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  • 1. Adams, Melinda
    et al.
    Smrek, Michal
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Making Institutions and Context Count: How Useful Is Feminist Institutionalism in Explaining Male Dominance in Politics?2018In: Politics & Gender, ISSN 1743-923X, E-ISSN 1743-9248, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 271-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the same formal candidate selection rules are generally in place throughout a state, there is often intracountry variation in male descriptive overrepresentation. To explain this variation, scholars cannot focus exclusively on women (e.g., how do women respond to formal institutional opportunities?) or femininity (e.g., how do norms governing appropriate female behavior affect women's odds of being selected as a candidate?). Rather, scholars must attend to the ways that informal norms regarding masculinity operate across space and time within a country. Drawing on the insights of feminist institutionalism, this essay examines two intracountry sources of variation in candidate selection: the spatial urban-rural divide and temporal differences between first-time recruitment and renomination. While the formal candidate selection rules are uniform, informal institutions vary depending on where and when we look, leading to different levels of male overrepresentation.

  • 2.
    Astapova, Anastasiya
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Univ Tartu, Dept Estonian & Comparat Folklore, Tartu, Estonia.
    Navumau, Vasil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Veyshnoria: A Fake Country in the Midst of Real Information Warfare2018In: Journal of American Folklore, ISSN 0021-8715, E-ISSN 1535-1882, Vol. 131, no 522, p. 435-443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a humorous response to the threat of the Russian occupation of Belarus during the joint military exercise of September 2017, civic activists created the fictional Republic of Veyshnoria. This meme soon obtained all the attributes of a micro-nation, including numerous virtual citizens, serving to critique the autocratic government of Belarus and creating a platform for alternative nation-building. Via humor and fake news, fictional Veyshnoria is becoming increasingly instrumental in the realm of information and ideological warfare.

  • 3.
    Bedford, Sofie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Vinatier, Laurent
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Resisting the Irresistible: ‘Failed Opposition’ in Azerbaijan and Belarus Revisited2018In: Government and Opposition, ISSN 0017-257X, E-ISSN 1477-7053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent literature on post-Soviet electoral revolutions in places where attempts at regime change through popular protest did not succeed, opposition groups are often simply regarded as ‘failed’. And yet, opposition actors exist and participate in the political life of their country. Building on the Belarusian and Azerbaijani cases, we argue that opposition actors are maintained in a ‘ghetto’, often virtual, tightly managed by the ruling authorities who exert monopolistic control over civic activities. Opposition actors adapt to the restricted conditions – accepting a certain level of dependency. They thus develop various tactics to engage with the outside, striving to reduce the ghetto walls. To this end this article proposes a typology of what we call oppositional ‘resistance models’: electoral, in the media, lobbying and through education. The models highlight what makes ‘opposition’ in authoritarian states and are a step towards a more comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon in this context.

  • 4.
    Bennich-Björkman, Li
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Around the corner?: Female empowerment, security, and elite mind-sets in Georgia2018In: Gendering Postsocialism: Old Legacies and New Hierarchies / [ed] Gradskova, Y Morell, IA, Routledge, 2018, p. 54-70Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Blackburn, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Discourses of Russian-speaking youth in Nazarbayev’s Kazakhstan2019In: Central Asian Survey, ISSN 0263-4937, E-ISSN 1465-3354, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 217-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research into post-independence identity shifts among Kazakhstan’s Russian-speaking minorities has outlined a number of possible pathways, such as diasporization, integrated national minority status and ethnic separatism. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with young people in Almaty and Karaganda, I examine how Russian-speaking minorities identify with the state and imagine their place in a ‘soft’ or ‘hybrid’ post-Soviet authoritarian system. What is found is that Russian-speaking minorities largely accept their status beneath the Kazakh ‘elder brother’ and do not wish to identify as a ‘national minority’. Furthermore, they affirm passive loyalty to the political status quo while remaining disinterested in political representation. Russian-speaking minorities are also ambivalent towards Kazakh language promotion and anxious about the increasing presence of Kazakh- speakers in urban spaces. This article argues that two factors are central to these stances among Kazakhstan’s Russian-speaking minorities: the persistence of Soviet legacies and the effects of state discourse and policy since 1991.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-11-30 16:05
  • 6.
    Bogolepova, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Anna Widmann - a Swiss emigre to Russia: a family history2019In: Regio-Familienforscher: Zeitschrift der Genealogisch-Heraldischen Gesellschaft der Regio Basel, ISSN 1423-0992, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 25-41Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There was significant emigration of Swiss people to the Russian Empire from the late 17th to the late 19th century. Most of these Swiss diaspora populations returned to Switzerland before or shortly after the 1917 revolution. Fates of those remained in Russia are mostly unknown. The article is a case study in the Widmann family genealogy and history during the late 19th - beginning of 20th century. Facts and description of Anna Widmann‟s life represent one of the personal histories of those many thousands of Swiss emigre to Russia. The article also examines relationships between the Russian (e.g. Evgenia Tur, Nikolai Bogolepov) and Swiss (Josef Viktor Widmann) members of the family and their friends (Carl Spitteler and Alexander Skryabin), well known figures in the intellectual life of both countries.

