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  • 1.
    Abate Waktola, Ebba Abate
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. EPHI, Ethiopia.
    Blomgran, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Verma, Deepti
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lerm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Belayneh, Meseret
    Univ Addis Abeba, Ethiopia.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Stendahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schön, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Polymorphisms in CARD8 and NLRP3 are associated with extrapulmonary TB and poor clinical outcome in active TB in Ethiopia2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 3126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innate immunity is a first line defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection where inflammasome activation and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1beta, plays a major role. Thus, genetic polymorphisms in innate immunity-related genes such as CARD8 and NLRP3 may contribute to the understanding of why most exposed individuals do not develop infection. Our aim was to investigate the association between polymorphisms in CARD8 and NLRP3 and active tuberculosis (TB) as well as their relationship to treatment outcome in a high-endemic setting for TB. Polymorphisms in CARD8 (C10X) and NLRP3 (Q705K) were analysed in 1190 TB patients and 1990 healthy donors (HD). There was a significant association between homozygotes in the CARD8 polymorphism and extrapulmonary TB (EPTB), which was not the case for pulmonary TB or HDs. Among TB-patients, there was an association between poor treatment outcome and the NLRP3 (Q705K) polymorphism. Our study shows that inflammasome polymorphisms are associated with EPTB and poor clinical outcome in active TB in Ethiopia. The practical implications and determining causal relationships on a mechanistic level needs further study.

  • 2.
    Abelius, Martina S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg.
    Duchén, Karel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Placental Immune Milieu is Characterized by a Th2- and Anti-Inflammatory Transcription Profile, Regardless of Maternal Allergy, and Associates with Neonatal Immunity2015In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 73, no 5, p. 445-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROBLEM: How maternal allergy affects the systemic and local immunological environment during pregnancy and the immune development of the offspring is unclear.

    METHOD OF STUDY: Expression of 40 genes was quantified by PCR arrays in placenta, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) from 7 allergic and 12 non-allergic women and their offspring.

    RESULTS: Placental gene expression was dominated by a Th2-/anti-inflammatory profile, irrespectively of maternal allergy, as compared to gene expression in PBMC. p35 expression in placenta correlated with fetal Tbx21 (ρ = -0.88, P < 0.001) and IL-5 expression in PBMC with fetal galectin1 (ρ = 0.91, P < 0.001). Increased expression of Th2-associated CCL22 in CBMC preceded allergy development.

    CONCLUSIONS: Gene expression locally and systemically during pregnancy was partly associated with the offspring's gene expression, possibly indicating that the immunological milieu is important for fetal immune development. Maternal allergy was not associated with an enhanced Th2 immunity in placenta or PBMC, while a marked prenatal Th2 skewing, shown as increased CCL22 mRNA expression, might contribute to postnatal allergy development.

  • 3.
    Abelius, Martina S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Duchén, Karel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gene expression in placenta, peripheral and cord blood mononuclear cells from allergic and non-allergic women2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The influence of maternal allergy on the development of immune responses and allergy in the offspring is not understood.

    Objective: To investigate (i) if maternal allergy influences the gene expression locally in placenta, systemically in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and fetally in cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC), (ii) if the gene expression in the placenta and PBMC influences the gene expression in CBMC and (iii) how the gene expression at birth relates to allergy development during  childhood.

    Methods: A real-time PCR array was used to quantify forty immune regulatory genes in placenta, PBMC (gestational week 39) and in CBMC from 7 allergic and 12 non-allergic women and their offspring. Furthermore, quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure mRNA expression of Tbx21, GATA-3, Foxp3, RORC and CCL22 in CBMC, selected based on present PCR array results and previous protein findings in cord blood, in 13 children who developed and 11 children who did not develop allergy during childhood.

    Results: The gene expression profile in the placenta revealed a T-helper (Th) 2-/anti-inflammatory environment as compared with gene expression systemically, in PBMC. Maternal allergy was associated with increased expression of p35 in PBMC and CBMC and p40 in placenta. Placental p35 expression correlated with fetal Tbx21 expression (Rho=-0.88, p<0.001) and maternal IL-5 expression in PBMC with fetal Galectin-1 (Rho=0.91, p<0.001) expression. Allergy development in the children was preceded by high mRNA expression of the Th2-associated chemokine CCL22 at birth.

    Conclusion and clinical relevance: Gene expression locally and systemically during pregnancy influenced the offspring’s gene expression at birth, indicating an interplay between maternal and fetal immunity. Children developing allergy during childhood had an increased expression of the Th2-associated chemokine CCL22 at birth, indicating a Th2 skewing before disease onset. Maternal allergy was not associated with a Th2-dominance in placenta, PBMC or CBMC.

  • 4.
    Abrouk, Michael
    et al.
    Institute of Experimental Botany, Centre of the Region Hana for Biotechnological and Agricultural Research, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    Balcarkova, Barbora
    Institute of Experimental Botany, Centre of the Region Hana for Biotechnological and Agricultural Research, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    Simkova, Hana
    Institute of Experimental Botany, Centre of the Region Hana for Biotechnological and Agricultural Research, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    Kominkova, Eva
    Institute of Experimental Botany, Centre of the Region Hana for Biotechnological and Agricultural Research, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    Martis, Mihaela-Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institute for Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, Helmholtz Center Munich, Neuherberg, Germany.
    Jakobson, Irena
    Department of Gene Technology, Tallinn University of Technology, Akadeemia tee 15, Tallinn 19086, Estonia.
    Timofejeva, Ljudmilla
    Department of Gene Technology, Tallinn University of Technology, Akadeemia tee 15, Tallinn 19086, Estonia.
    Rey, Elodie
    Institute of Experimental Botany, Centre of the Region Hana for Biotechnological and Agricultural Research, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    Vrana, Jan
    Institute of Experimental Botany, Centre of the Region Hana for Biotechnological and Agricultural Research, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    Kilian, Andrzej
    Diversity Arrays Technology Pty Ltd, Yarralumla, ACT2600, Australia.
    Järve, Kadri
    Department of Gene Technology, Tallinn University of Technology, Akadeemia tee 15, Tallinn 19086, Estonia.
    Dolezel, Jaroslav
    Institute of Experimental Botany, Centre of the Region Hana for Biotechnological and Agricultural Research, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    Valarik, Miroslav
    Institute of Experimental Botany, Centre of the Region Hana for Biotechnological and Agricultural Research, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    The in silico identification and characterization of a bread wheat/Triticum militinae introgression line: Characterization of alien introgression in wheat2017In: Plant Biotechnology Journal, ISSN 1467-7644, E-ISSN 1467-7652, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 249-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The capacity of the bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) genome to tolerate introgression from related genomes can be exploited for wheat improvement. A resistance to powdery mildew expressed by a derivative of the cross bread wheat cv. Tähti ⨯ T. militinae (Tm) is known to be due to the incorporation of a Tm segment into the long arm of chromosome 4A. Here, a newly developed in silico method termed RICh (rearrangement identification and characterization) has been applied to characterize the introgression. A virtual gene order, assembled using the GenomeZipper approach, was obtained for the native copy of chromosome 4A; it incorporated 570 4A DArTseq markers to produce a zipper comprising 2,132 loci. A comparison between the native and introgressed forms of the 4AL chromosome arm showed that the introgressed region is located at the distal part of the arm. The Tm segment, derived from chromosome 7G, harbors 131 homoeologs out of the 357 genes present on the corresponding region of Chinese Spring 4AL. The estimated number of Tm genes transferred along with the disease resistance gene was 169. Characterizing the introgression's position, gene content and internal gene order should facilitate not only gene isolation, but may also be informative with respect to chromatin structure and behavior studies.

  • 5.
    Agholme, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Getting rid of intracellular Aβ- loss of cellular degradation leads to transfer between connected neurons2014In: Current pharmaceutical design, ISSN 1381-6128, E-ISSN 1873-4286, Vol. 20, no 15, p. 2458-2468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sporadic, late onset form of Alzheimers disease (AD) shares pathological hallmarks with the familial form; however, no clear reason for increased beta-amyloid (A beta) generation has been found in the former. It has long been speculated that the late onset form of AD is caused by reduced degradation and/or clearance of A beta. Indeed, both intracellular degradation systems, the proteasomal and lysosomal systems, have been shown to be defective in AD. Reduced proteasome activity increases levels of intracellular and secreted A beta. Furthermore, accumulation of improperly degraded A beta in the lysosomes causes lysosomal disruption and cell death. We recently showed that oligomeric A beta can be transmitted from one neuron to another, which causes neurotoxicity. In both the donating and receiving cells, A beta accumulates in the endo-lysosomal compartment. It is possible that ineffective degradation of A beta causes its transfer to neighboring neurons, thereby spreading AD pathology. This review summarizes the data underlying the idea of reduced A beta clearance and subsequent A beta spread in AD, and also suggests new therapeutic methods, which are aimed at targeting the degradation systems and synaptic transfer. By enhancing degradation of intracellular accumulated A beta, it can be possible to remove it and avoid A beta-induced neurodegeneration without disturbing the endogenously important pool of secreted A beta. Additionally, drugs targeted to inhibit the spread of intracellular toxic A beta aggregates may also be useful in stopping the progression of pathology, without affecting the level of A beta that normally occurs in the brain.

  • 6.
    Agholme, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Nath, Sangeeta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Domert, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Proteasome Inhibition Induces Stress Kinase Dependent Transport Deficits – Implications for Alzheimer’s Disease2014In: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, ISSN 1044-7431, E-ISSN 1095-9327, Vol. 58, p. 29-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of two misfolded and aggregated proteins, β-amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau. Both cellular systems responsible for clearance of misfolded and aggregated proteins, the lysosomal and the proteasomal, have been shown to be malfunctioning in the aged brain and more so in AD patients. This malfunction could be the cause of β-amyloid and tau accumulation, eventually aggregating in plaques and tangles. We have investigated how decreased proteasome activity affects AD related pathophysiological changes of microtubule transport and stability, as well as tau phosphorylation. To do this, we used our recently developed neuronal model where human SH-SY5Y cells obtain neuronal morphology and function through differentiation. We found that exposure to low doses of the proteasome inhibitor MG-115 caused disturbed neuritic transport, together with microtubule destabilization and tau phosphorylation. Furthermore, reduced proteasome activity activated several kinases implicated in AD pathology, including JNK, c-Jun and ERK 1/2. Restoration of the microtubule transport was achieved by inhibiting ERK 1/2 activation, and simultaneous inhibition of both ERK 1/2 and c-Jun reversed the proteasome inhibition-induced tau phosphorylation. Taken together, this study suggests that a decrease in proteasome activity can, through activation of c-Jun and ERK 1/2, result in several events contributing to AD pathology. Restoring proteasome function or inhibiting ERK 1/2 and c-Jun could therefore be used as novel treatments against AD.

