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  • 1. Adams, Melinda
    et al.
    Smrek, Michal
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Making Institutions and Context Count: How Useful Is Feminist Institutionalism in Explaining Male Dominance in Politics?2018In: Politics & Gender, ISSN 1743-923X, E-ISSN 1743-9248, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 271-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the same formal candidate selection rules are generally in place throughout a state, there is often intracountry variation in male descriptive overrepresentation. To explain this variation, scholars cannot focus exclusively on women (e.g., how do women respond to formal institutional opportunities?) or femininity (e.g., how do norms governing appropriate female behavior affect women's odds of being selected as a candidate?). Rather, scholars must attend to the ways that informal norms regarding masculinity operate across space and time within a country. Drawing on the insights of feminist institutionalism, this essay examines two intracountry sources of variation in candidate selection: the spatial urban-rural divide and temporal differences between first-time recruitment and renomination. While the formal candidate selection rules are uniform, informal institutions vary depending on where and when we look, leading to different levels of male overrepresentation.

  • 2. Ahlskog, Rafael
    et al.
    Nyman, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Smrek, Michal
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The Fiscal Effects of EU Migration to Slovakia2019In: Globe in Motion 2: Multiple Shades of Migration: Regional Perspectives / [ed] Miroslava Hlinčíková; Martina Sekulová, Bratislava: Institute of Ethnology and Social Anthropology, Slovak Academy of Sciences , 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Astapova, Anastasiya
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Univ Tartu, Dept Estonian & Comparat Folklore, Tartu, Estonia.
    Navumau, Vasil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Veyshnoria: A Fake Country in the Midst of Real Information Warfare2018In: Journal of American Folklore, ISSN 0021-8715, E-ISSN 1535-1882, Vol. 131, no 522, p. 435-443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a humorous response to the threat of the Russian occupation of Belarus during the joint military exercise of September 2017, civic activists created the fictional Republic of Veyshnoria. This meme soon obtained all the attributes of a micro-nation, including numerous virtual citizens, serving to critique the autocratic government of Belarus and creating a platform for alternative nation-building. Via humor and fake news, fictional Veyshnoria is becoming increasingly instrumental in the realm of information and ideological warfare.

  • 4.
    Bedford, Sofie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Inst Human Sci IWM, Vienna, Austria.
    Vinatier, Laurent
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Resisting the Irresistible: ‘Failed Opposition’ in Azerbaijan and Belarus Revisited2019In: Government and Opposition, ISSN 0017-257X, E-ISSN 1477-7053, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 686-714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent literature on post-Soviet electoral revolutions in places where attempts at regime change through popular protest did not succeed, opposition groups are often simply regarded as ‘failed’. And yet, opposition actors exist and participate in the political life of their country. Building on the Belarusian and Azerbaijani cases, we argue that opposition actors are maintained in a ‘ghetto’, often virtual, tightly managed by the ruling authorities who exert monopolistic control over civic activities. Opposition actors adapt to the restricted conditions – accepting a certain level of dependency. They thus develop various tactics to engage with the outside, striving to reduce the ghetto walls. To this end this article proposes a typology of what we call oppositional ‘resistance models’: electoral, in the media, lobbying and through education. The models highlight what makes ‘opposition’ in authoritarian states and are a step towards a more comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon in this context.

  • 5.
    Bennich-Björkman, Li
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Around the corner?: Female empowerment, security, and elite mind-sets in Georgia2018In: Gendering Postsocialism: Old Legacies and New Hierarchies / [ed] Gradskova, Y Morell, IA, Routledge, 2018, p. 54-70Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bennich-Björkman, Li
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Life Interrupted But Mended Trauma And The Remembering Self Among Estonian And Bosnian Emigres2016In: Cultural Patterns And Life Stories / [ed] Joesalu, K Kannike, A, 2016, p. 183-210Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, I approach the existential aspects of being a refugee and living in exile, those aspects that are not part of the system-world of the state and its policies but the life-world of being. Involuntary emigration as in the case of Estonians and Bosnians that is the focus in this chapter, and the integration that may follow, accentuates fundamental existential questions. Having to leave behind the place where you are rooted causes an existential trauma, a trauma defined as a highly stressful event, a serious threat to one's life or integrity, involving feelings of uncertainty, helplessness and fear. There are many strategies that men and women who have experienced disruption use to create a whole out of the separation that has occurred. Here, I explore how the way that life is remembered and narrated can become a way to mitigate the existential trauma of refugee-ship. I will do so by analysing how individuals in two refugee communities, the Estonian "republican" generation that fled their homeland in 1944, and the Bosnians who left their tormented territory in 1992 and 1993, remember their lives. In the life stories of the Estonian and Bosnian refugees who went through existential traumas it is not only the fact that traumatic events are integrated, but how and by which narrative structure it is done.

