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  • 1.
    Aartsen, Marja
    et al.
    Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway.
    Walsh, Kieran
    National University of Ireland Galway, Ireland.
    Löwenstein, Ariela
    Haifa University, Israel.
    Katz, Ruth
    University of Haifa, Israel.
    Naim, Sigal Pearl
    Yezreel Academic College, Israel.
    Motel-Klingebiel, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wanka, Anna
    Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main, Germany; University of Stuttgart, Germany..
    Urbaniak, Anna
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Hansen, Thomas
    Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway.
    Vidovićová, Lucie
    Masaryk University, Tjeckien.
    Exclusion from Social Relations in Later Lifeand the Role of Gender: A Heuristic Model2021In: Gender and Research, ISSN 2570-6578, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 16-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Being socially connected is a universal human need, but a substantial number ofolder men and women are or become excluded from these connections in later life. Exclusionfrom social relations (ESR) is unwanted as it undermines people’s ability to lead a healthy,active, and independent life. Policies to reduce this form of exclusion have been limited ineffectiveness, due in part to a broader lack of knowledge about the dynamics of socialexclusion in older ages and the intersection of social exclusion with gender constructions. Toadvance our understanding of ESR in later life, we develop a heuristic model based on theoriesand previous empirical studies. Considering the gendered constructing forces of ESR in olderage that can potentially lead to loneliness and reduced health and wellbeing, the modelidentifies individual drivers, such as biopsychosocial conditions, personal standards and life--course transitions, and macro-level drivers, such as norms and welfare state provisions. Thismodel can serve as a conceptual platform for further theoretical development and empiricalstudy on the gendered construction of ESR in later life. While our focus is on drivers of ESRand its outcomes, potential reversed effects are also discussed.

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  • 2.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change.
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change.
    Boende och bostäder för äldre på framtidens landsbygd2018In: Nya visioner för landsbygden / [ed] Josefina Syssner, Boxholm: Linnefors förlag , 2018, Vol. Sidorna 95-117, p. 95-117Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Allemann, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Poli, Arianna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Designing and evaluating information and communication technology-based interventions? Be aware of the needs of older people2020In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 370-372Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

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  • 4.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    INRCA - National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing.
    Poli, Arianna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andréasson, Frida
    Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Salzmann, Benjamin
    wir pflegen e.V., Berlin, Germany.
    Efthymiou, Areti
    Cyprus University of Technology, Limassol, Cyprus.
    Papa, Roberta
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Ancona, Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Ancona, Italy.
    Design, test, and implementation of a web platform for informal caregivers of older people in Europe2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution provides insights from one of the four social innovations of the INNOVAGE project, focused on the development of the InformCare web platform for supporting informal caregivers of older people in Europe. The platform included information resources on different topics (major diseases in older age, public care services and benefits, coping and reconciliation strategies etc.) and interactive services for professional and peer support (dedicated social network, forum, chat and videochat). The design phase was based on a consultation process involving almost 200 stakeholders and on user tests. The pilot phase was carried out as a mixed-methods study in Germany, Italy and Sweden, which recruited totally 118 caregivers who could access the InformCare platform for 3 months. Positive findings led to its refinement and implementation in 27 European countries. Today, the platform is publicly accessible (www.eurocarers.org/informcare) in 32 versions and 23 languages, with over 2,500 web pages for informal caregivers.

  • 5.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    Natl Inst Hlth & Sci Ageing INRCA, Italy; Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Poli, Arianna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Natl Inst Hlth & Sci Ageing INRCA, Italy.
    Andréasson, Frida
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Swedish Family Care Competence Ctr NKA, Sweden.
    Salzmann, Benjamin
    Natl Inst Hlth & Sci Ageing INRCA, Italy; Wir Pflegen eV, Germany.
    Papa, Roberta
    Natl Inst Hlth & Sci Ageing INRCA, Italy.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Swedish Family Care Competence Ctr NKA, Sweden; Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Efthymiou, Areti
    Eurocarers, Belgium; Cyprus Univ Technol, Cyprus.
    Doehner, Hanneli
    Wir Pflegen eV, Germany.
    Lancioni, Cristina
    Natl Inst Hlth & Sci Ageing INRCA, Italy.
    Civerchia, Patrizia
    Natl Inst Hlth & Sci Ageing INRCA, Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    Natl Inst Hlth & Sci Ageing INRCA, Italy.
    A Web-Based Psychosocial Intervention for Family Caregivers of Older People: Results from a Mixed-Methods Study in Three European Countries2016In: JMIR Research Protocols, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 5, no 4, article id e196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Informal caregiving is the main source of care for older people in Europe. An enormous amount of responsibility and care activity is on the shoulders of family caregivers, who might experience problems in their psychological well-being and in reconciling caregiving and their personal sphere. In order to alleviate such burden, there is increasing interest and growing research in Europe on Web-based support addressing family caregivers and their needs. However, the level of development and penetration of innovative Web-based services for caregivers is still quite low and the access to traditional face-to-face services can be problematic for logistic, availability, and quality reasons. Objective: As part of the European project INNOVAGE, a pilot study was conducted for developing and testing a Web-based psychosocial intervention aimed at empowering family caregivers of older people in Italy, Sweden, and Germany. The program offered information resources and interactive services to enable both professional and peer support. Methods: A mixed-methods, sequential explanatory design was adopted. Caregivers psychological well-being, perceived negative and positive aspects of caregiving, and social support received were assessed before and after the 3-month intervention. Poststudy, a subsample of users participated in focus groups to assist in the interpretation of the quantitative results. Results: A total of 94 out of 118 family caregivers (79.7%) from the three countries used the Web platform at least once. The information resources were used to different extents in each country, with Italian users having the lowest median number of visits (5, interquartile range [IQR] 2-8), whereas German users had the highest number (17, IQR 7-66) (P<.001). The interactive services most frequently accessed (more than 12 times) in all countries were the social network (29/73, 40%) and private messages (27/73, 37%). The pretest-posttest analysis revealed some changes, particularly the slight worsening of perceived positive values of caregiving (Carers of Older People in Europe [COPE] positive value subscale: P=.02) and social support received (COPE quality-of-support subscale: P=.02; Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support subscale: P=.04), in all cases with small effect size (r range -.15 to -.18). Focus groups were conducted with 20 family caregivers and the content analysis of discussions identified five main themes: online social support, role awareness, caregiving activities, psychological well-being, and technical concerns. The analysis suggested the intervention was useful and appropriate, also stimulating a better self-efficacy and reappraisal of the caregivers role. Conclusions: The intervention seemed to contribute to the improvement of family caregivers awareness, efficacy, and empowerment, which in turn may lead to a better self-recognition of their own needs and improved efforts for developing and accessing coping resources. A major implication of the study was the finalization and implementation of the InformCare Web platform in 27 European countries, now publicly accessible (www.eurocarers.org/informcare).

