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  • 1.
    Aarnio, Mikko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Appel, Lieuwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gordh, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Wolf, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Eriksson, Måns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Peterson, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Linnman, Clas
    Harvard Med Sch, Boston Childrens Hosp, Dept Anesthesiol, Boston, MA USA.
    Visualization of painful inflammation in patients with pain after traumatic ankle sprain using [(11)C]-D-deprenyl PET/CT.2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 418-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Positron emission tomography (PET) with the radioligand [(11)C]-D-deprenyl has shown increased signal at location of pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and chronic whiplash injury. The binding site of [(11)C]-D-deprenyl in peripheral tissues is suggested to be mitochondrial monoamine oxidase in cells engaged in post-traumatic inflammation and tissue repair processes. The association between [(11)C]-D-deprenyl uptake and the transition from acute to chronic pain remain unknown. Further imaging studies of musculoskeletal pain at the molecular level would benefit from establishing a clinical model in a common and well-defined injury in otherwise healthy and drug-naïve subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate if [(11)C]-D-deprenyl uptake would be acutely elevated in unilateral ankle sprain and if tracer uptake would be reduced as a function of healing, and correlated with pain localizations and pain experience.

    METHODS: Eight otherwise healthy patients with unilateral ankle sprain were recruited at the emergency department. All underwent [(11)C]-D-deprenyl PET/CT in the acute phase, at one month and 6-14 months after injury.

    RESULTS: Acute [(11)C]-D-deprenyl uptake at the injury site was a factor of 10.7 (range 2.9-37.3) higher than the intact ankle. During healing, [(11)C]-D-deprenyl uptake decreased, but did not normalize until after 11 months. Patients experiencing persistent pain had prolonged [(11)C]-D-deprenyl uptake in painful locations.

    CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: The data provide further support that [(11)C]-D-deprenyl PET can visualize, quantify and follow processes in peripheral tissue that may relate to soft tissue injuries, inflammation and associated nociceptive signaling. Such an objective correlate would represent a progress in pain research, as well as in clinical pain diagnostics and management.

  • 2.
    Aarnio, Mikko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lampa, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. PET Centre, Department of Medical Imaging, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gordh, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Linnman, Clas
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States.
    Whiplash injuries associated with experienced pain and disability can be visualized with [11C]-D-deprenyl positron emission tomography and computed tomography2022In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 163, no 3, p. 489-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of etiological mechanisms underlying whiplash-associated disorders is incomplete. Localisation and quantification of peripheral musculoskeletal injury and inflammation in whiplash-associated disorders would facilitate diagnosis, strengthen patients' subjective pain reports, and aid clinical decisions, all of which could lead to improved treatment. In this longitudinal observational study, we evaluated combined [11C]-D-deprenyl positron emission tomography and computed tomography after acute whiplash injury and at 6-month follow-up. Sixteen adult patients (mean age 33 years) with whiplash injury grade II were recruited at the emergency department. [11C]-D-deprenyl positron emission tomography and computed tomography, subjective pain levels, self-rated neck disability, and active cervical range of motion were recorded within 7 days after injury and again at 6-month follow-up. Imaging results showed possible tissue injuries after acute whiplash with an altered [11C]-D-deprenyl uptake in the cervical bone structures and facet joints, associated with subjective pain locale and levels, as well as self-rated disability. At follow-up, some patients had recovered and some showed persistent symptoms and reductions in [11C]-D-deprenyl uptake correlated to reductions in pain levels. These findings help identify affected peripheral structures in whiplash injury and strengthen the idea that positron emission tomography and computed tomography detectable organic lesions in peripheral tissue are relevant for the development of persistent pain and disability in whiplash injury.

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  • 3.
    Aarnio, Mikko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Linnman, Clas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lampa, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Gordh, Torsten
    Whiplash injuries associated with experienced pain and disability can be visualized with [11C]-D-deprenyl PET/CTManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The understanding of etiological mechanisms of whiplash associated disorder is still inadequate. Objective visualization and quantification of peripheral musculoskeletal injury and possible painful inflammation in whiplash associated disorder would facilitate diagnosis, strengthen patients’ subjective pain reports and aid clinical decisions eventually leading to better treatments. In the current study, we further evaluated the potential to use [11C]D-deprenyl PET/CT to visualize inflammation after whiplash injury. Sixteen patients with whiplash injury grade II were recruited at the emergency department and underwent [11C]D-deprenyl PET/CT in the acute phase and at 6 months after injury. Subjective pain levels, self rated neck disability and active cervical range of motion were recorded at each imaging session. Results showed that the molecular aspects of inflammation and possible tissue injuries after acute whiplash injury could be visualized, objectively quantified and followed over time with [11C]-D-deprenyl PET/CT. An altered [11C]D-deprenyl uptake in the cervical bone structures and facet joints was associated with subjective pain levels and self rated disability during both imaging occasions. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of affected peripheral structures in whiplash injury and strengthens the idea that PET/CT detectable organic lesions in peripheral tissue may be relevant for the development of persistent pain and disability in whiplash injury.

    Perspective: This article presents a novel way of objectively visualizing possible structural damage and inflammation that cause pain and disability in whiplash injury. This PET method can bring an advance in pain research and eventually would facilitate the clinical management of patients in pain.

  • 4. Abdelhak, Ahmed
    et al.
    Barba, Lorenzo
    Romoli, Michele
    Benkert, Pascal
    Conversi, Francesco
    D'Anna, Lucio
    Masvekar, Ruturaj R
    Bielekova, Bibiana
    Prudencio, Mercedes
    Petrucelli, Leonard
    Meschia, James F
    Erben, Young
    Furlan, Roberto
    De Lorenzo, Rebecca
    Mandelli, Alessandra
    Sutter, Raoul
    Hert, Lisa
    Epple, Varenka
    Marastoni, Damiano
    Sellner, Johann
    Steinacker, Petra
    Aamodt, Anne Hege
    Heggelund, Lars
    Dyrhol-Riise, Anne Margarita
    Virhammar, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Neurology.
    Fällmar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Rostami, Elham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Neurosurgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Acquired brain injury.
    Kumlien, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Neurology.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Tumani, Hayrettin
    Sacco, Simona
    Green, Ari J
    Otto, Markus
    Kuhle, Jens
    Ornello, Raffaele
    Foschi, Matteo
    Abu-Rumeileh, Samir
    Prognostic performance of blood neurofilament light chain protein in hospitalized COVID-19 patients without major central nervous system manifestations: an individual participant data meta-analysis.2023In: Journal of Neurology, ISSN 0340-5354, E-ISSN 1432-1459, Vol. 270, no 7, p. 3315-3328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To investigate the prognostic value of blood neurofilament light chain protein (NfL) levels in the acute phase of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

    METHODS: We conducted an individual participant data (IPD) meta-analysis after screening on MEDLINE and Scopus to May 23rd 2022. We included studies with hospitalized adult COVID-19 patients without major COVID-19-associated central nervous system (CNS) manifestations and with a measurement of blood NfL in the acute phase as well as data regarding at least one clinical outcome including intensive care unit (ICU) admission, need of mechanical ventilation (MV) and death. We derived the age-adjusted measures NfL Z scores and conducted mixed-effects modelling to test associations between NfL Z scores and other variables, encompassing clinical outcomes. Summary receiver operating characteristic curves (SROCs) were used to calculate the area under the curve (AUC) for blood NfL.

    RESULTS: We identified 382 records, of which 7 studies were included with a total of 669 hospitalized COVID-19 cases (mean age 66.2 ± 15.0 years, 68.1% males). Median NfL Z score at admission was elevated compared to the age-corrected reference population (2.37, IQR: 1.13-3.06, referring to 99th percentile in healthy controls). NfL Z scores were significantly associated with disease duration and severity. Higher NfL Z scores were associated with a higher likelihood of ICU admission, need of MV, and death. SROCs revealed AUCs of 0.74, 0.80 and 0.71 for mortality, need of MV and ICU admission, respectively.

    CONCLUSIONS: Blood NfL levels were elevated in the acute phase of COVID-19 patients without major CNS manifestations and associated with clinical severity and poor outcome. The marker might ameliorate the performance of prognostic multivariable algorithms in COVID-19.

  • 5.
    Abdulla, Maysaa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Guglielmo, Priscilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Brotzu General Hospital, Cagliari, Italy.
    Hollander, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Åström, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Prognostic impact of abdominal lymph node involvement in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma2020In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 207-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The prognostic value of site of nodal involvement in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) is mainly unknown. We aimed to determine the prognostic significance of nodal abdominal involvement in relation to tumour cell markers and clinical characteristics of 249 DLBCL patients in a retrospective single-centre study.

    METHODS: Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and thorax revealed pathologically enlarged abdominal lymph nodes in 156 patients, while in 93 patients there were no pathologically enlarged lymph nodes in the abdomen. In 81 cases, the diagnosis of DLBCL was verified by histopathological biopsy obtained from abdominal lymph node.

    RESULTS: Patients with abdominal nodal disease had inferior lymphoma-specific survival (P = .04) and presented with higher age-adjusted IPI (P < .001), lactate dehydrogenase (P < .001) and more often advanced stage (P < .001), bulky disease (P < .001), B symptoms (P < .001), and double expression of MYC and BCL2 (P = .02) compared to patients without nodal abdominal involvement, but less often extranodal involvement (P < .02). The worst outcome was observed in those where the abdominal nodal involvement was verified by histopathological biopsy.

    CONCLUSION: Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas patients with abdominal nodal disease had inferior outcome and more aggressive behaviour, reflected both in clinical and biological characteristics.

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  • 6.
    Abouzayed, Ayman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Rinne, Sara S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics.
    Sabahnoo, Hamideh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Chernov, Vladimir
    Russian Acad Sci, Canc Res Inst, Dept Nucl Med, Tomsk Natl Res Med Ctr, Tomsk 634009, Russia; Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Ctr Oncotheranost, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Tomsk 634009, Russia.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science. Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Ctr Oncotheranost, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Tomsk 634009, Russia.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Ctr Oncotheranost, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Tomsk 634009, Russia.
    Preclinical Evaluation of 99mTc-Labeled GRPR Antagonists maSSS/SES-PEG2-RM26 for Imaging of Prostate Cancer2021In: Pharmaceutics, ISSN 1999-4923, E-ISSN 1999-4923, Vol. 13, no 2, article id 182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is an important target for imaging of prostate cancer. The wide availability of single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) and the generator-produced 99mTc can be utilized to facilitate the use of GRPR-targeting radiotracers for diagnostics of prostate cancers.

    Methods: Synthetically produced mercaptoacetyl-Ser-Ser-Ser (maSSS)-PEG2-RM26 and mercaptoacetyl-Ser-Glu-Ser (maSES)-PEG2-RM26 (RM26 = d-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-Leu-NH2) were radiolabeled with 99mTc and characterized in vitro using PC-3 cells and in vivo, using NMRI or PC-3 tumor bearing mice. SPECT/CT imaging and dosimetry calculations were performed for [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26.