  • 7.
    Ahn, Jae-Il
    et al.
    Ottawa Hospital, Canada .
    Kuffova, Lucia
    University of Aberdeen, Scotland .
    Merrett, Kimberley
    Ottawa Hospital, Canada .
    Mitra, Debbie
    Ottawa Hospital, Canada .
    Forrester, John V.
    University of Aberdeen, Scotland .
    Li, Fengfu
    Ottawa Hospital, Canada .
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Ottawa Hospital, Canada .
    Crosslinked collagen hydrogels as corneal implants: Effects of sterically bulky vs. non-bulky carbodiimides as crosslinkers2013In: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 9, no 8, p. 7796-7805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously shown that recombinant human collagen can be crosslinked with N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC) to fabricate transparent hydrogels possessing the shape and dimensions of the human cornea. These corneal implants have been tested in a Phase I human clinical study. Although these hydrogels successfully promoted corneal tissue and nerve regeneration, the gelling kinetics were difficult to control during the manufacture of the implants. An alternative carbodiimide capable of producing hydrogels of similar characteristics as EDC in terms of strength and biocompatibility, but with a longer gelation time would be a desirable alternative. Here, we compared the crosslinking kinetics and properties of hydrogels crosslinked with a sterically bulky carbodiimide, N-Cyclohexyl-N-(2-morpholinoethyl) carbodiimide metho-p-toluenesulfonate (CMC), with that of EDC. CMC crosslinking was possible at ambient temperature whereas the EDC reaction was too rapid to control and had to be carried out at low temperatures. The highest tensile strength obtained using optimized formulations were equivalent, although CMC crosslinked hydrogels were found to be stiffer. The collagenase resistance of CMC crosslinked hydrogels was superior to that of EDC crosslinked hydrogels while biocompatibility was similar. We are also able to substitute porcine collagen with recombinant human collagen and show that the in vivo performance of both resulting hydrogels as full-thickness corneal implants is comparable in a mouse model of an orthotopic corneal graft. In conclusion, CMC is a viable alternative to EDC as a crosslinker for collagen-based biomaterials for use as corneal implants, and potentially for use in other tissue engineering applications.

  • 8.
    Aili Fagerholm, Siri
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Insulin signaling in primary adipocytes in insulin sensitive and insulin resistant states2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing numbers of people world-wide develops the disease type 2 diabetes. Development of type 2 diabetes is characterized by a shift from an insulin sensitive state to an insulin resistant state in peripheral insulin responding organs, which originates from the development of insulin resistance in the adipose tissue. Insulin resistance in combination with reduced pancreatic insulin secretion lead to overt type 2 diabetes.

    In this thesis, the insulin signaling network in primary adipocytes was analyzed. Key proteins and mechanisms were studied to gain deeper knowledge of signaling both in the insulin sensitive state and in the insulin resistant state produced by rapid weight gain as well as in type 2 diabetes.

    The surface of the adipocyte is dotted with invaginations in the cell membrane called caveolae that act as important metabolic and signaling platforms in adipocytes, and also harbor the insulin receptor. In paper I we show that insulin stimulation of primary adipocytes results in a rapid phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and caveolin-1, and that internalization of the proteins is mediated by endocytosis of caveolae.

    Weight gain due to overfeeding and obesity has been associated with the development of insulin resistance in insulin sensitive tissues such as the adipose tissue. In paper II we show that short-term overfeeding for one month of lean subjects results in an insulin resistant state. At the end of the study, the subjects had developed a mild systemic insulin resistance. Moreover, in isolated subcutaneous adipocytes we found several alterations of the insulin signaling pathway that mimicked alterations found in isolated subcutaneous adipocytes from subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    In paper III we present a first dynamic mathematical model of the insulin signaling network in human adipocytes that are based on experimental data acquired in a consistent fashion. The model takes account of insulin signaling in both the healthy, insulin sensitive state and in the insulin resistant state of type 2 diabetes. We show that attenuated mTORC1-mediated positive feedback to control of phosphorylation of IRS1 at Ser307 is an essential component of the insulin resistant state of type 2 diabetes. A future application of the model is the identification and evaluation of drug targets for the treatment of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

    In paper IV we examine the protein kinase that catalyzes the insulin stimulated mTORC1- mediated feedback to IRS1. We find that the phosphorylation of IRS1 at Ser307 is not likely to be catalyzed by the kinases S6K1, mTOR or PKB. However, a catalyzing protein kinase for the in vitro phosphorylation of IRS1 at Ser307 was found to be associated with the complex mTORC1.

    In conclusion, this thesis provide new insights and characterize mechanisms of the intrinsically complex insulin signaling network of primary adipocytes, both in insulin sensitive and insulin resistant states.

  • 9.
    Akanda, Nesar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology.
    Tofighi, Roshan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden .
    Brask, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    Tamm, Christoffer
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden .
    Elinder, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ceccatelli, Sandra
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden .
    Voltage-dependent anion channels (VDAC) in the plasma membrane play a critical role in apoptosis in differentiated hippocampal neurons but not in neural stem cells2008In: Cell Cycle, ISSN 1538-4101, E-ISSN 1551-4005, Vol. 7, no 20, p. 3225-3234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate a large variety of cellular processes including differentiation, apoptosis and proliferation. Several miRNAs display defective expression patterns in human tumors with the consequent alteration of target oncogene or tumor suppressor genes. Many of these miRNAs modulate the major proliferation pathways through direct interaction with critical regulators such as RAS, PI3K/PTEN or ABL, as well as members of the retinoblastoma pathway, Cyclin-CDK complexes or cell cycle inhibitors of the INK4 or Cip/Kip families. A complex interplay between miRNAs and MYC or E2F family members also exists to modulate cell cycle-dependent transcription during normal or tumoral proliferation. The ability of miRNAs to modulate these proliferation pathways may have relevant implications not only in physiological or developmental processes but also in tumor progression or cancer therapy.

  • 10.
    Alarcon, E I
    et al.
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Vulesevic, B
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Argawal, A
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Ross, A
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Bejjani, P
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Podrebarac, J
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Ravichandran, Ranjithkumar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Suuronen, E J
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Coloured cornea replacements with anti-infective properties: expanding the safe use of silver nanoparticles in regenerative medicine.2016In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 8, no 12, p. 6484-6489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the broad anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), their use in bioengineered corneal replacements or bandage contact lenses has been hindered due to their intense yellow coloration. In this communication, we report the development of a new strategy to pre-stabilize and incorporate AgNPs with different colours into collagen matrices for fabrication of corneal implants and lenses, and assessed their in vitro and in vivo activity.

  • 11.
    Alarcon, Emilio I.
    et al.
    University of Ottawa, Canada; University of Ottawa, Canada; University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Udekwu, Klas I.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Noel, Christopher W.
    University of Ottawa, Canada; .
    Gagnon, Luke B. -P.
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Taylor, Patrick K.
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Vulesevic, Branka
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Simpson, Madeline J.
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Gkotzis, Spyridon
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Islam, Mohammed Mirazul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lee, Chyan-Jang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Mah, Thien-Fah
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Suuronen, Erik J.
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Scaiano, Juan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Safety and efficacy of composite collagen-silver nanoparticle hydrogels as tissue engineering scaffolds2015In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 7, no 44, p. 18789-18798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing number of multidrug resistant bacteria has revitalized interest in seeking alternative sources for controlling bacterial infection. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), are amongst the most promising candidates due to their wide microbial spectrum of action. In this work, we report on the safety and efficacy of the incorporation of collagen coated AgNPs into collagen hydrogels for tissue engineering. The resulting hybrid materials at [AgNPs] less than0.4 mu M retained the mechanical properties and biocompatibility for primary human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes of collagen hydrogels; they also displayed remarkable anti-infective properties against S. aureus, S. epidermidis, E. coli and P. aeruginosa at considerably lower concentrations than silver nitrate. Further, subcutaneous implants of materials containing 0.2 mu M AgNPs in mice showed a reduction in the levels of IL-6 and other inflammation markers (CCL24, sTNFR-2, and TIMP1). Finally, an analysis of silver contents in implanted mice showed that silver accumulation primarily occurred within the tissue surrounding the implant.

  • 12.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Johansson, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Björnstedt, Mikael
    Division of Pathology F42, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rosén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Post, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Research Department, Innlandet Hospital Trust and Hedmark University College, Norway.
    Relatively high mortality risk in elderly Swedish subjects with low selenium status2016In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 91-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Objectives: 

    The daily dietary intake of selenium (Se), an essential trace element, is still low in Sweden in spite of decades of nutritional information campaigns and the effect of this on the public health is presently not well known. The objective of this study was to determine the serum Se levels in an elderly Swedish population and to analyze whether a low Se status had any influence on mortality.

    Subjects/Methods: 

    Six-hundred sixty-eight (n=668) elderly participants were invited from a municipality and evaluated in an observational study. Individuals were followed for 6.8 years and Se levels were re-evaluated in 98 individuals after 48 months. Clinical examination of all individuals included functional classification, echocardiography, electrocardiogram and serum Se measurement. All mortality was registered and endpoints of mortality were assessed by Kaplan–Meier plots, and Cox proportional hazard ratios adjusted for potential confounding factors were calculated.

    Results: 

    The mean serum Se level of the study population (n=668) was 67.1 μg/l, corresponding to relatively low Se intake. After adjustment for male gender, smoking, ischemic heart disease, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and impaired heart function, persons with serum Se in the lowest quartile had 43% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02–2.00) and 56% (95% CI: 1.03–2.36) increased risk for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, respectively. The result was not driven by inflammatory effects on Se concentration in serum.

    Conclusion: 

    The mean serum Se concentration in an elderly Swedish population was 67.1 μg/l, which is below the physiological saturation level for several selenoprotein enzymes. This result may suggest the value of modest Se supplementation in order to improve the health of the Swedish population.

  • 13.
    Alexandre, Campos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Apraiz, Itzaso
    Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    da Fonseca, Rute R
    The Bioinformatics Centre, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Shotgun analysis of the marine mussel Mytilus edulis hemolymph proteome and mapping the innate immunity elements.2015In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 15, no 23-24, p. 4021-4029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The marine mussel innate immunity provides protection to pathogen invasion and inflammation.In this regard, the mussel hemolymph takes a main role in the animal innate response.Despite the importance of this body fluid in determining the physiological condition of theanimal, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular and humoralresponses. In this work, we have applied aMS (nano-LC-MS/MS) strategy integrating genomicand transcriptomic data with the aim to: (i) identify the main protein functional groups thatcharacterize hemolymph and (ii) to map the elements of innate immunity in the marine musselMytilus edulis hemolymph proteome. After sample analysis and first protein identificationbased onMS/MS data comparison, proteins with unknown functions were annotated with blastusing public database (nrNCBI) information. Overall 595 hemolymph proteins were identifiedwith high confidence and annotated. These proteins encompass primary cellular metabolicprocesses: energy production and metabolism of biomolecules, as well as processes related tooxidative stress defence, xenobiotic detoxification, drug metabolism, and immune response.A group of proteins was identified with putative immune effector, receptor, and signalingfunctions in M. edulis. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001951(http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001951).