  • 7.
    Bogolepova, Olga
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Donovan, Stephen K.
    Harper, David A. T.
    Suyarkova, Anna A.
    Yakupov, Rustem
    Gubanov, Alexander P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    New records of brachiopods and crinoids from the Silurian (Wenlock) of the southern Urals, Russia2018In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crinoids and brachiopods are described from the Silurian Uzyan Formation of the Zilair Zone in the southern Urals. The occurrence of the graptolites Coronograptus praedeubeli suggests a late Homerian (Wenlock) age for the strata. A new disparid crinoid, Cicerocrinus gracilis Donovan sp. nov., is the oldest known member of this genus. It has a long, flexible and homeomorphic column, and a tall bryozoan palaeontology terminology (IBr2) (second primibrachial) axillary. All species of Cicerocrinus described previously have been limited to the Ludlow of the British Isles, Sweden and Estonia, and the Pridoli of Estonia. The poorly preserved brachiopod fauna is represented by small atrypid (Atrypa? sp.) and dalmanellid brachiopods (Levenea? sp.). The reported assemblage generally inhabited deep-water environments.

  • 8.
    Giandomenico, Jessica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Hur underhålls en hybridstat?: Indikationer från Albanien och Makedonien2018In: Nordisk Østforum, ISSN 0801-7220, E-ISSN 1891-1773, Vol. 32, p. 21-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How is a hybrid state maintained? Today, several countries undergoing democratic reforms are also backsliding towards greater authoritarianism. This article draws on election data from Macedonia and Albania to show how a country can display elements of democratic improvement and democratic deterioration within the same policy field. The Albanian case shows how the political parties, with an anchoring in legislation, work to make the electoral administration politically dependent. This enables the political parties to exert control over central aspects of the distribution of power. By contrast, the case of Macedonia shows how undemocratic behaviors can become institutionalized and gradually accepted, even as other features of the electoral process undergo improvement. Common to both countries are patterns of patronage that serve to maintain a unique organization of power: the democratic façade is improved, but the undemocratic behavior remains.

  • 9.
    Granberg, Leo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Pitirim Sorokin Between East and West: Russian traces in rural sociology2018In: Bulletin of Udmurt University. Sociology. Political Science. International Relations, ISSN 2587-9030, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 324-335Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Pitirim Sorokin (1889–1968) was a young social scientists, who worked for a short academic period in Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) before and during revolution. There he followed newest streams in western and eastern philosophy, made field research in Russia and worked for a new synthesis in sociology. Neo-positivism and empiricism characterized young Sorokin’s own research but he had strong interest on theories, and he made a major effort to develop an own theoretical interpretation of society. During his first years in United States he contributed rural sociology by lectures and publications with Carle C. Zimmerman. Principles of Rural-Urban Sociology (1929), followed by Systematic Source Book in Rural Sociology (1930–32) became the synthesis of previous works in rural sociology. This article aims to bridge the two phases in Sorokin’s life and to evaluate his contribution on rural sociology, as well as the reception of his works.