    Results: Peptides were radiolabeled with high yields (>98%), demonstrating GRPR specific binding and slow internalization in PC-3 cells. [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26 outperformed [99mTc]Tc-maSES-PEG2-RM26 in terms of GRPR affinity, with a lower dissociation constant (61 pM vs 849 pM) and demonstrating higher tumor uptake. [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26 had tumor-to-blood, tumor-to-muscle, and tumor-to-bone ratios of 97 ± 56, 188 ± 32, and 177 ± 79, respectively. SPECT/CT images of [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26 clearly visualized the GRPR-overexpressing tumors. The dosimetry estimated for [99mTc]Tc-maSSS-PEG2-RM26 showed the highest absorbed dose in the small intestine (1.65 × 10−3 mGy/MBq), and the effective dose is 3.49 × 10−3 mSv/MBq.

    Conclusion: The GRPR antagonist maSSS-PEG2-RM26 is a promising GRPR-targeting agent that can be radiolabeled through a single-step with the generator-produced 99mTc and used for imaging of GRPR-expressing prostate cancer.

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  • 7.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lannsjö, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Extended anatomical grading in diffuse axonal injury using MRI: Hemorrhagic lesions in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome2017In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 5, no 34, p. 341-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical outcome after traumatic diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is difficult to predict. In this study, three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences were used to quantify the anatomical distribution of lesions, to grade DAI according to the Adams grading system, and to evaluate the value of lesion localization in combination with clinical prognostic factors to improve outcome prediction. Thirty patients (mean 31.2 years ±14.3 standard deviation) with severe DAI (Glasgow Motor Score [GMS] <6) examined with MRI within 1 week post-injury were included. Diffusion-weighted (DW), T2*-weighted gradient echo and susceptibility-weighted (SWI) sequences were used. Extended Glasgow outcome score was assessed after 6 months. Number of DW lesions in the thalamus, basal ganglia, and internal capsule and number of SWI lesions in the mesencephalon correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Age, GMS at admission, GMS at discharge, and low proportion of good monitoring time with cerebral perfusion pressure <60 mm Hg correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed an independent relation with poor outcome for age (p = 0.005) and lesions in the mesencephalic region corresponding to substantia nigra and tegmentum on SWI (p  = 0.008). We conclude that higher age and lesions in substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome in DAI. We propose an extended MRI classification system based on four stages (stage I—hemispheric lesions, stage II—corpus callosum lesions, stage III—brainstem lesions, and stage IV—substantia nigra or mesencephalic tegmentum lesions); all are subdivided by age (≥/<30 years).

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  • 8.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lannsjö, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    MRI analysis of diffuse axonal injury - Hemorrhagic lesions in the mesencephalon idicate poor long-term outcome2016In: MRI analysis of diffuse axonal injury - Hemorrhagic lesions in the mesencephalon idicate poor long-term outcome, Springer, 2016, Vol. 7, Suppl. 1, article id B-0814Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Clinical outcome after traumatic diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is difficult to predict. Three MRI techniques were compared in demonstrating acute brain lesions.  Relationship of the anatomical distribution of the lesions in combination with clinical prognostic factors to outcome after 6 months was evaluated.  

    Methods and Materials: Thirty patients, aged 16-60 years (mean 31.2 years) with severe DAI (Glasgow Motor Score = GMS < 6) were examined with MRI at 1.5T within one week after the injury. A diffusion-weighted (DW) sequence (SE-EPI, b value 1000 s/mm2), a T2*-weighted gradient echo (T2*GRE) sequence and a susceptibility-weighted (SWI) sequence were evaluated by two independent reviewers with short and long neuroradiological experiences. Clinical outcome was assessed with Extended Glasgow Outcome Score (GOSE) after ≥ 6 months.

    Results: Interreviewer agreement for DAI classification was very good (ҡ 0.82 – 0.91) with all three sequences. SWI visualized more lesions than the T2*GRE or DW sequence.  In univariate analysis, number of DW lesions in the deep gray matter area including the internal capsules, number of SWI lesions in the mesencephalon, age, and GMS at admission and discharge correlated significantly with poor outcome.  Multivariate analysis only revealed an independent relation with poor outcome for age (p = 0.011) and lesions in the mesencephalic region including crura cerebri, substantia nigra and tegmentum on SWI (p = 0.032).

    Conclusion: SWI is the most sensitive technique to visualize lesions in DAI. Age over 30 years and hemorrhagic mesencephalic lesions anterior to the tectum are indicators of poor long-term outcome in DAI.

  • 9.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Intracranial pressure elevations in diffuse axonal injury: association with nonhemorrhagic MR lesions in central mesencephalic structures2019In: Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0022-3085, E-ISSN 1933-0693, Vol. 131, no 2, p. 604-611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is not well defined. This study investigated the occurrence of increased ICP and whether clinical factors and lesion localization on MRI were associated with increased ICP in patients with DAI.

    Methods: Fifty-two patients with severe TBI (median age 24 years, range 9–61 years), who had undergone ICP monitoring and had DAI on MRI, as determined using T2*-weighted gradient echo, susceptibility-weighted imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequences, were enrolled. The proportion of good monitoring time (GMT) with ICP > 20 mm Hg during the first 120 hours postinjury was calculated and associations with clinical and MRI-related factors were evaluated using linear regression.

    Results: All patients had episodes of ICP > 20 mm Hg. The mean proportion of GMT with ICP > 20 mm Hg was 5%, and 27% of the patients (14/52) spent more than 5% of GMT with ICP > 20 mm Hg. The Glasgow Coma Scale motor score at admission (p = 0.04) and lesions on DWI sequences in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum (SN-T, p = 0.001) were associated with the proportion of GMT with ICP > 20 mm Hg. In multivariable linear regression, lesions on DWI sequences in SN-T (8% of GMT with ICP > 20 mm Hg, 95% CI 3%–13%, p = 0.004) and young age (−0.2% of GMT with ICP > 20 mm Hg, 95% CI −0.07% to −0.3%, p = 0.002) were associated with increased ICP.

    Conclusions: Increased ICP occurs in approximately one-third of patients with severe TBI who have DAI. Age and lesions on DWI sequences in the central mesencephalon (i.e., SN-T) are associated with elevated ICP. These findings suggest that MR lesion localization may aid prediction of increased ICP in patients with DAI.

    Abbreviations: ADC = apparent diffusion coefficient; CPP = cerebral perfusion pressure; DAI = diffuse axonal injury; DWI = diffusion-weighted imaging; EVD = external ventricular drain; GCS = Glasgow Coma Scale; GMT = good monitoring time; GOSE = Glasgow Outcome Scale–Extended; ICC = intraclass correlation coefficient; ICP = intracranial pressure; MAP = mean arterial blood pressure; NICU = neurointensive care unit; SN-T = substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum; SWI = susceptibility-weighted imaging; TBI = traumatic brain injury; T2*GRE = T2*-weighted gradient echo.

  • 10.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Howells, Timothy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Intracranial pressure elevations in diffuse axonal injury are associated with non-hemorrhagic MR lesions in central mesencephalic structuresIn: Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is not well defined. This study investigated the occurrence of increased ICP and whether clinical factors and lesion localization on MRI were associated with increased ICP in DAI patients.

    Methods: Fifty-two severe TBI patients (median 24, range 9-61 years), with ICP-monitoring and DAI on MRI, using T2*-weighted gradient echo, susceptibility-weighted and diffusion-weighted (DW) sequences, were enrolled. Proportion of good monitoring time (GMT) with ICP>20 mmHg during the first 120 hours post-injury was calculated and associations with clinical and MRI-related factors were evaluated using linear regression. 

    Results: All patients had episodes of ICP>20 mmHg. The mean proportion of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg was 5% and 27% of the patients (14/52) had more than 5% of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg. Glasgow Coma Scale motor score at admission (P=0.04) and lesions on DW images in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum (SN-T, P=0.001) were associated with the proportion of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg. In multivariate linear regression, lesions on DW images in SN-T (8% of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg, 95% CI 3–13%, P=0.004) and young age (-0.2% of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg, 95% CI -0.07–-0.3%, P=0.0008) were associated with increased ICP.   

    Conclusions: Increased ICP occurs in ~1/3 of severe TBI patients with DAI. Age and lesions on DW images in the central mesencephalon (SN-T) associate with elevated ICP. These findings suggest that MR lesion localization may aid prediction of increased ICP in DAI patients.

  • 11.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    CT Guided Ablation of T1 Renal Tumors2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The widespread use of medical imaging contributes to the increased detection of incidentally detected small renal tumors, a majority which are often indolent masses found in elderly patients with preexisting chronic kidney disease. In Sweden, partial nephrectomy with minimal invasive surgical approach is the current standard for removing these tumors, although another option is percutaneous image-guided tumor ablation that allows treatment of elderly patients with comorbidities for who surgery is a risk. Due to the lack of long-term follow-up studies and prospective randomized trials, ablation is still considered an alternative option to surgery in Sweden. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate treatment of T1 renal tumors with CT guided radiofrequency (RFA) and microwave ablation (MWA).

    Factors affecting the efficacy rate of complete tumor ablation with RFA after a single session were evaluated (Paper I). Optimal electrode placement and a long tumor distance to the collecting system were associated with an increased primary efficacy. Renal tumor RFA was compared with laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN: Papers II-III): both methods had comparable secondary efficacy rates, but RFA involved several treatment sessions. Total session times and hospitalization times were shorter and complications less frequent for RFA than for LPN (Paper II). After treatment, renal function impact was assessed by evaluation of both renal function quantity and quality through determination of the split renal function (SRF: Paper III). Standard renal function measurements were assessed and both RFA and LPN were nephron sparing when treating small renal tumors and did not affect creatinine or GFR. However, LPN involved greater SRF reduction in the affected kidney than RFA. Initial experience with microwave ablation was evaluated and this new ablation technique demonstrated high efficacy rates with fewer complications, and was comparable with the mid-term results of now established ablation techniques (Paper IV).

    In conclusion, CT guided RFA and MWA are safe and effective treatments for the removal of T1 renal tumors. This thesis provides further insights into the field of thermal ablation of small renal masses, which can aid future treatment selection and patient management.

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  • 12.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Båtelsson, Sarah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Onkamo, Elina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Nilsson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Renal Medicine.
    Lönnemark, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Dahlman, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Split Renal Function after Treatment of Small Renal Masses: Comparison between Radiofrequency Ablation and Laparoscopic Partial NephrectomyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Båtelsson, Sarah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Onkamo, Elina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Nilsson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lönnemark, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Dahlman, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Split renal function after treatment of small renal masses: comparison between radiofrequency ablation and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy.2021In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 62, no 9, p. 1248-1256, article id 284185120956281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) are used to treat small renal masses (SRM; ≤4 cm), although there are conflicting results in the changes in creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) after treatment. On contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) images, the quantity and quality of renal function can be evaluated by calculating the split renal function (SRF).

    PURPOSE: To compare renal function after RFA or LPN treatment of SRMs through evaluation of the SRF in the affected kidney.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Single T1a renal tumors successfully treated with RFA (n = 60) or LPN (n = 31) were retrospectively compared. The SRF was calculated on pre-treatment CE-CT images and the first follow-up exam after completed treatment. Serum creatinine and eGFR values were collected simultaneously. To compare renal function outcomes, Student's t-test and multivariable linear regression models (adjusted to RFA/LPN treatment, pre-treatment SRF/eGFR, BMI, age, tumor characteristics, and Charlson Comorbidity Index) were used.