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  • 6.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    Italian National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA).
    Poli, Arianna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kostakis, Ioannis
    Harokopio University, Kallithea, Grekland.
    Socio-economic status and social participation as predictors of quality of life of older adults with functional limitations: a cross-sectional study in Italy and Greece2019In: Retraité et Société, Vol. 81, no 1, p. 41-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older adults with functional limitations constitute a vulnerable group with usually lower levels of health status and quality of life (QoL). In both Italy and Greece, informal care and privately-hired care workers are common measures for providing them continuous care and support, more than public care services. This situation might increase the risk of worst QoL if older adults are not equipped with own social and economic resources for coping with daily life limitations, especially in a macro-context heavily influenced in recent years by the effects of the economic crisis. The study aimed at identifying the role of socio-economic status (SES) and social participation as predictors of QoL of older adults with functional limitations, after the Great Recession period. We used data on older adults (50+ years) from the Survey on health, ageing and retirement in Europe (Share) wave 6 (2015) for conducting a cross-sectional descriptive analysis and running a hierarchical linear regression model for both Italy and Greece, with blocs of predictors concerning demographic, socio-economic, health, access to care, and social participation domains. In both countries, higher levels of SES and social participation were strongly associated with higher QoL, although good health status remained the most influential predictor of better QoL. Our results suggested that multiple social inequalities are likely to occur among most socially disadvantaged older adults and may heavily affect their QoL and social inclusion.

  • 7. Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    Poli, Arianna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change.
    Santini, Sara
    Lamura, Giovanni
    Informal caregivers: the role of spouses, adult children, neighbours, volunteers2018In: Cultures of care: Handbook of cultural geropsychology, Charlotte (NY): Information Age Publishing, 2018, p. 193-212Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Avdelningen för socialt arbete, Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping University.
    Eriksson, Lisbeth
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Avdelningen för socialt arbete och socialpedagogik, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Högskolan Väst, Trollhättan.
    Ringsby Jansson, Bibby
    Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Högskolan Väst, Trollhättan.
    Svensson, Lars A.
    Avdelningen för socialt arbete och socialpedagogik, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Högskolan Väst, Trollhättan.
    Renässans för socialpedagogik?: En bok om socialpedagogisk bildning2019Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna bok söker vi samla idéer och tankar från olika tidsepoker för att formulera en socialpedagogik för framtiden. För att de idéer som historiskt formulerats om socialpedagogiken ska vara användbara måste de förstås utifrån och kopplas till den nutida situationen. Boken tecknar en aktuell bild av socialpedagogisk verksamhet och forskning i Sverige, kompletterad med internationella utblickar.

    Socialpedagogiken och socialpedagogerna verkar i ett samhälle som är statt i förändring. Det gör att socialpedagoger i allt högre utsträckning än förr möter grupper av människor som befinner sig på andra samhällsarenor och i förändrade livssituationer. Detta ger upphov till och ett behov av att beskriva och förstå socialpedagogik på ett förändrat och fördjupat sätt. En ambition med boken är att skapa en förståelse för socialpedagogik och dess kopplingar till människors lärande. Detta sätt att tänka kring socialpedagogik ger en bra grund för den som vill utveckla ett socialpedagogiskt tänkande och förhållningssätt. Boken lyfter fram det socialpedagogiska perspektivets styrkor i dagens och morgondagens välfärdsarbete och ger en ram för det som benämns socialpedagogisk bildning.

    Boken vänder sig i första hand till studerande på socialpedagogiska högskoleutbildningar, men även till studenter på socionomprogram och lärarprogram. Boken kan med fördel läsas på avancerad nivå och forskarnivå, men även av studenter på grundnivå.

     

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  • 9.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work.
    Kvarnström, Susanne
    Tensions between institutional and professional frames in team talk in gerontological social work2024In: Communication & Medicine: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Healthcare, Ethics and Society, ISSN 1612-1783, E-ISSN 1613-3625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Team meetings are central to social workers’ decision-making practices. These meetings often function as a forum for collegial consultations, when applications are processed and recommendations on decisions are discussed. In this paper, we present findings from a case study on team talk and decision-making practices in gerontological social work. The data come from a body of material gathered within the framework of a larger project covering the process of assessing elder care for older persons in three Swedish municipalities. The case concerns an application, due to homelessness, from a couple for an apartment in special housing. The team meeting was analysed using a data-driven perspective within a micro-analytical approach to talk, focusing in detail on how conflicting perspectives in the assessment of the couple’s needs are dealt with, and how tensions between divergent views and opinions are handled in relation to institutional and professional conversational frames. The findings show how the care managers (in Sweden the professional title for social workers working in elder care) negotiated the boundaries of responsibility and power within both the institutional and professional frames, revealing that the institutional frame dominated when it came to making decisions. The findings have implications for practice, as they give insight into the interactional dynamics involved in social workers’ assessments when navigating different conversational frames within their decision-making practices.

  • 10.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sverker, Annette M.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Finding the right care path: Experiences of participation in care by older persons with complex health problems: A Focused Primary Care Intervention2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Despite evidence that older persons want to be involved in care, little is known about how older people with complex health problems living at home experience participation in care provided by different stakeholders. This study investigates the experiences of participation in care by older people, following their involvement in a proactive intervention based on a new health care model called Focused Primary Care. Material and methods: Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 older persons in five municipalities in Sweden. All the interviewees had participated in the intervention. Results: The older persons highlighted opportunities and limitations for participation on a personal level i.e. conditions for being involved in direct care and in relation to independence. Experiences of participation on an organisational level were reported to a lesser degree. In order to keep care contacts together and improve participation, a coordinating person (called “the spider in the net”) was requested who could safeguard the staff’s relationship with the older person. Conclusions: Primary care should to a greater extent involve older persons more directly in the planning and execution of care. There is considerable potential for developing the health and primary care sector to better target the needs of older persons with complex health problems, and to enhance their participation and independence. Interventions, like the one followed in this project, can play a critical role in realising the needs of older persons, where providing participation in care is recognised as a significant goal to assist them in navigating the care system. 

  • 11.
    Derbring, Sandra
    et al.
    DART Centre for AAC and AT, Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Barbos Nordström, Melissa
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Svenningsson, Jenny-Ann
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ingebrand, Elias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laakso, Katja
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Buchholz, Margret
    DART Centre for AAC and AT, Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Effects of a digital reminiscing intervention on people with dementia and their care-givers and relatives2023In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 43, no 9, p. 1983-2000Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dementia is a source of growing concern globally, and often impacts on social and commu-nicative functioning. INdependent LIving Support Functions for the Elderly (IN LIFE) was aproject carried out within the European Commission Research and Innovation programmeHorizon 2020 that resulted in the development of two digital communication aids for rem-iniscence intervention for elderly people with dementia and their communication partners.The purpose of this intervention study was to investigate the effects on quality of life forpeople with dementia when using these aids. People with dementia (N = 118) and their for-mal care-givers (N = 187) and relatives (N = 9) were given the communication aids for a per-iod of 4–12 weeks. To assess a range of outcomes, questionnaires developed within theproject were used along with the EQ-5D (European Quality of Life – 5 Dimensions) andQoL-AD (Quality of Life in Alzheimer’s Disease) questionnaires. Quality of life improvedamong people with dementia when measured using EQ-5D ( p < 0.05). There was also a cor-relation between the impact on the participants’ health and wellbeing, the carers’ rating ofthe usefulness of the digital communication aids and the care-givers’ satisfaction with usingtechnology ( p < 0.05). These results indicate that digital communication aids may be usefulin social interaction where one partner has dementia.