  • 10.
    Gubanov, Alexander P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Bogolepova, Olga K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    A new record of the enigmatic mollusc Jinonicella from the Silurian of the Carnic Alps, Austria2018In: Estonian journal of earth sciences, ISSN 1736-4728, E-ISSN 1736-7557, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 158-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The small enigmatic mollusc Jinonicella kolebabai Pokorny, 1978 is described from the upper Silurian Cardiola Formation at the Rauchkofel Sud section of the Carnic Alps, Austria. The associated conodonts suggest a late Ludlow (Ludfordian) Polygnathoides siluricus conodont Zone. Previous Silurian records of Jinonicella are known from the Wenlock to Ludlow of the Czech Republic, USA, Gotland of Sweden and the Carnic Alps of Austria. The wide distribution of this taxon across different climatic zones and widely separated areas in the Silurian is problematic, and it is unclear whether Jinonicella was present in high-latitude areas before the end-Ordovician cooling and mass extinction or was dispersed during the Silurian. Possible planktotrophy in Jinonicella and Silurian ocean circulation patterns may explain the dispersal, but within the framework of current palaeogeographical reconstructions the model does not adequately explain an equatorial to polar distribution of other contemporaneous benthic faunas from these areas.

  • 11.
    Götz, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Borders in the Baltic Sea region: suturing the ruptures2017In: Journal of Baltic Studies, ISSN 0162-9778, E-ISSN 1751-7877, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 539-541Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Götz, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Enemy at the Gates: A Neoclassical Realist Explanation of Russia's Baltic PolicyIn: Foreign Policy Analysis, ISSN 1743-8586, E-ISSN 1743-8594Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Götz, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    In the hegemon’s shadow: leading states and the rise of regional powers2016In: Global Affairs, ISSN 2334-0460, E-ISSN 2334-0479, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 448-450Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Götz, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Near Abroad: Putin, the West, and the Contest over Ukraine and the Caucasus2019In: Nationalities Papers, ISSN 0090-5992, E-ISSN 1465-3923, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 167-169Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Götz, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Review of: China, Russia, and twenty-first century global geopolitics2018In: International Affairs, ISSN 0020-5850, E-ISSN 1468-2346, Vol. 94, no 5, p. 1208-1209Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Götz, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Strategic imperatives, status aspirations, or domestic interests? Explaining Russia’s nuclear weapons policyIn: International Politics, ISSN 1384-5748, E-ISSN 1740-3898Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Götz, Elias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    MacFarlane, Neil
    Russia’s role in world politics: power, ideas, and domestic influencesIn: International Politics, ISSN 1384-5748, E-ISSN 1740-3898Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Hansen, Julie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Institutionen för moderna språk.
    Foreword2019In: Living through Literature: Essays in Memory of Omry Ronen / [ed] Julie Hansen, Karen Evans-Romaine & Herbert Eagle, Uppsala: Uppsala University, 2019, p. 11-20Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Omry Ronen (1937–2012) was a world-renowned scholar of Russian literature and an inspiring teacher. His most influential work focused on historical and descriptive poetics, metrics, structural analysis of verse and prose, Russian Modernist poetry, and particularly the work of Osip Mandelstam. He also studied Alexander Pushkin’s poetics, subtextual interpretive strategies, the poetry of the OBERIU, the work of Vladimir Nabokov and the problems of literary multilingualism, the picaresque in Russian literature, popular fiction and science fiction, children’s literature, intersemiotic transposition in the arts, literature and cinema, the history of Russian formalism and structuralism, twentieth-century Ukrainian poetry, and the history and theory of Russian Symbolism, Acmeism, and Futurism. 

     

    This volume honors Omry Ronen’s memory and scholarly legacy with ten essays by his former students Karen Evans-Romaine, Sara Feldman, Susanne Fusso, Julie Hansen, Kelly E. Miller, Nancy Pollak, Irena Ronen, Stephanie Sandler, Timothy D. Sergay, and Michael Wachtel. The volume also contains an introduction by Vyacheslav Vsevolodovich Ivanov.

  • 19.
    Hansen, Julie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Introduction: Translingualism and transculturality in Russian contexts of translation2018In: Translation Studies, ISSN 1478-1700, E-ISSN 1751-2921, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 113-121Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Hansen, Julie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Kak ponimat' trans''yazykovoi tekst?: Russkye imena, kul'turnye alliuzii i igra slov v romane "Zhizn' Sukhanova v snovideniiakh" Olgi Grushinoi2016In: The Humanities and Social Studies in the Far East, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 58-69Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Hansen, Julie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Department of Modern Languages.
    Living through Literature: Essays in Memory of Omry Ronen2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Omry Ronen (1937–2012) was a world-renowned scholar of Russian literature and an inspiring teacher. His most influential work focused on historical and descriptive poetics, metrics, structural analysis of verse and prose, Russian Modernist poetry, and particularly the work of Osip Mandelstam. He also studied Alexander Pushkin’s poetics, subtextual interpretive strategies, the poetry of the OBERIU, the work of Vladimir Nabokov and the problems of literary multilingualism, the picaresque in Russian literature, popular fiction and science fiction, children’s literature, intersemiotic transposition in the arts, literature and cinema, the history of Russian formalism and structuralism, twentieth-century Ukrainian poetry, and the history and theory of Russian Symbolism, Acmeism, and Futurism. 

