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  • 1.
    Aasa, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hovbäck, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Det preoperativa informationssamtalets betydelse för patientens delaktighet i sin vård inom kolorektalkirurgi2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: ERAS (Enhanced Recovery After Surgery) är ett standardiserat multimodalt vårdprogram vid elektiv kolorektalkirurgi, som syftar till snabbare återhämtning och kortare vårdtider genom ett tvärprofessionellt samarbete.  En vecka innan planerad operation träffar sjuksköterskan patienten för ett samtal om vårdförloppet.

     

    Syfte: Att identifiera och beskriva patientens upplevelse av sjuksköterskans ERAS- samtal och dess betydelse för patientens delaktighet i sin vård. 

     

    Metod: Datainsamlingen skedde genom kvalitativa intervjuer. Tolv patienter, nio män och tre kvinnor har intervjuats. De ljudinspelade samtalen har transkriberats ordagrant och analyserats med hjälp av tolkande fenomenologisk analys (Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis).

     

    Resultat: Analysarbetet resulterade i fem olika teman; bli sedd, trygghet, tillit, ansvar samt delaktighet. Alla teman relaterar till varandra och illustrerar en positiv och en negativ sida av den upplevda erfarenheten. Tillsammans bildar en helhet av upplevelsen; ERAS- samtalet och dess betydelse för patientens delaktighet.

     

    Konklusion: Resultatet visar att patienterna känner sig sedda under informationssamtalet. Det är viktigt att bekräfta patienten och knyta an mer till informationssamtalet under vårdtiden för att patienterna ska vara delaktiga och ta eget ansvar. Tilliten till vårdpersonalen har betydelse för att patienterna ska känna trygghet. Studien visar att ERAS- samtalet upplevs strukturerat och individuellt men informationen måste följa patienterna under hela vårdtillfället.

  • 2.
    Aasa, Agneta
    et al.
    Kirurgmottagningen, Ryhovs Länssjukhus, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hovbäck, Malin
    Kirurgmottagningen, Ryhovs Länssjukhus, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The importance of preoperative information for patient participation in colorectal surgery care2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 11-12, p. 1604-1612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To identify and describe patients' experiences of a preoperative information session with a nurse, as part of the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) concept, and its impact on patient participation in their own care.

    Background

    Enhanced recovery after surgery is a standardised, multimodal treatment programme for elective colorectal surgery, leading to faster recovery and shorter hospital stays via interprofessional collaboration. The ERAS concept is initiated for patients a week before surgery when the patient receives detailed information about the care process during a meeting with a nurse.

    Design

    The study is a qualitative interpretive study based on interviews.

    Methods

    Twelve patients, nine men and three women, were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA).

    Results

    The analysis identified and formulated five themes: being seen, security, trust, responsibility and participation. All themes are closely related and illustrate positive and negative sides of the patient's experience. They hang together and form a complete set of experiences: ERAS conversation and its impact on patients' participation.

    Conclusions

    The results show that patients feel confirmed in the ERAS conversation. Healthcare professionals need to be bonding more information call during hospitalisation. It is important to confirm the patient in order for them to participate and take responsibility. Reliance on caregivers is important for patients to feel safe and to participate in their own care. This study shows that the ERAS conversation was experienced as being structured and individually tailored, but the information must apply to the patients throughout the period of care.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    Some shortcomings have been revealed, which should enable improvement in the care of patients. Healthcare professionals need to raise awareness of patients' responsibilities for participation in their own recovery and care. Healthcare professionals and patients need to be aware of each other's responsibilities.

  • 3.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effect of a structured follow-up visit to a midwife on women with early miscarriage: A randomized study2006In: Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 330-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Women's grief after miscarriage is substantial and important. Women who experience early miscarriage do not constitute a homogenous group. The aim of this study is to measure whether a structured follow-up visit to a midwife (group 1) at 21-28 days after early miscarriage could reduce the women's grief, measured using the perinatal grief scale Swedish short version (PGS) after a further 3 months (i.e. 4 months after the miscarriage), compared to a regular follow-up visit to a midwife (group 2). Methods. We performed an open randomized study of women who experienced early miscarriage (n = 88). The midwife's attitude in group 1 came from Swanson science theory of midwifery. In group 2, the women were offered only the ordinary type of consultation at a regular visit. A questionnaire with the PGS was used in both groups. Four months after the miscarriage, a second questionnaire with the same perinatal grief scale was sent by post. Results. There was a 30% greater reduction in grief in group 1 than that in group 2, when comparing the first and second measurements (not significant). The biggest differences were in the subscales active grief and difficulty in coping. Women with the subdiagnosis missed abortions had, as a group, significantly higher PGS scores at both visits, especially in active grief and difficulty in coping, regardless of the type of follow-up visit. Conclusions. A structured follow-up visit did not, in comparison with a regular follow-up visit, imply any significant reduction in grief as measured using the PGS scale. However, the subgroup missed abortion had more extensive grief than the other women with miscarriage. Structured follow-up visits are not imperative for all women with early miscarriage.

  • 4.
    Adolfsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Guilt and emptiness: Women’s experiences of miscarriage2004In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 543-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women who lose an early pregnancy are shocked when they are first given the information that they have miscarried. Later they feel guilt and emptiness. Heideggerian interpretive phenomenology has been used with 13 women from southwest Sweden to uncover their lived experience of miscarriage. Women plan their future with a child during early pregnancy. When miscarriage occurs it is not a gore, an embryo, or a fetus they lose, it is their child. They feel that they are the cause of the miscarriage through something they have done, eaten, or thought. They feel abandonment and they grieve for their profound loss; they are actually in bereavement.

  • 5.
    Ahl Jonsson, Christina
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Stenberg, Annette
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    The lived experience of the early postoperative period after colorectal cancer surgery2011In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 248-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancer diagnoses and undergoing colorectal cancer surgery is reported to be associated with physical symptoms and psychological reactions. Social support is described as important during the postoperative period. The purpose of this paper was to describe how patients experience the early postoperative period after colorectal cancer surgery.

    Interviews according a phenomenological approach were performed with 13 adult participants, within 1 week after discharge from hospital. Data were collected from August 2006 to February 2007. Analysis of the interview transcripts was conducted according to Giorgi.

    The essence of the phenomenon was to regain control over ones body in the early postoperative period after colorectal cancer surgery. Lack of control, fear of wound and anastomosis rupture, insecurity according to complications was prominent findings.

    When caring for these patients it is a challenge to be sensitive, encourage and promote patients to express their feelings and needs. One possibility to empower the patients and give support could be a follow up phone call within a week after discharge.