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  • 12.
    Derbring, Sandra
    et al.
    DART Centre for AAC and AT, Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Nordström, Melissa Barbos
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Svenningsson, Jenny-Ann
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Laakso, Katja
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden,.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ingebrand, Elias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Buchholz, Margret
    DART Centre for AAC and AT, Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Correction: Effects of a digital reminiscing intervention on people with dementia and their care-givers and relatives - CORRIGENDUM (Oct, 10.1017/S0144686X21001446, 2021)2023In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 43, p. 2748-2749Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 13. Di Rosa, Mirko
    et al.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    Poli, Arianna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Santini, Sara
    Lamura, Giovanni
    Migrant care workers in Italian households: recent trends and future perspectives2018In: Routledge handbook of social care work around the World / [ed] Karen Christensen, Doria Pilling, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 142-155Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Ekström, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Assisted eating as a communicative activity : A framework of joint attention and co-ordinated embodied actions2023In: Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders/Equinox, ISSN 2040-5111, E-ISSN 2040-512X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 79-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study aims to further the understanding of communication involv-ing people with late-stage dementia by highlighting assisted eating as an interactive joint activity. Assisted eating is, on the surface, primarily a care activity with the purpose of feeding the assisted person and thereby facilitating nutritional uptake. Helping someone to eat requires, nevertheless, fine-grained communication and co-ordination of both attention and embodied actions. Method: Using video recordings where a person with late-stage dementia is pro-vided with assistance to eat, we show how assisted eating is sequentially organized into smaller, local communicative projects, and how each projects completion is contingent upon the temporal co-ordination of the participants attention and embodied actions. Results: The analysis shows how actions necessary to carry out the eating (e.g., manipulating the food, bringing the food to the mouth) are also inherently commu-nicative and achieved through an embodied participation framework. Discussion/conclusion: Our findings show that while the caregiving staff perform most of the actions required in the assisted eating, the person with dementia is a central agent whose actions -displays of engagement and disengagement -are deci-sive for the progression of the eating activity and play central roles in the interactive achievement of the activity.

  • 15.
    Ferm, Ulrika
    et al.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Elias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tablet computer-supported conversation between people with dementia and their carers: technology as interactional focus2021In: Universal Access in the Information Society, ISSN 1615-5289, E-ISSN 1615-5297, Vol. 20, p. 753-765Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study is to explore when and how technology becomes a topic in interactions involving people with dementia and their carers. Three dyads of older women with dementia and their carers participated in the study. The dyads interacted in the home environments of the persons with dementia using tablet computers and two web-based applications with generic pictures, videos, and music files (CIRCA) and personalized pictures and films (CIRCUS). The data included twenty-one video-recorded interactions. Topical episode analysis and transcripts of interaction were used to analyze and exemplify when and how technology was talked about in the dyads. The dyads were engaged in exploring the tablets, and six common ways of making technology a topic of conversation were identified: talk about tech problems, commenting actions, expressing uncertainty in navigation, instructing and explaining, expressing surprise, and talk about technical development. The dyads explored the tablets in ways that were reflected in the content of their conversations. If people with dementia and their carers should benefit from todays technology, such as there is evidence for the interactions examined in this study, their homes and daily environments must be equipped with sufficient internet access and technical support.

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  • 16.
    Focacci, Chiara Natalie
    et al.
    Erasmus Univ, Netherlands.
    Öylü, Gülin
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Motel-Klingebiel, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kelfve, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The value of pension reforms for late working life: evidence from Sweden2023In: International journal of sociology and social policy, ISSN 0144-333X, E-ISSN 1758-6720, Vol. 43, no 13/14, p. 79-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeDriven by the aim to increase the participation of older people in the labour force and to extend peoples working lives, the Swedish Parliament passed a bill in 1998 to increase the pension eligibility age from 60 to 61 years and establish a notional defined-contribution (NDC) plan. In this article, the authors investigate the impacts towards the prolongation of working lives expected from such an intervention.Design/methodology/approachThe authors apply a multinomial probabilistic model based on Swedish registry data on the birth cohorts 1937-1938 (n = 102,826) and observe differences in exit behaviour between eligible and non-eligible individuals.FindingsThe authors find that the cohorts eligible to the pension reform exit the labour market at a later age compared to non-eligible cohorts at the 61-years cut-off. The authors also find that the effect persists in the long term. Furthermore, the authors find that both men and women are equally struck by the reform.Originality/valueWhile there exist many descriptive reports and theoretical analyses on the costs and benefits of pension reforms, this study is the first one to empirically analyse the effect of the first European NDC pay-as-you go pension plan on the potential exclusion of old-aged workers.

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  • 17.
    Genelyte, Indre
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Heuer, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Motel-Klingebiel, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Exclusion and Inequality in Late Working Life: National Country Context: Sweden2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    This text is a first full draft that includes all the planned sections and covers key aspects of late working life issues in Sweden.

    Chapter 1 presents key statistical data for population structure and demographic processes in Sweden as well as labour market participation among the older groups of the population. It is mapping the main political economic discourses that frame late working life and brings in some historically important points for understanding the developments in the Swedish discourse. The aspects of the welfare regime and its transformations after the 1990s are included.

    Chapter 2 briefly introduces the Swedish social model and discusses the roles of social partners and institutional context. It also informs about particularities regarding authorities and unique aspects of the Swedish social model. The most information-rich part is the presentation of the discourses and the positions of the main actors in the Swedish labour market. They actively contribute to shaping the political agenda and policy outcomes that translate into specific legislation.

    Chapter 3 presents patterns and characteristics of current late working life in Sweden, and focusses on late labour market participation and exit, working conditions, sectoral distributions, and lifelong learning aspects. The main inequalities are discussed under these headings.

    Chapter 4 is an account of the most influential policies for late working life in Sweden. It covers three main sections. Namely, retirement and pensions, disability insurance and policies related to the labour market inclusion. These policies are analysed regarding their impact on extending working lives as well as their potential to decrease inequalities in the labour market, in particular amongst older workers.

    The text provides, finally, a brief overview of developments and policies regarding late working life in Sweden. Moreover, it sketches how these developments and policies affect inequalities in late working life. This is followed by an appendix containing additional data.

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  • 18.
    Genelyte, Indre
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change.
    Torgé, Cristina Joy
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Social Work.
    Homman, Lina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division.
    Resilient Workers and Resilient Markets: Lessons from the Work Life Courses of Older Workers2023Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Hansen, Thomas
    et al.
    Department of Mental health and Suicide, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; NOVA Norwegian Social Research, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
    Kafková, Marcela Petrová
    Department of Sociology, Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Katz, Ruth
    Max Stern Yezreel Academic College, Haifa, Israel.
    Lowenstein, Ariela
    Center for Research & Study of Aging, The University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.
    Naim, Sigal
    Max Stern Yezreel Academic College, Haifa, Israel.
    Pavlidis, George
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Villar, Feliciano
    Department of Cognition, Development and Educational Psychology, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Walsh, Kieran
    Irish Centre for Social Gerontology, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland.
    Aartsen, Marja
    NOVA Norwegian Social Research, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
    Exclusion from Social Relations in Later Life: Micro- and Macro-Level Patterns and Correlations in a European Perspective2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 23, article id 12418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older adults face particular risks of exclusion from social relationships (ESR) and are especially vulnerable to its consequences. However, research so far has been limited to specific dimensions, countries, and time points. In this paper, we examine the prevalence and micro- and macro-level predictors of ESR among older adults (60+) using two waves of data obtained four years apart across 14 European countries in the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). We consider four ESR indicators (household composition, social networks, social opportunities, and loneliness) and link them to micro-level (age, gender, socioeconomic factors, health, and family responsibilities) and national macro-level factors (social expenditures, unmet health needs, individualism, social trust, and institutional trust). Findings reveal a northwest to southeast gradient, with the lowest rates of ESR in the stronger welfare states of Northwest Europe. The high rates of ESR in the southeast are especially pronounced among women. Predictably, higher age and fewer personal resources (socioeconomic factors and health) increase the risk of all ESR dimensions for both genders. Macro-level factors show significant associations with ESR beyond the effect of micro-level factors, suggesting that national policies and cultural and structural characteristics may play a role in fostering sociability and connectivity and, thus, reduce the risk of ESR in later life.