    This volume honors Omry Ronen’s memory and scholarly legacy with ten essays by his former students Karen Evans-Romaine, Sara Feldman, Susanne Fusso, Julie Hansen, Kelly E. Miller, Nancy Pollak, Irena Ronen, Stephanie Sandler, Timothy D. Sergay, and Michael Wachtel. The volume also contains an introduction by Vyacheslav Vsevolodovich Ivanov. 

  • 22.
    Hansen, Julie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Institutionen för moderna språk.
    The Pleasure of Translingual Punning: Homage to Nabokov in Olga Grushin’s The Dream Life of Sukhanov2019In: Living through Literature: Essays in Memory of Omry Ronen / [ed] Julie Hansen, Karen Evans-Romaine & Herb Eagle, Uppsala: Uppsala University, 2019, p. 217-239Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Hansen, Julie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Translingualism and Transculturality in Russian Contexts of Translation: Special issue of Translation Studies (ISSN: 1478-1700, ESSN: 1751-2921)2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Hansen, Julie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Transplanting Pushkin: A Symposium on Reading, Translating and Adapting Eugene Onegin2018In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 59, p. 97-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Hansen, Julie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Boyden, MichaelKelbert, Eugenia
    The Theory Deficit in Translingual Studies (special issue of Journal of World Literature): special issue of Journal of World Literature2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Kott, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Antisemitism in Contemporary Latvia: At the Nexus of Competing Nationalisms and a Securitizing State2018In: Antisemitism Studies, ISSN 2474-1809, E-ISSN 2474-1817, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 35-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Present-day Latvia is a multi-ethnic society divided by the traumatic experiences of the twentieth century. It was both a locus of the Holocaust and a society deeply affected by decades of Soviet rule. Today, Latvia’s Jewish community is trying to negotiate its place as a re-emergent historical minority in the space between two dominant ethno-cultural communities, Latvian speakers and Russian speakers. After outlining the expressions of antisemitism in both the Lettophone and Russophone milieus since 1991, this article argues that competing nationalist narratives of threat and ownership of the state best explain antisemitism in contemporary Latvia. The fluctuating influence of the 1941 Rumbula Massacre on popular memory culture is a recurrent point of reference, which illustrates my argument. Recent events suggest a new, more conciliatory, trend where Jews are seen as an integral part of the people of Latvia, rather than as a potential risk to the state and nation.

  • 27.
    Kott, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Detangling Putin's web in the West2018In: New Eastern Europe, ISSN 2083-7372, no 2, p. 165-171Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Kott, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    From the editor2018In: Journal of Baltic Studies, ISSN 0162-9778, E-ISSN 1751-7877, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 1-1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Kott, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Remembering 1989: Sometimes, the goddess of democracy doesn't triumph2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    As we commemorate the 30th anniversary of the events that led to the reunification not only of Germany, but also of Europe, we would be wise to recall the cautionary message of those who sacrificed their lives on Tiananmen Square.