  • 14.
    Ali, Zaheer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mukwaya, Anthonny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Biesemeier, Antje
    Univ Tubingen, Germany.
    Ntzouni, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ramskold, Daniel
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Giatrellis, Sarantis
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Mammadzada, Parviz
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Cao, Renhai
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lennikov, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Missouri, MO 65211 USA.
    Marass, Michele
    Max Planck Inst Lung and Heart Res, Germany.
    Gerri, Claudia
    Max Planck Inst Lung and Heart Res, Germany.
    Hildesjö, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Taylor, Michael
    Univ Wisconsin, WI 53706 USA.
    Deng, Qiaolin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Peebo, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping. Bayer AB, Sweden.
    del Peso, Luis
    Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain; Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas Alberto Sols, CSIC-UAM Madrid, Spain.
    Kvanta, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Rickard
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Schraermeyer, Ulrich
    Univ Tubingen, Germany.
    Andre, Helder
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Steffensen, John F.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kele, Julianna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Univ Autonoma Madrid, Spain; UAM, Spain.
    Intussusceptive Vascular Remodeling Precedes Pathological Neovascularization2019In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 1402-1418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective—

    Pathological neovascularization is crucial for progression and morbidity of serious diseases such as cancer, diabetic retinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration. While mechanisms of ongoing pathological neovascularization have been extensively studied, the initiating pathological vascular remodeling (PVR) events, which precede neovascularization remains poorly understood. Here, we identify novel molecular and cellular mechanisms of preneovascular PVR, by using the adult choriocapillaris as a model.

    Approach and Results—

    Using hypoxia or forced overexpression of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) in the subretinal space to induce PVR in zebrafish and rats respectively, and by analyzing choriocapillaris membranes adjacent to choroidal neovascular lesions from age-related macular degeneration patients, we show that the choriocapillaris undergo robust induction of vascular intussusception and permeability at preneovascular stages of PVR. This PVR response included endothelial cell proliferation, formation of endothelial luminal processes, extensive vesiculation and thickening of the endothelium, degradation of collagen fibers, and splitting of existing extravascular columns. RNA-sequencing established a role for endothelial tight junction disruption, cytoskeletal remodeling, vesicle- and cilium biogenesis in this process. Mechanistically, using genetic gain- and loss-of-function zebrafish models and analysis of primary human choriocapillaris endothelial cells, we determined that HIF (hypoxia-induced factor)-1α-VEGF-A-VEGFR2 signaling was important for hypoxia-induced PVR.

    Conclusions—

    Our findings reveal that PVR involving intussusception and splitting of extravascular columns, endothelial proliferation, vesiculation, fenestration, and thickening is induced before neovascularization, suggesting that identifying and targeting these processes may prevent development of advanced neovascular disease in the future.

    Visual Overview—

    An online visual overview is available for this article.

  • 15.
    Alila-Fersi, Olfa
    et al.
    Molecular and Functional Genetics Laboratory, Faculty of Science of Sfax, University of Sfax, Tunisia.
    Tabebi, Mouna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Maalej, Marwa
    Molecular and Functional Genetics Laboratory, Faculty of Science of Sfax, University of Sfax, Tunisia.
    Belguith, Neila
    Department of Medical Genetics, Hédi Chaker Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia.
    Keskes, Leila
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Faculty of Medecine of Sfax, University of Sfax, Tunisia.
    Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna
    Molecular and Functional Genetics Laboratory, Faculty of Science of Sfax, University of Sfax, Tunisia.
    Fakhfakh, Faiza
    Molecular and Functional Genetics Laboratory, Faculty of Science of Sfax, University of Sfax, Tunisia.
    First description of a novel mitochondrial mutation in the MT-TI gene associated with multiple mitochondrial DNA deletion and depletion in family with severe dilated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy2018In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 497, no 4, p. 1049-1054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitochondria are essential for early cardiac development and impaired mitochondria] function was described associated with heart diseases such as hypertrophic or dilated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy. In this study, we report a family including two individuals with severe dilated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy. The whole mitochondrial genome screening showed the presence of several variations and a novel homoplasmic mutation m.4318-4322deIC in the MT-TI gene shared by the two patients and their mother and leading to a disruption of the tRNA(IIe) secondary structure. In addition, a mitochondrial depletion was present in blood leucocyte of the two affected brother whereas a de novo heteroplasmic multiple deletion in the major arc of mtDNA was present in blood leucocyte and mucosa of only one of them. These deletions in the major arc of the mtDNA resulted to the loss of several protein-encoding genes and also some tRNA genes. The mtDNA deletion and depletion could result to an impairment of the oxidative phosphorylation and energy metabolism in the respiratory chain in the studied patients. Our report is the first description of a family with severe lethal dilated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy and presenting several mtDNA abnormalities including punctual mutation, deletion and depletion.

  • 16.
    Alkaissi, Hammoudi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Ekstrand, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Jawad, Aksa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Nielsen, Jesper Bo
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Havarinasab, Said
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Genes Related to Renal Mercury Concentrations in Mice2016In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 124, no 7, p. 920-926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Following human mercury (Hg) exposure, the metal accumulates in considerable concentrations in kidney, liver, and brain. Although the toxicokinetics of Hg have been studied extensively, factors responsible for interindividual variation in humans are largely unknown. Differences in accumulation of renal Hg between inbred mouse strains suggest a genetic interstrain variation regulating retention or/and excretion of Hg. A. SW, DBA/2 and BALB/C mouse strains accumulate higher amounts of Hg than B10.S.

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to find candidate genes associated with regulation of renal Hg concentrations.

    METHODS: A. SW, B10.S and their F1 and F2 offspring were exposed for 6 weeks to 2.0 mg Hg/L drinking water. Genotyping with microsatellites was conducted on 84 F2 mice for genome-wide scanning with ion pair reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (IP RP HPLC). Quantitative trait loci (QTL) were established. Denaturing HPLC was used to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms for haplotyping and fine mapping in 184 and 32 F2 mice, respectively. Candidate genes (Pprc1, Btrc and Nfkb2) verified by fine mapping and QTL were further investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Genes enhanced by Pprc1 (Nrf1 and Nrf2) were included for gene expression analysis.

    RESULTS: Renal Hg concentrations differed significantly between A. SW and B10. S mice and between males and females within each strain. QTL analysis showed a peak logarithm of odds ratio score 5.78 on chromosome 19 (p = 0.002). Haplotype and fine mapping associated the Hg accumulation with Pprc1, which encodes PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC), a coactivator for proteins involved in detoxification. Pprc1 and two genes coactivated by Pprc1 (Nrf1 and Nrf2) had significantly lower gene expression in the A. SW strain than in the B10. S strain.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study supports Pprc1 as a key regulator for renal Hg excretion.

  • 17.
    Alkaissi, Hammoudi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Havarinasab, Said
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Jesper Bo
    Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Bank1 and NF-kappaB as key regulators in anti-nucleolar antibody development2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e0199979Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic autoimmune rheumatic disorders (SARD) represent important causes of morbidity and mortality in humans. The mechanisms triggering autoimmune responses are complex and involve a network of genetic factors. Mercury-induced autoimmunity (HgIA) in mice is an established model to study the mechanisms of the development of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), which is a hallmark in the diagnosis of SARD. A.SW mice with HgIA show a significantly higher titer of antinucleolar antibodies (ANoA) than the B10.S mice, although both share the same MHC class II (H-2). We applied a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to their Hg-exposed F2 offspring to investigate the non-MHC genes involved in the development of ANoA. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis showed a peak logarithm of odds ratio (LOD) score of 3.05 on chromosome 3. Microsatellites were used for haplotyping, and fine mapping was conducted with next generation sequencing. The candidate genes Bank1 (B-cell scaffold protein with ankyrin repeats 1) and Nfkbl (nuclear factor kappa B subunit 1) were identified by additional QTL analysis. Expression of the Bank1 and Nfkb1 genes and their downstream target genes involved in the intracellular pathway (Tlr9,II6, Tnf) was investigated in mercury-exposed A.SW and B10.S mice by real-time PCR. Bank1 showed significantly lower gene expression in the A.SW strain after Hg-exposure, whereas the B10.S strain showed no significant difference. Nfkb1, Tlr9, II6 and Tnf had significantly higher gene expression in the A.SW strain after Hg-exposure, while the B10.S strain showed no difference. This study supports the roles of Bank1 (produced mainly in B-cells) and Nfkbl (produced in most immune cells) as key regulators of ANoA development in HgIA.

  • 18.
    Alkhori, Liza
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mechanisms of sensory neuron diversification during development and in the adult Drosophila: How to make a difference2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The nervous system contains a vast number of neurons and displays a great diversity in cell types and classes. Even though this has been known for a long time, the exact mechanism of cell specification is still poorly understood. How does a cell know what type of neuron to which it should be specified? It is important to understand cellular specification, not only for our general understanding of biological processes, but also to allow us to develop treatments for patients with destructive diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson, cancer or stroke. To address how neuronal specification and thereby diversification is evolved, we have chosen to study a complex but defined set of neurons, the Drosophila olfactory system. Olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) detect an enormous variety of small volatile molecules with extremely high specificity and sensitivity. The adult Drosophila olfactory system contains 34 OSN classes each defined by their expression of a specific odorant receptor (OR). In both insects and vertebrates, each OSN expresses only one OR. In mouse there are approximately 1200 and in Drosophila 60 different OR genes. Despite the range of mechanisms known to determine cell identity and that the olfactory system is remarkably conserved across the phyla, it is still unclear how an OSN chooses to express a particular OR from a large genomic repertoire. In this thesis, the specification and diversification of the final steps establishing an OSN identity is addressed. We find seven transcription factors that are continuously required in different combinations for the expression of all ORs. The TFs can in different gene context both activate and repress OR expression, making the regulation more economical and indicating that repression is crucial for correct gene expression. We further identified a repressor complex that is able to segregate OR expression between OSN classes and propose a mechanism on how one single co-repressor can specify a large number of neuron classes.Exploring the OSN we found the developmental Hh signalling pathway is expressed in the postmitotic neuron. We show several fundamental similarities between the canonical Drosophila Hh pathway and the cilia mediated Hh transduction in component function. Further investigation revealed a function of cilia mediated Hh signalling in sensory neuron modulator. The results generated here will create a greater in vivo understanding of how postmitotic processes generate neurons with different fates and contribute to the maintaining of neuron function.

  • 19.
    Alkhori, Liza
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sanchez, Gonzalo M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Schultz, Sebastian W.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kuzhandaivel, Anujaianthi
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Freiburg, Germany.
    Granseth, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Alenius, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hh signalling regulates odorant receptor cilia localization in Drosophila2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is a key regulatory pathway during development. Here, we show that in adult OSNs the Hh pathway regulate 􀁒dorant receptor transport to cilia and put forward a novel non-developmental function of the pathway as a neuromodulator. We demonstrate that the level of Hh signal modulate the OSNs response to odors. We show that knock down of Hh and Smoothened (Smo), a transmembrane protein that transduce the signal, are required for receptor transport. We further show that the coreceptor, Orco, has an Hh independent transport path and that knock down of Smo segregate OR and Orco to different vesicular compartments. Last, we show that the odor response to the second receptor type in Drosophila olfaction, the ionotropic receptors (IRs), also require Hh signalling. Thus, Hh signalling is a general regulator of the odorant response that fulfils the criteria of being a potential player in Drosophila odorant adaptation.