  • 7.
    Blackburn, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Being ‘Proficient’ and ‘Competent’: On ‘Languaging’, Field Identity and Power/Privilege Dynamics in Ethnographic Research2019In: Learning and Using Languages in Ethnographic Research / [ed] R. Gibb, A. Tremlett, J. D. Iglesias, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2019, p. 164-176Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acquisition of ‘proficiency’ is often assumed to solve a variety of problems when conducting ethnographic fieldwork in a second language. Based on my experience of doing fieldwork while ‘proficient’ in Russian, this chapter highlights the issues raised by ‘fluency’, which complicate and deepen challenges common to ethnographic fieldwork in general. Firstly, I consider how I was ‘enlanguaged’ by new contexts and activities, espe- cially in learning new cultural norms. Secondly, I examine the performative aspects of conducting fieldwork in a foreign language, such as the pressure to ‘pass for a native’ and the emergence of a ‘field identity’. Finally, I reflect on how being ‘fluent’ impacts on issues of power, hierarchy and inequality in local Russian contexts. This chapter demonstrates how the emotional and ethical challenges of conducting ethnographic research in a foreign language do not end with ‘fluency’ and encourages those doing fieldwork to consider what it means to be an effective ‘intercultural speaker’.

  • 8.
    Blackburn, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Discourses of Russian-speaking youth in Nazarbayev’s Kazakhstan2019In: Central Asian Survey, ISSN 0263-4937, E-ISSN 1465-3354, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 217-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research into post-independence identity shifts among Kazakhstan’s Russian-speaking minorities has outlined a number of possible pathways, such as diasporization, integrated national minority status and ethnic separatism. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with young people in Almaty and Karaganda, I examine how Russian-speaking minorities identify with the state and imagine their place in a ‘soft’ or ‘hybrid’ post-Soviet authoritarian system. What is found is that Russian-speaking minorities largely accept their status beneath the Kazakh ‘elder brother’ and do not wish to identify as a ‘national minority’. Furthermore, they affirm passive loyalty to the political status quo while remaining disinterested in political representation. Russian-speaking minorities are also ambivalent towards Kazakh language promotion and anxious about the increasing presence of Kazakh- speakers in urban spaces. This article argues that two factors are central to these stances among Kazakhstan’s Russian-speaking minorities: the persistence of Soviet legacies and the effects of state discourse and policy since 1991.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-11-30 16:05
  • 9.
    Blackburn, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Mainstream Russian Nationalism and the “State-Civilization” Identity: Perspectives from Below2020In: Nationalities Papers, ISSN 0090-5992, E-ISSN 1465-3923Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on over 100 interviews in European Russia, this paper sheds light on the bottom-up dynamics of Russian nationalism. After offering a characterization of the post-2012 “state-civilization” discourse from above, I examine how ordinary people imagine Russia as a “state-civilization.” Interview narratives of inclusion into the nation are found to overlap with state discourse on three main lines: (1) ethno-nationalism is rejected, and Russia is imagined to be a unique, harmonious multi-ethnic space in which the Russians (russkie) lead without repressing the others; (2) Russia’s multinationalism is remembered in myths of peaceful interactions between Russians (russkie) and indigenous ethnic groups (korennyye narodi) across the imperial and Soviet past; (3) Russian culture and language are perceived as the glue that holds together a unified category of nationhood. Interview narratives on exclusion deviate from state discourse in two key areas: attitudes to the North Caucasus reveal the geopolitical-security, post-imperial aspect of the “state- civilization” identity, while stances toward non-Slavic migrants in city spaces reveal a degree of “cultural nationalism” that, while sharing characteristics with those of Western Europe, is also based on Soviet- framed notions of normality. Overall, the paper contributes to debates on how Soviet legacies and Russia’s post-imperial consciousness play out in the context of the “pro-Putin consensus.”

