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  • 1.
    Aare, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas.
    "What is it like to be one of these people?": Narrativa strategier för att skapa inlevelse i reportage2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The eyewitnessed reportage has a pronounced character of narrating. The imaginative power of the text helps the reader to empathise with the characters. That makes constructing empathy a necessary skill of reporters. But how can this be done?

    Despite a tradition of story telling among reporters, narratologists virtually have neglected the reportage genre. The purpose of this thesis is to examine how narrative strategies can be used in reportages and, at the same time, suggest methods for investigating those strategies. The main question is: How can empathy be constructed? Empathy is here defined as a function of presence, perspective, selection and disnarration. A screen of covert values is also added.

    The study applies a narratological and a media rhetorical approach to journalistic narratives, and focus is on basic discussions supported by analysis samples. Theories by Gérard Genette, Dorrit Cohn, Seymor Chatman, William C. Booth, Gerald Prince, Göran Rossholm, Bengt Nerman and others are discussed.

    Even though a reportage is about real events, it always represents a personal interpretation. It presents the readers with a represented reality. In a narratological model for the macro level of the reportage I identify the trait of construction as an interaction between three instances: the producer (i. e. the implied author), the narrator and the experiencing reporter. On a micro level this model helps me to explain, for example, how a homodiegetic narrator can be combined with external focalisation, and how another character than the experiencing reporter can be focalised. In the former case I examine the interplay between showing and telling relative to the narrator’s visibility. In the latter case I especially focus on a complex technique for shifting perspectives, both those concerning thoughts, like Free, Indirect Discourse (FID), and those concerning perception. At the same time I study different degrees of perspectivity.  

  • 2.
    Aare, Kätlin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Respiratory patterns and turn-taking in spontaneous Estonian: Inhalation amplitude in multiparty conversations2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores the relationship between inhalation amplitude and turn-taking in spontaneous multiparty conversations held in Estonian. Respiratory activity is recorded with Respiratory Inductance Plethysmography. The main focus is on how inhalation amplitude varies between the inhalations produced directly before turn onset compared to the following inhalations within the same speaking turn. The results indicate a significant difference in amplitude, realised mainly by an increase in inhalation end lung volume values. One of the possible functions of this pattern is to signal an intention of taking the conversational turn. Another could be a phrasing or grouping function connected to lower inhalation amplitudes within turns.

  • 3.
    Aare, Kätlin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lippus, Pärtel
    University of Tartu.
    Włodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Creak in the respiratory cycle2018In: Proceedings of Interspeech 2018, Hyderabad, India: The International Speech Communication Association (ISCA), 2018, p. 1408-1412-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Creakiness is a well-known turn-taking cue and has been observed to systematically accompany phrase and turn ends in several languages. In Estonian, creaky voice is frequently used by all speakers without any obvious evidence for its systematic use as a turn-taking cue. Rather, it signals a lack of prominence and is favored by lengthening and later timing in phrases. In this paper, we analyze the occurrence of creak with respect to properties of the respiratory cycle. We show that creak is more likely to accompany longer exhalations. Furthermore, the results suggest there is little difference in lung volume values regardless of the presence of creak, indicating that creaky voice might be employed to preserve air over the course of longer utterances. We discuss the results in connection to processes of speech planning in spontaneous speech.

  • 4.
    Aare, Kätlin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Włodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Backchannels and breathing2014In: Proceedings from FONETIK 2014: Stockholm, June 9-11, 2014 / [ed] Mattias Heldner, Stockholm: Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University , 2014, p. 47-52Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated the timing of backchannel onsets within speaker’s own and dialogue partner’s breathing cycle in two spontaneous conversations in Estonian. Results indicate that backchannels are mainly produced near the beginning, but also in the second half of the speaker’s exhalation phase. A similar tendency was observed in short non-backchannel utterances, indicating that timing of backchannels might be determined by their duration rather than their pragmatic function. By contrast, longer non-backchannel utterances were initiated almost exclusively right at the beginning of the exhalation. As expected, backchannels in the conversation partner’s breathing cycle occurred predominantly towards the end of the exhalation or at the beginning of the inhalation. 