  • 20.
    Alkhori, Liza
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öst, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Freiburg, Germany.
    Alenius, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The corepressor Atrophin specifies odorant receptor expression in Drosophila2014In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 1355-1364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In both insects and vertebrates, each olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) expresses one odorant receptor (OR) from a large genomic repertoire. How a receptor is specified is a tantalizing question addressing fundamental aspects of cell differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that the corepressor Atrophin (Atro) segregates OR gene expression between OSN classes in Drosophila. We show that the knockdown of Atro result in either loss or gain of a broad set of ORs. Each OR phenotypic group correlated with one of two opposing Notch fates, Notch responding, Nba (N(on)), and nonresponding, Nab (N(off)) OSNs. Our data show that Atro segregates ORs expressed in the Nba OSN classes and helps establish the Nab fate during OSN development. Consistent with a role in recruiting histone deacetylates, immunohistochemistry revealed that Atro regulates global histone 3 acetylation (H3ac) in OSNs and requires Hdac3 to segregate OR gene expression. We further found that Nba OSN classes exhibit variable but higher H3ac levels than the Nab OSNs. Together, these data suggest that Atro determines the level of H3ac, which ensures correct OR gene expression within the Nba OSNs. We propose a mechanism by which a single corepressor can specify a large number of neuron classes.-Alkhori, L., Öst, A., Alenius, M. The corepressor Atrophin specifies odorant receptor expression in Drosophila.

  • 21.
    Almeida, A. M.
    et al.
    CVZ Centre Vet and Zootecnia, Portugal; CIISA Centre Interdisciplinar Invest Sanidade Anim, Portugal; UNL, Portugal; IBET Institute Biol Expt and Tecnol, Portugal.
    Bassols, A.
    University of Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Bendixen, E.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Bhide, M.
    University of Vet Medical and Pharm, Slovakia.
    Ceciliani, F.
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. University of Basque Country, Spain.
    Eckersall, P. D.
    University of Glasgow, Scotland.
    Hollung, K.
    Nofima AS, Norway.
    Lisacek, F.
    Swiss Institute Bioinformat, Switzerland.
    Mazzucchelli, G.
    University of Liege, Belgium.
    McLaughlin, M.
    University of Glasgow, Scotland.
    Miller, I.
    University of Vet Med, Austria.
    Nally, J. E.
    ARS, IA 50010 USA.
    Plowman, J.
    AgResearch, New Zealand.
    Renaut, J.
    Centre Rech Public Gabriel Lippmann, Luxembourg.
    Rodrigues, P.
    University of Algarve, Portugal.
    Roncada, P.
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Staric, J.
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Turk, R.
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Animal board invited review: advances in proteomics for animal and food sciences2015In: Animal, ISSN 1751-7311, E-ISSN 1751-732X, Vol. 9, no 1Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal production and health (APH) is an important sector in the world economy, representing a large proportion of the budget of all member states in the European Union and in other continents. APH is a highly competitive sector with a strong emphasis on innovation and, albeit with country to country variations, on scientific research. Proteomics (the study of all proteins present in a given tissue or fluid - i.e. the proteome) has an enormous potential when applied to APH. Nevertheless, for a variety of reasons and in contrast to disciplines such as plant sciences or human biomedicine, such potential is only now being tapped. To counter such limited usage, 6 years ago we created a consortium dedicated to the applications of Proteomics to APH, specifically in the form of a Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action, termed FA1002 - Proteomics in Farm Animals: www.cost-faproteomics.org. In 4 years, the consortium quickly enlarged to a total of 31 countries in Europe, as well as Israel, Argentina, Australia and New Zealand. This article has a triple purpose. First, we aim to provide clear examples on the applications and benefits of the use of proteomics in all aspects related to APH. Second, we provide insights and possibilities on the new trends and objectives for APH proteomics applications and technologies for the years to come. Finally, we provide an overview and balance of the major activities and accomplishments of the COST Action on Farm Animal Proteomics. These include activities such as the organization of seminars, workshops and major scientific conferences, organization of summer schools, financing Short-Term Scientific Missions (STSMs) and the generation of scientific literature. Overall, the Action has attained all of the proposed objectives and has made considerable difference by putting proteomics on the global map for animal and veterinary researchers in general and by contributing significantly to reduce the East-West and North-South gaps existing in the European farm animal research. Future activities of significance in the field of scientific research, involving members of the action, as well as others, will likely be established in the future.

  • 22.
    Amandusson, Asa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Estrogenic influences in pain processing2013In: Frontiers in neuroendocrinology (Print), ISSN 0091-3022, E-ISSN 1095-6808, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 329-349Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gonadal hormones not only play a pivotal role in reproductive behavior and sexual differentiation, they also contribute to thermoregulation, feeding, memory, neuronal survival, and the perception of somatosensory stimuli. Numerous studies on both animals and human subjects have also demonstrated the potential effects of gonadal hormones, such as estrogens, on pain transmission. These effects most likely involve multiple neuroanatomical circuits as well as diverse neurochemical systems and they therefore need to be evaluated specifically to determine the localization and intrinsic characteristics of the neurons engaged. The aim of this review is to summarize the morphological as well as biochemical evidence in support for gonadal hormone modulation of nociceptive processing, with particular focus on estrogens and spinal cord mechanisms.

  • 23.
    Amirhosseini, Mehdi
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aseptic Loosening of Orthopedic Implants: Osteoclastogenesis Regulation and Potential Therapeutics2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aseptic loosening is the main cause of failure of orthopedic prostheses. With no pharmaceuticals to prevent or mitigate periprosthetic bone degradation, a surgery to replace the loose implant with a new one is the only choice to restore patients’ function. Most studies on mechanisms for aseptic loosening investigate wear debris particle-induced osteolysis. However, pathological loading conditions around unstable implants can also trigger osteoclast differentiation and bone loss.

    In the first study, global gene expression changes induced by mechanical instability of implants, and by titanium particles were compared in a validated rat model for aseptic loosening. Microarray analysis showed that similar signaling pathways and gene expression patterns are involved in particle- and instability-induced periprosthetic osteolysis with an early onset innate immune response as a hallmark of osteolysis induced by mechanical instability.

    Further, effects of potential therapeutics on restriction of excessive osteoclast differentiation were evaluated. Wnt signaling pathway is known to regulate bone remodeling. In the second study, effects of inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β), a negative regulator of canonical Wnt signaling, on instability-induced periprosthetic osteolysis were examined using our rat model for aseptic loosening. Inhibition of GSK-3β led to a decrease in osteoclast numbers in the periprosthetic bone tissue exposed to mechanical instability while osteoblast perimeter showed an increase. This was accompanied by higher bone volume fraction (BV/TV) in animals treated with the GSK-3β inhibitor.

    In the third study, potential beneficial effects of two selective inhibitors of cyclindependent kinase 8/19 (CDK8/19) on bone tissue were evaluated. CDK8/19 is a Mediator complex-associated transcriptional regulator involved in several signaling pathways. CDK8/19 inhibitors, mainly under investigation as treatments for tumors, are reported to enhance osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. We show in this study, for the first time, that inhibition of CDK8/19 led to marked suppression of osteoclast differentiation from bone marrow macrophages in vitro through disruption of the RANK signaling. In mouse primary osteoblasts downregulation of osteopontin mRNA, a negative regulator of mineralization, together with increased alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition indicated that osteoblast mineralization was promoted by CDK8/19 inhibition. Moreover, local administration of a CDK8/19 inhibitor promoted cancellous bone regeneration in a rat model for bone healing.

    These studies contribute to better understanding of mechanisms behind mechanical instability-induced periprosthetic osteolysis and propose potential therapeutics to restrict bone loss with effects on both osteoclasts and osteoblasts.

  • 24.
    Amirhosseini, Mehdi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Göran
    Division of Pathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mechanical instability and titanium particles induce similar transcriptomic changes in a rat model for periprosthetic osteolysis and aseptic loosening2017In: Bone Reports, ISSN 2352-1872, Vol. 7, p. 17-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wear debris particles released from prosthetic bearing surfaces and mechanical instability of implants are two main causes of periprosthetic osteolysis. While particle-induced loosening has been studied extensively, mechanisms through which mechanical factors lead to implant loosening have been less investigated. This study compares the transcriptional profiles associated with osteolysis in a rat model for aseptic loosening, induced by either mechanical instability or titanium particles. Rats were exposed to mechanical instability or titanium particles. After 15 min, 3, 48 or 120 h from start of the stimulation, gene expression changes in periprosthetic bone tissue was determined by microarray analysis. Microarray data were analyzed by PANTHER Gene List Analysis tool and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Both types of osteolytic stimulation led to gene regulation in comparison to unstimulated controls after 3, 48 or 120 h. However, when mechanical instability was compared to titanium particles, no gene showed a statistically significant difference (fold change = ± 1.5 and adjusted p-value = 0.05) at any time point. There was a remarkable similarity in numbers and functional classification of regulated genes. Pathway analysis showed several inflammatory pathways activated by both stimuli, including Acute Phase Response signaling, IL-6 signaling and Oncostatin M signaling. Quantitative PCR confirmed the changes in expression of key genes involved in osteolysis observed by global transcriptomics. Inflammatory mediators including interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1ß, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)2, prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase (Ptgs)2 and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) showed strong upregulation, as assessed by both microarray and qPCR. By investigating genome-wide expression changes we show that, despite the different nature of mechanical implant instability and titanium particles, osteolysis seems to be induced through similar biological and signaling pathways in this rat model for aseptic loosening. Pathways associated to the innate inflammatory response appear to be a major driver for osteolysis. Our findings implicate early restriction of inflammation to be critical to prevent or mitigate osteolysis and aseptic loosening of orthopedic implants.