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  • 20.
    Homman, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Queens Univ Belfast, North Ireland.
    Smart, S. E.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    ONeill, F.
    Queens Univ Belfast, North Ireland.
    MacCabe, J. H.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Attrition in longitudinal studies among patients with schizophrenia and other psychoses; findings from the STRATA collaboration2021In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 305, article id 114211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major problem with longitudinal studies is the bias generated due to attrition, particularly apparent amongst patients suffering from psychotic disorders. Factors associated with study-participation were investigated as part of a larger research collaboration (STRATA). Out of 479 eligible participants, only 50 (10,4%) were successfully followed up. The present study investigated whether study participation differed depending on baseline characteristics. Results indicated that individuals who did not participate were more likely to report an alcohol use disorder while those who did respond were more likely to have been in full-time education for longer and be of white ethnicity. Participation did not differ depending on diagnosis, symptoms, GAF, age of onset or depression.

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  • 21.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Book Review: Learning from the Talk of Persons with Dementia: A Practical Guide to Interaction and Interactional Research in JOURNAL OF INTERACTIONAL RESEARCH IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS, vol 12, issue 2, pp 262-2652021In: Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders/Equinox, ISSN 2040-5111, E-ISSN 2040-512X, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 262-265Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Book Review: The Dynamics of Dementia Communication2021In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 177, p. 149-150Article, book review (Other academic)
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  • 23.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Book Review: The Dynamics of Dementia Communication in JOURNAL OF PRAGMATICS, vol 177, issue , pp 149-1502021In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 177, p. 149-150Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 24.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Intercorporeal collaboration: Staging, parsing, and embodied directives in dementia care2023In: Health, ISSN 1363-4593, E-ISSN 1461-7196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study shows how concerted bodily movements and particularly intercorporeality play a central role in interaction, particularly in joint activities with people with late-stage dementia. Direct involvement of bodies in care situations makes intercorporeal collaboration the basic form for engaging with people with late-stage dementia. By detailed analysis of a videorecording of a joint activity involving a person with late-stage dementia as an example, we show that the process of concerted bodily movements includes not only an interactive bodywork but also a reconfiguration of the routine activities and actions in situ. Reconfigurations often require, and are the outcome of, particular practices for the systematic modification of the embodied conducts of the participants and their use of artifacts in the surrounding environment. These practices, that we highlight in our study, are (1) staging activities through organization and re-organization of body parts, as well as artifacts (rather than using verbal descriptions of activities); (2) decomposing (parsing) activities into smaller parts possible for the person with dementia to perform (rather than using verbal action descriptions); and (3) providing embodied directions and bodily demonstrations of actions (rather than using verbal directives). As a result, we point to these practices for their reflexive roles in the change of the use of modalities in interaction: from mainly using verbal language to the prominence of visual depiction and bodily demonstration as necessary methods to facilitate the participation of people with latestage dementia in joint activities

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  • 25.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    'Proto-conversation' as a practice in late-stage dementia care2024In: Pragmatics and Society, ISSN 1878-9714, E-ISSN 1878-9722, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 178-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study suggests that the concept of proto-conversation may be used to describe and understand communication with people with late-stage dementia who have lost their abilities to produce verbal language. In the study, a multimodal conversation analytic method is used to analyze sequences of interactions between professional caregivers in an elderly care home and people with late-stage dementia. The study shows how minimal actions (shift of gaze directions, vocalizations or bodily movements) not instantly recognizable as intentional, communicative conduct, may be recognized and treated as communicative contributions by engaging the person living with dementia in proto-conversations. In such interactional sequences, the caregivers do not only turn the contributions of persons with dementia into actions through their responses, but they also treat the persons as agentive actors and position them as partners in interaction.

  • 26.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Forsblad, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Narrative identity and dementia: The problem of living with fewer available resources2020In: Identity Construction and Illness Narratives in Persons with Disabilities / [ed] Glintborg, C. & de la Mata, M. L., Routledge, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing number of researchers have argued that both identity and self are narrative: a person’s identity develops and changes through a constant narrative elaboration and revision. Disorders like Alzheimer’s disease as well as many other brain disorders challenge the idea of a connection between human identity and stories. The reason for this is that dementia changes not only the story but also the storyteller: the kind of stories persons living with dementia tell often tend to deviate from cultural narrative norms and expectations. Storytelling is still a relevant activity for the person with dementia at all the different stages of the disease process for the simple reason that both the person with dementia and other family members have much of their identity invested in everyday stories, and they all continue to tell stories even when the person with dementia has severe problems with telling the stories. In dementia the pathological brain processes imply changes in the functional systems of the brain so that processes of the construction and maintenance of identities have less functional brain resources (episodic memory for instance). A consequence of the shifts in brain functionalities and resources is that narratives and identities become more dependent on other persons and socially and physically distributed cognitive processes. As the dementia progresses the patterns of engagement of the person with dementia in the storytelling activity will change. Some persons with dementia can tell autobiographical stories on their own, while others can do it with support, especially from their spouses. In this chapter we review how an interactional perspective so far has been used to understand the processes that produce narratives and identities of people with dementia across different types and stages of dementia. Also, drawing on our own and previous research, we suggest a framework for how narratives and identity construction can be understood in the case of dementia through the idea of collaborative compensatory adaption.

  • 27.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    Department of Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Assisted eating in late-stage dementia: Intercorporeal interaction2022In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 61, article id 101000Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we argue that investigating and learning about agentive abilities of people living with late-stage dementia requires a theoretical framework that focuses on the use of bodily resources in interpersonal interaction (i.e., intercorporeality) for performing joint activities rather than on solely the use of spoken language. Assisted eating, which involves people living with late-stage dementia and professional carers, is taken as an empirical example. The study is based on observations and video recordings of occasions of assisted eating involving five people with late-stage dementia in a residential elder care home; one of these people is used as an example in this paper. The analysis shows that assisted eating is performed as a joint intercorporeal activity. The participants create joint attentional space and a common space of action for their bodily movements when they give and receive food. The participants engaged in the activity coordinate their bodily moves with each other. The analysis (1) demonstrates that the collaboration between people living with late-stage dementia and nurses is based on practical interdependent and co-operative bodily actions. (2) This makes it possible to better understand agency in terms of intercorporeal interaction displayed by people living with late-stage dementia. (3) The agency demonstrated in intercorporeal interaction is thus considered to be shared and distributed across bodies and requires support to be interactionally achieved. (4) The intercorporeal interaction as grounds for agency not only calls on other participants to note and honor the agency of the person with dementia that is still evident in embodied interaction, but also invites others to support people with dementia to claim and display their agency in social interactions and joint activities.