    RESULTS: SRF was reduced in both groups, although reduction was greater in the LPN group (LPN -5.7%) than in the RFA group (RFA -3.5%; P = 0.013). After adjusted analysis, the LPN group still had greater SRF reduction (difference 3.2%, 95% confidence interval 1.3-1.5; P = 0.001). There was no difference between groups in the change of creatinine/eGFR after treatment.

    CONCLUSION: Both RFA and LPN are nephron-sparing when treating SRMs. However, in this series, reduction of SRF in the affected kidney was smaller after RFA, having a more favorable preservation of renal function than LPN.

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  • 14.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Dahlman, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Brekkan, Einar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Lönnemark, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Microwave ablation of 105 T1 renal tumors: technique efficacy with a mean follow-up of two years2024In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 294-301, article id 284185120956283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Thermal ablation (TA) with radiofrequency (RFA) or cryoablation (CA) are established treatments for small renal masses (≤4 cm). Microwave ablation (MWA) has several potential benefits (decreased ablation time, less susceptibility to heat-sink, higher lesion temperatures than RFA) but is still considered experimental considering the available small-sample studies with short follow-up.

    Purpose: To evaluate technique efficacy and complications of our initial experience of renal tumors treated using percutaneous MWA with a curative intent.

    Material and Methods: A total of 105 renal tumors (in 93 patients) were treated between April 2014 and August 2017. MWA was performed percutaneously with computed tomography (CT) guidance under conscious sedation (n=82) or full anesthesia. Patients were followed with contrast-enhanced CT scans at six months and yearly thereafter for a minimum of five years. The mean follow-up time was 2.1 years. The percentage of tumors completely ablated in a single session (primary efficacy rate) and those successfully treated after repeat ablation (secondary efficacy rate) were recorded. Patient and tumor characteristics as well as complications were collected retrospectively.

    Results: The median patient age was 70 years and median tumor size was 25 mm. Primary efficacy rate was 96.2% (101/105 tumors). After including two residual tumors for a second ablation session, secondary efficacy was 97.1% (102/105). Periprocedural complications were found in 5.2% (5/95) sessions: four Clavien-Dindo I and one Clavien-Dindo IIIa. One postprocedural Clavien-Dindo II complication was found.

    Conclusion: MWA has high efficacy rates and few complications compared to other TA methods at a mean follow-up of two years.

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  • 15.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Dahlman, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Brekkan, Einar
    Lönnemark, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Percutaneous CT Guided Microwave Ablation of 105 T1a-T1b Renal Tumors: Technique Efficacy with a Mean 2-Year Follow-upManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ladjevardi, Sam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Brekkan, Einar
    Uppsala University Hospital, Urology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Häggman, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Lönnemark, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Periprocedural outcome after laparoscopic partial nephrectomy versus radiofrequency ablation for T1 renal tumors: A modified R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score adjusted comparison2019In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 260-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Comparable oncological outcomes have been seen after surgical nephrectomy and thermal ablation of renal tumors recently. However, periprocedural outcome needs to be assessed for aiding treatment decision.

    Purpose: To compare efficacy rates and periprocedural outcome (technical success, session time, hospitalization time, and complications) after renal tumor treatment with laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA).

    Material and Methods: The initial experience with 49 (treated with LPN) and 84 (treated with RFA) consecutive patients for a single renal tumor (diameter ≤ 5 cm, limited to the kidney) during 2007-2014 was evaluated. Patient and tumor characteristics, efficacy rates, and periprocedural outcome were collected retrospectively. The stratified Mantel Haenzel and Van Elteren tests, adjusted for tumor complexity (with the modified R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score [m-RNS]), were used to assess differences in treatment outcomes.

    Results: Primary efficacy rate was 98% for LPN and 85.7% for RFA; secondary efficacy rate was 93.9% for LPN and 95.2% for RFA; and technical success rate was 87.8% for LPN and 100% for RFA. Median session (m-RNS adjusted P < 0.001; LPN 215 min, RFA 137 min) and median hospitalization time were longer after LPN (m-RNS adjusted P < 0.001; LPN 5 days, RFA 2 days). Side effects were uncommon (LPN 2%, RFA 4.8%). Complications were more frequent after LPN (m-RNS adjusted P < 0.001; LPN 42.9%, RFA 10.7%).

    Conclusion: Both methods achieved equivalent secondary efficacy rates. RFA included several treatment sessions, but session and hospitalization times were shorter, and complications were less frequent than for LPN. The differences remained after adjustment for renal tumor complexity.

  • 17.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lönnemark, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Brekkan, Einar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Dahlman, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Predictive factors for complete renal tumor ablation using RFA2016In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 886-893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can be used to treat renal masses in patients where surgery is preferably avoided. As tumor size and location can affect ablation results, procedural planning needs to identify these factors to limit treatment to a single session and increase ablation success.

    PURPOSE: To identify factors that may affect the primary efficacy of complete renal tumor ablation with radiofrequency after a single session.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Percutaneous RFA (using an impedance based system) was performed using computed tomography (CT) guidance. Fifty-two renal tumors (in 44 patients) were retrospectively studied (median follow-up, 7 months). Data collection included patient demographics, tumor data (modified Renal Nephrometry Score, histopathological diagnosis), RFA treatment data (electrode placement), and follow-up results (tumor relapse). Data were analyzed through generalized estimating equations.

    RESULTS: Primary efficacy rate was 83%. Predictors for complete ablation were optimal electrode placement (P = 0.002, OR = 16.67) and increasing distance to the collecting system (P = 0.02, OR = 1.18). Tumor size was not a predictor for complete ablation (median size, 24 mm; P = 0.069, OR = 0.47), but all tumors ≤2 cm were completely ablated. All papillary tumors and oncocytomas were completely ablated in a single session; the most common incompletely ablated tumor type was clear cell carcinoma (6 of 9).

    CONCLUSION: Optimal electrode placement and a long distance from the collecting system are associated with an increased primary efficacy of renal tumor RFA. These variables need to be considered to increase primary ablation success. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of RFA on histopathologically different renal tumors.

  • 18. Adam, A
    et al.
    Robison, J
    Lu, J
    Jose, R
    Badran, N
    Vivas-Buitrago, T
    Rigamonti, D
    Sattar, A
    Omoush, O
    Hammad, M
    Dawood, M
    Maghaslah, M
    Belcher, T
    Carson, K
    Hoffberger, J
    Jusué Torres, I
    Foley, S
    Yasar, S
    Thai, Q A
    Wemmer, J
    Klinge, P
    Al-Mutawa, L
    Al-Ghamdi, H
    Carson, K A
    Asgari, M
    de Zélicourt, D
    Kurtcuoglu, V
    Garnotel, S
    Salmon, S
    Balédent, O
    Lokossou, A
    Page, G
    Balardy, L
    Czosnyka, Z
    Payoux, P
    Schmidt, E A
    Zitoun, M
    Sevestre, M A
    Alperin, N
    Baudracco, I
    Craven, C
    Matloob, S
    Thompson, S
    Haylock Vize, P
    Thorne, L
    Watkins, L D
    Toma, A K
    Bechter, Karl
    Pong, A C
    Jugé, L
    Bilston, L E
    Cheng, S
    Bradley, W
    Hakim, F
    Ramón, J F
    Cárdenas, M F
    Davidson, J S
    García, C
    González, D
    Bermúdez, S
    Useche, N
    Mejía, J A
    Mayorga, P
    Cruz, F
    Martinez, C
    Matiz, M C
    Vallejo, M
    Ghotme, K
    Soto, H A
    Riveros, D
    Buitrago, A
    Mora, M
    Murcia, L
    Bermudez, S
    Cohen, D
    Dasgupta, D
    Curtis, C
    Domínguez, L
    Remolina, A J
    Grijalba, M A
    Whitehouse, K J
    Edwards, R J
    Eleftheriou, A
    Lundin, F
    Fountas, K N
    Kapsalaki, E Z
    Smisson, H F
    Robinson, J S
    Fritsch, M J
    Arouk, W
    Garzon, M
    Kang, M
    Sandhu, K
    Baghawatti, D
    Aquilina, K
    James, G
    Thompson, D
    Gehlen, M
    Schmid Daners, M
    Eklund, A
    Malm, J
    Gomez, D
    Guerra, M
    Jara, M
    Flores, M
    Vío, K
    Moreno, I
    Rodríguez, S
    Ortega, E
    Rodríguez, E M
    McAllister, J P
    Guerra, M M
    Morales, D M
    Sival, D
    Jimenez, A
    Limbrick, D D
    Ishikawa, M
    Yamada, S
    Yamamoto, K
    Junkkari, A
    Häyrinen, A
    Rauramaa, T
    Sintonen, H
    Nerg, O
    Koivisto, A M
    Roine, R P
    Viinamäki, H
    Soininen, H
    Luikku, A
    Jääskeläinen, J E
    Leinonen, V
    Kehler, U
    Lilja-Lund, O
    Kockum, K
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Riklund, K
    Söderström, L
    Hellström, P
    Laurell, K
    Kojoukhova, M
    Sutela, A
    Vanninen, R
    Vanha, K I
    Timonen, M
    Rummukainen, J
    Korhonen, V
    Helisalmi, S
    Solje, E
    Remes, A M
    Huovinen, J
    Paananen, J
    Hiltunen, M
    Kurki, M
    Martin, B
    Loth, F
    Luciano, M
    Luikku, A J
    Hall, A
    Herukka, S K
    Mattila, J
    Lötjönen, J
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Jurjević, I
    Miyajima, M
    Nakajima, M
    Murai, H
    Shin, T
    Kawaguchi, D
    Akiba, C
    Ogino, I
    Karagiozov, K
    Arai, H
    Reis, R C
    Teixeira, M J
    Valêncio, C G
    da Vigua, D
    Almeida-Lopes, L
    Mancini, M W
    Pinto, F C G
    Maykot, R H
    Calia, G
    Tornai, J
    Silvestre, S S S
    Mendes, G
    Sousa, V
    Bezerra, B
    Dutra, P
    Modesto, P
    Oliveira, M F
    Petitto, C E
    Pulhorn, H
    Chandran, A
    McMahon, C
    Rao, A S
    Jumaly, M
    Solomon, D
    Moghekar, A
    Relkin, N
    Hamilton, M
    Katzen, H
    Williams, M
    Bach, T
    Zuspan, S
    Holubkov, R
    Rigamonti, A
    Clemens, G
    Sharkey, P
    Sanyal, A
    Sankey, E
    Rigamonti, K
    Naqvi, S
    Hung, A
    Schmidt, E
    Ory-Magne, F
    Gantet, P
    Guenego, A
    Januel, A C
    Tall, P
    Fabre, N
    Mahieu, L
    Cognard, C
    Gray, L
    Buttner-Ennever, J A
    Takagi, K
    Onouchi, K
    Thompson, S D
    Thorne, L D
    Tully, H M
    Wenger, T L
    Kukull, W A
    Doherty, D
    Dobyns, W B
    Moran, D
    Vakili, S
    Patel, M A
    Elder, B
    Goodwin, C R
    Crawford, J A
    Pletnikov, M V
    Xu, J
    Blitz, A
    Herzka, D A
    Guerrero-Cazares, H
    Quiñones-Hinojosa, A
    Mori, S
    Saavedra, P
    Treviño, H
    Maitani, K
    Ziai, W C
    Eslami, V
    Nekoovaght-Tak, S
    Dlugash, R
    Yenokyan, G
    McBee, N
    Hanley, D F
    Abstracts from Hydrocephalus 2016.2017In: Fluids and Barriers of the CNS, E-ISSN 2045-8118, Vol. 14, no Suppl 1, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Adamczuk, Katarzyna
    et al.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Schaeverbeke, Jolien
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Nelissen, Natalie
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Oxford, Dept Psychiat, Oxford OX3 7JX, England..
    Neyens, Veerle
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Vandenbulcke, Mathieu
    Univ Hosp Leuven, Dept Old Age Psychiat, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Goffin, Karolien
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Nucl Med & Mol Imaging Dept, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Hosp Leuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Lilja, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. GE Healthcare, S-75323 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hilven, Kelly
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Neuroimmunol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Dupont, Patrick
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Van Laere, Koen
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Nucl Med & Mol Imaging Dept, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Hosp Leuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Vandenberghe, Rik
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Hosp Leuven, Dept Neurol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Amyloid imaging in cognitively normal older adults: comparison between F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-Pittsburgh compound B2016In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 142-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Preclinical, or asymptomatic, Alzheimer's disease (AD) refers to the presence of positive AD biomarkers in the absence of cognitive deficits. This research concept is being applied to define target populations for clinical drug development. In a prospective community-recruited cohort of cognitively intact older adults, we compared two amyloid imaging markers within subjects: F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). Methods In 32 community-recruited cognitively intact older adults aged between 65 and 80 years, we determined the concordance between binary classification based on F-18-flutemetamol versus C-11-PIB according to semiquantitative assessment (standardized uptake value ratio in composite cortical volume, SUVRcomp) and, alternatively, according to visual reads. We also determined the correlation between F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-PIB SUVR and evaluated how this was affected by the reference region chosen (cerebellar grey matter versus pons) and the use of partial volume correction (PVC) in this population. Results Binary classification based on semiquantitative assessment was concordant between F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-PIB in 94 % of cases. Concordance of blinded binary visual reads between tracers was 84 %. The Spearman correlation between F-18-flutemetamol and C-11-PIB SUVRcomp with cerebellar grey matter as reference region was 0.84, with a slope of 0.98. Correlations in neocortical regions were significantly lower with the pons as reference region. PVC improved the correlation in striatum and medial temporal cortex. Conclusion For the definition of preclinical AD based on F-18-flutemetamol, concordance with C-11-PIB was highest using semiquantitative assessment with cerebellar grey matter as reference region.