  • 5.
    Aare, Kätlin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Włodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Inhalation amplitude and turn-taking in spontaneous Estonian conversations2015In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2015 Lund, June 8-10, 2015 / [ed] Malin Svensson Lundmark, Gilbert Ambrazaitis, Joost van de Weijer, Lund: Lund University , 2015, p. 1-5Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the relationship between inhalation amplitude and turn management in four approximately 20 minute long spontaneous multiparty conversations in Estonian. The main focus of interest is whether inhalation amplitude is greater before turn onset than in the following inhalations within the same speaking turn. The results show that inhalations directly before turn onset are greater in amplitude than those later in the turn. The difference seems to be realized by ending the inhalation at a greater lung volume value, whereas the initial lung volume before inhalation onset remains roughly the same across a single turn. The findings suggest that the increased inhalation amplitude could function as a cue for claiming the conversational floor.

  • 6.
    Aarni, Teddy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities.
    The Kalunga concept in Ovambo religion from 1870 onwards1982Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Abarca, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Japanese Studies.
    Förebyggandet av självmord: En komparativ studie mellan Sverige och Japan2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 8.
    Abdelmoez, Joel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Middle Eastern Studies.
    Muscles, Moustaches and Machismo: Narratives of Masculinity by Egyptian English-Language Media Professionals and Media Audiences2018In: Masculinities: a journal of identity and culture, no 10, p. 168-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study utilizes ethnographic methods to inquire how ideas of masculinities are perceived by English-language media professionals and media audiences in Egypt. Using semi-structured interviews and a survey, the aim is to find common narratives on how masculinity is perceived on personal levels and what terms are used to describe men and masculinities, which in turn can be used as the basis for further analysisof Egyptian media content. The word “narrative” in itself is used toconvey personal experience, and the telling of those experiences, rather than generalizable data applicable to the larger population. Found are several common themes, such as emphasized heterosexuality, and the expectation of men as providers and protectors, which is related, by the respondents, to the nation and the military. Protection and militarism relates to ideas of strength, honor, and courage. Men are almostexclusively seen as possessors of power. The ‘head of the household,’ andthe head of state, both portrayed as iconized leaders, emerge as the quintessence of Egyptian masculine identity, whether that identity is contested or not.

  • 9.
    Abdelmoez Wiklund, Joel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Middle Eastern Studies.
    Women’s status in Islamic texts and feminist interventions2017In: Orientaliska Studier, ISSN 0345-8997, no 152, p. 5-14Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Abdollahian Barough, Somaje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Book review: Reflections on Persian Grammar Developments in Persian Linguistic Scholarship I2017Other (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Abdollahian, Somaje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Perspectivation in narratives in Persian L2 English2011In: EUROSLA 21, 21st Annual Conference of the European Second Language Association, Stockholm University, 8-10 September 2011: Book of Abstracts, 2011, p. 216-216Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Abdulla, Trifa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    De som avvek och en som gick in2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I mitt reportage De som avvek och en som gick in berättar krigsvägraren William Males, desertören Steve David Kinnaman och veteranen Bill Ray i porträttform om hur de på olika sätt undkom kriget som rasade i Vietnam mellan åren 1955-1975.

    En vägrade i initialt skede att delta i kriget. En var halvvägs till Vietnam innan han avvek. Den tredje upplevde krigets fasor och överlevde. Gemensamt för dem alla är att Sverige blev deras andra hem från 1960-talet och framåt, en fristad undan kriget och hemlandet USAs politiska förföljelser.

    Utifrån ett dussin intervjuer, arkivmaterial, facklitteratur, gamla tidningsdokument, fotografier, ljudsnuttar, filmer och digitala källor har jag skrivit reportaget i tre självständiga porträtt. Tillsammans med nytagna porträttbilder av intervjupersonerna och privata fotografier från deras ungdomstid, flyktväg, krigsminnen och familjer har jag försökt skapa en så levande bild av deras liv som möjligt.

  • 13.
    Abed, Sarah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Teachers’ perceptions of peer review on written assignment in English: A qualitative study of six teachers at two junior high schools in Stockholm2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Peer review is aan interestingwell-researched  topic, with much research focusing on the students’' own perceptions of peer review/assessment as well as benefits and challenges with the method. However, little research has been conducted on teachers’ perceptions of students’ peer review of written assignments in English, with a general focus on junior high school level in a Swedish school. Thus, this study was aimed at examining six English teachers’´ perceptions and their usage of peer review of written assignments in English at two junior high schools in Stockholm. A qualitative method was applied, with semi-structured interviews which were analysed using content analysis. The findings revealed that the teachers used different strategies during peer review depending on students’ knowledge level, social competence and the challenges and opportunities that the method offered. Despite a lack of knowledge about the English language and other variables such as different personalities and lack of self-confidence causing difficulties for students to implement peer review as intended, teachers still had positive attitudes towards peer review on written assignments in English. In order to enhance the implementation of peer review, both teachers and students need to become familiar with the practical implementation of the method. Future classroom research within the Swedish education system will help engender favourable conditions that move learning forward.