  • 25.
    Amirhosseini, Mehdi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lång, Pernilla
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Andersson, Göran
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Flygare, Johan
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Gene Therapy, Lund Stem Cell Center, Lund University, Lund, Sweden..
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cyclin-dependent kinase 8/19 inhibition suppresses osteoclastogenesis by downregulating RANK and promotes osteoblast mineralization and cancellous bone healing.2019In: Journal of Cellular Physiology, ISSN 0021-9541, E-ISSN 1097-4652, Vol. 234, no 9, p. 16503-16516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) is a mediator complex-associated transcriptional regulator that acts depending on context and cell type. While primarily under investigation as potential cancer therapeutics, some inhibitors of CDK8-and its paralog CDK19-have been reported to affect the osteoblast lineage and bone formation. This study investigated the effects of two selective CDK8/19 inhibitors on osteoclastogenesis and osteoblasts in vitro, and further evaluated how local treatment with a CDK8/19 inhibitor affects cancellous bone healing in rats. CDK8/19 inhibitors did not alter the proliferation of neither mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) nor primary mouse osteoblasts. Receptor activator of nuclear factor κΒ (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis from mouse BMMs was suppressed markedly by inhibition of CDK8/19, concomitant with reduced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity and C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen levels. This was accompanied by downregulation of PU.1, RANK, NF-κB, nuclear factor of activated T-cells 1 (NFATc1), dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), TRAP, and cathepsin K in RANKL-stimulated BMMs. Downregulating RANK and its downstream signaling in osteoclast precursors enforce CDK8/19 inhibitors as anticatabolic agents to impede excessive osteoclastogenesis. In mouse primary osteoblasts, CDK8/19 inhibition did not affect differentiation but enhanced osteoblast mineralization by promoting alkaline phosphatase activity and downregulating osteopontin, a negative regulator of mineralization. In rat tibiae, a CDK8/19 inhibitor administered locally promoted cancellous bone regeneration. Our data indicate that inhibitors of CDK8/19 have the potential to develop into therapeutics to restrict osteolysis and enhance bone regeneration.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-02-21 12:44
  • 26.
    Amirhosseini, Mehdi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Madsen, Rune V.
    Hosp Special Surg, NY 10021 USA.
    Escott, K. Jane
    AstraZeneca, England.
    Bostrom, Mathias P.
    Hosp Special Surg, NY 10021 USA.
    Ross, F. Patrick
    Hosp Special Surg, NY 10021 USA.
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    GSK-3 beta inhibition suppresses instability-induced osteolysis by a dual action on osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation2018In: Journal of Cellular Physiology, ISSN 0021-9541, E-ISSN 1097-4652, Vol. 233, no 3, p. 2398-2408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, there are no medications available to treat aseptic loosening of orthopedic implants. Using osteoprotegerin fusion protein (OPG-Fc), we previously blocked instability-induced osteoclast differentiation and peri-prosthetic osteolysis. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, which regulates OPG secretion from osteoblasts, also modulates the bone tissue response to mechanical loading. We hypothesized that activating Wnt/beta-catenin signaling by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3 beta) would reduce instability-induced bone loss through regulation of both osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation. We examined effects of GSK-3 beta inhibition on regulation of RANKL and OPG in a rat model of mechanical instability-induced peri-implant osteolysis. The rats were treated daily with a GSK-3 beta inhibitor, AR28 (20 mg/kg bw), for up to 5 days. Bone tissue and blood serum were assessed by qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and ELISA on days 3 and 5, and by micro-CT on day 5. After 3 days of treatment with AR28, mRNA levels of beta-catenin, Runx2, Osterix, Col1 alpha 1, and ALP were increased leading to higher osteoblast numbers compared to vehicle-treated animals. BMP-2 and Wnt16 mRNA levels were downregulated by mechanical instability and this was rescued by GSK-3 beta inhibition. Osteoclast numbers were decreased significantly after 3 days of GSK-3 beta inhibition, which correlated with enhanced OPG mRNA expression. This was accompanied by decreased serum levels of TRAP5b on days 3 and 5. Treatment with AR28 upregulated osteoblast differentiation, while osteoclastogenesis was blunted, leading to increased bone mass by day 5. These data suggest that GSK-3 beta inactivation suppresses osteolysis through regulating both osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation in a rat model of instability-induced osteolysis.

  • 27.
    Anders Eriksson, Mats
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Lieden, Agne
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Bremer, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics. Division of Clinical Genetics, University Hospital, Link.
    Wincent, Josephine
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sahlin, Ellika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gillberg, Christopher
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Fernell, Elisabeth
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Anderlid, Britt-Marie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Rare copy number variants are common in young children with autism spectrum disorder2015In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 104, no 6, p. 610-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimSeveral studies have suggested that rare copy number variants (CNVs) are an important genetic contributor to autism spectrum disorders. The aims of the study were to use chromosomal microarray to investigate the presence of rare copy number variants in a population-based cohort of well-characterised young children with autism spectrum disorders and to relate the genetic results to neurodevelopmental profiles and medical conditions. MethodsWe performed chromosomal microarray on samples from 162 children who had been referred to the Stockholm Autism Centre for Young Children in Sweden after being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder between 20 and 54months of age. ResultsPathogenic aberrations were detected in 8.6% of the children and variants of uncertain significance were present in another 8.6%. CNVs were more frequent in children with congenital malformations or dysmorphic features as well as in the subgroup with intellectual disability. ConclusionOur results support the use of chromosomal microarray methods for the first tier genetic analysis of autism spectrum disorder. However, it is likely in the near future that chromosomal microarray methods will probably be replaced by whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing technologies in clinical genetic testing.

  • 28.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Internal Medicine, County Council of Jönköping, Jönköping.
    Landberg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Norrköping, Sweden.
    Consequences of high-sensitivity troponin T testing applied in a primary care population with chest pain compared with a commercially available point-of-care troponin T analysis: an observational prospective study2015In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:There is a demand for a highly sensitive and specific point-of care test to detect acute myocardial infarction (AMI). It is unclear if a high-sensitivity troponin assay will have enough discriminative power to become a decision support in primary care. The aim of this study was to evaluate a high-sensitivity troponin T assay performed in three primary health care centres in southeast Sweden and to compare the outcome with a point-of-care troponin T test.METHODS:This study included 115 patients who consulted their general practitioner for chest pain, dyspnoea on exertion, unexplained weakness and/or fatigue in the last 7days. Troponin T was analysed by a point-of-care test and a high-sensitivity method together with N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and creatinine. All patients were checked for AMI or unstable angina (UA) within 30days of study enrolment. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was carried out to examine possible connections between troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L, clinical variables and laboratory findings at baseline. In addition, 21 patients with troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L and no signs of AMI or UA were followed up for 2-3years.RESULTS:Three patients were diagnosed with AMI and three with UA. At the [greater than or equal to]15ng/L cut-off, the troponin T method had 100% sensitivity, 75% specificity for AMI and a positive predictive value of 10%. The troponin T point-of-care test missed one case of AMI and the detection limit was 50ng/L. Troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L was correlated to age [greater than or equal to]65years (odds ratio (OR), 10.9 95% CI 2.28-51.8) and NT-proBNP in accordance with heart failure (OR 8.62 95% CI 1.61-46.1). Fourteen of the 21 patients, without signs of AMI or UA at baseline, still had increased troponin T at follow-up after 2-3years.CONCLUSIONS:A high-sensitivity troponin T assay could become useful in primary care as a point-of-care test for patients <65years. For patients older than 65-70years, a higher decision limit than [greater than or equal to]15ng/L should be considered and used in conjunction with clinical parameters and possibly with NT-proBNP.

  • 29.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wäster, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Ida
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Lysosomal exocytosis and caspase-8-mediated apoptosis in UVA-irradiated keratinocytes2013In: Journal of Cell Science, ISSN 0021-9533, E-ISSN 1477-9137, Vol. 126, no 24, p. 5578-5584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is a major environmental carcinogen involved in the development of skin cancer. To elucidate the initial signaling during UV-induced damage in human keratinocytes, we investigated lysosomal exocytosis and apoptosis induction. UVA, but not UVB, induced plasma membrane damage, which was repaired by Ca2+-dependent lysosomal exocytosis. The lysosomal exocytosis resulted in extracellular release of cathepsin D and acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase). Two hours after UVA irradiation, we detected activation of caspase-8, which was reduced by addition of anti-aSMAse. Furthermore, caspase-8 activation and apoptosis was reduced by prevention of endocytosis and by the use of cathepsin inhibitors. We conclude that lysosomal exocytosis is part of the keratinocyte response to UVA and is followed by cathepsin-dependent activation of caspase-8. The findings have implications for the understanding of UV-induced skin damage and emphasize that UVA and UVB initiate apoptosis through different signaling pathways in keratinocytes.

  • 30.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wäster, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    The lysosome: from waste bag to potential therapeutic target2013In: Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, ISSN 1674-2788, E-ISSN 1759-4685, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 214-226Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lysosomes are ubiquitous membrane-bound intracellular organelles with an acidic interior. They are central for degradation and recycling of macromolecules delivered by endocytosis, phagocytosis, and autophagy. In contrast to the rather simplified view of lysosomes as waste bags, nowadays lysosomes are recognized as advanced organelles involved in many cellular processes and are considered crucial regulators of cell homeostasis. The function of lysosomes is critically dependent on soluble lysosomal hydrolases (e.g. cathepsins) as well as lysosomal membrane proteins (e.g. lysosome-associated membrane proteins). This review focuses on lysosomal involvement in digestion of intra- and extracellular material, plasma membrane repair, cholesterol homeostasis, and cell death. Regulation of lysosomal biogenesis and function via the transcription factor EB (TFEB) will also be discussed. In addition, lysosomal contribution to diseases, including lysosomal storage disorders, neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases, is presented.

  • 31.
    Armstrong, Andrea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mattsson, Niklas
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA .
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandin, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Agholme, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Bob
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Svensson, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. AlzeCure Fdn.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden UCL Institute Neurol, England .
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lysosomal Network Proteins as Potential Novel CSF Biomarkers for Alzheimers Disease2014In: Neuromolecular medicine, ISSN 1535-1084, E-ISSN 1559-1174, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 150-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The success of future intervention strategies for Alzheimers disease (AD) will likely rely on the development of treatments starting early in the disease course, before irreversible brain damage occurs. The pre-symptomatic stage of AD occurs at least one decade before the clinical onset, highlighting the need for validated biomarkers that reflect this early period. Reliable biomarkers for AD are also needed in research and clinics for diagnosis, patient stratification, clinical trials, monitoring of disease progression and the development of new treatments. Changes in the lysosomal network, i.e., the endosomal, lysosomal and autophagy systems, are among the first alterations observed in an AD brain. In this study, we performed a targeted search for lysosomal network proteins in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Thirty-four proteins were investigated, and six of them, early endosomal antigen 1 (EEA1), lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 (LAMP-1, LAMP-2), microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), Rab3 and Rab7, were significantly increased in the CSF from AD patients compared with neurological controls. These results were confirmed in a validation cohort of CSF samples, and patients with no neurochemical evidence of AD, apart from increased total-tau, were found to have EEA1 levels corresponding to the increased total-tau levels. These findings indicate that increased levels of LAMP-1, LAMP-2, LC3, Rab3 and Rab7 in the CSF might be specific for AD, and increased EEA1 levels may be a sign of general neurodegeneration. These six lysosomal network proteins are potential AD biomarkers and may be used to investigate lysosomal involvement in AD pathogenesis.

