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  • 1.
    Alfsdotter, Clara
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    The Sandby Borg Massacre: Interpersonal Violence and the Demography of the Dead2019In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 210-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During excavations of the Iron Age ringfort of Sandby borg (ad 400-550), the remains of twenty-six unburied bodies were encountered inside and outside the buildings. The skeletons and the archaeological record indicate that after the individuals had died the ringfort was deserted. An osteological investigation and trauma analysis were conducted according to standard anthropological protocols. The osteological analysis identified only men, but individuals of all ages were represented. Eight individuals (31 per cent) showed evidence of perimortem trauma that was sharp, blunt, and penetrating, consistent with interpersonal violence. The location of the bodies and the trauma pattern appear to indicate a massacre rather than a battle. The 'efficient trauma' distribution (i.e. minimal but effective violence), the fact that the bodies were not manipulated, combined with the archaeological context, suggest that the perpetrators were numerous and that the assault was carried out effectively. The contemporary sociopolitical situation was seemingly turbulent and the suggested motive behind the massacre was to gain power and control.

  • 2. Gummesson, Sara
    et al.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Keep your head high - Mesolithic human remains mountedon stakes in Motala, Sweden.In: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    People in Transition: Life in the Mälaren Valley from an Osteological Perspective2016In: Shetland and the viking world : papers from the seventeenth Viking Congress, Lerwick / [ed] Val E. Turner, Olwyn A. Owen, Doreen J. Waugh, Lerwick: Shetland Heritage Publications, 2016, p. 197-202Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4. Sten, Sabine
    et al.
    Lovén, Christian
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Vretemark, Maria
    Hongslo Vala, Cecilie
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Fjällström, Markus
    Shalabi, Adel
    Duvernoy, Olov
    Segelsjö, Monica
    Malmström, Helena
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Erik den heliges skelett2016In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 111, no 1, p. 27-40Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Saint Erik was King of Sweden for a few years up to 1160, when he was killed. A skeleton attributed to him is kept in Uppsala Cathedral. It underwent sci­entific reappraisal in 2014. The analyses included computer tomography, X­ray absorptiometry, isotope analysis and DNA sampling. Radiocarbon con­firms the alleged age of the bones. They belong to a 35–40­year­old man inexcellent physical shape. The many wounds that he received in connectionwith his death fit surprisingly well with the saint's legend, whose preservedversion was written 130 years after the event.

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