     

  • 14.
    Abrahamsson, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Enahanda läsning: En queer tolkning av romancegenren2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This doctoral thesis investigates popular romance, a mass-cultural genre with a large female audience. Popular romance is often considered ”lowbrow” and is referred to by terms such as ”porn” and ”garbage”. The female reader of this so called “sentimental trash” is often portrayed as naïve and unworldly. The thesis makes this derogatory view of the genre its point of departure, to investigate what cultural understandings of gender and sexuality the critique against popular romance entails. The thesis further investigates how these conceptions of gender and sexuality deviate from and challenge a culturally promoted and normative sexuality.

    The thesis consists of six chapters. The first chapter describes the selection of the empirical material and the theoretical and methodological framework. The empirical material consists of the three novels in the popular series Fifty Shades of Grey and the four novels and five films in the popular series Twilight. The thesis places itself within the field of feminist cultural studies and queer theory. It makes use of the concept of masturbation (both literal and figurative) as an analytical entry point and as a method focusing on the “here and now” of romance reading.

    The second chapter contextualizes the study by defining the term “popular romance” and by providing a brief historical overview of the genre. Previous research on popular romance is presented and discussed in relation to the derogatory view of the genre.

    The third chapter studies the Swedish media commentaries on Fifty Shades of Grey and Twilight to define how the rejected romance reader is conceptualized, and how this romance reader is presumed to be reading. This “romance reader” is thereafter discussed in relation to the Western historical discourse on masturbation, “female illness” and (women’s) private reading. The chapter closes with a discussion on the form of reading that the romance reader is associated with. This self-immersed, excessive and over-invested reading form is defined as “masturbatory”.

    The fourth chapter explores the act of romance reading when defined as a sexual activity. The romance community is compared to the “second wave” feminism of the 1970s in order to demonstrate how the genre establishes a separatist female community where relations, positions, and identifications are in motion, revealing both homoerotic and autoerotic elements to this homosocial context.

    In the fifth chapter, a close reading of the material is performed with a focus on the “here and now” of the reading situation. The dichotomy of desiring subject and desired object is problematized in relation to looks and gaze. The thesis argues that the romance text uses detailed and intimate descriptions to instill a sexual charge and to freeze the flow of the storyline in order to make room for constant erotic contemplation. These “frozen moments” and the repetitiveness of the genre are discussed in relation to theories of queer temporality. The romance text constructs a room “outside of time” that privileges the overwhelming pleasures of the “here and now”. This liminal room is not only available for the heroine and hero of the story, but for the romance reader as well.

    The sixth and final chapter ties together the main arguments of the thesis in an overarching discussion on how conceiving romance reading as a form of masturbation challenges previous research on popular romance and the gendering of and contempt for mass culture.

  • 15.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Acquiring L2 Syllable Margins: Studies on the simplification of onsets and codas in interlanguage phonology2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals with developmental, universal, grammatical, and functional factors involved in the acquisition of L2 syllable structure. More specifically, using speech data from Spanish and Chinese learners of Swedish, the thesis examines the production and development of syllable onsets and codas—that is, syllable margins. In doing so, the present work draws on various theoretical considerations and empirical findings from research on L1 and L2 acquisition, phonology and phonetics, language variation and language typology. The thesis includes three empirical studies, all of which are based on longitudinal conver­sational data. Study I deals with the acquisition of word-initial /sC(C)/ onsets by one native Spanish speaker, whereas Study II and Study III focus on the acquisi­tion of word-final codas by three native Chinese speakers. Study I and Study II both showed that onset and coda length and phonetic environment are influen­tial factors in the production of syllable structure, while sonority may not be as reliable a predictor of production difficulty. Next, both Study I and Study III provide evidence of a U-shaped rather than linear development of pronunciation accuracy. This pattern is interpreted as an effect of initial increase in fluency, with more focus on content and less on form. In addition, Study III showed that L2 proficiency is related to the epenthesis-deletion differential. An increasing ratio of epenthesis-to-deletion is the first-order indicator of increasing L2 profi­ciency during early stages of acquisition, but increased target-like production becomes the first-order indicator of development at later stages. Finally, Study III showed that learners are aware of potential ambiguity resulting from simpli­fication in different grammatical/functional categories. Codas that are essential for the retention of semantic information are preserved through higher accuracy rates and higher relative levels of epenthesis errors.