  • 6.
    Ahldén, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Lars Owe
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Parents' Expectations About Participating in Antenatal Parenthood Education Classes2012In: The Journal of Perinatal Education, ISSN 1058-1243, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 11-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our objective was to assess parents' expectations about participating in antenatal parenthood education classes and to determine whether their expectations might be related to gender, age, and educational level. Data from 1,117 women and 1,019 partners residing in three cities in Sweden were collected with a questionnaire in a cross-sectional study. Participants believed that antenatal education classes would help them to feel more secure as parents and to be better oriented toward childbirth. Men had more positive expectations about the childbirth than the women. The participants mostly wanted help in preparing for parenthood and in learning infant care skills, followed by help in preparing for childbirth. The participants' expectations were affected by gender, age, and educational level. The expectant parents appeared to want more focus on preparation for parenthood than on childbirth.

  • 7.
    Ahldén, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Göransson, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Parenthood education in Swedish antenatal care: perceptions of midwives and obstetricians in charge.2008In: The Journal of perinatal education : an ASPO/Lamaze publication, ISSN 1058-1243, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 21-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe perceptions of parenthood education among midwives and obstetricians in charge of antenatal care in Sweden. Focus group interviews of 25 obstetricians and midwives were conducted. Data were analyzed with a phenomenographic approach. Five main categories emerged: aim of the parenthood education, content and expectations, implementation, support to group leaders, and strategies for the future. There is a strong belief in parenthood education, and the overall aim was considered to be support in the transition to parenthood. Contents should focus on awareness of the expected child, confidence in the biological processes, and the changes of roles. Pedagogies training, cost effectiveness, development, and the need to reach target groups were emphasized.

  • 8. Ahlgren Andersson, E
    et al.
    Almerud Österberg, S
    Elneborg, K
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Johansson, E
    Minthon, L
    Pettersson, M
    Thulesius, H
    Wohlin, S
    Åberg, B
    Östberg, H
    Låg kognitiv hastighet före operation hade samband med postoperativ förvirring efter elektiv hjärtkirurgi2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Alehagen, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Hermansson, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Somasunduram, Konduri
    Centre for Social Medicine, Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences-Deemed University, Loni, Maharashtra, India.
    Bangal, Vidyadhar
    Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences-Deemed University, Loni, Maharashtra, India.
    Patil, Ashok
    Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences-Deemed University, Loni, Maharashtra, India.
    Chandekar, Pratibha
    Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences-Deemed University, Loni, Maharashtra, India.
    Johansson, AnnaKarin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nurse-based antenatal and child health care in rural India, implementation and effects - an Indian-Swedish collaboration2012In: Rural and remote health, ISSN 1445-6354, Vol. 12, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION:

    Improving maternal and child health care are two of the Millennium Development Goals of the World Health Organization. India is one of the countries worldwide most burdened by maternal and child deaths. The aim of the study was to describe how families participate in nurse-based antenatal and child health care, and the effect of this in relation to referrals to specialist care, institutional deliveries and mortality.

    METHODS:

    The intervention took place in a remote rural area in India and was influenced by Swedish nurse-based health care. A baseline survey was performed before the intervention commenced. The intervention included education program for staff members with a model called Training of Trainers and the establishment of clinics as both primary health centers and mobile clinics. Health records and manuals, and informational and educational materials were produced and the clinics were equipped with easily handled instruments. The study period was between 2006 and 2009. Data were collected from antenatal care and child healthcare records. The Chi-square test was used to analyze mortality differences between years. A focus group discussion and a content analysis were performed.

    RESULTS:

    Families' participation increased which led to more check-ups of pregnant women and small children. Antenatal visits before 16 weeks among pregnant women increased from 32 to 62% during the period. Women having at least three check-ups during pregnancy increased from 30 to 60%. Maternal mortality decreased from 478 to 121 per 100 000 live births. The total numbers of children examined in the project increased from approximately 6000 to 18 500 children. Infant mortality decreased from 80 to 43 per 1000 live births. Women and children referred to specialist care increased considerably and institutional deliveries increased from 47 to 74%.

    CONCLUSION:

    These results suggest that it is possible in a rural and remote area to influence peoples' awareness of the value of preventive health care. The results also indicate that this might decrease maternal and child mortality. The education led to a more patient-friendly encounter between health professionals and patients.

  • 10.
    Alehagen, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hägg, Monica
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalén-Enterlöv, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, AnnaKarin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Experiences of community health nurses regarding father participation in child health care2011In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 153-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally child health care (CHC) has been an arena where mothers and nurses meet, but in recent years fathers are entering CHC with increasing frequency. The aim of this study was to describe nurses’ experiences of fathers’ participation in CHC. Nine Swedish nurses working in CHC were interviewed and asked to give a description of their experiences from meetings with fathers in CHC. Phenomenology according to Giorgi was used for the analysis and the essence of the findings was that father participation was seen from the perspective of mother participation and was constantly compared to mother participation in CHC. The essence is explicated in the following themes: participation through activities; equal participation although diverse; influence of structures in society; and strengthening participation. Clinical implications include the need for creating a separate identity in CHC for fathers and more communication directed at fathers.

  • 11.
    Alehagen, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wambui, Theresah
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Perceptions of family planning among low-income men in Western Kenya: Original Article2009In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 340-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Men have rarely been involved in either receiving or providing information on sexuality, reproductive health or birth spacing. They have also been ignored or excluded in one way or the other from participating in many family planning programmes as family planning is viewed as a womans affair.

    Aim: To describe the perceptions of family planning among low-income men in Western Kenya. Methods: A qualitative study using focus group interviews and content analysis was conducted, with 64 men aged 15-54 years participating actively.

    Findings: Perceptions of family planning were manifold. For example, some perceived it as meaning having the number of children one is able to provide for. Most men knew about traditional and modern methods of birth control, although their knowledge was poor and misconceived. Modern methods were thought to give side effects, discouraging family planning. Low instances of family planning were also because of the fact that culturally, children are considered wealth. A law advocating family size limitation was regarded as necessary for the future.

    Conclusion: Mens perceptions of family planning are manifold. Their knowledge about contraception is poor and sometimes misconceived. Preferences regarding a childs gender are strong, thus attitudes and cultural beliefs that might hinder family planning have to be considered. A policy on male contraception and contraceptive services is seen as necessary.