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  • 10.
    Blackburn, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Political Legitimacy in Contemporary Russia ‘from Below’: ‘Pro-Putin’ Stances, the Normative Split and Imagining Two Russias2020In: Russian Politics, ISSN 2451-8913, E-ISSN 2451-8921, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 52-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how urban Russians perceive, negotiate, challenge and reaffirm the political configuration of the country and leadership in terms of the ‘imagined nation’. Based on around 100 interviews in three Russian cities, three main pillars appear to prop up the imagined ‘pro-Putin’ social contract: (i) the belief that ‘delegating’ all power into the hands of the President is the best way to discipline and mould state and society; (ii) the acceptance of Putin’s carefully crafted image as a ‘real man’, juxtaposed against negative views of the Russian ‘national character’; (iii) the internalization of a pro-Putin mythology on a ‘government of saviors’ that delivers normality and redeems a ‘once-ruined’ nation. The paper shows that those who reject these pillars do so due to differing views on what constitutes ‘normality’ in politics. This normative split is examined over a number of issues, leading to a discussion of internal orientalism and the limited success of state media agitation in winning over the skeptical.

    The full text will be freely available from 2021-04-02 09:56
  • 11.
    Bogolepova, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Anna Widmann - a Swiss emigre to Russia: a family history2019In: Regio-Familienforscher: Zeitschrift der Genealogisch-Heraldischen Gesellschaft der Regio Basel, ISSN 1423-0992, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 25-41Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There was significant emigration of Swiss people to the Russian Empire from the late 17th to the late 19th century. Most of these Swiss diaspora populations returned to Switzerland before or shortly after the 1917 revolution. Fates of those remained in Russia are mostly unknown. The article is a case study in the Widmann family genealogy and history during the late 19th - beginning of 20th century. Facts and description of Anna Widmann‟s life represent one of the personal histories of those many thousands of Swiss emigre to Russia. The article also examines relationships between the Russian (e.g. Evgenia Tur, Nikolai Bogolepov) and Swiss (Josef Viktor Widmann) members of the family and their friends (Carl Spitteler and Alexander Skryabin), well known figures in the intellectual life of both countries.

  • 12.
    Bogolepova, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Евгения Тур и неизвестные письма ее дочери Ольги, 1862-18692019In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 60, p. 20-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evgenia Tur (pseudonym of Elizaveta Salias de Tournemir, nee Sukhovo-Kobylina) was a prominent female author in Russia in the middle of the 19th century. She has been virtually forgotten today, however. Tur was at the epicenter of Russian cultural life; she wrote prose fiction, critical articles, children’s books, and published the newspaper Russian Speech. She also hosted a salon, frequented by many of prominent intellectuals, including Turgenev, Ogarev, Ostrovsky and Herzen. Tur’s works have never been published in a collected edition and little of her correspondence has been printed. A great deal of assumptions have been made about her biography, which has not been studied in detail. The article provides a short biography of Tur and presents archive materials containing previously unknown facts about her life. Letters written by her daughter Olga in 1862–1869 (deposited in the Russian State Archive of Literature and Art in Moscow) are presented here for the first time. 

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  • 13.
    Bogolepova, Olga
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Donovan, Stephen K.
    Harper, David A. T.
    Suyarkova, Anna A.
    Yakupov, Rustem
    Gubanov, Alexander P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    New records of brachiopods and crinoids from the Silurian (Wenlock) of the southern Urals, Russia2018In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crinoids and brachiopods are described from the Silurian Uzyan Formation of the Zilair Zone in the southern Urals. The occurrence of the graptolites Coronograptus praedeubeli suggests a late Homerian (Wenlock) age for the strata. A new disparid crinoid, Cicerocrinus gracilis Donovan sp. nov., is the oldest known member of this genus. It has a long, flexible and homeomorphic column, and a tall bryozoan palaeontology terminology (IBr2) (second primibrachial) axillary. All species of Cicerocrinus described previously have been limited to the Ludlow of the British Isles, Sweden and Estonia, and the Pridoli of Estonia. The poorly preserved brachiopod fauna is represented by small atrypid (Atrypa? sp.) and dalmanellid brachiopods (Levenea? sp.). The reported assemblage generally inhabited deep-water environments.