  • 16.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Age of onset and nativelike L2 ultimate attainment of morphosyntactic and phonetic intuition2012In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, ISSN 0272-2631, E-ISSN 1470-1545, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 187-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has consistently shown there is a negative correlation between age of onset (AO) of acquisition and ultimate attainment (UA) of either pronunciation or grammar in a second language (L2). A few studies have indeed reported nativelike behavior in some postpuberty learners with respect to either phonetics/phonology or morphosyntax, a result that has sometimes been taken as evidence against the critical period hypothesis (CPH). However, in the few studies that have employed a wide range of linguistic tests and tasks, adult learners have not exhibited nativelike L2 proficiency across the board of measures, which, according to some, suggests that the hypothesis still holds. The present study investigated the relationship between AO and UA and the incidence of nativelikeness when measures of phonetic and grammatical intuition are combined. An additional aim was to investigate whether children and adults develop the L2 through fundamentally different brain mechanisms-namely, whether children acquire the language (more) implicitly as an interdependent whole, whereas adults learn it (more) explicitly as independent parts of a whole.

  • 17.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Andraspråksinlärning2009Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Denna grundbok belyser fenomenet, ämnet och forskningsfältet andraspråksinlärning. Med utgångspunkt i 1960-talets brytning med behavioristisk inlärningspsykologi och kontrastiv språkanalys diskuteras de mest centrala frågeställningarna inom den därefter följande moderna, mentalistiskt orienterade andraspråksforskningen.

    I bokens tio kapitel presenteras de huvudsakliga empiriska upptäckterna och teorierna om andraspråkets utveckling och variation, dess kognition, processning och universella egenskaper, liksom inflödets, interaktionens och undervisningens roll, effekter av sociala och individuella skillnader samt modersmålets inverkan. Många exempel ges från studier av svenska som andraspråk. Boken avslutas med en termordlista med förklaringar till centrala begrepp inom fältet.

    Boken vänder sig främst till universitetsstuderande på grundnivå i ämnen som tvåspråkighet, svenska och nordiska språk samt till blivande och verksamma lärare i svenska som andraspråk och modersmålssvenska.

  • 18.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    But first, let's think again!2018In: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, ISSN 1366-7289, E-ISSN 1469-1841Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Critical Period Hypothesis (CPH)2013In: Routledge Encyclopedia of Second Language Acquisition / [ed] Peter Robinson, London: Routledge, 2013, p. 146-151Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Development and recoverability of L2 codas: A longitudinal study of Chinese/Swedish interphonology2003In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, ISSN 0272-2631, E-ISSN 1470-1545, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 313-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study deals with the development and recoverability of word-final codas in Chinese-Swedish interlanguage. The relation between consonant deletion and vowel epenthesis is investigated from both a developmental perspective and a grammatical-functional one. Longitudinal, conversational data from three Chinese beginner learners of Swedish were analyzed. First, it is shown that for these learners the acquisition of Swedish codas was U-shaped rather than linear such that they exhibited relatively high accuracy rates at early stages, lower accuracy rates at later stages, and again high accuracy rates at more advanced stages. It is also demonstrated that the epenthesis-deletion differential is closely related to second language proficiency in that the proportion of epenthesis to deletion errors increases over time. Furthermore, the data show that word-final codas that are relatively important for the retention of semantically relevant information generate lower overall frequencies of simplification and greater epenthesis-deletion proportions than codas containing information that is relatively recoverable from other segments or features in the context.