  • 12.
    Alkaissi, Aidah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Stålnert, Monica
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalman, Sigga
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Effect and placebo effect of acupressure (P6) on nausea and vomiting after outpatientgynaecological surgery1999In: Acta anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 270-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Acupuncture and acupressure have previously been reported to possess antiemetic effect. We wanted to investigate the "true" and placebo effect of acupressure in prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty women undergoing outpatient minor gynaecological surgery were entered into a double-blind and randomised study. One group received acupressure with bilateral stimulation of P6 (A), a second group received bilateral placebo stimulation (P) and a third group received no acupressure wrist band and served as a reference group (R). PONV was evaluated as number of patients with complete response (no PONV), nausea only or vomiting. In addition, the need for rescue antiemetic medication and nausea after 24 h was registered. RESULTS: Complete response was obtained in 11, 11 and 9 patients in groups, A, P and R, respectively. Nine, 7 and 6 patients had nausea before discharge home, and 1, 1 and 8 patients were nauseated (8 vs 1 patient: P < 0.05) 24 h after operation in A, P and R groups, respectively. When compared to placebo acupressure (2 patients vomited and 5 needed rescue), significantly (P < 0.05) fewer needed rescue antiemetic medication after acupressure at P6 (no vomiting or rescue medication). When compared to the observation group (5 vomited and 4 needed rescue antiemetics), significantly fewer vomited after acupressure (P < 0.05) CONCLUSION: In patients undergoing brief gynaecological surgery, placebo effect of acupressure decreased nausea after 24 h but vomiting and need of rescue antiemetics was reduced only by acupressure with the correct P6 point stimulation.

  • 13.
    Allvin, R.
    et al.
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden, Department of Clinical Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Berg, Katarina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Nilsson, U.
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden, Department of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Postoperative recovery: A concept analysis2007In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 57, no 5, p. 552-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This paper presents a concept analysis of the phenomenon of postoperative recovery. Background. Each year, millions of patients throughout the world undergo surgical procedures. Although postoperative recovery is commonly used as an outcome of surgery, it is difficult to identify a standard definition. Method. Walker and Avant's concept analysis approach was used. Literature retrieved from MEDLINE and CINAHL databases for English language papers published from 1982 to 2005 was used for the analysis. Findings. The theoretical definition developed points out that postoperative recovery is an energy-requiring process of returning to normality and wholeness. It is defined by comparative standards, achieved by regaining control over physical, psychological, social and habitual functions, and results in a return to preoperative level of independence/dependency in activities of daily living and optimum level of psychological well-being. Conclusion. The concept of postoperative recovery lacks clarity, both in its meaning in relation to postoperative recovery to healthcare professionals in their care for surgical patients, and in the understanding of what researchers in this area really intend to investigate. The theoretical definition we have developed may be useful but needs to be further explored. © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 14.
    Allvin, R
    et al.
    Örebro.
    Ehnfors, M
    Örebro.
    Rawal, N
    Örebro.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Experiences of the Postoperative Recovery Process: An interview Study2008In: Open nursing journal, ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Allvin, Renee
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Ehnfors, Margareta
    University of Örebro.
    Idvall , Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Development of a questionnaire to measure patient-reported postoperative recovery: content validity and intra-patient reliability2009In: JOURNAL OF EVALUATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE, ISSN 1356-1294 , Vol. 15, no 3, p. 411-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we describe the development of a short, easy-to-use questionnaire to measure postoperative recovery and evaluate its content validity and intra-patient reliability. The questionnaire is designed to evaluate the progress of postoperative recovery and the long-term follow-up of possible effects of interventions during recovery. The study involved four steps. (1) A conceptualization and item definitions were based on a theoretical framework and a description of patients postoperative recovery from the perspective of patients, registered nurses and surgeons; (2) Content validity of items was tested through expert judgements; (3) A test run of the questionnaire was performed to confirm its feasibility and workload requirement; and (4) The stability of the questionnaire was evaluated through intra-patient reliability assessment. As a result of the operationalization process of the concept postoperative recovery, five dimensions (physical symptoms, physical functions, psychological, social, activity) and 19 items were identified. Each item was formulated as a statement in the questionnaire. Content validity was judged to be high. After the pre-test of the questionnaire a revision with refinements in the layout was made. The vast majority of items showed a high level of intra-patient reliability. Based on a theoretical framework and empirical data, we developed a short and easy-to-use tentative questionnaire to measure patient-reported postoperative recovery. Initial support for content validity was established. The vast majority of items showed a high level of test-retest reliability.

  • 16.
    Almlöv, J
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Foldemo, Anniqa
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Vägledd självhjälp vid depression - en pilotstudie av Internet-och telefonbaserad kognitiv beteendeterapi inom primärvården.2009Report (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Andersen Amofah, Hege
    et al.
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Bergen University of Coll, Norway; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; Bergen University of Coll, Norway; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Bjorvatn, Bjorn
    Norwegian Competence Centre Sleep Disorders, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Haaverstad, Rune
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Ove Hufthammer, Karl
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Kuiper, Karel K. J.
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Hylen Ranhoff, Anette
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haraldsplass Hospital, Norway.
    Norekval, Tone M.
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; Bergen University of Coll, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Sleep in octogenarians during the postoperative phase after transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement2016In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 168-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Octogenarians with aortic stenosis are an increasing population of patients admitted for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Although adequate sleep is important after illness and surgery, it has scarcely been studied in the immediate postoperative phase. Aims: To determine and compare the nature of self-reported sleep and insomnia, and recorded sleep-wake patterns in octogenarians during the in-hospital postoperative phase after SAVR or TAVI. Methods: A prospective cohort design was used that included octogenarian patients undergoing SAVR or TAVI at a regional university hospital. Self-reports were used to document sleep and insomnia, and actigraphy was used to record sleep-wake patterns. Data were collected at baseline preoperatively, and then daily for the first five postoperative days. Results: SAVR patients experienced the most insomnia on postoperative nights later in recovery, while TAVI patients experienced the most insomnia on postoperative nights early in recovery. The median total sleep time, as measured by actigraphy, was 6.4 h, and the median sleep efficiency was 79% for the five postoperative nights, but no differences were found between SAVR and TAVI patients on this parameter. All patients slept more during daytime than at night, with SAVR patients having significantly more total sleep hours for all five days than TAVI patients (p &lt; 0.01). Conclusion: Octogenarians with aortic stenosis had disturbed self-reported sleep, increased insomnia, and disturbed sleep-wake patterns postoperatively, resulting in more daytime sleep and inactivity. In patients undergoing SAVR or TAVI, sleep evolves differently during the in-hospital postoperative phase.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Inger S.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Perceptions of nursing care quality, in acute hospital settings measured by the Karen instruments2013In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 87-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims The objectives of this study were to measure the quality of nursing care from the perspectives of patients and personnel and to compare these perspectives. Background The perception of quality in nursing care is affected by patient needs and it is common that patients and personnel disagree on the nature of the quality. Thus, it is important to measure the quality from both perspectives. Method A total of 95 patients and 120 personnel from surgical and medical wards at a hospital in Sweden participated. The Karen instruments were used for data collection. A scale index was used for comparison of the perspectives. Results The patients and personnel were satisfied with the quality of care and there were no obvious differences in the total index. The different subscales indicated areas of lower care quality in need of improvement. Conclusion The quality of the care seemed to be satisfactory from the perspectives of both the patients and the personal. Further analysis from the subscale or a variable level is needed to define areas of lower care quality. Implications for Nursing Management Measurements have to be carried out continuously to guarantee care quality over time, as a result of organisational changes and financial cutbacks.