  • 30.
    Kott, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Review of British intelligence and Hitler’s empire in the Soviet Union, 1941–1945 by Ben Wheatley2018In: Journal of Baltic Studies, ISSN 0162-9778, E-ISSN 1751-7877, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 268-271Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Kott, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Review of Mischka's War: A Story of Survival from War-Torn Europe to New York, by Sheila Fitzpatrick2018In: Latvijas Vēstures Institūta Žurnāls, ISSN 1025-8906, no 1, p. 183-189Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Kott, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Review of War Veterans and Fascism in Interwar Europe, by Ángel Alcalde2018In: Fascism: Journal of Comparative Fascist Studies, ISSN 2211-6249, E-ISSN 2211-6257, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 300-304Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Kragh, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Utrikespolitiska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The rise and fall of Belarusian nationalism, 1906-19312017In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 137, no 1, p. 160-162Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Kujawska, Monika
    et al.
    Univ Lodz, Inst Ethnol & Cultural Anthropol, Lindleya 3-5, PL-90131 Lodz, Poland.
    Svanberg, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    From medicinal plant to noxious weed: Bryonia alba L. (Cucurbitaceae) in northern and eastern Europe2019In: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, ISSN 1746-4269, E-ISSN 1746-4269, Vol. 15, article id 22Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: White bryony, Bryonia alba L., is a relatively little known plant in the history of folk medicine and folk botany in eastern and northern Europe. The main aim of this article is to bring together data about Bryonia alba and to summarise its cultural history and folk botanical importance in eastern and northern Europe. Nowadays, this species is considered at best as an ornamental plant, and at worst as a noxious weed. However, ethnographic and historical sources show that it used to be of magical, medicinal and ritual importance in our part of Europe. Methods: A diachronic perspective was chosen in order to outline and analyse the devolution and changes in the use of B. alba, in the course of which we take into account the social, ecological and chemical aspects of the usage of this plant. We have therefore traced down and analysed published sources such as ethnographical descriptions, floras, linguistic records and topographical descriptions from northern and central-eastern Europe, particularly Scandinavia, Baltic States, Germany, Poland, Belarus, Ukraine and the Balkan Peninsula. The analysed material is presented and discussed within the biocultural domains that developed in the interaction between human societies and Bryonia alba. Results and discussion: Bryonia alba has many folk names in northern and central-eastern parts of Europe: some of them refer to its medicinal properties, life form, odour, or toxicity; others to its possession by the devil. As we learn, Bryonia alba was an inexpensive surrogate for mandrake (Mandragora officinarum L.) and sold as such in the discussed parts of Europe. The folklore and medicinal properties ascribed to mandrake were passed on to white bryony due to an apparent resemblance of the roots. In ethnographic descriptions, we find a mixture of booklore, i.e. written traditions, and oral traditions concerning this species. Some of this folklore must have been an alternative stories spread by swindlers who wished to sell fake mandrake roots to people. Conclusions: Plant monographs and reviews of particular species tend to concentrate on the botanicals, which might have great useful potential. White bryony presents a precisely opposite example, being a plant that used to be of medicinal relevance and was furnished with symbolical meaning, and has nowadays preserved only its ornamental value among some urban and rural dwellers of northern Europe. Nonetheless, it might be considered as a part of the biocultural heritage in old, well-preserved gardens. It is still used as a medicine in some parts of the Balkan Peninsula.

  • 35.
    Kulikov, Volodymyr
    et al.
    Kharkov Natl Univ, Dept Hist, Kharkov, Ukraine.
    Kragh, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Big business in the Russian empire: A European perspective2019In: Business History, ISSN 0007-6791, E-ISSN 1743-7938, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 299-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an inventory of the largest private companies in the Russian Empire in 1914, and their comparison to the largest contemporary British, German, and French companies identified by Youssef Cassis as 'big business'. It focusses on three questions. First, how big was big business in Russia from a European perspective? Second, how did the structure of big business in Russia compare to that of other large European economies? And finally, how did foreign entrepreneurship appear in Russian big business? Drawing on new empirical evidence, it contributes to the discussion on the 'backward' and 'peripheral' character of the Russian economy before the First World War.

  • 36.
    Lentsner, Dina
    et al.
    Capital Univ, Mus Theory & Composit, Columbus, OH USA.
    Katschthaler, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Galieva-Szokolay, Julia
    Royal Conservatory Mus Toronto, Glenn Gould Sch, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Forum Introduction: Reading Kurtág, Reading with Kurtág: Musico-Literary Perspectives2018In: Slavic and East European Journal, ISSN 0037-6752, E-ISSN 2325-7687, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 118-119Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Loader, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    A Stalinist Purge in the Khrushchev Era?: The Latvian Communist Party Purge, 1959–19632018In: Slavonic and East European Review, ISSN 0037-6795, E-ISSN 2222-4327, Vol. 96, no 2, p. 244-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 1959 and 1963, an alliance of Latvian Stalinists and Kremlin conservatives purged the Latvian Communist Party, ousting its so-called 'national communist' reformist wing. This article seeks to inform our understanding of the Latvian purge by comparing its processes with two previous Soviet political purges, Khrushchev's 1957 'Anti-Party Group' purge and Stalin's 1937 Great Purge. Through two-step demotions, exiles, an attempt to organize a show trial, the purge of the purgers and an ideological cleansing campaign, the Latvian purge straddled two eras, borrowing from both its predecessors. Finally, this article asks how the purge's architect, arch-Stalinist Arvīds Pelše, emerged victorious from the internecine Party struggle.