  • 21.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Development and recoverability of L2 codas: A longitudinal study of Chinese/Swedish interphonology.2001Report (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Developmental sequences2013In: Routledge Encyclopedia of Second Language Acquisition / [ed] Peter Robinson, London: Routledge, 2013, p. 173-177Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Fonologiska aspekter på andraspråksinlärning och svenska som andraspråk2013In: Svenska som andraspråk: i forskning, undervisning och samhälle / [ed] Hyltenstam, Kenneth & Lindberg, Inger, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 2. uppl., p. 85-120Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Fonologiska aspekter på andraspråksinlärning och svenska som andraspråk2004In: Svenska som andraspråk: i forskning, undervisning och samhälle / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Inger Lindberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2004, p. 79-116Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Natural phonology and second language acquisi­tion: problems and consequences1996In: Toegepaste taalwetenschap in artikelen, ISSN 0169-7420, E-ISSN 2213-4883, no 55, p. 9-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Phonological acquisition2012In: The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics / [ed] C. A. Chapelle, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Review of David Birdsong (ed.): Second Language Acquisition and the Critical Period Hypothesis. Lawrence Erlbaum, 1999.1999In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 571-575Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Some observations of child-adult differences in second language pronunciation.1994In: Scandinavian Working Papers on Bilingualism, Vol. 9, p. 1-15Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Universal constraints on L2 coda production: The case of Chinese/Swedish interphonology2003In: La fonologia dell’interlingua. Principi e metodi di analisi / [ed] Lidia Costamagna, Stefania Giannini, Milano: FrancoAngeli , 2003, p. 131-162Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    U-shaped learning and overgeneralization2013In: Routledge Encyclopedia of Second Language Acquisition / [ed] Peter Robinson, London: Routledge, 2013, p. 663-665Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Vowel ‘epenthesis’ in the L2 production of L1 Spanish speakers: puzzle or evidence for natural phonology?1997In: New Sounds 97.: Proceedings of the Third Symposium on the Acquisition of Second-Language Speech (University of Klagenfurt, 8-11 September 1997). / [ed] J. Leather & A. James, Klagenfurt: University of Klagenfurt , 1997Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Vowel epenthesis of /sC(C)/ onsets in Spanish/Swedish inter­phonology: A longitudinal case study1999In: Language learning, ISSN 0023-8333, E-ISSN 1467-9922, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 473-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies showed that vowel epenthesis of initial /sC(C)/ clusters in the L2 production of L1 Spanish speakers is conditioned by several variable constraints, such as preceding environment, onset length, and sonority relations among onset members. This case study was designed to investigate whether the patterns obtained from elicited speech also hold for conversational data. A longitudinal corpus of spontaneous/natural speech from 1 adult L1 Spanish learner of L2 Swedish was used. The study confirmed most of the results from previous research, for example, that the frequency of epenthesis varies with preceding phonetic environment. However, the study suggested that a lowering effect of preceding vowels must be present, not just the enhancing effect of preceding consonants suggested by Carlisle (1997).

  • 33.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Bardel, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Bartning, Inge
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Erman, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. English department, Stockholm.
    Fant, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Forsberg Lundell, Fanny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Föremålet för inlärning [kap. 3]2014In: avancerad andraspråksanvändning: slutrapport från ett forskningsprogram / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Inge Bartning, Lars Fant, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag , 2014, no 2, p. 20-46, article id M2005-0459Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Andraspråksinlärning och förstaspråksutveckling i en andraspråkskontext2012In: Flerspråkighet – en forskningsöversikt / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Monica Axelsson, Inger Lindberg, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2012, p. 153-246Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Age of onset and nativelikeness in a second language: listener perception versus linguistic scrutiny2009In: Language learning, ISSN 0023-8333, E-ISSN 1467-9922, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 249-306Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Barndomen - en kritisk period för språkutveckling?2010In: Barn utvecklar sitt språk: (2:a reviderade upplagan) / [ed] Louise Bjar och Caroline Liberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2010, 2, p. 29-56Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Barndomen – en kritisk period för språkutveck­ling?2003In: Barn utvecklar sitt språk / [ed] Louise Bjar, Caroline Liberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2003, 1. uppl., p. 29-56Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hyltenstam, KennethStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    High-Level L2 Acquisition, Learning, and Use: Special Issue2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Inlärningsålder och uppfattad inföddhet i andraspråket – lyssnarexperiment med avancerade L2-talare av svenska2006In: Nordand: nordisk tidsskrift for andrespråksforskning, ISSN 0809-9227, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 9-36Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Mognadsbegränsningar och den kritiska perioden för andraspråksinlärning2013In: Svenska som andraspråk: i forskning, undervisning och samhälle / [ed] Hyltenstam, Kenneth & Lindberg, Inger, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 2. uppl., p. 221-257Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Mognadsbegränsningar och den kritiska perioden för andraspråks­inlärning2004In: Svenska som andraspråk: i forskning, undervisning och samhälle / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Inger Lindberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2004, p. 221-258Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    The robustness of aptitude effects in near-native second language acquisition2008In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, ISSN 0272-2631, E-ISSN 1470-1545, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 481-509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Results from a number of recent studies suggest that nativelike adult second language (L2) learners possess a high degree of language learning aptitude, the positive effects of which may have compensated for the negative effects of a critical period in these learners. According to the same studies, child learners seem to attain a nativelike command of the L2 regardless of high or low aptitude, which has led researchers to conclude that this factor plays no role in early acquisition. The present study investigates the L2 proficiency and language aptitude of 42 near-native L2 speakers of Swedish (i.e., individuals whom actual mother-tongue speakers of Swedish believe are native speakers). The results confirm previous research suggesting that a high degree of language aptitude is required if adult learners are to reach a L2 proficiency that is indistinguishable from that of native speakers. However, in contrast to previous studies, the present results also identify small yet significant aptitude effects in child SLA. Our findings lead us to the conclusions that the rare nativelike adult learners sometimes observed would all turn out to be exceptionally talented language learners with an unusual ability to compensate for maturational effects and, consequently, that their nativelikeness per se does not constitute a reason to reject the critical period hypothesis.