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    SouthernUrals
  • 14.
    Giandomenico, Jessica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Hur underhålls en hybridstat?: Indikationer från Albanien och Makedonien2018In: Nordisk Østforum, ISSN 0801-7220, E-ISSN 1891-1773, Vol. 32, p. 21-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How is a hybrid state maintained? Today, several countries undergoing democratic reforms are also backsliding towards greater authoritarianism. This article draws on election data from Macedonia and Albania to show how a country can display elements of democratic improvement and democratic deterioration within the same policy field. The Albanian case shows how the political parties, with an anchoring in legislation, work to make the electoral administration politically dependent. This enables the political parties to exert control over central aspects of the distribution of power. By contrast, the case of Macedonia shows how undemocratic behaviors can become institutionalized and gradually accepted, even as other features of the electoral process undergo improvement. Common to both countries are patterns of patronage that serve to maintain a unique organization of power: the democratic façade is improved, but the undemocratic behavior remains.

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  • 15.
    Granberg, Leo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Pitirim Sorokin Between East and West: Russian traces in rural sociology2018In: Bulletin of Udmurt University. Sociology. Political Science. International Relations, ISSN 2587-9030, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 324-335Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Pitirim Sorokin (1889–1968) was a young social scientists, who worked for a short academic period in Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) before and during revolution. There he followed newest streams in western and eastern philosophy, made field research in Russia and worked for a new synthesis in sociology. Neo-positivism and empiricism characterized young Sorokin’s own research but he had strong interest on theories, and he made a major effort to develop an own theoretical interpretation of society. During his first years in United States he contributed rural sociology by lectures and publications with Carle C. Zimmerman. Principles of Rural-Urban Sociology (1929), followed by Systematic Source Book in Rural Sociology (1930–32) became the synthesis of previous works in rural sociology. This article aims to bridge the two phases in Sorokin’s life and to evaluate his contribution on rural sociology, as well as the reception of his works.

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    Pitirim Sorokin_between east and west
  • 16.
    Granberg, Leo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Reflections on civic organisations in Russia - civil society and poverty2019In: Nauka, biznes, vlast - triada regionalnava razbitija / [ed] Rimma Timofejeva and l.A. Kirkorova, Novgorod, 2019, p. 61-63Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Granberg, Leo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Siperian menetetyt mahdollisuudet (Siberia's lost opportunities)2019In: Ydin-lehti, ISSN 0356-357X, no 3, p. 38-41Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Gubanov, Alexander P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Bogolepova, Olga K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    A new record of the enigmatic mollusc Jinonicella from the Silurian of the Carnic Alps, Austria2018In: Estonian journal of earth sciences, ISSN 1736-4728, E-ISSN 1736-7557, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 158-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The small enigmatic mollusc Jinonicella kolebabai Pokorny, 1978 is described from the upper Silurian Cardiola Formation at the Rauchkofel Sud section of the Carnic Alps, Austria. The associated conodonts suggest a late Ludlow (Ludfordian) Polygnathoides siluricus conodont Zone. Previous Silurian records of Jinonicella are known from the Wenlock to Ludlow of the Czech Republic, USA, Gotland of Sweden and the Carnic Alps of Austria. The wide distribution of this taxon across different climatic zones and widely separated areas in the Silurian is problematic, and it is unclear whether Jinonicella was present in high-latitude areas before the end-Ordovician cooling and mass extinction or was dispersed during the Silurian. Possible planktotrophy in Jinonicella and Silurian ocean circulation patterns may explain the dispersal, but within the framework of current palaeogeographical reconstructions the model does not adequately explain an equatorial to polar distribution of other contemporaneous benthic faunas from these areas.