  • 19.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    The assosciation between depressive symptoms and appetite among patients with chronic heart failure2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Hjelm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Factors influencing nutritional status in chronic heart failure2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Appelin, G
    et al.
    Avd för omvårdnad Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping.
    Brobäck, Gunilla
    Avd för omvårdnad Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Palliative care in the home from the perspective of the patient, the relatives and the nursing staff.2000In: Palliative care 2000, Jerusalem., 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Arestedt, K
    et al.
    Linnaeus University.
    Ågren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Inger Flemme, I F
    Halmstad University.
    Bedbra Moser, D M
    University Kentucky.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Psychometric properties of the swedish version of the Control Attitudes Scale (CAS) for patients with cardiac disease and their partners in EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, vol 31, issue , pp 230-2302010In: EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, Oxford University Press , 2010, Vol. 31, p. 230-230Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 23.
    Athlin, Elsy
    et al.
    Karlstad University.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jernfalt, Margareth
    Karlstad University.
    Johansson, Inger
    Karlstad University.
    Factors of importance to the development of pressure ulcers in the care trajectory: perceptions of hospital and community care nurses2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 15-16, p. 2252-2258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. The study aimed at describing contributing factors for the progression or regression of pressure ulcers in the care trajectory as they were understood by nurses working in hospitals or community care. Background. The development of pressure ulcers is considered to be connected with early prevention and awareness among nurses and some studies have indicated that the care trajectory may be a weak point. Design. The study was carried out with a qualitative design. Method. Fifteen nurses from two Swedish hospitals and 15 nurses from community care were interviewed during 2005. Qualitative content analysis was used to make an understanding of patterns possible. Findings. Three main categories arose, showing that pressure ulcers were considered to be affected in the care trajectory by factors related to the individual patient, to the healthcare personnel and to the healthcare structure. Hospital and community care nurses mostly had corresponding perceptions of these factors. Conclusion. The study both confirmed previous findings and added new knowledge about factors that may affect pressure ulcer in the trajectory of care. The informants views of nurses responsibilities and their attitudes towards the care of pressure ulcers could, along with their views on the organisation of care, increase the understanding of the occurrence of pressure ulcers. The need for development and clarification of the organisation and responsibility of pressure ulcer care in the care trajectory was stressed. Relevance to clinical practice. The study highlighted attitudes and values among registered nurses, as well as to how to preserve their commitment and increase their knowledge concerning prevention of pressure ulcers.

  • 24.
    Axelsson, Asa
    et al.
    Gothenburg University.
    Thoren, A B
    Växjö University.
    Aune, S
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Fridlund, B
    Jönköping University.
    Moons, P
    Catholic University Louvain.
    Martensson, J
    Jönköping University.
    Smith, K
    University of Dundee.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Thompson, D R
    University of Leicester.
    Norekval, T M
    Haukeland Hospital.
    European cardiovascular nurses and allied professions practical skills in cardiopulmonary resuscitation2009In: in CARDIOLOGY, vol 113, 2009, Vol. 113, p. 118-118Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Axelsson, Åsa B
    et al.
    Gothenburg University.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Vaxjö University.
    Moons, Philip
    Catholic University of Louvain.
    Martensson, Jan
    Jonköping University.
    Scholte op Reimer, Wilma
    University Amsterdam.
    Smith, Karen
    University of Dundee.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Thompson, David R
    University of Leicester.
    Norekval, Tone M
    Haukeland Hospital.
    European cardiovascular nurses experiences of and attitudes towards having family members present in the resuscitation room2010In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR NURSING, ISSN 1474-5151, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 15-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate cardiovascular nurses experiences of and attitudes towards the presence of family members during resuscitation of adult patients. Methods: A 36-item questionnaire exploring the experiences of and attitudes towards family members being present in the resuscitation room was distributed to a convenience sample of nurses attending three national and one international cardiovascular nursing conferences held in Europe during 2007. Results: Of 820 questionnaires distributed, 411(50%) completed ones were returned. Of these 411 respondents, 178 (44%) had experienced at least one situation of families being present. Positive (23%) and negative (21%) experiences of family presence were equally distributed. Only 28 (7%) respondents stated that their unit had a protocol covering family presence. Nurses in Ireland (n=30; 59%) and the UK (n=18; 55%) were most likely to have experienced family presence and protocols relating to this were most commonly found in the UK (n=4; 14%). Conclusion: Less than half of the included European cardiovascular nurses had experienced a situation of families being present during resuscitation and protocols pertaining to this were rare. There was no clear attitude towards family presence, though experience in nursing made nurses more favourable towards it.

  • 26.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Torsten
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nutritional status and functional capacity after femoral neck fractures: a prospective randomized one-year follow-up study2000In: Aging, ISSN 1945-4589, E-ISSN 1945-4589, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 366-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different surgical methods on nutritional status and functional capacity during the first postoperative year in patients with displaced femoral neck fractures. A further aim was to evaluate the effect of nutritional support. One hundred patients were randomly assigned to treatment with either primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) or osteosynthesis. Half of the patients in each treatment group received protein- and energy-enriched food in the hospital in addition to individual nutritional advice in order to optimize their intake of protein- and energy-rich food. Nutritional state and functional capacity were examined at baseline, one and three months, and one year after the operation. Pain was examined at three months and one year. The effect of nutritional intervention was equal within both surgical groups. Logistic regression showed that the dependent variable "living at one year" was significantly associated with serum albumin levels at one month. Advanced age, mental impairment and deteriorated nutritional status were predominant in the non-survivors. Overall, the primary THA group performed better compared with the osteosynthesis group concerning weight change over time, locomotion and pain. This study also showed that primary THA could safely be performed in the elderly without an increased postoperative mortality rate.

  • 27.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Karlsson, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pettersson, Lars-Goran
    Kalmar Central Hospital.
    Johansson, Torsten
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Patients on the waiting list for total hip replacement: a 1-year follow-up study2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 536-542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients on the waiting list for total hip replacement: a 1-year follow-up study

    Untreated osteoarthritis (OA) in the hip causes pain and reduced physical and social functioning. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of waiting time on health-related quality of life (HRQOL), functional condition and dependence on help at the time of surgery and during follow-up 1 year after surgery. A further aim was to elucidate possible differences between men and women. Two hundred and twenty-nine consecutively included patients with OA in the hip were interviewed when assigned to the waiting list, again 1 week prior to surgery with unilateral total hip replacement (THR), and 1 year after surgery. Health-related quality of life and function were measured using the Nottingham Health Profile, EuroQoL and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. The result showed that the average waiting time was 239 days, that 15% of the patients were operated on within 3 months, and that 21% had to wait more than 6 months. At the time of surgery, HRQOL had deteriorated significantly (p < 0.05) and the number of patients receiving support from relatives had increased from 31% to 58% during the wait. At the 1-year follow-up, both HRQOL and functional condition had improved significantly despite the wait, and the need for support from relatives had decreased to 11% (p < 0.001). In conclusion, long waiting time for THR is detrimental to patients HRQOL causing reduced functional condition, pain and increased need for support from relatives, which limit the independence in daily life.