  • 43.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Age effects on language acquisition, retention and loss. Key hypotheses and findings2018In: High-Level Language Proficiency in Second Language and Multilingual Contexts / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Inge Bartning, Lars Fant, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 16-49Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Abrigo, Paul Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Kommunikationspolicyn: En studie av svenska offentliga organisationers kommunikationspolicys med utgångspunkt i samtida forskningsperspektiv2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I akademisk litteratur om public relations och strategisk kommunikation talas det om ett paradigmskifte. Istället för att se kommunikation som information som skickas från en aktiv sändare till en passiv mottagare, börjar man se kommunikation som något som skapas i en dialog mellan två aktiva aktörer. Man rör sig från en strategisk syn på publiken som en påverkbar målgrupp till en dialogisk syn på publiken som aktiva deltagare. Har detta paradigmskifte även ägt rum i praktiken? Hur ser man på kommunikation inom svenska offentliga organisationer idag? Finns det några likheter och skillnader i synsätt, och vad kan dessa tänkas bero på? Materialet utgörs av elva svenska offentliga organisationers kommunikationspolicys. Teorin utgörs av två svenska forskningsantologier om public relations respektive strategisk kommunikation, samt ett urval kritiskt problematiserande artiklar i ämnet. Efter en genomgång av den teoretiska litteraturen har de samtida forskningsperspektiven sammanfattats. Utifrån dessa har en idéanalysmall, en typologi, konstruerats med utgångspunkt i två idealtyper. Det förekom tydliga samband mellan de olika synsätten och hart när alla organisationer gick att placera i endera av de två idealtyperna. Samtliga forskningsperspektiv utom ett gick att hitta i materialet. Skillnaderna i synsätt gick att koppla till de olika organisationernas uppdrag och utformning. Organisationer med nya synsätt är överlag sådana som har tydliga behov av att effektivt kommunicera med omvärlden, medan de övriga organisationerna huvudsakligen har en informationsspridande funktion.

  • 45.
    Acerbi, Alberto
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Bentley, R. Alexander
    Biases in cultural transmission shape the turnover of popular traits2014In: Evolution and human behavior, ISSN 1090-5138, E-ISSN 1879-0607, Vol. 35, p. 228-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The neutral model of cultural evolution, which assumes that copying is unbiased, provides precise predictions regarding frequency distributions of traits and the turnover within a popularity-ranked list. Here we study turnover in ranked lists and identify where the turnover departs from neutral model predictions to detect transmission biases in three different domains: color terms usage in English language 20th century books, popularity of early (1880–1930) and recent (1960–2010) USA baby names, and musical preferences of users of the Web site Last.fm. To help characterize the type of transmission bias, we modify the neutral model to include a content-based bias and two context-based biases (conformity and anti-conformity). How these modified models match real data helps us to infer, from population scale observations, when cultural transmission is biased, and, to some extent, what kind of biases are operating at individual level.