  • 20.
    Adamczuk, Katarzyna
    et al.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Schaeverbeke, Jolien
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Vanderstichele, Hugo M. J.
    ADx NeuroSci, B-9052 Ghent, Belgium..
    Lilja, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. GE Healthcare, S-75125 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Nelissen, Natalie
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Univ Oxford, Dept Psychiat, Oxford OX3 7JX, England..
    Van Laere, Koen
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Nucl Med & Mol Imaging Dept, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven Hosp, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Dupont, Patrick
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Hilven, Kelly
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Neuroimmunol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Poesen, Koen
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Mol Neurobiomarker Res, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;UZ Leuven, Lab Med, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Vandenberghe, Rik
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Cognit Neurol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Leuven Inst Neurosci & Dis, Alzheimer Res Ctr, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium.;Univ Hosp Leuven, Dept Neurol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Diagnostic value of cerebrospinal fluid A beta ratios in preclinical Alzheimer's disease2015In: Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, E-ISSN 1758-9193, Vol. 7, article id 75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In this study of preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) we assessed the added diagnostic value of using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) A beta ratios rather than A beta 42 in isolation for detecting individuals who are positive on amyloid positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Thirty-eight community-recruited cognitively intact older adults (mean age 73, range 65-80 years) underwent F-18-flutemetamol PET and CSF measurement of A beta 1-42, A beta 1-40, A beta 1-38, and total tau (ttau). F-18-flutemetamol retention was quantified using standardized uptake value ratios in a composite cortical region (SUVRcomp) with reference to cerebellar grey matter. Based on a prior autopsy validation study, the SUVRcomp cut-off was 1.57. Sensitivities, specificities and cut-offs were defined based on receiver operating characteristic analysis with CSF analytes as variables of interest and F-18-flutemetamol positivity as the classifier. We also determined sensitivities and CSF cut-off values at fixed specificities of 90 % and 95 %. Results: Seven out of 38 subjects (18 %) were positive on amyloid PET. A beta 42/ttau, A beta 42/A beta 40, A beta 42/A beta 38, and A beta 42 had the highest accuracy to identify amyloid-positive subjects (area under the curve (AUC) >= 0.908). A beta 40 and A beta 38 had significantly lower discriminative power (AUC = 0.571). When specificity was fixed at 90 % and 95 %, A beta 42/ttau had the highest sensitivity among the different CSF markers (85.71 % and 71.43 %, respectively). Sensitivity of A beta 42 alone was significantly lower under these conditions (57.14 % and 42.86 %, respectively). Conclusion: For the CSF-based definition of preclinical AD, if a high specificity is required, our data support the use of A beta 42/ttau rather than using A beta 42 in isolation.

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  • 21.
    Adeen, Sofia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Andersson, Clara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Möjliga orsaker till patienters oro vid magnetkameraundersökningar; en jämförelse mellan två sjukhus: En deskriptiv enkätstudie2021Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging technique of which the usage has increased a lot during the last decades. The technique requires the patient to lay completely still in the narrow space during a long time, which causes anxiety for some patients. This results in canceled and postponed examinations and causes stress for the radiographers together with economic consequences for the society.

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the most common reasons for anxiety when undergoing an MRI-scan and to compare differences between two hospitals. The study will also evaluate the patients experiences of the communication and information given by the radiographers before and during an MRI-scan. 

    Method: An empirical quantitative method was chosen. The authors designed a questionnaire that was distributed to the patients after their MRI-scan at Uppsala University Hospital or Enköping Hospital.

    Results: The main reason for anxiety was the fear of what the scan might reveal. Other reasons were the narrow space in the MRI and the requirement to be completely still during the scan. Most of the patients felt calmer by the given communication and information, or declared it had no influence on their anxiety levels. The comparison between the two hospitals resulted in no significant difference (p>0,05). 

    Conclusion: The results from each hospital were very similar to each other and no significant difference was discovered. Overall, the patients became calmer by the communication and information given before and during the examination.

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  • 22. Aguilar, Carlos
    et al.
    Edholm, Kaijsa
    Simmons, Andrew
    Cavallin, Lena
    Muller, Susanne
    Skoog, Ingmar
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Axelsson, Rimma
    Wahlund, Lars-Olof
    Westman, Eric
    Automated CT-based segmentation and quantification of total intracranial volume2015In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 25, no 11, p. 3151-3160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To develop an algorithm to segment and obtain an estimate of total intracranial volume (tICV) from computed tomography (CT) images.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six CT examinations from 18 patients were included. Ten patients were examined twice the same day and eight patients twice six months apart (these patients also underwent MRI). The algorithm combines morphological operations, intensity thresholding and mixture modelling. The method was validated against manual delineation and its robustness assessed from repeated imaging examinations. Using automated MRI software, the comparability with MRI was investigated. Volumes were compared based on average relative volume differences and their magnitudes; agreement was shown by a Bland-Altman analysis graph.

    RESULTS: We observed good agreement between our algorithm and manual delineation of a trained radiologist: the Pearson's correlation coefficient was r = 0.94, tICVml[manual] = 1.05 × tICVml[automated] - 33.78 (R(2) = 0.88). Bland-Altman analysis showed a bias of 31 mL and a standard deviation of 30 mL over a range of 1265 to 1526 mL.

    CONCLUSIONS: tICV measurements derived from CT using our proposed algorithm have shown to be reliable and consistent compared to manual delineation. However, it appears difficult to directly compare tICV measures between CT and MRI.

    KEY POINTS: • Automated estimation of tICV is in good agreement with manual tracing. • Consistent tICV estimations from repeated measurements demonstrate the robustness of the algorithm. • Automatically segmented volumes seem less variable than those from manual tracing. • Unbiased and automated tlCV estimation is possible from CT.

  • 23.
    Ahlkvist, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lidell, Tilda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Gadoliniumretention, dess inverkan på människokroppen samt vilka förebyggande åtgärder röntgensjuksköterskan kan behöva implementera: En litteraturstudie2024Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging exams is becoming more common and therefore the use of gadolinium-based contrast media increases. However, gadolinium retention is a relatively newly discovered phenomenon, and its impact on the human body is still unknown.

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to obtain a deeper understanding of what gadolinium retention is and how it affects the human body, and which implementations radiographers may have to do to adapt the care according to new research within the field.

    Method This study is a systematic literary review. The data collection was made from the databases PubMed and CINAHL. Only scientific studies that fulfilled the inclusion criteria, for example that they were peer-reviewed and primary published, were included. The articles that answered the questions were quality reviewed and the articles that achieved medium or high quality were analysed.

    Results The result of this study shows thar accumulated gadoliniumretention can arise after repeated administrations of gadolinium-based contrast media. No adverse effects in the human body have been demonstrated. To reduce the risk of accumulating gadoliniumretention several studies recommend reducing the dosage and to be cautious when administrating.

    Conclusion Gadoliniumretention can be seen as an increased signal intensity, mainly in dentate nucleus and globus palladius in the human brain after multiple administration of gadolinium-based contrast media. Its adverse effects on the human body are still unknown and more research is needed on how radiographer can adapt the care thereafter.

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  • 24.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ekström, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sjöholm, Therese
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Strand, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, E.
    Antaros Med, Molndal, Sweden..
    Hagmar, P.
    Antaros Med, Molndal, Sweden..
    Malmberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Registration-based automated lesion detection and therapy evaluation of tumors in whole body PET-MR images2017In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 28, no S5, article id 78PArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Ahmad, Nouman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Dahlberg, Hugo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Jönsson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Tarai, Sambit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Guggilla, Rama Krishna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Strand, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division Vi3.
    Lundström, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bergstrom, Goran
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Med, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Physiol, Reg Vastra Gotaland, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Antaros Med, Mölndal, Sweden..
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Antaros Med, Mölndal, Sweden..
    Voxel-wise body composition analysis using image registration of a three-slice CT imaging protocol: methodology and proof-of-concept studies2024In: Biomedical engineering online, E-ISSN 1475-925X, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Computed tomography (CT) is an imaging modality commonly used for studies of internal body structures and very useful for detailed studies of body composition. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a fully automatic image registration framework for inter-subject CT slice registration. The aim was also to use the results, in a set of proof-of-concept studies, for voxel-wise statistical body composition analysis (Imiomics) of correlations between imaging and non-imaging data.Methods The current study utilized three single-slice CT images of the liver, abdomen, and thigh from two large cohort studies, SCAPIS and IGT. The image registration method developed and evaluated used both CT images together with image-derived tissue and organ segmentation masks. To evaluate the performance of the registration method, a set of baseline 3-single-slice CT images (from 2780 subjects including 8285 slices) from the SCAPIS and IGT cohorts were registered. Vector magnitude and intensity magnitude error indicating inverse consistency were used for evaluation. Image registration results were further used for voxel-wise analysis of associations between the CT images (as represented by tissue volume from Hounsfield unit and Jacobian determinant) and various explicit measurements of various tissues, fat depots, and organs collected in both cohort studies.Results Our findings demonstrated that the key organs and anatomical structures were registered appropriately. The evaluation parameters of inverse consistency, such as vector magnitude and intensity magnitude error, were on average less than 3 mm and 50 Hounsfield units. The registration followed by Imiomics analysis enabled the examination of associations between various explicit measurements (liver, spleen, abdominal muscle, visceral adipose tissue (VAT), subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), thigh SAT, intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT), and thigh muscle) and the voxel-wise image information.Conclusion The developed and evaluated framework allows accurate image registrations of the collected three single-slice CT images and enables detailed voxel-wise studies of associations between body composition and associated diseases and risk factors.