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  • 19.
    Gubanov, Alexander P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Männik, Peep
    Bogolepova, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    New data on the problematic mollusc Jinonicella from the early Silurian of east Siberia2020In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Jinonicella kolebabai Pokorný, 1978, a small problematic “mollusc” of unknown origin is described from the early Silurian (early to mid Llandovery) of east Siberia. This is the first record of Jinonicella from Siberia. Previous Silurian records of Jinonicella were from the late Llandovery (Telychian) of North America and the Wenlock to Ludlow of Europe (Bohemia, Gotland and the Carnic Alps of Austria). Jinonicella shows a wide range of geographic and stratigraphic distribution. It was reported from three palaeocontinents and several smaller terranes. It also demonstrates adaptation to different environments from shallow to deep-water settings, and spans several climatic zones from equatorial to temperate belts. The wide distribution and adaptation to a broad range of environments allow Jinonicella to subsist for about 100 my, i.e., from the Middle Ordovician to the Late Devonian surviving through two major extinction events.

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  • 20.
    Götz, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Borders in the Baltic Sea region: suturing the ruptures2017In: Journal of Baltic Studies, ISSN 0162-9778, E-ISSN 1751-7877, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 539-541Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Götz, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Enemy at the Gates: A Neoclassical Realist Explanation of Russia's Baltic Policy2019In: Foreign Policy Analysis, ISSN 1743-8586, E-ISSN 1743-8594, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 99-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What drives Russia's Baltic policy? To answer this question, I develop a neoclassical realist framework that explains how local great powers act toward neighboring small states. In brief, the framework argues that local great powers face strong systemic incentives to establish a sphere of influence around their borders. Toward that end, they can employ positive and negative incentives. The general rule is that the higher the level of external pressure, the more assertive the policies pursued by the local great power. However, this simple relationship between external pressure and regional assertiveness is moderated by two variables: (1) the ability of small states to obtain security guarantees from extra regional powers; and (2) the level of state capacity of the local great power. The article develops this theoretical argument and shows that it goes a long way to explain the overall pattern and evolution of Russia's Baltic policy over the last two decades.

  • 22.
    Götz, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Explaining Russia's Opposition to NATO Enlargement:: Strategic Imperatives, Ideas, or Domestic Politics?2019In: Open Door:: NATO and Euro-Atlantic Security after the Cold War / [ed] Daniel Hamilton; Kristina Spohr, Washington DC: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019, p. 481-500Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Götz, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    In the hegemon’s shadow: leading states and the rise of regional powers2016In: Global Affairs, ISSN 2334-0460, E-ISSN 2334-0479, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 448-450Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Götz, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Near Abroad: Putin, the West, and the Contest over Ukraine and the Caucasus2019In: Nationalities Papers, ISSN 0090-5992, E-ISSN 1465-3923, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 167-169Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Götz, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Review of: China, Russia, and twenty-first century global geopolitics2018In: International Affairs, ISSN 0020-5850, E-ISSN 1468-2346, Vol. 94, no 5, p. 1208-1209Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Götz, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Russia, the West, and the Ukraine Crisis2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Götz, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Strategic imperatives, status aspirations, or domestic interests?: Explaining Russia’s nuclear weapons policy2019In: International Politics, ISSN 1384-5748, E-ISSN 1740-3898, Vol. 56, no 6, p. 810-827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What are the causes of Russia’s increasingly assertive nuclear weapons policy? This article offers a synthetic explanation combining strategic imperatives, status aspirations, and domestic political factors. In brief, it is argued that strategic imperatives go a long way toward explaining Russia’s nuclear force modernization. Russia seeks to upgrade its aging nuclear arsenal to maintain an assured second-strike capability. Status aspirations, in turn, can account for many nuclear exercises and maneuvers conducted by Russia. The aim is to promote Russia’s image as a great power in world politics. Finally, regime security considerations are the primary driver of Moscow’s abrasive nuclear rhetoric, which often caters to a domestic audience. The article unpacks these arguments, demonstrates their explanatory purchase, and discusses policy implications.