  • 38.
    Loader, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    A Stalinist Purge in the Khrushchev Era?: The Latvian Communist Party Purge, 1959-19632018In: Slavonic and East European Review, ISSN 0037-6795, E-ISSN 2222-4327, Vol. 96, no 2, p. 244-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 1959 and 1963, an alliance of Latvian Stalinists and Kremlin conservatives purged the Latvian Communist Party, ousting its so-called 'national communist' reformist wing. This article seeks to inform our understanding of the Latvian purge by comparing its processes with two previous Soviet political purges, Khrushchev's 1957 'Anti-Party Group' purge and Stalin's 1937 Great Purge. Through two-step demotions, exiles, an attempt to organize a show trial, the purge of the purgers and an ideological cleansing campaign, the Latvian purge straddled two eras, borrowing from both its predecessors. Finally, this article asks how the purge's architect, arch-Stalinist Arvids Pelse, emerged victorious from the internecine Party struggle.

  • 39.
    Loader, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Resisting Russification in Soviet Latvia2018In: Baltic Rim Economies, ISSN 1459-9759, no 4, p. 45-45Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Magnus, Riin
    et al.
    Univ Tartu, Dept Semiot, Jakobi 2, EE-51014 Tartu, Estonia..
    Svanberg, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Wild Animals in Human Assistance: Historical Practices, Semiotic Grounds and Future Prospects2017In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 47, p. 154-170Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Makarychev, Andrey
    et al.
    Univ Tartu, Skytte Inst Polit Studies, Tartu, Estonia..
    Yatsyk, Alexandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Kazan Fed Univ, Ctr Cultural Studies Postsocialism, Kazan, Russia..
    Biopolitics and national identities: between liberalism and totalization2017In: Nationalities Papers, ISSN 0090-5992, E-ISSN 1465-3923, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Makarychev, Andrey
    et al.
    University of Tartu, Johan Skytte Institute of Political Studies, Tartu, Estonia.
    Yatsyk, Alexandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Entertain and Govern: From Sochi 2014 to FIFA 20182018In: Problems of Post-Communism, ISSN 1075-8216, E-ISSN 1557-783X, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 115-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article looks at Russia’s international sports politics from two different perspectives. The authors discuss sport mega-events as instruments of legitimizing the existing regime and stabilizing its foundations. They argue that, due to mega-events, the Russian state has found itself under persistent external pressures from international organizations, and has had to react to them and adjust its legal norms and policy practices accordingly. The key argument of the article is that both elements of the puzzle can be approached as central elements of governmentality.

  • 43.
    Makarychev, Andrey
    et al.
    University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Yatsyk, Alexandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Illiberal Geographies: Popular geopolitics and Russian biopolitical regionalism2018In: Eurasian geography and economics, ISSN 1538-7216, E-ISSN 1938-2863, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 51-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we focus on how a variety of illiberal discourses construct a scene for new geopolitical and geocultural imageries of the post-Soviet space, Europe, and Eurasia. Academically, our approach falls into disciplinary niches known as popular geopolitics (when it comes to territories) and biopolitics (when it comes to people). More specifically, we try to see how Russian artistic personalities and public intellectuals contribute to the re-imagination of the post-Soviet space along the lines of Russian illiberal - and largely anti-Western - thinking. Among our protagonists are Valery Gergiev, Iosif Kobzon, Yulia Chicherina, Gleb Kornilov, Ivan Okhlobystin, and Zakhar Prilepin. All of them are important cultural figures who produce cultural justifications for imperial foreign policy in general, and Russia's annexation of Crimea and de facto occupation of Donbas in particular. Our main argument is that the illiberal imagery of the post-Soviet world drastically reduces the validity of the major pillars of international society, such as state territorial borders, national jurisdictions, citizenship, and legal obligations and commitments. Instead of the rule of law Russian performative illiberalism puts a premium on a series of loosely defined yet foundational for this type of imagery concepts such as patriotism, national spirit and pride, and "natural," "organic" bonds defining the sense of belonging to Russia as a trans-border political community.