  • 28.
    Back, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    How do children overcome difficulties talking about sexual abuseManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim of this study was to identify and describe the obstacles that can prevent children from talking about sexual abuse in a police interview. Data consisted of 28 investigative interviews with children and 12 police interrogations with non-offending parents. The children in these situations were between 8 and 15 years of age when they were interviewed. Data interpretation and analysis were based on content analysis. The following categories were identified: not being believed/telling the truth, need of support and dependence on adults, guilt and shame, fear, and spatial- and time-oriented.

  • 29.
    Back, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Parents’ opinions – view of their child´s experiences in the legal process: An interpretative analysis of parents’ opinionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate how parents of children, who are victims of sexual assault, experience the legal process, seen from the child’s, as well as the parents’ perspective. Nine parents identified in the records of three public prosecution offices in three cities in Sweden, were interviewed. The parents described feelings of shame and guilt over what their children had experienced. They felt stigmatized and had difficulty fulfilling their parental role; perceived a lack of information and support from the professionals involved; experienced a sense of withdrawal from their role as parents, even though they felt the professionals who worked with their children were helpful and influential.

  • 30.
    Back, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sexually Abused Children – Prosecutors' Experiences of their Participation in the Legal Process in Sweden2013In: Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, ISSN 1321-8719, E-ISSN 1934-1687, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 273-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to interview prosecutors, based on their experiences working with children who have been sexually abused. The informants were seven prosecutors identified from the records of three public prosecution offices in three cities in Sweden. The informants' experiences were elicited via individual in-depth semi-structured interviews. The interviews were carried out and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Three themes emerged: (1) difficulties with evidence of criminal conduct, (2) children's special needs, and (3) children's dependence on adults. Informants' descriptions of how they perceived the children in the legal process were associated with their experience of the difficulty of finding proof of the crime. Informants were found to experience difficulties when they encounter children in the legal process. As prosecutors they often face difficulties proving that the child has been exposed to crime.

  • 31.
    Back, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Per A
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, IngBeth
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Managing the legal proceedings: An interpretative phenomenological analysis of sexually abused children's experience with the legal process2011In: International Journal of Child Abuse & Neglect, ISSN 0145-2134, E-ISSN 1873-7757, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 50-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe how sexually abused children experience the legal process, a process that includes being questioned by the police during the preliminary investigation and by lawyers and the prosecutor in the courtroom, and meeting other professionals from various agencies.

    METHOD: Face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 children-9 girls and 1 boy between 9 and 15 years old-who had experienced child sexual abuse (CSA). The interviews were semi structured and carried out and analyzed by interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). The aim of IPA is to explore the participants' views of the world and to adopt as far as possible an "insider perspective." IPA draws on a tradition of phenomenology and symbolic interactionism in attempting to understand how people make sense of their experiences.

    RESULTS: Five major themes emerged through the analysis: not being believed, making CSA visible, need for support, sanctions for offenders, and lack of respect for the child's integrity. Almost all the children had a feeling of not being believed. They described feelings ranging from anxiety to dread and even terror when they had to describe the CSA they had experienced. Even though the importance of support for such children is already well understood, the children stated that the support they were given was not sufficient. The children said that they wanted support from a single professional who was well informed about both the legal process and CSA. When the children were asked to reflect on sanctions against the abusers, they said that it was important that the perpetrator got treatment/therapy but they also said that imprisonment was desirable. Financial compensation was not as important to them; the damage had been done and money could not compensate for that damage. The children also said that both the lawyers and the media had treated them with disrespect.

    CONCLUSIONS: It is valuable for children who have been exposed to CSA to learn that they can take part in the legal process as equal partners with the other participants, and it is evident that the quality of psychological care and support needs to be improved. The children want to be participants in the legal process rather than passive objects of that process.

  • 32. Bader, Dan
    et al.
    Clark, Michael
    Dealey, Carol
    Rithalia, Shyam
    Oomens, Cees
    Goossens, Richard
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Takahashi, Makamoto
    Laboratory measurement of the interface pressures applied by active therapy support surfaces: A consensus document2010In: Journal of Tissue Viability, ISSN 0965-206X, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 2-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key element in pressure ulcer prevention and management is the selection of appropriate pressure redistributing (PR) patient support surfaces for use while seated and in bed. However little explicit guidance exists allowing standardised quantitative comparison of different PR surfaces based upon their ability to redistribute pressure from anatomical landmarks such as the heels and sacrum. In 2008 a working group was established in Europe through the US National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) support surface standardisation initiative (S3I) and under the aegis of the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel with the specific remit of developing test methods for the evaluation of active therapy support surfaces (alternating pressure air mattresses). This report describes a consensus development process to agree test methods appropriate to compare active therapy surfaces based upon their ability to redistribute pressure from the sacrum and the heels.

  • 33.
    Baggens, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Att lära sig samtala. Samtalsträning under professionsutbildning2012In: Delaktighetens praktik: det professionella samtalets villkor och möjligheter / [ed] Pia Bülow, Daniel Persson Thunqvist & Inger Sandén, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2012, 1, p. 161-179Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Delaktighet och kommunikation är centrala ideal inom vård, omsorg och socialt arbete. Men vad innebär delaktighet i praktiken och hur kan teorier om delaktighet och professionella samtal förstås i olika praktiska sammanhang? Med utgångspunkt i svensk och internationell forskning ger den här boken en djupare inblick i villkor och möjligheter för professionella samtal.

    I ett tvärvetenskapligt perspektiv på kommunikation presenteras exempel från nya studier på vad delaktighet innebär inom en rad miljöer: nödsamtal, akut- och specialistsjukvård, äldreomsorg, biståndsbedömning, arbetsrelaterad rehabilitering och vårdutbildning. Boken passar väl för utbildningar till sjuksköterska, socionom, arbetsterapeut, sjukgymnast och läkare. I boken beskrivs även olika metoder för datainsamling och analys av data. Det innebär att boken med fördel kan knytas till metodundervisning och examensarbete på avancerad nivå.