  • 28.
    Götz, Elias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    The Great Delusion: Liberal Dreams and International Realities2019In: Global Affairs, ISSN 2334-0460, E-ISSN 2334-0479, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 187-189Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Götz, Elias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    MacFarlane, Neil
    Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
    Russia’s role in world politics: power, ideas, and domestic influences2019In: International Politics, ISSN 1384-5748, E-ISSN 1740-3898, Vol. 56, no 6, p. 713-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Russia's role in world politics has become the object of a spirited debate among policymakers, think-tank analysts, and academics. Much of this debate focuses on one central question: What are the main drivers, or causes, of Moscow's increasingly proactive and assertive foreign policy? The purpose of this special issue is to address this question by focusing on the interplay of power, ideas, and domestic influences. Our introductory article sets the scene for this analytical endeavor. More specifically, the article has three aims: (1) to review the existing explanations of Moscow's assertiveness; (2) to discuss the challenges, opportunities, and benefits of employing eclectic approaches in the study of Russian foreign policy; and (3) to outline the contributions of the articles that follow.

  • 30.
    Götz, Elias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Merlen, Camille-Renaud
    Russia and the Question of World Order2019In: European Politics and Society, ISSN 2374-5118, E-ISSN 2374-5126, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 133-153Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Hansen, Julie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Introduction: Translingualism and transculturality in Russian contexts of translation2018In: Translation Studies, ISSN 1478-1700, E-ISSN 1751-2921, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 113-121Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 32.
    Hansen, Julie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Kak ponimat' trans''yazykovoi tekst?: Russkye imena, kul'turnye alliuzii i igra slov v romane "Zhizn' Sukhanova v snovideniiakh" Olgi Grushinoi2016In: The Humanities and Social Studies in the Far East, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 58-69Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 33.
    Hansen, Julie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Translingualism and Transculturality in Russian Contexts of Translation: Special issue of Translation Studies (ISSN: 1478-1700, ESSN: 1751-2921)2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Hansen, Julie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Transplanting Pushkin: A Symposium on Reading, Translating and Adapting Eugene Onegin2018In: Slovo: Journal of Slavic Languages, Literatures and Cultures , E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 59, p. 97-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 35.
    Hansen, Julie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Boyden, MichaelKelbert, Eugenia
    The Theory Deficit in Translingual Studies (special issue of Journal of World Literature): special issue of Journal of World Literature2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Hedlund, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Crisis in Soviet Agriculture2019Book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Kott, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Antisemitism in Contemporary Latvia: At the Nexus of Competing Nationalisms and a Securitizing State2018In: Antisemitism Studies, ISSN 2474-1809, E-ISSN 2474-1817, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 35-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Present-day Latvia is a multi-ethnic society divided by the traumatic experiences of the twentieth century. It was both a locus of the Holocaust and a society deeply affected by decades of Soviet rule. Today, Latvia’s Jewish community is trying to negotiate its place as a re-emergent historical minority in the space between two dominant ethno-cultural communities, Latvian speakers and Russian speakers. After outlining the expressions of antisemitism in both the Lettophone and Russophone milieus since 1991, this article argues that competing nationalist narratives of threat and ownership of the state best explain antisemitism in contemporary Latvia. The fluctuating influence of the 1941 Rumbula Massacre on popular memory culture is a recurrent point of reference, which illustrates my argument. Recent events suggest a new, more conciliatory, trend where Jews are seen as an integral part of the people of Latvia, rather than as a potential risk to the state and nation.

  • 38.
    Kott, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Detangling Putin's web in the West2018In: New Eastern Europe, ISSN 2083-7372, no 2, p. 165-171Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Kott, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    From the editor2018In: Journal of Baltic Studies, ISSN 0162-9778, E-ISSN 1751-7877, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 1-1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Kott, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Intermarium: An empty signifier?2019In: New Eastern Europe, ISSN 2083-7372, no 6, p. 147-150Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Kott, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Remembering 1989: Sometimes, the goddess of democracy doesn't triumph2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    As we commemorate the 30th anniversary of the events that led to the reunification not only of Germany, but also of Europe, we would be wise to recall the cautionary message of those who sacrificed their lives on Tiananmen Square.