  • 46.
    Acerbi, Alberto
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Bologna.
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Department of Ethology.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Cultural evolution and individual development of openness and conservatism2009In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 106, no 45, p. 18931-18935Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a model of cultural evolution in which an individual's propensity to engage in social learning is affected by social learning itself. We assume that individuals observe cultural traits displayed by others and decide whether to copy them based on their overall preference for the displayed traits. Preferences, too, can be transmitted between individuals. Our results show that such cultural dynamics tends to produce conservative individuals, i.e., individuals who are reluctant to copy new traits. Openness to new information, however, can be maintained when individuals need significant time to acquire the cultural traits that make them effective cultural models. We show that a gradual enculturation of young individuals by many models and a larger cultural repertoire to be acquired are favorable circumstances for the long-term maintenance of openness in individuals and groups. Our results agree with data about lifetime personality change, showing that openness to new information decreases with age. Our results show that cultural remodeling of cultural transmission is a powerful force in cultural evolution, i.e., that cultural evolution can change its own dynamics

  • 47.
    Acerbi, Alberto
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. City University of New York, USA.
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Old and Young Individuals' Role in Cultural Change2012In: JASSS: Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, ISSN 1460-7425, E-ISSN 1460-7425, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 1-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore the impact of age on cultural change through simulations of cultural evolution. Our simulations show that common observations about the relationship between old and young naturally emerge from repeated cultural learning. In particular, young individuals are more open to learn than older individuals, they are less effective as cultural models, and they possess less cultural traits. We also show that, being more open to learning, young individuals are an important source of cultural change. Cultural change, however, is faster in populations with both young and old. A relatively large share of older individuals, in fact, allows a population to retain more culture, and a large culture can change in more directions than a small culture. For the same reason, considering age-biased cultural transmission in an overlapping generations model, cultural evolution is slower when individuals interact preferentially with models of similar age than when they mainly interact with older models.

  • 48.
    Acerbi, Alberto
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Brooklyn College, USA.
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Regulatory traits: Cultural influences on cultural evolution2014In: Evolution, Complexity and Artificial Life / [ed] Stefano Cagnoni, Marco Mirolli, Marco Villani, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2014, p. 135-147Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use the term regulatory traits to indicate traits that both regulate cultural transmission (e.g., from whom to learn) and are themselves culturally transmitted. In the first part of this contribution we study the dynamics of some of these traits through simple mathematical models. In particular, we consider the cultural evolution of traits that determine the propensity to copy others, the ability to influence others, the number of individuals from whom one may copy, and the number of individuals one tries to influence. We then show how to extend these simple models to address more complex human cultural phenomena, such as ingroup biases, the emergence of open or conservative societies, and of cyclical, fashion-like, increases and decreases of popularity of cultural traits. We finally discuss how the ubiquity of regulatory traits in cultural evolution impacts on the analogy between genetic and cultural evolution and therefore on the possibility of using models inspired by evolutionary biology to study human cultural dynamics.

  • 49.
    Acerbi, Alberto
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Ethology.
    Regulatory Traits in Cultural Evolution2012In: Proceedings of WiVACE 2012, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We call \regulatory traits" those cultural traits that aretransmitted through cultural interactions and, at the same time, changeindividual behaviors directly inuencing the outcome of future culturalinteractions. The cultural dynamics of some of those traits are studiedthrough simple simulations. In particular, we consider the cultural evolu-tion of traits determining the propensity to copy, the number of potentialdemonstrators from whom one individual may copy, and conformist ver-sus anti{conformist attitudes. Our results show that regulatory traitsgenerate peculiar dynamics that may explain complex human culturalphenomena. We discuss how the existence and importance of regulatorytraits in cultural evolution impact on the analogy between genetic andcultural evolution and therefore on the possibility of using evolutionarybiology{inspired models to study human cultural dynamics.

  • 50.
    Acerbi, Alberto
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    The logic of fashion cycles2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 3, p. e32541-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many cultural traits exhibit volatile dynamics, commonly dubbed fashions or fads. Here we show that realistic fashion-like dynamics emerge spontaneously if individuals can copy others' preferences for cultural traits as well as traits themselves. We demonstrate this dynamics in simple mathematical models of the diffusion, and subsequent abandonment, of a single cultural trait which individuals may or may not prefer. We then simulate the coevolution between many cultural traits and the associated preferences, reproducing power-law frequency distributions of cultural traits (most traits are adopted by few individuals for a short time, and very few by many for a long time), as well as correlations between the rate of increase and the rate of decrease of traits (traits that increase rapidly in popularity are also abandoned quickly and vice versa). We also establish that alternative theories, that fashions result from individuals signaling their social status, or from individuals randomly copying each other, do not satisfactorily reproduce these empirical observations.

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