  • 32.
    Asif, Muhammad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. COMSATS institute of Information Technology, Lahore, Pakistan.
    Elinder, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Electrochemical Biosensors Based on ZnO Nanostructures to Measure Intracellular Metal Ions and Glucose2011In: Journal of Analytical & Bioanalytical Techniques, ISSN 2155-9872, Vol. S7, no 003, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures have attracted much interest for intracellular electrochemical measurements because of its large surface area, and its biocompatible properties. To design intracellular biosensors for metal ions and glucose, we grew ZnO nanorods on the tip of borosilicate glass capillaries (0.7μm in diameter) and characterized the nano-scale structure with field-emission scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The ZnO nanorods were functionalized accordingly for intracellular free metal ions or glucose measurements. Selectivity was achieved by using a metal-ion selective plastic membrane or glucose oxidase enzyme for glucose measurements. These functionalized ZnO nanorods showed high sensitivity and good biocompatibility for intracellular environments. Human adipocytes and frog oocytes were used for determinations of intracellular free metal ions and glucose concentrations. In this review, we discuss the simple and direct approach for intracellular measurements using ZnO nanostructure-based potentiometric biosensors for clinical and non-clinical applications. The performance of ZnO nanostructure-based intracellular sensor can be improved through engineering of morphology, effective surface area, functionality, and adsorption/desorption capability. This study paves the way to find applications in biomedicine by using this simple and miniaturized biosensing device

  • 33.
    Asklund, Thomas
    et al.
    Department of Radiation Sciences and Oncology, Umeå University, Sweden .
    Malmström, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden; Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Sweden .
    Björ, Ove
    Department of Radiation Sciences and Oncology, Umeå University, Sweden .
    Henriksson, Roger
    Department of Radiation Sciences and Oncology, Umeå University, Sweden: Regional Cancer Centre Stockholm, Gotland, Sweden .
    Brain tumors in Sweden: Data from a population-based registry 1999-2012.2014In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The Swedish brain tumor registry has, since it was launched in 1999, provided significant amounts of data on histopathological diagnoses and on important aspects of surgical and medical management of these patients. The purpose is mainly quality control, but also as a resource for research. Methods. Three Swedish healthcare regions, constituting 40% of the Swedish population, have had an almost complete registration. The following parameters are registered: diagnosis according to SNOMED/WHO classification, symptoms, performance status, pre- and postoperative radiology, tumor size and localization, extent of surgery and occurrence of postoperative complications, postoperative treatment, such as radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, other treatments, complications and toxicity, occurrence of reoperation/s, participation in clinical trials, multidisciplinary conferences and availability of a contact nurse. Results. Surgical radicality has been essentially constant, whereas the use of early (within 72 hours) postoperative CT and MRI has increased, especially for high-grade glioma, which is a reflection of quality of surgery. Survival of patients with high-grade glioma has increased, especially in the age group 60-69. Patients aged 18-39 years had a five-year survival of 40%. Waiting times for the pathological report has been slightly prolonged. Geographical differences do exist for some of the variables. Conclusion. Population-based registration is valuable for assessment of clinical management, which could have impact on patient care. As a result of short survival and/or the propensity to affect cognitive functions this patient group has considerable difficulties to make their voices heard in society. We therefore believe that a report like the present one can contribute to the spread of knowledge and increase the awareness for this patient group among caregivers and policy makers.

  • 34.
    Aslan, Cynthia
    et al.
    Tabriz Univ Med Sci, Iran.
    Maralbashi, Sepideh
    Kermanshah Univ Med Sci, Iran.
    Salari, Farhad
    Kermanshah Univ Med Sci, Iran.
    Kahroba, Houman
    Tabriz Univ Med Sci, Iran.
    Sigaroodi, Faraz
    Tabriz Univ Med Sci, Iran.
    Kazemi, Tohid
    Tabriz Univ Med Sci, Iran.
    Kharaziha, Pedram
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Tumor-derived exosomes: Implication in angiogenesis and antiangiogenesis cancer therapy2019In: Journal of Cellular Physiology, ISSN 0021-9541, E-ISSN 1097-4652, Vol. 234, no 10, p. 16885-16903Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tumor cells utilize different strategies to communicate with neighboring tissues for facilitating tumor progression and invasion, one of these strategies has been shown to be the release of exosomes. Exosomes are small nanovesicles secreted by all kind of cells in the body, especially cancer cells, and mediate cell to cell communications. Exosomes play an important role in cancer invasiveness by harboring various cargoes that could accelerate angiogenesis. Here first, we will present an overview of exosomes, their biology, and their function in the body. Then, we will focus on exosomes derived from tumor cells as tumor angiogenesis mediators with a particular emphasis on the underlying mechanisms in various cancer origins. Also, exosomes derived from stem cells and tumor-associated macrophages will be discussed in this regard. Finally, we will discuss the novel therapeutic strategies of exosomes as drug delivery vehicles against angiogenesis.

  • 35.
    Assarsson, Malin
    et al.
    Div Dermatol and Venereol, Sweden.
    Duvetorp, Albert
    Div Dermatol and Venereol, Sweden.
    Dienus, Olaf
    Div Med Diagnost, Sweden.
    Söderman, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Div Med Diagnost, Sweden.
    Seifert, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Div Dermatol and Venereol, Sweden.
    Significant Changes in the Skin Microbiome in Patients with Chronic Plaque Psoriasis after Treatment with Narrowband Ultraviolet B2018In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 98, no 4, p. 428-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in the skin microbiome have been shown to promote cutaneous inflammation. The skin microbiome of patients with chronic plaque type psoriasis was analysed before and after treatment with narrowband ultraviolet B (UVB). Swab samples of the microbiome were taken from lesional and non-lesional skin of 26 patients. Microbiotas were characterized by sequencing 16S rRNA bacterial genes on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Lesional skin microbiome diversity correlated with psoriasis severity (measured with the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index; PASI). There was a significantly lower abundance of the phylum Firmicutes and the genus Staphylococcus in lesional skin compared with non-lesional skin before UVB treatment. Responders (amp;gt; 75% target Psoriasis Severity Index (PSI) improvement) had significantly lower abundance of the phyla Firmicutes in lesional and non-lesional skin and lower abundance of the genera Staphylococcus, Finegoldia, Anaerococcus, Peptoniphilus, Gardnerella, Prevotella and Clostridium in lesional skin after UVB treatment. Pseudomonas significantly decreased in lesional and non-lesional skin of treatment responders. These results suggest that skin microbiome alterations after UVB treatment could be related to treatment and treatment response.

  • 36.
    Assarsson, Malin
    et al.
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Soderman, Jan
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Duvetorp, Albert
    Skanes Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Mrowietz, Ulrich
    Univ Med Ctr Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Skarstedt, Marita
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Seifert, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Narrowband UVB treatment induces expression of WNT7B, WNT10B and TCF7L2 in psoriasis skin2019In: Archives of Dermatological Research, ISSN 0340-3696, E-ISSN 1432-069X, Vol. 311, no 7, p. 535-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    WNT/beta-catenin signaling pathways play a pivotal role in the human immune defense against infections and in chronic inflammatory conditions as psoriasis. Wnt gene alterations are linked to known comorbidities of psoriasis as obesity, diabetes and Crohns disease. The objective of this study was to investigate WNT7B, WNT10B, WNT16 and TCF7L2 gene and protein expression in lesional and non-lesional skin and in the peripheral blood of patients with chronic plaque psoriasis compared with healthy individuals. To investigate the effect of narrowband UVB radiation, expression of these genes were analyzed before and after narrowband UVB treatment. Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms for WNT7B, WNT10B, WNT16 and TCF7L2 genes and psoriasis were tested. Our results show significantly decreased WNT7B, WNT10B and TCF7L2 gene expression in lesional skin compared with non-lesional skin and healthy controls. Narrowband UVB treatment significantly increased expression of these genes in lesional skin. Immunohistochemistry shows increased WNT16 expression in lesional skin. No significant differences in allele or genotype frequencies for Wnt or TCF7L2 gene polymorphisms were found between patient and control group. This study shows for the first time significant UVB induced upregulation of WNT7B, WNT10B and TCF7L2 in patients with psoriasis and suggests a potential role of these genes in psoriasis pathogenesis.

  • 37.
    Atkins, Alison Lynn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Helms, M L
    Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Sciences University, 3710 SW US Veterans Hospital Road, R & D5, Portland, OR 97201, USA.
    O'Toole, L A
    Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Sciences University, 3710 SW US Veterans Hospital Road, R & D5, Portland, OR 97201, USA.
    Belknap, J K
    Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Sciences University, 3710 SW US Veterans Hospital Road, R & D5, Portland, OR 97201, USA.
    Stereotypic behaviors in mice selectively bred for high and low methamphetamine-induced stereotypic chewing.2001In: Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0033-3158, E-ISSN 1432-2072, Vol. 157, no 1, p. 96-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RATIONALE: At high doses, methamphetamine produces repetitive stereotypic behaviors, and the degree to which this occurs is heritable.

    OBJECTIVES: Mice of a B6D2F2 genetic background were selectively bred for four generations for high (HMA) and low (LMA) numbers of stereotyped chewing episodes measured for 1 min at 33 min post-injection following 10 mg/kg methamphetamine (changed to 7 mg/kg for the high line and 15 mg/kg for the low line in the third selected generation to avoid ceiling and floor effects, respectively). We sought to determine whether stereotypic behaviors other than number of repetitive chewing episodes were altered by the selective breeding process.

    METHODS: HMA and LMA mice of the third and fourth selected generations were tested for chewing stereotypy, for a number of other stereotypic behaviors previously observed in rodents, and for several other non-stereotypic responses to methamphetamine. Testing in the third selected generation was conducted by observing behaviors on videotape following 7 mg/kg methamphetamine. In the fourth selected generation, mice were also tested in automated activity monitors following 10 mg/kg methamphetamine and in climbing chimneys following 16 mg/kg methamphetamine. Dose-response curves with doses of 1, 2, 3.5, 7, 10, and 15 mg/kg methamphetamine were constructed for the most commonly observed behaviors.

    RESULTS: LMA mice, which exhibited low stereotyped chewing, exhibited high stereotyped circling and climbing, and the reverse was true for these behaviors for HMA mice. For most of the other behaviors measured, there were drug effects but no differences between selected lines.

    CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that these three stereotyped behaviors, chewing, circling, and climbing, at least partly share the same mechanisms, and therefore are influenced by at least some of the same genes, since animals selectively bred for low methamphetamine-induced stereotyped chewing exhibited high amounts of circling and climbing when given methamphetamine. This also suggests that the other stereotypic behaviors that we measured do not occur by the same genetically determined mechanisms as stereotypic chewing.

  • 38.
    Atkins, Alison Lynn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mashhoon, Yasmin
    Department of Psychology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, United States.
    Kantak, Kathleen M
    Department of Psychology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, United States.
    Hippocampal regulation of contextual cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior.2008In: Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, ISSN 0091-3057, E-ISSN 1873-5177, Vol. 90, no 3, p. 481-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Associations between cocaine and cues facilitate development and maintenance of addiction. We hypothesized that the ventral hippocampus is important for acquisition of these associations. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine, with or without pre-exposure to distinct sets of cocaine- and saline-paired contextual cues. Next, rats were conditioned for 3 days with the distinct sets of contextual cues paired with cocaine and saline along with distinct discrete cues. Vehicle or lidocaine was infused into the ventral hippocampus prior to conditioning sessions. Following extinction, reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior was examined following exposure to contextual cues, discrete cues, or their combination. Inactivation of the ventral hippocampus during conditioning blocked acquisition of the association between cocaine and cocaine-paired contextual cues in that only lidocaine-treated rats with short-term cue exposure failed to reinstate responding in the presence of cocaine-paired contextual cues. Lidocaine also prevented rats in both cue exposure groups from discriminating between cocaine- and saline-paired contextual cues during reinstatement tests. Reinstatement induced by cocaine-paired discrete cues or by contextual and discrete cues together was not impaired for either cue exposure condition. The hippocampus is important for acquisition of the association between cocaine and context and in maintaining discrimination between cocaine-relevant and -irrelevant contextual cues.