  • 44.
    Makarychev, Andrey
    et al.
    Univ Tartu, Johan Skytte Inst Polit Studies, Tartu, Estonia.
    Yatsyk, Alexandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Unpacking the Post-Soviet: Political Legacy of the Tartu Semiotic School2018In: All Azimuth A journal of foreign policy and peace, ISSN 2146-7757, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 31-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article sketches out general approach to using cultural semiotics as a cognitive tool for analyzing international relations in general and in post-Soviet area in particular. The authors discuss how the homegrown school of cultural semiotics associated with the University of Tartu can be helpful for IR studies. In this respect we place cultural semiotic knowledge in a multidisciplinary perspective and look for projections of its concepts into the vocabulary of foreign policy. Then we intend to discuss the Tartu school from a political perspective, thus claiming that its premium put on cultural issues renders strong politicizing effects. Ultimately, we use cultural semiotic notions and approaches for problematizing the concept of the post-Soviet with its conflictual split between reproducing archaic policies and discourses, on the one hand, and playing by the rules of the post-modern society, with entertainment, hybridity and the spirit of deconstruction as its pivots.

  • 45.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Metaphysics, Aesthetics, or Epistemology?: The Conceptual History of tvorchestvo in Nineteenth-Century Russian Thought2018In: Slavic and East European Journal, ISSN 0037-6752, E-ISSN 2325-7687, Vol. 62, no 1 (Spring 2018), p. 4-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes the history of the Russian concept of tvorchestvo (“creation,” “creativity”) from its emergence and early usages in the early nineteenth century, in particular in the writings of Nikolai Nadezhdin, Nikolai Stankevich and Vissarion Belinskii, and up to and including the philosophy of Vladimir Solov’ev. While the concept later on became a key term and pivotal philosophical issue for thinkers such as Nikolai Berdiaev and Sergei Bulgakov, this article focuses on its early history, and more specifically on how it was coined in the translation of the ideas of Schelling, while subsequently becoming independent of the Schellingian origins. More specifically, while it initially was a metaphysical concept, corresponding to Schilling’s idea of “productivity” (of nature as well as of the human being), thinkers like Nadezhdin and Belinskii used it as an aesthetic concept, referring to the creative genius, while Solov’ev in turn applied it in order to emphasize the active role we play in cognition and perception (epistemology). The article demonstrates the importance of cultural transfer in the creation of a Russian philosophical discourse in the nineteenth century and expolores how processes of transfer and translation generate new philosophical issues.

  • 46.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Provincialising Europe?: Soviet Historiography of Philosophy and the Question of Eurocentrism2018In: Rivista di storia della filosofia (1984), ISSN 0393-2516, E-ISSN 1972-5558, no 2, p. 277-293Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    "Russia's Thousand-Year-Old History": The Claim for a Past in Contemporary Russian Conservatism2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    "Russia’s Thousand-Year-Old History": The Claim for a Past in Contemporary Russian Conservative Thought2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Smuta: Cyclical visions of history in contemporary Russian thought and the question of hegemony2018In: Studies in East European thought, ISSN 0925-9392, E-ISSN 1573-0948, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 19-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the post-Soviet context, various cyclical models of recurrent Russian “Times of Troubles” (smuty) have become increasingly popular. This perspective emerged first in Soviet dissident circles (Alexander Yanov, Aleksandr Akhiezer), who used it as a means to expose as mistaken the Soviet belief in continual historical progress on Russian soil. In post-Soviet Russia this critical approach has been continued by members of the “Akhezier circle,” the economist Egor Gaidar, and others. Meanwhile it was given an affirmative, conservative reinterpretation by Aleksandr Panarin, according to whom Russia has always managed to overcome its phases of devastating Westernization and state collapse. This idea of Russian history has become influential; even Vladimir Putin has talked about Russia as a strong state able to survive various “Times of Troubles” from the early seventeenth century to the early post-Soviet period. It also figures prominently among members of the neoconservative Izborsk Club. This article analyzes different conceptions of Russian history as cyclical and their prominent place in the prevailing civilizational discourse of post-Soviet Russia. By means of postcolonial perspectives, this discourse is seen on the one hand as an attempt to question and reject Western hegemony, attempts that on the other hand nevertheless seem unable to liberate themselves from a normative dependence on the West.

  • 50.
    Mjør, Kåre Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Spøkelset frå den russiske revolusjonen: Imperium, nasjon og revolusjon: Arven frå Sovjetunionen i det 21. hundreåret2018In: Syn og Segn, ISSN 0039-7717, no 3, p. 88-96Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
123 1 - 50 of 116
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