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  • 26.
    Ahmad, Nouman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Strand, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Sparresäter, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Tarai, Sambit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lundström, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bergström, Göran
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Automatic segmentation of large-scale CT image datasets for detailed body composition analysis.2023In: BMC Bioinformatics, E-ISSN 1471-2105, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Body composition (BC) is an important factor in determining the risk of type 2-diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Computed tomography (CT) is a useful imaging technique for studying BC, however manual segmentation of CT images is time-consuming and subjective. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate fully automated segmentation techniques applicable to a 3-slice CT imaging protocol, consisting of single slices at the level of the liver, abdomen, and thigh, allowing detailed analysis of numerous tissues and organs.

    METHODS: The study used more than 4000 CT subjects acquired from the large-scale SCAPIS and IGT cohort to train and evaluate four convolutional neural network based architectures: ResUNET, UNET++, Ghost-UNET, and the proposed Ghost-UNET++. The segmentation techniques were developed and evaluated for automated segmentation of the liver, spleen, skeletal muscle, bone marrow, cortical bone, and various adipose tissue depots, including visceral (VAT), intraperitoneal (IPAT), retroperitoneal (RPAT), subcutaneous (SAT), deep (DSAT), and superficial SAT (SSAT), as well as intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT). The models were trained and validated for each target using tenfold cross-validation and test sets.

    RESULTS: The Dice scores on cross validation in SCAPIS were: ResUNET 0.964 (0.909-0.996), UNET++ 0.981 (0.927-0.996), Ghost-UNET 0.961 (0.904-0.991), and Ghost-UNET++ 0.968 (0.910-0.994). All four models showed relatively strong results, however UNET++ had the best performance overall. Ghost-UNET++ performed competitively compared to UNET++ and showed a more computationally efficient approach.

    CONCLUSION: Fully automated segmentation techniques can be successfully applied to a 3-slice CT imaging protocol to analyze multiple tissues and organs related to BC. The overall best performance was achieved by UNET++, against which Ghost-UNET++ showed competitive results based on a more computationally efficient approach. The use of fully automated segmentation methods can reduce analysis time and provide objective results in large-scale studies of BC.

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  • 27.
    Ahmad, Shafqat
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Carrasquilla, Germán
    Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Langner, Taro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Menzel, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Malmberg, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Hammar, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Censin, Jenny C.
    Big Data Institute at the Li Ka Shing Centre for Health Information and Discovery, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; 7Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
    Sayols-Baixeras, Sergi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nguyen, Diem
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Mora, Andrés Martínez
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Eriksson, Jan W.
    Clinical Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Strand, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Fall, Tove
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Genetics of liver fat and volume associate with altered metabolism and whole body magnetic resonance imaging2022In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 77, p. S40-S40Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Ahmed, Adan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bemötande av barn på röntgen2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Barnen är oftast rädda och oroliga då de kommer till en röntgenundersökning på grund av att det är en främmande miljö utrustad med högteknologisk apparatur som är skrämmande för barnet. För att bemöta dessa barn behöver röntgensjuksköterskan ha kunskap och färdigheter om bemötande av barn. Ett bra samspel mellan röntgensjuksköterskan och barnen som bygger på ömsesidig tillit och respekt ger trygghet hos barnet och det kan samarbeta bättre under röntgenundersökningen. På en kort tid, ofta mindre än 5 minuter, måste en röntgensjuksköterska överföra viktig information om undersökningen till barnet. Därför är det viktigt för röntgensjuksköterskan att ha kunskap om gott bemötande av barn.

  • 29.
    Ahmed, Fozia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Hetty, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Vranic, Milica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Fanni, Giovanni
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Pereira, Maria J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Eriksson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    ESR2 expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue is related to body fat distribution in women, and knockdown impairs preadipocyte differentiation2022In: Adipocyte, ISSN 2162-3945, E-ISSN 2162-397X, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 434-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oestrogen receptor 2 (ESR2) expression has been shown to be higher in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) from postmenopausal compared to premenopausal women. The functional significance of altered ESR2 expression is not fully known. This study investigates the role of ESR2 for adipose tissue lipid and glucose metabolism. SAT biopsies were obtained from 44 female subjects with or without T2D. Gene expression of ESR2 and markers of adipose function and metabolism was assessed. ESR2 knockdown was performed using CRISPR/Cas9 in preadipocytes isolated from SAT of females, and differentiation rate, lipid storage, and glucose uptake were measured. ESR2 expression was inversely correlated with measures of central obesity and expression of some fatty acid oxidation markers, and positively correlated with lipid storage and glucose transport markers. Differentiation was reduced in ESR2 knockdown preadipocytes. This corresponded to reduced expression of markers of differentiation and lipogenesis. Glucose uptake was reduced in knockdown adipocytes. Our results indicate that ESR2 deficiency in women is associated with visceral adiposity and impaired subcutaneous adipocyte differentiation as well as glucose and lipid utilization. High ESR2 expression, as seen after menopause, could be a contributing factor to SAT expansion. This may support a possible target to promote a healthy obesity phenotype.

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  • 30.
    Ahnfelt, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Dahlman, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Segelsjö, Monica
    Magnusson, Mats O
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Accuracy of iodine quantification using dual-energy computed tomography with focus on low concentrations.2022In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 63, no 5, p. 623-631, article id 2841851211009462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Iodine quantification using dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is helpful in characterizing, and follow-up after treatment of tumors. Some malignant masses, for instance papillary renal cell carcinomas (p-RCC), are hard to differentiate from benign lesions because of very low contrast enhancement. In these cases, iodine concentrations might be very low, and it is therefore important that iodine quantification is reliable even at low concentrations if this technique is used.

    PURPOSE: To examine the accuracy of iodine quantification and to determine whether it is also accurate for low iodine concentrations.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-six syringes with different iodine concentrations (0-30 mg I/mL) were scanned in a phantom model using a DECT scanner with two different kilovoltage and image reconstruction settings. Iodine concentrations were measured and compared to known concentration. Absolute and relative errors were calculated.

    RESULTS: For concentrations of 1 mg I/mL or higher, there was an excellent correlation between true and measured iodine concentrations for all settings (R = 0.999-1.000; P < 0.001). For concentrations <1.0 mg I/mL, the relative error was greater. Absolute and relative errors were smaller using tube voltages of 80/Sn140 kV than 100/Sn140 kV (P < 0.01). Reconstructions using a 3.0-mm slice thickness had less variance between repeated acquisitions versus 0.6 mm (P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: Iodine quantification using DECT was in general very accurate, but for concentrations < 1.0 mg I/mL the technique was less reliable. Using a tube voltage with larger spectral separation was more accurate and the result was more reproducible using thicker image reconstructions.

  • 31.
    Aleksyniene, Ramune
    et al.
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Dept Nucl Med, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark..
    Iyer, Victor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Aalborg Univ Hosp, Dept Nucl Med, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark..
    Bertelsen, Henrik Christian
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Dept Nucl Med, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark..
    Nilsson, Majbritt Frost
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Dept Nucl Med, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark..
    Khalid, Vesal
    Aalborg Univ, Dept Clin Med, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark.;Aalborg Univ Hosp, Orthopaed Res Unit, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark..
    Schonheyder, Henrik Carl
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Microbiol, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark..
    Larsen, Lone Heimann
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Microbiol, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark..
    Nielsen, Poul Torben
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed Surg, Interdisciplinary Orthopaed, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark..
    Kappel, Andreas
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed Surg, Interdisciplinary Orthopaed, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark..
    Thomsen, Trine Rolighed
    Aalborg Univ, Ctr Microbial Communities, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark.;Danish Technol Inst, Med Biotechnol, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark..
    Lorenzen, Jan
    Danish Technol Inst, Med Biotechnol, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark..
    Ørsted, Iben
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Dept Infect Dis, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark..
    Simonsen, Ole
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed Surg, Interdisciplinary Orthopaed, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark..
    Jordal, Peter Lüttge
    Danish Technol Inst, Med Biotechnol, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark..
    Rasmussen, Sten
    Aalborg Univ, Dept Clin Med, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark.;Aalborg Univ Hosp, Orthopaed Res Unit, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark..
    The Role of Nuclear Medicine Imaging with F-18-FDG PET/CT, Combined In-111-WBC/(99)mTc-Nanocoll, and Tc-99m-HDP SPECT/CT in the Evaluation of Patients with Chronic Problems after TKA or THA in a Prospective Study2022In: Diagnostics, ISSN 2075-4418, Vol. 12, no 3, article id 681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this prospective study was to assess the diagnostic value of nuclear imaging with F-18-FDG PET/CT (FDG PET/CT), combined In-111-WBC/(99)mTc-Nanocoll, and Tc-99m-HDP SPECT/CT (dual-isotope WBC/bone marrow scan) for patients with chronic problems related to knee or hip prostheses (TKA or THA) scheduled by a structured multidisciplinary algorithm.

    Materials and Methods: Fifty-five patients underwent imaging with Tc-99m-HDP SPECT/CT (bone scan), dual-isotope WBC/bone marrow scan, and FDG PET/CT. The final diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) and/or loosening was based on the intraoperative findings and microbiological culture results and the clinical follow-up.

    Results: The diagnostic performance of dual-isotope WBC/bone marrow SPECT/CT for PJI showed a sensitivity of 100% (CI 0.74-1.00), a specificity of 97% (CI 0.82-1.00), and an accuracy of 98% (CI 0.88-1.00); for PET/CT, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 100% (CI 0.74-1.00), 71% (CI 0.56-0.90), and 79% (CI 0.68-0.93), respectively.

    Conclusions: In a standardized prospectively scheduled patient group, the results showed highly specific performance of combined dual-isotope WBC/bone marrow SPECT/CT in confirming chronic PJI. FDG PET/CT has an appropriate accuracy, but the utility of its use in the clinical diagnostic algorithm of suspected PJI needs further evidence.