  • 34.
    Baggens, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Multiparty talk during encounters in child health care2009In: Seventh Interdisciplinary Conference on Communication, Medicine & Ethics, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Baggens, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nurses' Work with Empowerment during Encounters with Families in Health Care2002In: Critical Public Health, ISSN 0958-1596, E-ISSN 1469-3682, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 351-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One goal of Swedish child healthcare work is to empower parents, and thereby reinforce them in their parental roles. It may, however, be difficult to put this ideology into practice because the concept of empowerment is abstract, and because it is unclear what this concept means in practice. The overall aim of this article is to examine critically and discuss empowerment in nurses' work, in their everyday encounters with families in child healthcare. An empirical study was conducted at three child health centres in medium-sized towns in Sweden. Data collection consisted of audiotapes of 44 visits by families to nurses at these centres. The tape-recorded conversations were transcribed verbatim and have been used as data. Data were analysed qualitatively by examining the advice-giving sequences, to see the extent to which the nurse tried to involve and encourage parents to participate actively in problem solving, and how frequently the nurse enquired about the parents' opinions and ideas. It was revealed that the nurses dominated advice giving in these visits to the extent that they took the initiative in the majority of the advisory sequences that occurred, and that they decided both when advice should be given and the nature of the advice. Furthermore, there were remarkably few examples that could be called empowering or have an empowering function in the advice giving. The nurse instead gave standard solutions and answers in response to various questions from the parents, reinforcing her own role as an expert.

  • 36.
    Baggens, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Patientundervisning och patienters lärande.2007In: Patientundervisning och patienters lärande, Stockholm: Gothia Förlag , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Baggens, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    What they talk about: Conversations between child health centre nurses and parents2001In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 659-667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The voluntary child health promotion programme reaches virtually all children in Sweden and each child will visit the child health centre about 20 times until it has reached school age. The practical responsibility for the tasks at the child health centre resides mainly with the nurse. The nurse’s talk is the main instrument used to carry out health examinations, detect health problems and developmental deviations, pass on information and give individual advice and support to families.

    Aim. The aim of the study is to explore the content of the conversations and analyse its relationship to both the child health promotion programme and the question of which party decides what is talked about in these encounters.

    Methods. The empirical study, approved by the Committee for Ethics in Medical Investigation, was conducted at three child health centres in medium-sized towns in Sweden. Data collection consisted of audiotapes of 44 visits to these child health centres. The tape-recorded conversations were transcribed verbatim and constitute the material. The analysis was content-orientated and was performed in four steps: coding and generating topics, categorization of topics, identifying the initiator and searching for regularities.

    Results/Conclusion. The results showed that the most common issues discussed concerned the child’s development (mainly physical aspects), situational matters and questions about procedures and routines. The nurses initiated most of the topics discussed and her dominance was established with the help of the official child health promotion programme. The findings evoke ideas about what possibilities the parents have of making their voices heard during the conversations. The conclusion is that the findings indicate a need for further research on nurse-parent/child communication during visits to the child health centre to acquire knowledge about the interactional consequences in the conversation when some topics are discussed but others are not.

  • 38.
    Baggens, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Foldemo, Anniqa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Teaching Communication Skills in the Nursing Programme2006Report (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Baggens, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandén, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Omvårdnad genom kommunikativa handlingar2009In: Omvårdnadens grunder: Perspektiv och förhållningssätt, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2009, 1:1, p. 201-234Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Omvårdnadens grunder - Perspektiv och förhållningssätt syftar till att belysa omvårdnad ur olika perspektiv, för att ge underlag till kritisk diskussion och utveckling av ett reflekterat förhållningssätt i omvårdnadsarbetet. Ett antagande är att omvårdnad inte entydigt kan definieras, men genom att belysa det ur olika perspektiv skapas utkikspunkter från vilka omvårdnad kan "ses", studeras och problematiseras. I bokens kapitel medverkar ett 30-tal svenska experter, varav flertalet sjuksköterskor med doktorsexamen, och tecknar några utmaningar för framtiden. Boken tar utgångspunkt i livscykel och hälsa, vilket medför att ett flertal områden lyfts fram: patienten som person, mognad, växt, dagligt liv, kritiska övergångar mellan olika livsskeden, lidande, död, genus, sociala relationer, kulturell mångfald, livsstil, kommunikation, lärande och etik. Inom dessa områden beskrivs perspektiv och förhållningssätt av betydelse för omvårdnad. Bokens kunskapsunderlag utgörs av empiriska forskningsresultat, teorier, filosofi och praktiska exempel.Omvårdnadens grunder består av totalt tre publikationer utan inbördes ordning: Perspektiv och förhållningssätt, Ansvar och utveckling, samt Hälsa och ohälsa. I första hand är böckerna avsedda som kurslitteratur för sjuksköterskestudenter på grundläggande nivå. Eftersom det är ett nytt standardverk inom omvårdnad kan även kliniskt verksamma sjuksköterskor och andra inom hälso- och sjukvården ha nytta av böckerna.Vill du beställa hela paketet till ett förmånligt pris? Klicka härFörstapristagare av Kurslitteraturpriset 2010

  • 40.
    Baggens, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sätterlund Larsson, U
    n/a.
    Giving advice to families with a new-born child1999In: Samtal och språkanvändning i professionerna, Uppsala: ASLA , 1999, p. 33-47Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Baggens, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sätterlund Larsson, U
    n/a.
    Men nu, förstår ni, nu rekommenderar vi andra saker.: En studie av distriktssköterskans rådgivning vid första hembesöket hos föräldrar som fått barn.1999In: Möten - en vänbok till Roger Säljö / [ed] Ullabeth Sätterlund Larsson, Kerstin Bergqvist, Linköping: Tema Kommunikation, Univ. , 1999, p. 141-167Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Berben, L.
    et al.
    University of Basel, Switzerland .
    Bogert, L
    University of Basel, Switzerland .
    Leventhal, M. E.
    University of Basel, Switzerland .
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Hälsohögskolan i Jönköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Norekvål, T. M.
    Haukeland University Hospital, Norway .
    Smith, K.
    Ninewells Hospital, UK .
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Thompson, David
    Australian Catholic University, Melbourne.
    De Geest, Sabine
    University of Basel, Switzerland .
    Which interventions are used by health care professionals to enhance medication adherence in cardiovascular patients? A survey of current clinical practice2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Berg, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Patients’ perspectives on recovery from day surgery2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A large number of elective surgical patients in Sweden and elsewhere have their surgical procedure performed in a day surgery context. The surgical care event, with its postoperative surveillance, is brief at the surgery unit and patients are discharged home with the intention that they should manage postoperative recovery mainly themselves. However, several patients attest to being in an exposed situation when assuming responsibility for recovery at home. The overall aim of this thesis was to attain comprehensive knowledge of postoperative recovery following day surgery from a patient perspective.