  • 39.
    Atkins, Alison Lynn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rustay, N R
    Portland Alcohol Research Center, United States, Department of Veterans Affairs, Portland,United States .
    Crabbe, J C
    Portland Alcohol Research Center, United States, Department of Veterans Affairs, Portland,United States .
    Anxiety and sensitivity to ethanol and pentobarbital in alcohol withdrawal seizure-prone and withdrawal seizure-resistant mice.2000In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 0145-6008, E-ISSN 1530-0277, Vol. 24, no 12, p. 1743-1749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Withdrawal Seizure-Prone (WSP) and Withdrawal Seizure-Resistant (WSR) mice were selectively bred for high and low handling-induced convulsions, respectively, after chronic ethanol treatment. Withdrawal severity is one factor that may contribute to the development of alcoholism and/or substance abuse, and anxiety is another. We sought to explore whether these factors are genetically related.

    METHODS: WSP and WSR mice of two replicate pairs of selected lines were tested for anxiety-related behaviors on the canopy stretched-attend-posture apparatus 20 min after intraperitoneal injection of ethanol (2 g/kg, 20% v/v), pentobarbital (20 mg/kg), or an equivalent volume of saline. Dependent measures of anxiety included number of stretched attend postures (SAP) and time spent in the exposed area of the apparatus. Number of line crossings, which measures overall activity, was also scored.

    RESULTS: WSP mice given saline exhibited more SAP than WSR mice given saline, which indicated greater baseline anxiety. Ethanol and pentobarbital both reduced SAP and increased time spent in the exposed area of the apparatus, which indicated that both drugs exerted an anxiolytic effect. Despite baseline differences in SAP between selected lines, both anxiolytic drugs reduced SAP to similar levels in WSP and WSR mice.

    CONCLUSIONS: These results support the hypothesis that WSP mice are more sensitive than WSR mice to the anxiety-reducing effects of ethanol and pentobarbital. Some genes that influence this difference are likely to be the same as those that influence ethanol withdrawal severity. Thus, higher basal anxiety and greater genetic sensitivity to anxiolytic drug effects may relate to a greater genetic predisposition to the development of severe alcohol withdrawal signs.

  • 40.
    Azharuddin, Mohammad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zhu, Geyunjian H.
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Das, Debapratim
    Indian Inst Technol Guwahati, India.
    Ozgur, Erdogan
    Hacettepe Univ, Turkey.
    Uzun, Lokman
    Hacettepe Univ, Turkey.
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    Cranfield Univ, England.
    Patra, Hirak Kumar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Cambridge, England.
    A repertoire of biomedical applications of noble metal nanoparticles2019In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 55, no 49, p. 6964-6996Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Noble metals comprise any of several metallic chemical elements that are outstandingly resistant to corrosion and oxidation, even at elevated temperatures. This group is not strictly defined, but the tentative list includes ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, silver, osmium, iridium, platinum and gold, in order of atomic number. The emerging properties of noble metal nanoparticles are attracting huge interest from the translational scientific community and have led to an unprecedented expansion of research and exploration of applications in biotechnology and biomedicine. Noble metal nanomaterials can be synthesised both by top-down and bottom up approaches, as well as via organism-assisted routes, and subsequently modified appropriately for the field of use. Nanoscale analogues of gold, silver, platinum, and palladium in particular, have gained primary importance owing to their excellent intrinsic properties and diversity of applications; they offer unique functional attributes, which are quite unlike the bulk material. Modulation of noble metal nanoparticles in terms of size, shape and surface functionalisation has endowed them with unusual capabilities and manipulation at the chemical level, which can lead to changes in their electrical, chemical, optical, spectral and other intrinsic properties. Such flexibility in multi-functionalisation delivers Ockhams razor to applied biomedical science. In this feature article, we highlight recent advances in the adaptation of noble metal nanomaterials and their biomedical applications in therapeutics, diagnostics and sensing.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-05-21 00:01
  • 41.
    Aziz, Abdul Maruf Asif
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brothers, Shaun
    University of Miami Health System, University of Miami, Miami, USA.
    Sartor, Gregory
    University of Miami Health System, University of Miami, Miami, USA.
    Holm, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN). Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Wahlestedt, Claes
    University of Miami Health System, University of Miami, Miami, USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor agonist SR-8993 as a candidate therapeutic for alcohol use disorders: validation in rat models2016In: Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0033-3158, E-ISSN 1432-2072, Vol. 233, no 19-20, p. 3553-3563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RATIONALE: Alcoholism is a complex disorder in which diverse pathophysiological processes contribute to initiation and progression, resulting in a high degree of heterogeneity among patients. Few pharmacotherapies are presently available, and patient responses to these are variable. The nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) receptor has been suggested to play a role both in alcohol reward and in negatively reinforced alcohol seeking. Previous studies have shown that NOP-receptor activation reduces alcohol intake in genetically selected alcohol-preferring as well as alcohol-dependent rats. NOP activation also blocks stress- and cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol-seeking behavior.

    OBJECTIVES: Here, we aimed to examine a novel, potent, and brain-penetrant small-molecule NOP-receptor agonist, SR-8993, in animal models of alcohol- as well as anxiety-related behavior using male Wistar rats.

    RESULTS: SR-8993 was mildly anxiolytic when given to naïve animals and potently reversed acute alcohol withdrawal-induced ("hangover") anxiety. SR-8993 reduced both home-cage limited access drinking, operant responding for alcohol, and escalation induced through prolonged intermittent access to alcohol. SR-8993 further attenuated stress- as well as cue-induced relapse to alcohol seeking. For the effective dose (1.0 mg/kg), non-specific effects such as sedation may be limited, since a range of control behaviors were unaffected, and this dose did not interact with alcohol elimination.

    CONCLUSION: These findings provide further support for NOP-receptor agonism as a promising candidate treatment for alcoholism and establish SR-8993 or related molecules as suitable for further development as therapeutics.

  • 42.
    Azzouzi, Sawsen
    et al.
    University of Sousse, Tunisia.
    Patra, Hirak Kumar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ben Ali, Mounir
    University of Sousse, Tunisia.
    Nooredeen Abbas, Mohammed
    National Research Centre, Egypt.
    Dridi, Cherif
    Centre Research Microelect and Nanotechnol CRMN Sousse, Tunisia.
    Errachid, Abdelhamid
    University of Lyon 1, France.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Citrate-selective electrochemical mu-sensor for early stage detection of prostate cancer2016In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 228, p. 335-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extremely specialised anatomical function of citrate inside the prostate, make it one of the preferred biomarkers for early stage detection of prostate cancer. However, current detection methods are seriously limited due to the very low citrate concentrations that need to be measured in order to follow disease progression. In the present work, we report a novel citrate-selective-sensor based on iron (III) phthalocyanine chloride-C-monoamido-Poly-n-Butyl Acrylate (Fe(III)MAPcC1 P n BA) modified gold -electrodes for the electrochemical determination and estimation of the pathophysiological range of citrate. The newly synthesised ionophore has been structurally characterised using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-vis spectroscopy. Contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been used to investigate the adhesion and morphological properties of the membrane. The developed citrate-selective-electrodes had a Nernstian sensitivity of-19.34 +/- 0.83 mV/decade with a detection limit of about 9 x 10-6M and a linear range from 4 x 10(-5)M to 10(-1) M, which covered the pathologically important clinical range. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) showed very high sensitivity with a lower Limit of detection 1.7 x 10(-9) M and linear detection range (10(-8)-10(-1) M), which is very important not only for the early-stage diagnosis and screening procedures, but also in mapping the stage of the cancer too. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 43.
    Bagger-Sjoback, Dan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stromback, Karin
    Academic Hospital, Sweden.
    Hakizimana, Pierre
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Plue, Jan
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Christina
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hultcrantz, Malou
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Papatziamos, Georgios
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Smeds, Henrik
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Danckwardt-Lilliestrom, Niklas
    Academic Hospital, Sweden.
    Hellstrom, Sten
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ann
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Tideholm, Bo
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Fridberger, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    A Randomised, Double Blind Trial of N-Acetylcysteine for Hearing Protection during Stapes Surgery2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 3, p. e0115657-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Otosclerosis is a disorder that impairs middle ear function, leading to conductive hearing loss. Surgical treatment results in large improvement of hearing at low sound frequencies, but high-frequency hearing often suffers. A likely reason for this is that inner ear sensory cells are damaged by surgical trauma and loud sounds generated during the operation. Animal studies have shown that antioxidants such as N-Acetylcysteine can protect the inner ear from noise, surgical trauma, and some ototoxic substances, but it is not known if this works in humans. This trial was performed to determine whether antioxidants improve surgical results at high frequencies. Methods We performed a randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled parallel group clinical trial at three Swedish university clinics. Using block-stratified randomization, 156 adult patients undergoing stapedotomy were assigned to intravenous N-Acetylcysteine (150 mg/kg body weight) or matching placebo (1:1 ratio), starting one hour before surgery. The primary outcome was the hearing threshold at 6 and 8 kHz; secondary outcomes included the severity of tinnitus and vertigo. Findings One year after surgery, high-frequency hearing had improved 2.7 +/- 3.8 dB in the placebo group (67 patients analysed) and 2.4 +/- 3.7 dB in the treated group (72 patients; means +/- 95% confidence interval, p = 0.54; linear mixed model). Surgery improved tinnitus, but there was no significant intergroup difference. Post-operative balance disturbance was common but improved during the first year, without significant difference between groups. Four patients receiving N-Acetylcysteine experienced mild side effects such as nausea and vomiting. Conclusions N-Acetylcysteine has no effect on hearing thresholds, tinnitus, or balance disturbance after stapedotomy.

  • 44.
    Bagger-Sjoback, Dan
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Stromback, Karin
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hultcrantz, Malou
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Papatziamos, Georgios
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Smeds, Henrik
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Danckwardt-Lilliestrom, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Tideholm, Bo
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ann
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hellstrom, Sten
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hakizimana, Pierre
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fridberger, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    High-frequency hearing, tinnitus, and patient satisfaction with stapedotomy: A randomized prospective study2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, no 13341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Otosclerosis is a common disorder that leads to conductive hearing loss. Most patients with otosclerosis also have tinnitus, and surgical treatment is known to improve hearing as well as tinnitus. Some patients however experience worsening of tinnitus after the operation, but there are no known factors that allow surgeons to predict who will be at risk. In this prospective observational study on 133 patients undergoing stapedotomy, we show that postoperative air conduction thresholds at very high stimulus frequencies predict improvement of tinnitus, as assessed with proportional odds logistic regression models. Young patients were significantly more likely to experience reduction of tinnitus and patients whose tinnitus became better were also more satisfied with the outcome of the operation. These findings have practical importance for patients and their surgeons. Young patients can be advised that surgery is likely to be beneficial for their tinnitus, but a less positive message should be conveyed to older patients.