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  • 32.
    Alhuseinalkhudhur, Ali
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Lindman, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Liss, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sundin, Tora
    Frejd, Fredrik Y.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Feldwisch, Joachim
    Iyer, Victor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Velikyan, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    68Ga-ABY-025 PET in HER2-positive breast cancer: assessment of small axillary lesionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Alhuseinalkhudhur, Ali
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Lindman, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Liss, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sundin, Tora
    Frejd, Fredrik Y.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Hartman, Johan
    Iyer, Victor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Feldwisch, Joachim
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Rönnlund, Caroline
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Velikyan, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Translational PET Imaging.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Targeting [68Ga]Ga-ABY-025 PET/CT Predicts Early Metabolic Response in Metastatic Breast Cancer.2023In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 64, no 9, p. 1364-1370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Imaging using the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-binding tracer 68Ga-labeled ZHER2:2891-Cys-MMA-DOTA ([68Ga]Ga-ABY-025) was shown to reflect HER2 status determined by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). This single-center open-label phase II study investigated how [68Ga]Ga-ABY-025 uptake corresponds to biopsy results and early treatment response in both primary breast cancer (PBC) planned for neoadjuvant chemotherapy and MBC. Methods: Forty patients with known positive HER2 status were included: 19 with PBC and 21 with MBC (median, 3 previous treatments). [68Ga]Ga-ABY-025 PET/CT, [18F]F-FDG PET/CT, and core-needle biopsies from targeted lesions were performed at baseline. [18F]F-FDG PET/CT was repeated after 2 cycles of therapy to calculate the directional change in tumor lesion glycolysis (Δ-TLG). The largest lesions (up to 5) were evaluated in all 3 scans per patient. SUVs from [68Ga]Ga-ABY-025 PET/CT were compared with the biopsied HER2 status and Δ-TLG by receiver operating characteristic analyses. Results: Trial biopsies were HER2-positive in 31 patients, HER2-negative in 6 patients, and borderline HER2-positive in 3 patients. The [68Ga]Ga-ABY-025 PET/CT cutoff SUVmax of 6.0 predicted a Δ-TLG lower than -25% with 86% sensitivity and 67% specificity in soft-tissue lesions (area under the curve, 0.74 [95% CI, 0.67-0.82]; P = 0.01). Compared with the HER2 status, this cutoff resulted in clinically relevant discordant findings in 12 of 40 patients. Metabolic response (Δ-TLG) was more pronounced in PBC (-71% [95% CI, -58% to -83%]; P < 0.0001) than in MBC (-27% [95% CI, -16% to -38%]; P < 0.0001), but [68Ga]Ga-ABY-025 SUVmax was similar in both with a mean SUVmax of 9.8 (95% CI, 6.3-13.3) and 13.9 (95% CI, 10.5-17.2), respectively (P = 0.10). In multivariate analysis, global Δ-TLG was positively associated with the number of previous treatments (P = 0.0004) and negatively associated with [68Ga]Ga-ABY-025 PET/CT SUVmax (P = 0.018) but not with HER2 status (P = 0.09). Conclusion: [68Ga]Ga-ABY-025 PET/CT predicted early metabolic response to HER2-targeted therapy in HER2-positive breast cancer. Metabolic response was attenuated in recurrent disease. [68Ga]Ga-ABY-025 PET/CT appears to provide an estimate of the HER2 expression required to induce tumor metabolic remission by targeted therapies and might be useful as an adjunct diagnostic tool.

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  • 34.
    Alhuseinalkhudhur, Ali
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lindman, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science. Res Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Ctr Oncotheranost, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Tomsk, Russia.
    Frejd, Fredrik Y.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science. Affibody AB, Solna, Sweden.
    Feldwisch, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science. Affibody AB, Solna, Sweden.
    Velikyan, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Kinetic analysis of HER2-binding ABY-025 Affibody molecule using dynamic PET in patients with metastatic breast cancer2020In: EJNMMI Research, E-ISSN 2191-219X, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: High expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) represents an aggressive subtype of breast cancer. Anti-HER2 treatment requires a theragnostic approach wherein sufficiently high receptor expression in biopsy material is mandatory. Heterogeneity and discordance of HER2 expression between primary tumour and metastases, as well as within a lesion, present a complication for the treatment and require multiple biopsies. Molecular imaging using the HER2-targeting Affibody peptide ABY-025 radiolabelled with Ga-68-gallium for PET/CT is currently under investigation as a non-invasive tool for whole-body evaluation of metastatic HER2 expression. Initial studies demonstrated a high correlation between Ga-68-ABY-025 standardized uptake values (SUVs) and histopathology. However, detecting small liver lesions might be compromised by high background uptake. This study aimed to explore the applicability of kinetic modelling and parametric image analysis for absolute quantification of Ga-68-ABY-025 uptake and HER2-receptor expression and how that relates to static SUVs.

    Methods: Dynamic Ga-68-ABY-025 PET of the upper abdomen was performed 0-45 min post-injection in 16 patients with metastatic breast cancer. Five patients underwent two examinations to test reproducibility. Parametric images of tracer delivery (K-1) and irreversible binding (K-i) were created with an irreversible two-tissue compartment model and Patlak graphical analysis using an image-derived input function from the descending aorta. A volume of interest (VOI)-based analysis was performed to validate parametric images. SUVs were calculated from 2 h and 4 h post-injection static whole-body images and compared to K-i.

    Results: Characterization of HER2 expression in smaller liver metastases was improved using parametric images. K-i values from parametric images agreed very well with VOI-based gold standard (R-2 > 0.99, p < 0.001). SUVs of metastases at 2 h and 4 h post-injection were highly correlated with K-i values from both the two-tissue compartment model and Patlak method (R-2 = 0.87 and 0.95, both p < 0.001). Ga-68-ABY-025 PET yielded high test-retest reliability (relative repeatability coefficient for Patlak 30% and for the two-tissue compartment model 47%).

    Conclusion: Ga-68-ABY-025 binding in HER2-positive metastases was well characterized by irreversible two-tissue compartment model wherein K-i highly correlated with SUVs at 2 and 4 h. Dynamic scanning with parametric image formation can be used to evaluate metastatic HER2 expression accurately.

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  • 35.
    Alhuseinalkhudhur, Ali
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Velikyan, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preparative Medicinal Chemistry.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Frejd, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Feldwisch, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Lindman, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Kinetic Analysis of the HER2-binding ABY-025 Affibody Using Dynamic PET in Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer2018In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 45, p. S457-S457Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36. Ali, Muhammad
    et al.
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Psutka, Sarah P.
    Liu, David
    Siva, Shankar
    Ablative Therapies for Localized Primary Renal Cell Carcinoma2022In: Société Internationale d’Urologie Journal, ISSN 2563-6499, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 437-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surgery with either partial or radical nephrectomy remains the standard of care for localized primary renal cellcarcinoma (RCC). However, most RCCs are detected in an older age group, and some may have multiple comorbiditiesthat preclude surgery. Thermal ablation (TA) with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), cryoablation (CA), or microwaveablation (MWA) is considered an alternative to extirpative surgical procedures for select patients with small renaltumors. There is more than 90% post-ablation local control in carefully selected patients with reported complicationrates of less than 10%. Most thermal ablation require only a single procedure. More recently, stereotactic ablativebody radiotherapy (SABR) has emerged as an attractive noninvasive treatment modality for elderly patients withcomorbidities and localized RCC. It has shown more than 90% local control rates for both small and relatively largertumors (> 4 cm). Modest post-SABR renal function decline has been observed. Despite most patients presenting withmild or moderate chronic kidney disease there is less than a 5% chance of progression to end-stage renal disease. Thisarticle aims to summarize the key evidence and ablative treatment’s optimal patient selection, efficacy, and toxicity.

  • 37.
    Ali, Zafar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, 38000 Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Klar, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Jameel, Mohammad
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, 38000 Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Khan, Kamal
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, 38000 Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Fatima, Ambrin
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, 38000 Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Baig, Shahid
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, 38000 Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Novel SACS mutations associated with intellectual disability, epilepsy and widespread supratentorial abnormalities2016In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences, ISSN 0022-510X, E-ISSN 1878-5883, Vol. 371, p. 105-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe eight subjects from two consanguineous families segregating with autosomal recessive childhood onset spastic ataxia, peripheral neuropathy and intellectual disability. The degree of intellectual disability varied from mild to severe and all four affected individuals in one family developed aggressive behavior and epilepsy. Using exome sequencing, we identified two novel truncating mutations (c.2656C>T (p.Gln886*)) and (c.4756_4760delAATCA (p.Asn1586Tyrfs*3)) in the SACS gene responsible for autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS). MRI revealed typical cerebellar and pontine changes associated with ARSACS as well as multiple supratentorial changes in both families as likely contributing factors to the cognitive symptoms. Intellectual disability and behavioral abnormalities have been reported in some cases of ARSACS but are not a part of the characteristic triad of symptoms that includes cerebellar ataxia, spasticity and peripheral neuropathy. Our combined findings bring further knowledge to the phenotypic spectrum, neurodegenerative changes and genetic variability associated with the SACS gene of clinical and diagnostic importance.

  • 38.
    Ali, Zafar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Zulfiqar, Shumaila
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Klar, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ullah, Farid
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Khan, Ayaz
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Abdullah, Uzma
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Baig, Shahid
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Homozygous GRID2 missense mutation predicts a shift in the D-serine binding domain of GluD2 in a case with generalized brain atrophy and unusual clinical features2017In: BMC Medical Genetics, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Spinocerebellar ataxias comprise a large and heterogeneous group of disorders that may present with isolated ataxia, or ataxia in combination with other neurologic or non-neurologic symptoms. Monoallelic or biallelic GRID2 mutations were recently reported in rare cases with cerebellar syndrome and variable degree of ataxia, ocular symptoms, hypotonia and developmental delay.

    CASE PRESENTATION: We report on a consanguineous family with autosomal recessive childhood onset of slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia and delayed psychomotor development in three siblings. MRI of an adult and affected family member revealed slightly widened cerebral and cerebellar sulci, suggesting generalized brain atrophy, and mild cerebellar atrophy. Using whole exome sequencing we identified a novel homozygous missense variant [c.2128C > T, p.(Arg710Trp)] in GRID2 that segregates with the disease. The missense variant is located in a conserved region encoding the extracellular serine-binding domain of the GluD2 protein and predicts a change in conformation of the protein.

    CONCLUSION: The widespread supratentorial brain abnormalities, absence of oculomotor symptoms, increased peripheral muscle tone and the novel missense mutation add to the clinical and genetic variability in GRID2 associated cerebellar syndrome. The neuroradiological findings in our family indicate a generalized neurodegenerative process to be taken into account in other families segregating complex clinical features and GRID2 mutations.

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  • 39.
    Almby, Kristina E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Lundqvist, Martin H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Kvernby, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Fahlström, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Pereira, Maria J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Gingnell, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Cervenka: Psychiatry.
    Karlsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Fanni, Giovanni
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Sundbom, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Umeå, Sweden..
    Haller, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Univ Geneva, Fac Med, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Eriksson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Effects of Gastric Bypass Surgery on the Brain: Simultaneous Assessment of Glucose Uptake, Blood Flow, Neural Activity, and Cognitive Function During Normo- and Hypoglycemia2021In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 70, no 6, p. 1265-1277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery in obese individuals typically improves glycemic control and prevents diabetes, it also frequently causes asymptomatic hypoglycemia. Previous work showed attenuated counterregulatory responses following RYGB. The underlying mechanisms as well as the clinical consequences are unclear. In this study, 11 subjects without diabetes with severe obesity were investigated pre- and post-RYGB during hyperinsulinemic normo-hypoglycemic clamps. Assessments were made of hormones, cognitive function, cerebral blood flow by arterial spin labeling, brain glucose metabolism by F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography, and activation of brain networks by functional MRI. Post- versus presurgery, we found a general increase of cerebral blood flow but a decrease of total brain FDG uptake during normoglycemia. During hypoglycemia, there was a marked increase in total brain FDG uptake, and this was similar for post- and presurgery, whereas hypothalamic FDG uptake was reduced during hypoglycemia. During hypoglycemia, attenuated responses of counterregulatory hormones and improvements in cognitive function were seen postsurgery. In early hypoglycemia, there was increased activation post- versus presurgery of neural networks in brain regions implicated in glucose regulation, such as the thalamus and hypothalamus. The results suggest adaptive responses of the brain that contribute to lowering of glycemia following RYGB, and the underlying mechanisms should be further elucidated.