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  • 28.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change.
    Rahman, Atiqur
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dementism och ålderism2021In: Perspektiv på ålderism / [ed] Håkan Jönsson, Lund: Social Work Press , 2021, p. 113-128Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Ingebrand, Elias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dementia and learning: The use of tablet computers in joint activities2023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Living with dementia is generally associated with terms such as loss, confusion, and dependency; not development, agency and collaboration. Contributing to a growing body of research that acknowledges the remaining abilities of people living with dementia, and how they cope with challenges in their everyday lives, this thesis concerns a topic habitually framed by negative presumptions, namely learning. 

    The risk of developing dementia increases with advancing age, and with an aging population the number of people living with dementia is expected to rise. Dementia is a complex condition that can have various underlying causes; it includes numerous diagnoses and is commonly characterized by a decline in cognitive and communicative functions. Due to its clinical connotations, people living with dementia often face negative assumptions about how they are, and what they can or cannot do. Alongside prevailing metaphors such as a return to childhood or empty shells, people living with dementia have been depicted as passive and disengaged communicators, incapable of initiating social action and asserting agency, who struggle to maintain attention in interactions. 

    The aim of this thesis is to study novel learning in everyday activities for people living with dementia, taking the use of tablet computers as a case in point. Learning is approached from an interactionist perspective, where it is understood as a social and situated process, and conceptualized as changing participation in joint activities. The data used in this thesis comprises a collection of 50 video recordings where a person living with dementia, who has no previous experience of using touchscreen technologies, is using a tablet computer together with either a caregiver or another person living with dementia. The participants were asked to use the tablet computers according to their own interests, and did not receive any information regarding learning as an objective of their activities. Through four empirical studies, all using the methodological framework of multimodal conversation analysis, this thesis challenges the stereotypical belief that people living with dementia are incapable of novel learning. 

    Study I shows how a woman living with dementia, over the course of six weeks, learns to perform the basic navigational steps needed to use an augmentative and alternative communication application. The analysis demonstrates how the participant's reliance on detailed information from her interlocutors gradually declined both during and across recordings. Study II highlights how people living with dementia position themselves as learners in unfamiliar joint activities. The results emphasize that the participants living with dementia publicly display their current understanding of the ongoing joint activities, introduce learning as a conversational topic, and are actively engaged in soliciting the information needed to partake. Study III shows how professional and family carers support the participants living with dementia in managing the tablet computers. The analysis reveals that the caregivers orient towards the doing of the participants with dementia, are attentive to their displayed understanding of the unfolding activities, and adapt any instructions with detailed multimodal cues if required. Study IV moves away from the dyadic constellations consisting of a person living with dementia together with a caregiver, and instead focuses on how people living with dementia manage the joint activities together with a peer. The results show that the participants treat the activities as collaborative endeavors, and orient towards the displayed competences of each other by offering or soliciting information when needed. 

    Taken together, the findings from this thesis demonstrate that novel learning is possible for people living with dementia even without the use of structured interventions. The learning process is highly collaborative, and the participants actively support each other's conduct throughout the unfolding activities. Apart from possibilities for repeated participation in joint activities, procedural and agentive aspects of learning for people living with dementia are emphasized. 

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  • 30.
    Ingebrand, Elias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Guiding novice tablet users living with dementia in managing iPads2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Ingebrand, Elias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    People living with dementia collaborating in a joint activity2022In: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, ISSN 2210-6561, E-ISSN 2210-657X, Vol. 34, article id 100629Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research has stressed the collaborative competences of people living with dementia, showing how they are capable of participating in a multitude of everyday activities when supported by cognitively healthy individuals. However, little is known about the collaborative work between different people living with dementia. Accordingly, this study aims to explore how people living with dementia, without the support of a cognitively healthy interlocutor, collaborate with other people living with dementia in an unfamiliar activity. The study is based on video recordings of three dyads, each comprising two individuals living with dementia, as they are using tablet computers with reminiscence and communication aiding applications. Drawing on multimodal interaction analysis, we show how the participants living with dementia treat the activities as joint endeavors and, when needed, engage in problem-solving sequences where they make their knowledge about how to progress within the activities publicly visible to their interlocutor. Our findings suggest that people living with dementia do collaborate with each other, and that the interactional labor between different people living with dementia is more symmetrical than what has been described in joint activities involving people living with dementia and cognitively healthy individuals.Previous article in issue

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  • 32.
    Ingebrand, Elias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    People with dementia positioning themselves as learners2021In: Educational gerontology, ISSN 0360-1277, E-ISSN 1521-0472, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 47-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies have demonstrated that people living with dementia, contrary to common believes, are capable of novel learning without structured interventions. Opportunities for learning throughout an individuals lifespan have been acknowledged as important factors in facilitating social participation and promoting wellbeing. However, little is still known about the situated practices used in the learning process for people living with dementia. This study aims to explore how people living with dementia in Swedish residential care facilities position, perceive, and assert, themselves as learners in a novel activity. The study is based on video recordings of eight people living with dementia, who for the first time use tablet computers as a social activity on a one-to-one basis with their formal caregivers. Through interaction analysis, we show how the participants living with dementia use the engagement displays of requests, accounts, formulations and metacomments to make their active undertaking in the ongoing activity public to their communication partner. Our findings suggest that people living with dementia might still perceive themselves as individuals capable of novel learning and that they are active and engaged agents in this process.

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  • 33.
    Ingebrand, Elias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change.
    Supporting people living with dementia in novel joint activities: Managing tablet computers2023In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 65, article id 101116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A bourgeoning number of studies have demonstrated that people living with dementia are capable of participating in a wide range of everyday activities when supported by care professionals or family carers. However, little remains known about the situated practices used by carers to support people living with dementia as active co-participants in novel joint activities. Taking the use of tablet computers as an example, this study focuses on the interactional organization of instructions in joint activities involving people living with dementia, who have no previous experiences of touchscreen technologies, and their carers. The study is based on forty-one video recordings of ten dyads, each comprising a person living with dementia and a carer, as they are using tablet computers with applications suited to individual interests. Drawing on multimodal interaction analysis, we show how the carers continually foster the accomplishment of their interlocutors, and rarely take over responsibility for closing an ongoing joint project themselves. Our findings suggest that the carers' instructions, realized as verbal and embodied directives, function as a form of scaffolding practice that facilitates the coordination of visual perception and embodied conduct for the participants living with dementia.