    A questionnaire, the Post-discharge Surgical Recovery scale, was translated into Swedish and evaluated regarding its psychometric properties in a Swedish context. A sample of 607 day surgery patients who had undergone orthopaedic, general or gynaecological surgery self-rated their recovery at postoperative Days 1, 7 and 14 using the Post-discharge Surgical Recovery scale and the Quality of Recovery-23. Health-related quality of life was assessed before and 30 days after the surgical procedure, using the EQ-5D. In a second sample, 31 patients were interviewed in their homes regarding their recovery after day surgery. The interviews were conducted on postoperative Days 11-37, and focused on the meaning of recovery, self-care and perceptions of recovery. Data were explored by means of a phenomenographic analysis.

    The Post-discharge Surgical Recovery scale showed satisfactory psychometric properties when used among Swedish day surgery patients. Following discharge, recovery included both physical and emotional perspectives. Recovery varied, and influencing factors were found to be type of surgery, age, perceived health and emotional status on the first postoperative day. Orthopaedic patients had a more protracted recovery process compared to general surgery and gynaecological patients, along with more postoperative pain and lower health-related quality of life. Patients perceived that postoperative recovery comprised different internal and external factors and a large amount of responsibility regarding their recovery and surgical outcome. To be prepared for recovery at home, patients wanted knowledge and understanding about the normal range of recovery following their specific surgical procedure, and needed support from different sources in their surroundings.

    This thesis provides insight into day surgery patients’ postoperative situation. Based on the studies, individualized and well thought-out support appears favourable in order to have confident and well prepared patients at home. In contrast to smooth and easy patient care at the surgery unit, the postoperative phase seems to be a weak link in the day surgical continuity of patient care. Postoperative care needs to be further improved to increase quality and patients’ overall satisfaction with the day surgical experience. Attention should be paid to patients’ physical and emotional resources and needs.

  • 44.
    Berg, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Postoperative recovery in daysurgery: Evaluation of psychometric properties and clinical usefulness of a questionnaire in day surgery2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Day surgery has increased during recent decades in many countries and represents approximately 50% of surgical procedures performed in Sweden. Day surgery implies that the patient is admitted and operated on during the same day and discharged without an overnight stay at the surgery unit. Undergoing a day surgical procedure thereby means that the major part of the postoperative recovery takes place in the patient’s home, leaving the patient and his/her supportive network responsible for the postoperative care. Day surgery also implies that health care professionals have to adapt to outpatient care and find valid measurements for monitoring a patient’s recovery progress after discharge.

    Aims: The aim of Study I was to evaluate the psychometric properties of a translated version of the Post-discharge Surgical Recovery (PSR) scale in a Swedish day surgery sample in terms of data quality, internal consistency, dimensionality and responsiveness. The aim of Study II was to describe postoperative recovery on postoperative days 1, 7 and 14 after different orthopaedic day surgical procedures, as well as to identify possible predictors associated with postoperative recovery two weeks after surgery.

    Methods: Six-hundred and seven patients who had undergone an orthopaedic surgical procedure (n=358), general surgery (n=182) or gynaecological surgery (n=67) were included. To assess postoperative recovery, the PSR scale and the emotional state, physical comfort and physical independency dimensions of the Quality of Recovery-23 (QoR-23) were used. In addition, patients’ background data and self ratings of their ability to work or handle usual business and general health were obtained. Data were collected preoperatively and on postoperative days 1, 7 and 14. In Study I data quality and internal consistency were evaluated using descriptive statistics, correlation analyses and Cronbach’s alpha. The dimensionality was determined using an exploratory factor analysis, and the responsiveness was evaluated through the standardized response mean (SRM) and the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC). In Study II, patients’ postoperative recovery and general health were compared over time using Friedmann’s ANOVA and between surgical groups of patients using the Kruskal-Wallis test. To determine predictors of recovery, a multiple linear regression analysis was performed with the PSR score on postoperative day 14 as the dependent variable.

    Results: In Study I, two items were deleted from the Swedish version of the PSR scale. This was based on several low inter-item (<0.30) and item-total correlations (<0.40) and substantial ceiling effects (65%). After the deletion of two items, the Cronbach’s coefficient alpha was 0.90 and the average interitem correlation was 0.44. According to the factor analysis, a single dimension was found explaining the common variance to 44%. The SRM (1.14) indicated a robust ability to detect changes in recovery. The AUC was 0.60 for the entire scale, but varied (0.58-0.81) when the PSR score on postoperative day 1 was categorized into three intervals. In Study II, the shoulder patients experienced significantly lower postoperative recovery and general health one and two weeks after surgery (p<0.001). Significant predictors of recovery on postoperative day 14 were age, perceived health and emotional status on postoperative day 1 and type of surgery, and explained the dependent variable to 33%.

    Conclusions: The Swedish version of the PSR scale seems to be a consistent and valid instrument for the assessment of postoperative recovery at home in Sweden. The recovery process for orthopaedic day surgery patients differs, with shoulder surgery patients in particular showing poor recovery, which could be considered when day surgery patient education programmes are developed.

  • 45.
    Berg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Postoperative recovery from the perspective of day surgery patients: A phenomenographic study2013In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 1630-1638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Today, many patients undergo surgical procedures in a day surgery setting. The shift from inpatient care to care at the patient’s own home following discharge places various demands on patients and their families during the recovery process. There is a need for knowledge of how the postoperative recovery process is perceived, as research indicates a lack of support for patients managing recovery at home.

    Objectives: To explore day surgery patients’ perceptions of postoperative recovery.

    Design: A qualitative design with a phenomenographic approach was used.

    Methods and settings: Semi-structured interviews with 31 patients undergoing an orthopaedic, general or urologic day surgical procedure were carried out face-to-face at the patients’ homes, 11-37 days post-discharge. Patients were recruited from two day surgery settings: one private unit and one unit associated with a local county hospital.

    Results: The patients perceived postoperative recovery as comprising internal and external prerequisites and implied changes in ordinary life with varying levels of support. The organization at the day surgery unit, with its advantages and disadvantages, was perceived as having an impact on the subsequent recovery trajectory. The results are demonstrated in three descriptive categories: ‘Conditions for recovery at home’, The rollback to ordinary life’ and ‘Being a cog in a flow of care’.

    Conclusions: Postoperative recovery following day surgery implies, from the patients’ perspective, a migration from being a recipient of care at the day surgery unit to playing an active role, with extensive responsibility at home. To manage self-care confidently, postdischarge patients require knowledge and understanding of what constitutes the normal range in recovery following their specific surgical procedure.