  • 40.
    Almqvist Terán, Nicolas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Neurosurgery.
    Loayza, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Neurosurgery.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ericson, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Neurosurgery.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Neurosurgery.
    Svedung-Wettervik, Teodor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Neurosurgery.
    In Reply to the Letter to the Editor Regarding "Posterior Fossa Volume and Dimensions: Relation to Pathophysiology and Surgical Outcomes in Classical Trigeminal Neuralgia"2023In: World Neurosurgery, ISSN 1878-8750, E-ISSN 1878-8769, Vol. 180, article id 268Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Almqvist Téran, Nicolas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Neurosurgery.
    Loayza, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Neurosurgery.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ericson, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Neurosurgery.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Neurosurgery.
    Svedung Wettervik, Teodor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Neurosurgery.
    Posterior Fossa Volume and Dimensions: Relation to Pathophysiology and Surgical Outcomes in Classic Trigeminal Neuralgia2023In: World Neurosurgery, ISSN 1878-8750, E-ISSN 1878-8769, Vol. 179, p. e397-e403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: A small posterior fossa (PF) has been hypothesized to explain the increased incidence of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) in females and could make microvascular decompression (MVD) more challenging. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the PF volume and dimensions in relation to biological sex, type of neurovascular conflict (NVC), and outcome after MVD in classic TN.

    METHODS: In this observational study, 84 patients with TN operated on with MVD with a preoperative head computed tomography(CT) scan were included. Eighty-two adults without TN who had undergone head CT for other reasons were included as controls. PF volume and dimensions (x-axis, y-axis, and z-axis) were evaluated on the CT scans. For the patients with TN, Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) grade was evaluated 6 months after MVD.

    RESULTS: There was no difference in PF volume or dimensions between the patients with TN and controls. Women showed a smaller volume and narrower (x-axis) PF than men, but these differences did not manifest when comparing patients with TN and controls within each sex. Patients with an NVC involving the superior cerebellar artery had a narrower (x-axis) and shorter (y-axis) PF than did patients with an NVC resulting from other arteries. PF volume or dimensions were not associated with BNI grade after MVD.

    CONCLUSIONS: PF anatomy was related to the NVC type but did not differ between patients with TN and controls and was not related to the surgical outcome after MVD.

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  • 42.
    Alsaqal, Salem
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Hockings, Paul
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Antaros Medical, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Gummesson, Anders
    Hedström, Anders
    Hulthe, Johannes
    Johansson, Lars
    Niessen, Heiko G
    Schoelch, Corinna
    Schultheis, Christian
    Vessby, Johan
    Wanders, Alkwin
    Rorsman, Fredrik
    Ebeling Barbier, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    The Combination of MR Elastography and Proton Density Fat Fraction Improves Diagnosis of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.2022In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 56, no 2, p. -379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rapidly increasing worldwide. It is subdivided into nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) and the more aggressive form, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which carries a higher risk of developing fibrosis and cirrhosis. There is currently no reliable non-invasive method for differentiating NASH from NAFL.

    PURPOSE: To investigate the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based imaging biomarkers to diagnose NASH and moderate fibrosis as well as assess their repeatability.

    STUDY TYPE: Prospective.

    SUBJECTS: Sixty-eight participants (41% women) with biopsy-proven NAFLD (53 NASH and 15 NAFL). Thirty participants underwent a second MRI in order to assess repeatability.

    FIELD STRENGTH/SEQUENCE: 3.0 T; MR elastography (MRE) (a spin-echo echo-planar imaging [SE-EPI] sequence with motion-encoding gradients), MR proton density fat fraction (PDFF) and R2* mapping (a multi-echo three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence), T1 mapping (a single-point saturation-recovery technique), and diffusion-weighted imaging (SE-EPI sequence).

    ASSESSMENT: Quantitative MRI measurements were obtained and assessed alone and in combination with biochemical markers (cytokeratin-18 [CK18] M30, alanine transaminase [ALT], and aspartate transaminase [AST]) using logistic regression models. Models that could differentiate between NASH and NAFL and between moderate to advanced fibrosis (F2-4) and no or mild fibrosis (F0-1), based on the histopathological results, were identified.

    STATISTICAL TESTS: Independent samples t-test, Pearson's chi-squared test, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC), Spearman's correlation, intra-individual coefficient of variation, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05.

    RESULTS: There was a significant difference between the NASH and NAFL groups with liver stiffness assessed with MRE, CK18 M30, and ALT, with an AUROC of 0.74, 0.76, and 0.70, respectively. Both MRE and PDFF contributed significantly to a bivariate model for diagnosing NASH (AUROC = 0.84). MRE could significantly differentiate between F2-4 and F0-1 (AUROC = 0.74). A model combining MRE with AST improved the diagnosis of F2-4 (AUROC = 0.83). The ICC for repeatability was 0.94 and 0.99 for MRE and PDFF, respectively.

    DATA CONCLUSION: MRE can potentially diagnose NASH and differentiate between fibrosis stages. Combining MRE with PDFF improves the diagnosis of NASH.

    LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2 TECHNICAL EFFICACY: Stage 2.

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  • 43.
    Altai, Mohamed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Perols, Anna
    Tsourma, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Mitran, Bogdan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Honarvar, Hadis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Robillard, Marc
    Rossin, Raffaella
    Ten Hoeve, Wolter
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Eriksson Karlström, Amelie
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Feasibility of affibody-based bioorthogonal chemistry-mediated radionuclide pretargeting2016In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 431-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Affibody molecules constitute a new class of probes for radionuclide tumor targeting. The small size of affibody molecules is favorable for rapid localization in tumors and clearance from circulation. However, high renal re-absorption of affibody molecules prevents the use of residualizing radiometals, including a number of promising low energy beta- and alpha-emitters, for radionuclide therapy. We tested a hypothesis that affibody-based pretargeting mediated by a bioorthogonal interaction between trans-cyclooctene (TCO) and tetrazine would provide higher accumulation of radiometals in tumor xenografts than in the kidneys.

    Methods:

    TCO was conjugated to the anti-HER2 affibody molecule Z2395. DOTA-tetrazine was labeled with indium-111 and lutetium-177. In vitro pretargeting was studied in HER2-expressing SKOV-3 and BT474 cell lines. In vivo studies were performed on BALB/C nu/nu mice bearing SKOV-3 xenografts.

    Results:

    125I-Z2395-TCO bound specifically to HER2-expressing cells in vitro with an affinity of 45±16 pM. 111In-tetrazine bound specifically and selectively to Z2395-TCO pre-treated cells. In vivo studies demonstrated HER2-specific 125I-Z2395-TCO accumulation in xenografts. TCO-mediated 111In-tetrazine localization was shown in tumors, when the radiolabeled tracer was injected 4 h after an injection of Z2395-TCO. At 1 h post injection, the tumor uptake of 111In-tetrazine and 177Lu-tetrazine was ca. 2-fold higher than the renal uptake. Pretargeting provided more than a 56-fold reduction of renal uptake of 111In in comparison with direct targeting.

    Conclusion:

    The feasibility of affibody-based bioorthogonal chemistry-mediated pretargeting was demonstrated. The use of pretargeting provides a substantial reduction of radiometal accumulation in kidneys, creating preconditions for palliative radionuclide therapy.

  • 44.
    Altai, Mohamed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Tsourma, M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Mitran, Bogdan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform. Preclin PET Platform, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Honarvar, Hadis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science. Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Perols, A.
    KTH, Div Prot Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Robillard, M.
    Tagworks Pharmaceut, Eindhoven, Netherlands..
    Rossin, R.
    Tagworks Pharmaceut, Eindhoven, Netherlands..
    ten Hoeve, W.
    Syncom BV, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Sandström, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Karlstrom, A. Eriksson
    KTH, Div Prot Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Affibody-based bioorthogonal chemistry-mediated radionuclide pretargeting: proof-of-principle2015In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 42, no S1, p. S246-S246Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45. Altena, Renske
    et al.
    Tzortzakakis, Antonios
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Frejd, Fredrik Y.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Bergh, Jonas
    Axelsson, Rimma
    HER2-låg bröstcancer ny entitet – ökar behandlingsmöjligheterna: [HER2-low breast cancer - A new entity that could expand possibilities of getting treatment]2022In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 119, article id 22093Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer among women in Sweden. Several decades ago it was recognized that the Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is involved in a critical growth system for breast cancer cells. Overexpression of HER2 (immunohistochemistry [IHC] 2+/3+, in situ hybridization [ISH] positive) is present in 15 percent of all breast cancers. HER2-low breast cancer has been discovered as a separate entity; the most commonly used definition so far is IHC 1+/2+ and ISH negative, but general consensus is still lacking. Clinical studies with the HER2 antibody drug conjugate trastuzumab deruxtecan (Enhertu) have shown impressive antitumor activity among women with advanced HER2-low breast cancer and this is expected to become part of routine treatment in the near future. Research is needed to establish refined ways to define HER2-low breast cancer, and a possible role lies in new imaging methods such as HER2 positron emission tomography (PET) with a [68Ga]Ga-ABY-025 tracer.