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  • 34.
    Jahan, Yasmin
    et al.
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Moriyama, Michiko
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Rahman, Md. Moshiur
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Bin Shahid, Abu Sadat Mohammad Sayeem
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res, Bangladesh.
    Rahman, Atiqur
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hossain, Nasif
    Nagasaki Univ, Japan.
    Das, Sumon Kumar
    Menzies Sch Hlth Res, Australia.
    Hossain, Md. Iqbal
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res, Bangladesh.
    Faruque, Abu Syed Golam
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res, Bangladesh.
    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res, Bangladesh.
    Changing trends in measles vaccination status between 2004 and 2014 among children aged 12-23 months in Bangladesh2020In: Tropical medicine & international health, ISSN 1360-2276, E-ISSN 1365-3156, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 475-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To assess the current measles vaccination status in Bangladesh, explain changing differentials in measles vaccination, and determine contexts that may improve measles vaccination coverage. Methods Secondary data analysis of datasets (2004-2014) from the nationally representative Bangladesh Demographic and Health Surveys that followed stratified, multi-stage cluster sampling design conducted both in urban and rural contexts. Results 5468 children aged 12-23 months were surveyed, of whom 892 (16%) reported non-compliance to measles vaccine. After simultaneous adjusting for covariates in multivariate logistic regression, children who came from a poor socio-economic background, who had mothers with no formal schooling, who were underweight, of higher birth order (amp;gt;= 4), who had adolescent mothers, who had a history of home delivery and who had no exposure to media were observed to be significantly associated with lack of measles vaccination. Measles vaccination coverage among children of adolescent mothers was consistently low. Despite lack of media exposure, measles vaccination status gradually increased from 26% in 2004 to 33% in 2014. Lack of maternal education was no longer associated with measles vaccination status in 2007, 2011 and 2014. Stunted children continued to be associated with lack of measles immunisation in 2014. Children with higher birth order demonstrated 53% excess risk for not being immunised with measles vaccine. Mothers with no exposure to mass media were two times more likely to have children without measles immunisation as indicated by BDHS 2014 data. Conclusions Our findings will help policy makers formulate strategies for expanding measles vaccination coverage in order to achieve further reduction in disease burden and mortality in Bangladesh.

  • 35.
    Jahan, Yasmin
    et al.
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Moriyama, Michiko
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Rahman, Md Moshiur
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Kazawa, Kana
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Mizukawa, Mariko
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Rahman, Atiqur
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bin Shahid, Abu Sadat Mohammad Sayeem
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res, Bangladesh.
    Das, Sumon Kumar
    Menzies Sch Hlth Res, Australia.
    Faruque, Abu Syed Golam
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res, Bangladesh.
    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res, Bangladesh.
    Disease perception and experiences among rural Bangladeshi hypertensive women: A qualitative approach2020In: HEALTH PROMOTION PERSPECTIVES, ISSN 2228-6497, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 66-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hypertension (HTN) is well established as a leading cause of common serious illnesses worldwide. We carried out this qualitative research to understand perception of and experiences related to HTN among rural Bangladeshi hypertensive women. Methods: A total of 74 female hypertensive participants who were diagnosed as HTN were purposively recruited in a rural community in Mirzapur, Bangladesh. A focus group discussion (FGD) was applied to share their perception and experiences. Transcripts were read in an iterative process, and a thematic analysis was performed. This paper is reported followed by COREQ checklist. Results: Three main themes were generated; (i) Perception of HTN based on experiences, (ii) Knowledge of management of HTN, and (iii) Barriers of management of HTN. Under the themes, seven subthemes were identified. The participants only knew about their high blood pressure (HBP) when they had symptoms, and they applied traditional remedies in the rural context to deal with those symptoms. Even though more than half of participants had relevant knowledge of how to manage HTN, but still there were social-cultural and economic barriers and lack of social infrastructure to access healthcare, existed to practice them. Conclusion: Based on our study reports, health education programs at the household and community level could be a potential starting point for any preventive and containment strategy in rural communities of Bangladesh.

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  • 36.
    Jahan, Yasmin
    et al.
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Moriyama, Michiko
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Rahman, Md Moshiur
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Kazawa, Kana
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Rahman, S M Atiqur
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bin Shahid, Abu Sadat Mohammad Sayeem
    Int Ctr Diarrheal Dis Res, Bangladesh.
    Das, Sumon Kumar
    Menzies Sch Hlth Res, Australia.
    Farque, A. S. G.
    Int Ctr Diarrheal Dis Res, Bangladesh.
    Chist, Mohammod Jobayer
    Int Ctr Diarrheal Dis Res, Bangladesh.
    Increasing Awareness and Use of Mobile Health Technology Among Individuals With Hypertension in a Rural Community of Bangladesh: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial2020In: JMIR Research Protocols, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 9, no 8, article id e15523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hypertension remains one of the foremost noncommunicable diseases that most often lead to cardiovascular diseases and its different complications. The prevalence of hypertension in Bangladesh has been increasing. However, there are very limited studies that have evaluated the impact of health education and awareness development in mitigating the burden of hypertension and its complications in Bangladesh. Objective: This study aims to increase awareness, enhance knowledge, and change lifestyle behaviors through health education and the use of mobile health (mHealth) technology among individuals with hypertension living in a rural community of Bangladesh. Methods: A randomized controlled trial is underway in a Mirzapur subdistrict of Bangladesh. This trial compares two groups of individuals with hypertension: The comparison arm receives health education and the intervention arm receives health education and a periodic mobile phone-based text message intervention. The trial duration is 5 months. The primary end point is participants actual behavior changes brought about by increased awareness and knowledge. Results: Enrollment of participants started in August 2018, and collection of follow-up data was completed at the end of July 2019. A total of 420 participants volunteered to participate, and among them, 209 and 211 were randomly allocated to the intervention group and the control group, respectively. Among them, the ratio of males/females was 12.0/88.0 in the intervention group and 16.1/83.9 in the control group. Data cleaning and analyses have been completed and the results have been submitted for publication. Conclusions: Periodic short education using mHealth technology in addition to face-to-face health education may be an effective method for increasing awareness and knowledge about behavioral changes and maintaining healthy lifestyle behaviors.

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  • 37.
    Jahan, Yasmin
    et al.
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Rahman, S M Atiqur
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ectopia Cordis: 6-Year Survival without Surgical Correction2021In: FETAL AND PEDIATRIC PATHOLOGY, ISSN 1551-3815, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 540-542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Ectopia cordis is a complete or partial extrusion of the heart through a ventral defect in the thoracoabdominal wall, either isolated or accompanied by other viscera in instances of pentalogy of Cantrell. Case Report: This six-year-old child has survived with uncorrected ectopia cordis. He is unable to participate in strenuous physical activities and has respiratory limitations. Conclusion: Ectopia cordis most commonly results in stillbirth or neonatal death without surgical treatment. This report highlights the exceptional 6-year survival of a child without surgical correction.