  • 46.
    Berg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Psychometric evaluation of the post-discharge surgical recovery scale2010In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 794-801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale, aim and objectives Day surgery patients are discharged after a short period of postoperative surveillance, and reliable and valid instruments for assessment at home are needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of a Swedish version of the post-discharge surgical recovery (PSR) scale, an instrument to monitor the patients recovery after day surgery, in terms of data quality, internal consistency, dimensionality and responsiveness. Methods Data were collected on postoperative days 1 and 14 and included 525 patients. Data quality and internal consistency were evaluated using descriptive statistics, correlation analyses and Cronbachs alpha. The dimensionality of the scale was determined through an exploratory factor analysis. Responsiveness was evaluated using the standardized response mean and the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC). The correlation between change score in PSR and change score in self-rated health was assessed using Pearsons correlation coefficient. Patients ability to work and their self-rated health on postoperative day 14 were used as external indicators of change. Results Six items showed floor or ceiling effects. Cronbachs coefficient alpha was 0.90 and the average inter-item correlation coefficient was 0.44 after the deletion of two items. The items were closely related to each other, and a one-factor solution was decided on. A robust ability to detect changes in recovery (standardized response mean = 1.14) was shown. The AUC for the entire scale was 0.60. When initial PSR scores were categorized into three intervals, the ability to detect improved and non-improved patients varied (AUC 0.58-0.81). There was a strong correlation between change scores in PSR and health (0.63). Conclusions The Swedish version of the PSR scale demonstrates acceptable psychometric properties of data quality, internal consistency, dimensionality and responsiveness. In addition to previous findings, these results strengthen the PSR scale as a potential instrument of recovery at home.

  • 47.
    Berg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Postoperative recovery after different orthopedic day surgical procedures2011In: International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, ISSN 1878-1241, E-ISSN 1878-1292, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 165-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Orthopedic day surgery is common. Postoperative recovery may differ according to surgical procedures and personal factors. We studied postoperative recovery up to 2 weeks after different orthopedic day surgical procedures and tried to identify possible predictors associated with recovery. Three-hundred and fifty eight patients who had undergone knee arthroscopy or surgery to the hand/arm, foot/leg or shoulder were included. Data were collected on postoperative days 1, 7 and 14 using the Swedish Post-discharge Surgery Recovery scale, the emotional state, physical comfort and physical independence dimensions in the Quality of Recovery-23 and a general health question. Multiple linear regression was used to explore predictors of recovery. The shoulder patients experienced significantly lower postoperative recovery and general health 1 and 2 weeks after surgery compared to the other patient groups (p < 0.001). Significant predictors of recovery were age, perceived health and emotional status on the first postoperative day and type of surgery. Postoperative recovery after common orthopedic day surgical procedures varies and factors influencing it need to be further explored. The impact of a patient’s emotional state on recovery after day surgery can be of particular interest in this work. Post-discharge planning needs to be tailored to the surgical procedure.

  • 48.
    Berg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Postoperativerecovery after different orthopaedic day surgical proceduresManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Orthopaedic day surgery is common. Postoperative recovery may differ according to surgical procedures and personal factors. We studied postoperative recovery up to two weeks after different orthopaedic day surgical procedures, and tried to identify possible predictors associated with recovery. Three-hundred and fifty-eight patients who had undergone knee arthroscopy or surgery on the hand/arm, foot/leg or shoulder were included. Data were collected preoperatively and on postoperative days 1, 7 and 14 using the Swedish Post-discharge Surgery Recovery scale, the emotional state, physical comfort and physical independence dimensions in the Quality of Recovery-23, and a general health question. A multiple linear regression was used to explore predictors of recovery. The shoulder patients experienced significantly lower postoperative recovery and general health one and two weeks after surgery compared to the other patient groups (p<0.001). Significant predictors of recovery were age, perceived health and emotional status on the first postoperative day, and type of surgery. Postoperative recovery after common orthopaedic day surgical procedures differs, and factors influencing it need to be further explored. The impact of a patient’s emotional state on recovery after day surgery can be of particular interest in this work. Post-discharge planning needs to be tailored to the surgical procedure.

  • 49.
    Berg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Postoperative recovery and its association with health-related quality of life among day surgery patientsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Day surgery holds advantages for both the patient and the health care organization. However, recovery beyond the first postoperative week and following different types of surgery has not been explored to any greater degree. The current aims were to prospectively describe postoperative recovery and health-related quality of life among different groups of day surgery patients and to explore the association between postoperative recovery and health-related quality of life 30 days after discharge. A consecutive sample of 607 adult day surgery patients undergoing orthopaedic, gynaecological or general surgery was included. Postoperative recovery was assessed on days 1, 7 and 14 using the Swedish Post-discharge Surgery Recovery scale and the Quality of Recovery-23 scale. The EQ-5D was used to assess health-related quality of life preoperatively and 30 days following discharge. A repeated measure ANOVA was conducted to evaluate postoperative recovery from day 1 to day 14 and between different surgical groups. Hierarchical multiple linear regression models were used to explore the association between postoperative recovery and health-related quality of life.

    Results: Postoperative recovery improved from day 1 to 14 in all surgical groups (p<0.001). The orthopaedic patients had lower postoperative recovery on day 14 compared to the general and the gynaecological patients (p<0.001). Health-related quality of life was lower among orthopaedic patients (p<0.001), even if significant improvements over time were seen in all groups. Recovery on day 7 was associated with health-related quality of life 30 days after the day surgery (p<0.05).

    Conclusion: Particularly orthopaedic day surgical patients seem to favour a closer follow-up in order to support recovery and thereby also positively influence health-related quality of life.

  • 50.
    Berg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Postoperative recovery and its association with health-related quality of life among day surgery patients2012In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 11, no 24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Day surgery holds advantages for both the patient and the health care organization. However, recovery beyond the first Postoperative week and following different types of surgery has not been explored to any greater degree. The current aims were to prospectively describe Postoperative recovery and health-related quality of life among different groups of day surgery patients and to explore the association between Postoperative recovery and healthrelated quality of life 30 days after discharge.

    METHODS: A consecutive sample of 607 adult day surgery patients undergoing orthopaedic, gynaecological or general surgery was included. Postoperative recovery was assessed on days 1, 7 and 14 using the Swedish Post-discharge Surgery recovery scale and the quality of recovery-23 scale. The EQ-5D was used to assess health-related quality of life preoperatively and 30 days following discharge. A repeated measure ANOVA was conducted to evaluate Postoperative recovery from day 1 to day 14 and between different surgical groups. Hierarchical multiple linear regression models were used to explore the association between Postoperative recovery and health-related quality of life.

    RESULTS: Postoperative recovery improved from day 1 to 14 in all surgical groups (p<0.001). The orthopaedic patients had lower Postoperative recovery on day 14 compared to the general and the gynaecological patients (p<0.001). health-related quality of life was lower among orthopaedic patients (p<0.001), even if significant improvements over time were seen in all groups. recovery on day 7 was associated with health-related quality of life 30 days after the day surgery (p<0.05).

    CONCLUSION: Particularly orthopaedic day surgical patients seem to favour a closer follow-up in order to support recovery and thereby also positively influence health-related quality of life.

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