  • 45.
    Bagheri, Maryam
    et al.
    Ilam University of Medical Science, Iran .
    Rezakhani, Arjang
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Turkina, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roghani, Mehrdad
    Shahed University, Iran .
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mohseni, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Amyloid Beta1-40-Induced Astrogliosis and the Effect of Genistein Treatment in Rat: A Three-Dimensional Confocal Morphometric and Proteomic Study2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Astrocytes are highly involved in regulation and homeostasis of the extracellular environment in the healthy brain. In pathological conditions, these cells play a major role in the inflammatory response seen in CNS tissues, which is called reactive astrogliosis and includes hypertrophy and proliferation of astrocytes. Here, we performed 3D confocal microscopy to evaluate the morphological response of reactive astrocytes positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in rats, to the presence of Aβ1–40 in the rat brain before and after treatment with genistein. In 50 astrocytes per animal, we measured the volume and surface area for the nucleus, cell body, the entire cell, the tissue covered by single astrocytes and quantified the number and length of branches, the density of the astrocytes and the intensity of GFAP immunoreactivity. Injecting Aβ1–40 into the brain of rats caused astrogliosis indicated by increased values for all measured parameters. Mass spectrometric analysis of hippocampal tissue in Aβ1–40-injected brain showed decreased amounts of tubulins, enolases and myelin basic protein, and increased amounts of dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2. In Aβ1–40-injected rats pretreated with genistein, GFAP intensity was decreased to the sham-operated group level, and Aβ1–40-induced astrogliosis was significantly ameliorated.

  • 46.
    Bagheri, Maryam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rezakhani, Arjang
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Roghani, Mehrdad
    Neurophysiology Research Center, Shahed University, Iran.
    Joghataei, Mohammad T.
    Iran University of Medical Science, Iran.
    Mohseni, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Protocol for Three-dimensional Confocal Morphometric Analysis of Astrocytes2015In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, ISSN 1940-087X, E-ISSN 1940-087X, no 106, p. e53113-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As glial cells in the brain, astrocytes have diverse functional roles in the central nervous system. In the presence of harmful stimuli, astrocytes modify their functional and structural properties, a condition called reactive astrogliosis. Here, a protocol for assessment of the morphological properties of astrocytes is presented. This protocol includes quantification of 12 different parameters i.e. the surface area and volume of the tissue covered by an astrocyte (astrocyte territory), the entire astrocyte including branches, cell body, and nucleus, as well as total length and number of branches, the intensity of fluorescence immunoreactivity of antibodies used for astrocyte detection, and astrocyte density (number/1,000 mu m(2)). For this purpose three-dimensional (3D) confocal microscopic images were created, and 3D image analysis software such as Volocity 6.3 was used for measurements. Rat brain tissue exposed to amyloid beta(1-40) (A beta(1-40)) with or without a therapeutic intervention was used to present the method. This protocol can also be used for 3D morphometric analysis of other cells from either in vivo or in vitro conditions.

  • 47.
    Bandyopadhyay, Souvik K.
    et al.
    GlaxoSmithKline Asia Pvt. Ltd., Bangalore, India.
    Azharuddin, Mohammad
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dasgupta, Anjan K.
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, India.
    Ganguli, Bhaswati
    Department of Statistics, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, India.
    SenRoy, Sugata
    Department of Statistics, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, India.
    Patra, Hirak Kumar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Wolfson College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Deb, Suryyani
    Department of Biotechnology, Maulana Abul Kalam Azad University of Technology, Kolkata, India.
    Probing ADP Induced Aggregation Kinetics During Platelet-Nanoparticle Interactions: Functional Dynamics Analysis to Rationalize Safety and Benefits2019In: Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology, E-ISSN 2296-4185, Vol. 7, p. 163-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Platelets, one of the most sensitive blood cells, can be activated by a range of external and internal stimuli including physical, chemical, physiological, and/or non-physiological agents. Platelets need to respond promptly during injury to maintain blood hemostasis. The time profile of platelet aggregation is very complex, especially in the presence of the agonist adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP), and it is difficult to probe such complexity using traditional linear dose response models. In the present study, we explored functional analysis techniques to characterize the pattern of platelet aggregation over time in response to nanoparticle induced perturbations. This has obviated the need to represent the pattern of aggregation by a single summary measure and allowed us to treat the entire aggregation profile over time, as the response. The modeling was performed in a flexible manner, without any imposition of shape restrictions on the curve, allowing smooth platelet aggregation over time. The use of a probabilistic framework not only allowed statistical prediction and inference of the aggregation signatures, but also provided a novel method for the estimation of higher order derivatives of the curve, thereby allowing plausible estimation of the extent and rate of platelet aggregation kinetics over time. In the present study, we focused on the estimated first derivative of the curve, obtained from the platelet optical aggregometric profile over time and used it to discern the underlying kinetics as well as to study the effects of ADP dosage and perturbation with gold nanoparticles. In addition, our method allowed the quantification of the extent of inter-individual signature variations. Our findings indicated several hidden features and showed a mixture of zero and first order kinetics interrupted by a metastable zero order ADP dose dependent process. In addition, we showed that the two first order kinetic constants were ADP dependent. However, we were able to perturb the overall kinetic pattern using gold nanoparticles, which resulted in autocatalytic aggregation with a higher aggregate mass and which facilitated the aggregation rate.

  • 48.
    Banerjee, Debarshi
    et al.
    Columbia University Medical Center, USA.
    Cieslar-Pobuda, Artur
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Zhu, Geyunjian Harry
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Wiechec, Emilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patra, Hirak
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Adding nanotechnology to the metastasis treatment arsenal.2019In: TIPS - Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, ISSN 0165-6147, E-ISSN 1873-3735, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 403-418Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metastasis is a major cause of cancer-related mortality, accounting for 90% of cancer deaths. The explosive growth of cancer biology research has revealed new mechanistic network information and pathways that promote metastasis. Consequently, a large number of antitumor agents have been developed and tested for their antimetastatic efficacy. Despite their exciting cytotoxic effects on tumor cells in vitro and antitumor activities in preclinical studies in vivo, only a few have shown potent antimetastatic activities in clinical trials. In this review, we provide a brief overview of current antimetastatic strategies that show clinical efficacy and review nanotechnology-based approaches that are currently being incorporated into these therapies to mitigate challenges associated with treating cancer metastasis.

  • 49.
    Bauer, Eva
    et al.
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Schmutzer, Thomas
    Leibniz Institute Plant Genet and Crop Plant Research IPK Gat, Germany.
    Barilar, Ivan
    University of Hohenheim, Germany.
    Mascher, Martin
    Leibniz Institute Plant Genet and Crop Plant Research IPK Gat, Germany.
    Gundlach, Heidrun
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Germany.
    Martis, Mihaela-Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Germany.
    Twardziok, Sven O.
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Germany.
    Hackauf, Bernd
    Julius Kuhn Institute, Germany.
    Gordillo, Andres
    KWS LOCHOW GMBH, Germany.
    Wilde, Peer
    KWS LOCHOW GMBH, Germany.
    Schmidt, Malthe
    KWS LOCHOW GMBH, Germany.
    Korzun, Viktor
    KWS LOCHOW GMBH, Germany.
    Mayer, Klaus F. X.
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Germany.
    Schmid, Karl
    University of Hohenheim, Germany.
    Schoen, Chris-Carolin
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Scholz, Uwe
    Leibniz Institute Plant Genet and Crop Plant Research IPK Gat, Germany.
    Towards a whole-genome sequence for rye (Secale cereale L.)2017In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 89, no 5, p. 853-869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on a whole-genome draft sequence of rye (Secale cereale L.). Rye is a diploid Triticeae species closely related to wheat and barley, and an important crop for food and feed in Central and Eastern Europe. Through whole-genome shotgun sequencing of the 7.9-Gbp genome of the winter rye inbred line Lo7 we obtained a de novo assembly represented by 1.29 million scaffolds covering a total length of 2.8 Gbp. Our reference sequence represents nearly the entire low-copy portion of the rye genome. This genome assembly was used to predict 27 784 rye gene models based on homology to sequenced grass genomes. Through resequencing of 10 rye inbred lines and one accession of the wild relative S. vavilovii, we discovered more than 90 million single nucleotide variants and short insertions/deletions in the rye genome. From these variants, we developed the high-density Rye600k genotyping array with 600 843 markers, which enabled anchoring the sequence contigs along a high-density genetic map and establishing a synteny-based virtual gene order. Genotyping data were used to characterize the diversity of rye breeding pools and genetic resources, and to obtain a genome-wide map of selection signals differentiating the divergent gene pools. This rye whole-genome sequence closes a gap in Triticeae genome research, and will be highly valuable for comparative genomics, functional studies and genome-based breeding in rye.

  • 50.
    Baumann, Katrine Y.
    et al.
    RefLab ApS, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Church, Martin K.
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany.
    Clough, Geraldine F.
    Univ Southampton, England.
    Quist, Sven Roy
    Otto von Guericke Univ, Germany; Skin Ctr MDZ, Germany.
    Schmelz, Martin
    Heidelberg Univ, Germany.
    Skov, Per Stahl
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Tannert, Line Kring
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Gimenez-Arnau, Ana Maria
    Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Frischbutter, Stefan
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany.
    Scheffel, Joerg
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany.
    Maurer, Marcus
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany.
    Skin microdialysis: methods, applications and future opportunities-an EAACI position paper2019In: Clinical and Translational Allergy, ISSN 2045-7022, E-ISSN 2045-7022, Vol. 9, article id 24Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skin microdialysis (SMD) is a versatile sampling technique that can be used to recover soluble endogenous and exogenous molecules from the extracellular compartment of human skin. Due to its minimally invasive character, SMD can be applied in both clinical and preclinical settings. Despite being available since the 1990s, the technique has still not reached its full potential use as a tool to explore pathophysiological mechanisms of allergic and inflammatory reactions in the skin. Therefore, an EAACI Task Force on SMD was formed to disseminate knowledge about the technique and its many applications. This position paper from the task force provides an overview of the current use of SMD in the investigation of the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, chronic urticaria, psoriasis, and in studies of cutaneous events during type 1 hypersensitivity reactions. Furthermore, this paper covers drug hypersensitivity, UVB-induced- and neurogenic inflammation, and drug penetration investigated by SMD. The aim of this paper is to encourage the use of SMD and to make the technique easily accessible by providing an overview of methodology and applications, supported by standardized operating procedures for SMD in vivo and ex vivo.

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