  • 38.
    Jahan, Yasmin
    et al.
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Rahman, S M Atiqur
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Management of dengue hemorrhagic fever in a secondary level hospital in Bangladesh: A case report2020In: IDCASES, ISSN 2214-2509, Vol. 21, article id e00880Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dengue is an important tropical infection caused by an arbovirus. As a mosquito borne infection, this disease is widely spread in several tropical endemic countries and this implies the global importance of this infection. In this specific case report, the author discussed the case management of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). A 42-year-old patient came to a secondary level hospital with complaints of diffuse abdominal pain (more in central region) continually for 3 days. Based on his clinical investigations the patient was diagnosed by DHF and managed with intravenously administered fluid resuscitation as he had a history of vomiting, close monitoring of vital status, and gave conservative treatment. Although, the plasma leakage had concerned the doctors about developing DSS. But after seeing his blood report, when the doctors found that the patients platelet count was raised gradually and no other associated signs then they decided to give him discharge from the hospital. Prevention and control of dengue and DHF has become more urgent and the available vaccine is still limited. Hence, effective disease prevention programs, education of the medical community to ensure effective case management, community-based integrated mosquito control are necessary. (C) 2020 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

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  • 39.
    Jahan, Yasmin
    et al.
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Rahman, Sohel
    Inst Epidemiol Dis Control & Res, Bangladesh.
    Shamsi, Tasdidaa
    Global Publ Hlth Res Fdn, Bangladesh.
    Rahman, S M Atiqur
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Attitudes and Views Concerning Human Milk Banking Among Mothers Residing in a Rural Region of Bangladesh2022In: Journal of Human Lactation, ISSN 0890-3344, E-ISSN 1552-5732, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 108-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Human milk banks play an essential role by providing human milk to infants who would otherwise not be able to receive mothers milk. Study aim: To determine the opinions and attitudes among possible donor mothers regarding human milk banks in one rural region in Bangladesh. Methods: A prospective, cross-sectional study following a probability type of stratified cluster sampling technique was used. Included in the study (N = 121) were mothers aged 20-49 years, with at least one child, who was currently lactating or had breastfed her child, and who resided in the rural community of Bangladesh where the study was conducted. Data were collected through a 21-item, close-ended questionnaire and a face-to-face interview conducted by the researcher at each participants home. Results: Among the participants, 98.3% (n = 119) said that they had not heard about human milk banks before speaking with the researchers. Most participants (71.9%, n = 87) said would obtain human milk from milk banks if necessary, but 28% (n =34) of mothers indicated that they would not receive milk from a milk bank, even if it was necessary for their children. Only 8.3% (n = 10) said human milk banks were not appropriate according to Islam and 99.2% (n = 120) did not know about the acceptance of human milk banking practices in Bangladesh. Conclusions: For those with religious concerns, a framework for both the donors and recipients can be established. It can be recommended that health education through healthcare personnel (midwives, nurses, gynecologists, pediatricians, and other health professionals) and religious leaders may strengthen the belief and increase awareness among family members about milk banking practices.

  • 40.
    Jahan, Yasmin
    et al.
    Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Japan.
    Rahman, Sohel
    Institute of Epidemiology Disease Control and Research, Bangladesh.
    sm-Rahman, Atiqur
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    COVID-19: A case report from Bangladesh perspective2020In: Respiratory Medicine Case Reports, ISSN 2213-0071, Vol. 30, article id 101068Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 34-year-old man without any significant medical history or comorbidities, suddenly developed fever, and shortness of breath, thereby admitted to the emergency department of a tertiary care hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh. He had neither a history of traveling to Coronavirus disease (COVID) prone areas nor a direct contact of COVID positive patients. His chest X-ray revealed ground-glass opacity in the right middle and lower zone of the lung. The first polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test on throat and nasal swabs for the COVID upon admission was negative. Based on the chest X-ray result, RT-PCR was done again resulted positive. The patient was primarily treated with chloroquine and azithromycin. On full recovery, he was discharged from the hospital on day 12, after two subsequent throat swab samples tested negative by PCR (24 hours apart). He was encouraged to maintain home quarantine for at least the next 14 days. SARS-CoV-2 RNA by swab remained negative and the blood sample shows the presence of antibody (both IgM and IgG) in his follow-up visit (after 7 days of hospital discharge).

  • 41.
    Komp-Leukkunen, Kathrin
    et al.
    LUT Univ, Finland.
    Poli, Arianna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    An introduction to digitalizing work in the Nordics2024In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital technologies have become an essential part of our everyday lives. While they were still a curious novelty in the 1960s and 1970s, they seem to permeate an ever- increasing part of today’s societies (Levin & Mamlok 2021). By now, they are no longer confined to offices, where people need to physically sit in front of computers to use them. Instead, they are ubiquitous, with handheld devices being portable, and wearable technologies frequently even unobtrusive (Delabrida Silva et al. 2018). Augmented Realities blur the lines between technology and reality, while Virtual Realities even place a technological layer over our realities (Arena et al. 2022). Our technologically embedded lives create a myriad of data, which is used for various kinds of communication and as a currency. It is shared on social media for social interaction and to cultivate a personal image (Hall 2018). Moreover, it is routinely shared with companies for marketing and product development, sometimes in exchange for services (Cao et al. 2022). Thus, the datafication of our lives pulls us into a complex network of interactions (...)

  • 42.
    Komp-Leukkunen, Kathrin
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Poli, Arianna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hellevik, Tale
    Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway.
    Herlofson, Katharina
    Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway.
    Heuer, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Norum, Roger
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Solem, Per Erik
    Oslo Metropolitan University; Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Khan, Jawaria
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Rantanen, Visa
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Motel-Klingebiel, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Older Workers in Digitalizing Workplaces: A Systematic Literature Review2022In: Journal of Aging and Social Change, ISSN 2576-5310, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 37-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Workplace digitalization created a sea change in work practices and it altered the situation of older workers. Digitalization entails the increased use of digital technologies, such as computers and online services. Older workers often possess limited digital skills, which may put their labor market participation at risk. Previous studies began exploring how older workers fare when their workplaces are digitalizing. However, the research field is still emerging and remains fragmented. This article comprises a systematic literature review that takes inventory of what we currently know about older workers in digitalizing workplaces. It demonstrates that older workers experience the digitalization of their workplaces in various areas, reaching from health monitoring to work arrangements. Interestingly, challenges and opportunities emerge in each area affected. This Janus-faced situation underlines the complexity of consequences, and it raises questions about social inequalities in these consequences. The work environment plays a crucial role in shaping how older workers experience workplace digitalization. It shapes which options for adaptation they have, and to which degree they can act on these options. This circumstance makes workplaces an excellent starting point for interventions. Country-characteristics likewise exert an influence. While characteristics such as retirement regulations are purposefully modified for intervention, other characteristics, such as culture, are not. This circumstance limits governmental options for shaping the situation of older workers in digitalizing workplaces. Future research should further explore the situation of older workers in digitalizing workplaces, paying special attention to the theoretical framework and to developments in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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  • 43.
    Komp-Leukkunen, Kathrin
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Poli, Arianna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hellevik, Tale
    Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway.
    Herlofson, Katharina
    Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway.
    Heuer, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Norum, Roger
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Solem, Per Erik
    Oslo Metropolitan University/Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Khan, Jawaria
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Rantanen, Visa
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Motel-Klingebiel, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Older Workers in Digitalizing Workplaces: A Systematic Literature Review2022In: The Journal of Aging and Social Change, ISSN 2576-5310, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 37-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Workplace digitalization created a sea change in work practices and it altered the situation of older workers. Digitalization entails the increased use of digital technologies, such as computers and online services. Older workers often possess limited digital skills, which may put their labor market participation at risk. Previous studies began exploring how older workers fare when their workplaces are digitalizing. However, the research field is still emerging and remains fragmented. This article comprises a systematic literature review that takes inventory of what we currently know about older workers in digitalizing workplaces. It demonstrates that older workers experience the digitalization of their workplaces in various areas, reaching from health monitoring to work arrangements. Interestingly, challenges and opportunities emerge in each area affected. This Janus-faced situation underlines the complexity of consequences, and it raises questions about social inequalities in these consequences. The work environment plays a crucial role in shaping how older workers experience workplace digitalization. It shapes which options for adaptation they have, and to which degree they can act on these options. This circumstance makes workplaces an excellent starting point for interventions. Country-characteristics likewise exert an influence. While characteristics such as retirement regulations are purposefully modified for intervention, other characteristics, such as culture, are not. This circumstance limits governmental options for shaping the situation of older workers in digitalizing workplaces. Future research should further explore the situation of older workers in digitalizing workplaces, paying special attention to the theoretical framework and to developments in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • 44.
    König, Stefanie
    et al.
    Department of Psychology and Centre for Ageing and Health – AgeCap, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kelfve, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet; Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Motel-Klingebiel, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wetzel, Martin
    Institute of Sociology and Social Psychology, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Development of healthcare use across contemporary retirement pathways: results from a register based cohort study2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 440-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: We aimed to understand the interplay between retirement pathways and healthcare use in the postponed and structurally changing context of retirement.