  • 46.
    Altomare, Daniele
    et al.
    Univ Geneva, Lab Neuroimaging Aging LANVIE, Geneva, Switzerland;Memory Clin, Univ Hosp Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Ferrari, Clarissa
    IRCCS Ist Ctr San Giovanni di Dio Fatebenefratell, Serv Stat, Via Pilastroni 4, I-25125 Brescia, Italy.
    Caroli, Anna
    Ist Ric Farmacol Mario Negri IRCCS, Med Imaging Unit, Bergamo, Italy.
    Galluzzi, Samantha
    IRCCS Ist Ctr San Giovanni di Dio Fatebenefratell, LANE, Brescia, Italy.
    Prestia, Annapaola
    IRCCS Ist Ctr San Giovanni di Dio Fatebenefratell, LANE, Brescia, Italy.
    van der Flier, Wiesje M.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam Neurosci, Alzheimer Ctr Amsterdam,Dept Neurol, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam Neurosci, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Ossenkoppele, Rik
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam Neurosci, Alzheimer Ctr Amsterdam,Dept Neurol, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam Neurosci, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Clin Memory Res Unit, Malmo, Sweden.
    Van Berckel, Bart
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam Neurosci, Alzheimer Ctr Amsterdam,Dept Neurol, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam Neurosci, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Barkhof, Frederik
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam Neurosci, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Amsterdam, Netherlands;UCL, Inst Neurol, London, England;UCL, Inst Healthcare Engn, London, England.
    Teunissen, Charlotte E.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam Neurosci, Dept Clin Chem,Neurochem Lab, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Wall, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Carter, Stephen F.
    Karolinska Inst, Alzheimer Neurobiol Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden;Univ Manchester, Wolfson Mol Imaging Ctr, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Scholl, Michael
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Clin Memory Res Unit, Malmo, Sweden;Univ Gothenburg, Dept Psychiat & Neurochem, Wallenberg Ctr Mol & Translat Med, Gothenburg, Sweden;UCL, Inst Neurol, Dept Neurodegenerat Dis, Dementia Res Ctr, Queen Sq, London, England.
    Choo, Il Han
    Karolinska Inst, Alzheimer Neurobiol Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden;Chosun Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neuropsychiat, Gwangju, South Korea.
    Grimmer, Timo
    Tech Univ Munich, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Klinikum Rechts Isar, Munich, Germany.
    Redolfi, Alberto
    IRCCS Ist Ctr San Giovanni di Dio Fatebenefratell, LANE, Brescia, Italy.
    Nordberg, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Alzheimer Res, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Clin Geriatr, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Aging Theme, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Scheltens, Philip
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam Neurosci, Alzheimer Ctr Amsterdam,Dept Neurol, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Drzezga, Alexander
    Univ Cologne, Dept Nucl Med, Cologne, Germany.
    Frisoni, Giovanni B.
    Univ Geneva, Lab Neuroimaging Aging LANVIE, Geneva, Switzerland;IRCCS Ist Ctr San Giovanni di Dio Fatebenefratell, LANE, Brescia, Italy;Memory Clin, Univ Hosp Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Prognostic value of Alzheimer's biomarkers in mild cognitive impairment: the effect of age at onset2019In: Journal of Neurology, ISSN 0340-5354, E-ISSN 1432-1459, Vol. 266, no 10, p. 2535-2545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim of this study is to assess the impact of age at onset on the prognostic value of Alzheimer's biomarkers in a large sample of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods We measured A beta 42, t-tau, hippocampal volume on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cortical metabolism on fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in 188 MCI patients followed for at least 1 year. We categorised patients into earlier and later onset (EO/LO). Receiver operating characteristic curves and corresponding areas under the curve (AUCs) were performed to assess and compar the biomarker prognostic performances in EO and LO groups. Linear Model was adopted for estimating the time-to-progression in relation with earlier/later onset MCI groups and biomarkers. Results In earlier onset patients, all the assessed biomarkers were able to predict cognitive decline (p < 0.05), with FDG-PET showing the best performance. In later onset patients, all biomarkers but t-tau predicted cognitive decline (p < 0.05). Moreover, FDG-PET alone in earlier onset patients showed a higher prognostic value than the one resulting from the combination of all the biomarkers in later onset patients (earlier onset AUC 0.935 vs later onset AUC 0.753, p < 0.001). Finally, FDG-PET showed a different prognostic value between earlier and later onset patients (p = 0.040) in time-to-progression allowing an estimate of the time free from disease. Discussion FDG-PET may represent the most universal tool for the establishment of a prognosis in MCI patients and may be used for obtaining an onset-related estimate of the time free from disease.

  • 47.
    Alwawi, Arafat
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Shafiiyon, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Kommunikation mellan röntgensjuksköterskor med utländsk bakgrund och patienter2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: I Sverige finns flera röntgensjuksköterskor med utländskbakgrund som har kontakt med patienter varje dag. Effektiv kommunikation är en viktig del inom hälso- och sjukvården men ibland finns det brister som kan hämma den effektiva kommunikationen mellan patienter och röntgensjuksköterskor med utländskbakgrund. Därför är det viktigt att förstärka de olika faktorer som leder till en bra kommunikation genom kompetensutveckling och förbättringsförslag. 

    Syfte: Syftet med studien var att studera patienters upplevelser av kommunikation och informationsöverföring av röntgensjuksköterska med utländskbakgrund vid röntgenundersökningar. 

    Metod: En empiriskt kvantitativ enkätstudie analyserad med deskriptiv analys. Totalt analyserades 61 enkäter och enkäten bestod av 10 frågor som besvarade studiens frågeställningar. Urvalet av deltagare var inriktat mot patienter som gjorde en röntgenundersökning på röntgenavdelning. 

    Resultat: I studiens resultat framkom att kommunikationen mellan röntgensjuksköterskor med utländskbakgrund och patienter fungerar väldig bra. Det var 96,7% av patienterna som inte upplevde några brister i kommunikationen i samband med undersökningar. Majoriteten av patienter (86,9%) kände sig delaktiga under undersökningar. Slutligen, visade enkätstudien att alla patienter (100%) som deltog i studien var nöjda med kommunikationen under undersökningsförloppet. Däremot var det (8,2%) av deltagarna som tyckte att de inte fick vara delaktiga. Slutligen hade deltagarna möjlighet att lämna förbättringsförslag på kommunikationen till röntgensjuksköterskor med utländskbakgrund.

    Slutsats: Resultatet av enkätstudien visade att alla patienter som deltog i studien upplevde en bra kommunikation med röntgensjuksköterskor med utländskbakgrund under undersökningen. Denna bra kommunikation var grundat på patientsnöjdhet, informationsöverföring och patients behov.

     Nyckelord: röntgensjuksköterskor med utländsk bakgrund, kommunikation, personcentrerad vård, patientsäkerhet 

     

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  • 48. Ambrosini, Valentina
    et al.
    Caplin, Martyn
    Castaño, Justo P
    Christ, Emanuel
    Denecke, Timm
    Deroose, Christophe M
    Dromain, Clarisse
    Falconi, Massimo
    Grozinsky-Glasberg, Simona
    Hicks, Rodney J
    Hofland, Johannes
    Kjaer, Andreas
    Knigge, Ulrich Peter
    Kos-Kudla, Beata
    Koumarianou, Anna
    Krishna, Balkundi
    Lamarca, Angela
    Pavel, Marianne
    Reed, Nicholas Simon
    Scarpa, Aldo
    Srirajaskanthan, Rajaventhan
    Sundin, Anders
    Toumpanakis, Christos
    Prasad, Vikas
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Use and perceived utility of [18 F]FDG PET/CT in neuroendocrine neoplasms: A consensus report from the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS) Advisory Board Meeting 2022.2024In: Journal of neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0953-8194, E-ISSN 1365-2826, Vol. 36, no 1, p. e13359-, article id e13359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Somatostatin receptor (SST) PET/CT is the gold standard for well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours (NET) imaging. Higher grades of neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) show preferential [18F]FDG (FDG) uptake, and even low-grade NET may de-differentiate over time. FDG PET/CT's prognostic role is widely accepted; however, its impact on clinical decision-making remains controversial and its use varies widely. A questionnaire-based survey on FDG PET/CT use and perceived decision-making utility in NEN was submitted to the ENETS Advisory Board Meeting attendees (November 2022, response rate = 70%). In 3/15 statements, agreement was higher than 75%: (i) FDG was considered useful in NET, irrespective of grade, in case of mis-matched lesions (detectable on diagnostic CT but negative/faintly positive on SST PET/CT), especially if PRRT is contemplated (80%); (ii) in NET G3 if curative surgery is considered (82%); and (iii) in NEC prior to surgery with curative intent (98%). FDG use in NET G3, even in the presence of matched lesions, as a baseline for response assessment was favoured by 74%. Four statements obtained more than 60% consensus: (i) FDG use in NET G3 if locoregional therapy is considered (65%); (ii) in neuroendocrine carcinoma before initiating active therapy as a baseline for response assessment (61%); (iii) biopsy to re-assess tumour grade prior to a change in therapeutic management (68%) upon detection of FDG-positivity on the background of a prior G1-2 NET; (iv) 67% were in favour to reconsider PRRT to treat residual SST-positive lesions after achieving complete remission on FDG of the SST-negative disease component. Multidisciplinary opinion broadly supports the use of FDG PET/CT for characterisation of disease biology and to guide treatment selection across a range of indications, despite the lack of full consensus in many situations. This may reflect existing clinical access due to lack of reimbursement or experience with this investigation, which should be addressed by further research.

  • 49. Ambrosini, Valentina
    et al.
    Kunikowska, Jolanta
    Baudin, Eric
    Bodei, Lisa
    Bouvier, Catherine
    Capdevila, Jaume
    Cremonesi, Marta
    de Herder, Wouter W
    Dromain, Clarisse
    Falconi, Massimo
    Fani, Melpomeni
    Fanti, Stefano
    Hicks, Rodney J
    Kabasakal, Levent
    Kaltsas, Gregory
    Lewington, Val
    Minozzi, Silvia
    Cinquini, Michela
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Oyen, Wim J G
    O'Toole, Dermot
    Pavel, Marianne
    Ruszniewski, Philippe
    Scarpa, Aldo
    Strosberg, Jonathan
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Taïeb, David
    Virgolini, Irene
    Wild, Damian
    Herrmann, Ken
    Yao, James
    Consensus on molecular imaging and theranostics in neuroendocrine neoplasms2021In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 146, p. 56-73Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nuclear medicine plays an increasingly important role in the management neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN). Somatostatin analogue (SSA)-based positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) have been used in clinical trials and approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) Focus 3 performed a multidisciplinary Delphi process to deliver a balanced perspective on molecular imaging and radionuclide therapy in well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). NETs form in cells that interact with the nervous system or in glands that produce hormones. These cells, called neuroendocrine cells, can be found throughout the body, but NETs are most often found in the abdomen, especially in the gastrointestinal tract. These tumours may also be found in the lungs, pancreas and adrenal glands. In addition to being rare, NETs are also complex and may be difficult to diagnose. Most NETs are non-functioning; however, a minority present with symptoms related to hypersecretion of bioactive compounds. NETs often do not cause symptoms early in the disease process. When diagnosed, substantial number of patients are already found to have metastatic disease. Several societies' guidelines address Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) management; however, many issues are still debated, due to both the difficulty in acquiring strong clinical evidence in a rare and heterogeneous disease and the different availability of diagnostic and therapeutic options across countries. EANM Focus 3 reached consensus on employing 68gallium-labelled somatostatin analogue ([68Ga]Ga-DOTA-SSA)-based PET/CT with diagnostic CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for unknown primary NET detection, metastatic NET, NET staging/restaging, suspected extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma and suspected paraganglioma. Consensus was reached on employing 18fluorine-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) PET/CT in neuroendocrine carcinoma, G3 NET and in G1-2 NET with mismatched lesions (CT-positive/[68Ga]Ga-DOTA-SSA-negative). Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) was recommended for second line treatment for gastrointestinal NET with [68Ga]Ga-DOTA-SSA uptake in all lesions, in G1/G2 NET at disease progression, and in a subset of G3 NET provided all lesions are positive at [18F]FDG and [68Ga]Ga-DOTA-SSA. PRRT rechallenge may be used for in patients with stable disease for at least 1 year after therapy completion. An international consensus is not only a prelude to a more standardised management across countries but also serves as a guide for the direction to follow when designing new research studies.

  • 50.
    Andersson, Camilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala Univ, Oncol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Patient experience of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in a mask fixation2016In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 43, p. S666-S666Article in journal (Refereed)
1234567 1 - 50 of 1190
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