of Adaptation in Film and Performance, ISSN 1753-6421, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 67-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on Martin Crimp's collaborations with Katie Mitchell in the context of productions of plays that involve a process of translation and whose source language is German. Specifically, the article concentrates on the productions of Pains of Youth by Ferdinand Bruckner at the National Theatre in 2009 and of The Jewish Wife by Bertolt Brecht at the Young Vic in 2007. The article offers a distinction when it comes to the terms adaptation, translation and version, before arguing that even in cases where Crimp has not produced a translation as such, but, rather, a version - as in the examples of these two texts - there is a substantial amount of translation involved. This translation is spatial, cultural, corporeal and indeed verbal, rendering the source text into a product that is responsive to a contemporary audience. Beginning with a consideration of The Jewish Wife, the article then goes on to examine in detail the methods through which Crimp and Mitchell delivered a modern staging of Pains of Youth that was entirely attuned to its modern-day context while remaining sensitive to its original cultural environment.

  • 23.
    Angelaki, Vicky
    University of Reading, UK.
    Theatre & Environment2019Book (Refereed)
  • 24. Angelaki, Vicky
    Whose Voice? Tim Crouch’s The Author and Active Listening on the Contemporary Stage2013In: Sillages Critiques, ISSN 1969-6302, Vol. 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The essay discusses Tim Crouch’s recent play The Author (2009) in the context of active listening, audience participation, response and responsibility in contemporary theatre. It provides a critical engagement with the spectatorial experience of the piece so as to problematize the multiple uses of the physical medium of voice and speech in a contemporary play that delivers a fresh angle to narrativity and metatheatricality. At the same time, the essay probes the varied range of possibilities but also realistic extent of audience involvement in the play, tracing its deep textual contingencies to produce an overall understanding of the equally rewarding and precarious interrelationship between performance piece and audience.

1 - 24 of 24
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