  • 42.
    Kott, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Review of British intelligence and Hitler’s empire in the Soviet Union, 1941–1945 by Ben Wheatley2018In: Journal of Baltic Studies, ISSN 0162-9778, E-ISSN 1751-7877, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 268-271Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Kott, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Review of Mischka's War: A Story of Survival from War-Torn Europe to New York, by Sheila Fitzpatrick2018In: Latvijas Vēstures Institūta Žurnāls, ISSN 1025-8906, no 1, p. 183-189Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Kott, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Review of War Veterans and Fascism in Interwar Europe, by Ángel Alcalde2018In: Fascism: Journal of Comparative Fascist Studies, ISSN 2211-6249, E-ISSN 2211-6257, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 300-304Article, book review (Other academic)
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  • 45.
    Kragh, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Conspiracy Theories in Russian Security Thinking2020In: Journal of Strategic Studies, ISSN 0140-2390, E-ISSN 1743-937XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Kragh, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Sveriges relationer med Ryssland: kontinuitet och förändring historiskt och idag2018In: Nordiskt Østforum, Vol. 32, p. 54-74Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Kragh, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Utrikespolitiska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The rise and fall of Belarusian nationalism, 1906-19312017In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 137, no 1, p. 160-162Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Kragh, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Andermo, Erik
    Secrecy and Military Expenditures in the Russian Budget2020In: Post-Soviet Affairs, ISSN 1060-586X, E-ISSN 1938-2855Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Kragh, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    Kulikov, Volodymyr
    Big Business in the Russian Empire: A European Perspective2019In: Business History, ISSN 0007-6791, E-ISSN 1743-7938, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 299-321Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Kujawska, Monika
    et al.
    Univ Lodz, Inst Ethnol & Cultural Anthropol, Lindleya 3-5, PL-90131 Lodz, Poland.
    Svanberg, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
    From medicinal plant to noxious weed: Bryonia alba L. (Cucurbitaceae) in northern and eastern Europe2019In: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, ISSN 1746-4269, E-ISSN 1746-4269, Vol. 15, article id 22Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: White bryony, Bryonia alba L., is a relatively little known plant in the history of folk medicine and folk botany in eastern and northern Europe. The main aim of this article is to bring together data about Bryonia alba and to summarise its cultural history and folk botanical importance in eastern and northern Europe. Nowadays, this species is considered at best as an ornamental plant, and at worst as a noxious weed. However, ethnographic and historical sources show that it used to be of magical, medicinal and ritual importance in our part of Europe. Methods: A diachronic perspective was chosen in order to outline and analyse the devolution and changes in the use of B. alba, in the course of which we take into account the social, ecological and chemical aspects of the usage of this plant. We have therefore traced down and analysed published sources such as ethnographical descriptions, floras, linguistic records and topographical descriptions from northern and central-eastern Europe, particularly Scandinavia, Baltic States, Germany, Poland, Belarus, Ukraine and the Balkan Peninsula. The analysed material is presented and discussed within the biocultural domains that developed in the interaction between human societies and Bryonia alba. Results and discussion: Bryonia alba has many folk names in northern and central-eastern parts of Europe: some of them refer to its medicinal properties, life form, odour, or toxicity; others to its possession by the devil. As we learn, Bryonia alba was an inexpensive surrogate for mandrake (Mandragora officinarum L.) and sold as such in the discussed parts of Europe. The folklore and medicinal properties ascribed to mandrake were passed on to white bryony due to an apparent resemblance of the roots. In ethnographic descriptions, we find a mixture of booklore, i.e. written traditions, and oral traditions concerning this species. Some of this folklore must have been an alternative stories spread by swindlers who wished to sell fake mandrake roots to people. Conclusions: Plant monographs and reviews of particular species tend to concentrate on the botanicals, which might have great useful potential. White bryony presents a precisely opposite example, being a plant that used to be of medicinal relevance and was furnished with symbolical meaning, and has nowadays preserved only its ornamental value among some urban and rural dwellers of northern Europe. Nonetheless, it might be considered as a part of the biocultural heritage in old, well-preserved gardens. It is still used as a medicine in some parts of the Balkan Peninsula.

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