    Methods: Based on Swedish register data on income and healthcare use, we applied combined sequence and cluster analysis to identify typical pathways into retirement and analysed their relation to healthcare use developments.

    Results: We detected five distinct pathways into retirement. Level of healthcare use was significantly higher for the pathway via disability pensions. We saw an overall increase in healthcare use across the retirement process that was related to age rather than to the different pathways.

    Conclusions: Level of healthcare use at the beginning of the retirement process may be related to selection into different pathways of retirement. We did not find clear evidence across several healthcare measures that different pathways lead to different developments in healthcare use.

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  • 45.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    et al.
    Centre for Socio-Economic Research on Ageing, INRCA - National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing, Italy.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    Centre for Socio-Economic Research on Ageing, INRCA - National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing, Italy.
    Andréasson, Frida
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre, Sweden.
    Döhner, Hanneli
    wir pflegen, Hamburg, Germany.
    Hansson, Elisabeth
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Poli, Arianna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Salzmann, Benjamin
    wir pflegen, Hamburg, Germany.
    How new technologies support carers of older people: the Eurocarers' InformCare platform2017In: Innovation in Aging, E-ISSN 2399-5300, Vol. 1, no Supplement 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation discusses how new technologies support family carers of older people with reference to the Eurocarers’ hub ‘InformCare’, the web-platform of support services for carers of older people co-funded by the European Union within the INNOVAGE project. After highlighting the status of technology-based services for carers in Europe, the main features of InformCare will be demonstrated. Tested in three European countries (Germany, Italy and Sweden), this tool provides a standardised, integrated, multilingual and culturally adapted set of on-line information and interactive services addressing carers’ needs and preferences which are available for the first time in 27 Member States. The implementation followed a pilot test with 117 carers, showing improvements in carers’ self-awareness and empowerment over a 3 month period. However, to ensure optimal benefit from InformCare, appropriate training and promotion campaigns are needed in order to overcome low digital literacy skills and lack of self-recognition characterising many carers.

  • 46.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    et al.
    INRCA - National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing.
    Di Rosa, Mirko
    INRCA - National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing.
    Papa, Roberta
    INRCA - National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing.
    Poli, Arianna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    Linnaeus Univ, Vaxjo, Sweden; INRCA - National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing, Linnaues.
    Implications of the use of migrant care work and web-based services on family caregivers’ health2019In: International Journal of Care and Caring, ISSN 2397-8821, E-ISSN 2397-883X , Vol. 3, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article illustrates the implications of two recent trends on family carers' health: the employment of home-based migrant care workers; and the provision of web-based supports. The main factors traditionally associated with carers' health are used to analyse the results of a six-country study via a multilevel linear regression. Attention will be dedicated to the role of migrant care workers, who are often hired by private households to provide eldercare. Finally, web-based services for carers will be investigated by considering InformCare, a recently implemented European platform tested on a sample of carers from three countries (Germany, Italy and Sweden).

  • 47.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    et al.
    Italian National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA).
    Poli, Arianna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Yghemonos, Stecy
    Eurocarers.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    Italian National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA).
    InformCare: the European information hub on family care2017In: International Journal of Care and Caring, ISSN 2397-8821, E-ISSN 2397-883X , Vol. 1, no 3, p. 409-413Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Loukovitis, Andreas
    et al.
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Pavlidis, George
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Daroglou, Garifalia
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Ourda, Despoina
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Barkoukis, Vassilis
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Doping in competitive sports: qualitative analysis of athletes' perceptions2020In: Hellenic Journal of Physical Education and Sport Science, Vol. 40, no 3,4, p. 225-238Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Mahrs Träff, Annsofie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    What Promotes and What Limits Physical Activity in Assisted Living Facilities?: A Study of the Physical Environments Design and Significance2020In: Journal of Housing for the Elderly, ISSN 0276-3893, E-ISSN 1540-353X, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 291-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of assisted living facilities is an issue that has engaged architects and contractors since they began building the first residential homes. Previous research has shown that participation in everyday activities promotes wellbeing in older people. Many assisted living facilities have locked units that limit the individuals ability to move freely. Our interest is directed towards older peoples opportunities to be physically active in assisted living facilities and how the physical environment affects these opportunities. The aim of this study was to increase the understanding of the importance of the physical environment to enable physical activities in assisted living facilities. The empirical material consists of observations and semi-structured interviews with thirteen residents and seventeen staff in four assisted living facilities in Sweden. The results show how the physical environment influences the opportunities for physical activity. Certain factors in the physical environment can be both promoting and limiting. An unsuitable environment limits the ability of older people to be physically active.

  • 50.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Assessments in assisted eating activities: The case of supporting people in late-stage dementia2022In: Communication & Medicine: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Healthcare, Ethics and Society, ISSN 1612-1783, E-ISSN 1613-3625, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 134-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study deals with assessment as an interactional practice in assisted eating activities involving people with late-stage dementia (here Alzheimer’s disease) in an elderly care home. The dataset for the study consists of video recordings of 26 occasions of eating activities. We investigate the use of embodied, vocal and verbal assessments (e.g., headshakes, nods and gustatory ‘mmm’) together with evaluative terms (e.g., ‘good’ or ‘great’) in three consecutive phases in these activities: ‘introducing the mealtime activity’, ‘offering the food’ and ‘receiving the food’. Drawing on multimodal analysis of interaction, we analyze three mealtime events, in which we show how assessments are issued by caregivers more often in interaction with a person with dementia who appears less engaged in the activity compared to a more engaged resident. Moreover, the analysis explicates how assessments fit in with the overall organization of the activity and are issued in a timely fashion when the food is introduced and brought close to the lips of the person with dementia, and when it is accepted. The findings show that assessments are used not only to share an evaluation of e.g., food or the action of the person with dementia, but also to manage the assisted eating activity. Assessments seem to be used distinctively (1) to build joint attention in the eating activity and (2) to encourage the assisted person to submit to/continue the activity of eating.

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