Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 141
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Amara, Walid
    et al.
    Larsen, Torben B
    Sciaraffia, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Hernández Madrid, Antonio
    Chen, Jian
    Estner, Heidi
    Todd, Derick
    Bongiorni, Maria G
    Potpara, Tatjana S
    Dagres, Nikolaos
    Sagnol, Pascal
    Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Patients' attitude and knowledge about oral anticoagulation therapy: results of a self-assessment survey in patients with atrial fibrillation conducted by the European Heart Rhythm Association.2016In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 151-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association survey was to assess the attitude, level of education, and knowledge concerning oral anticoagulants (OACs) among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) taking vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs) or antiplatelets. A total of 1147 patients with AF [mean age 66 ± 13 years, 529 (45%) women] from 8 selected European countries responded to this survey. The overall use of OACs and antiplatelets was 77 and 15.3%, respectively. Of the patients taking OACs, 67% were on VKAs, 33% on NOACs, and 17.9% on a combination of OACs and antiplatelets. Among patients on VKAs, 91% correctly stated the target international normalized ratio (INR) level. The proportion of patients on VKA medication who were aware that monthly INR monitoring was required for this treatment and the proportion of patients on NOAC who knew that renal function monitoring at least annually was mandatory for NOACs was 76 and 21%, respectively. An indirect estimation of compliance indicated that 14.5% of patients temporarily discontinued the treatment, and 26.5% of patients reported having missed at least one dose. The survey shows that there is room for improvement regarding education and adherence of patients taking OACs, particularly regarding monitoring requirements for NOACs.

  • 2. Auricchio, Angelo
    et al.
    Gasparini, Maurizio
    Linde, Cecilia
    Dobreanu, Dan
    Cano, Óscar
    Sterlinski, Maciej
    Bogale, Nigussie
    Stellbrink, Christoph
    Refaat, Marwan M
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Lober, Christiane
    Dickstein, Kenneth
    Normand, Camilla
    Sex-Related Procedural Aspects and Complications in CRT Survey II: A Multicenter European Experience in 11,088 Patients.2019In: JACC. Clinical electrophysiology, ISSN 2405-5018, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 1048-1058, article id S2405-500X(19)30410-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to compare sex difference for procedural aspects and complications in the European Society of Cardiology CRT Survey II, exploring whether adverse events were related to the type of CRT device implanted.

    BACKGROUND: Sex-related differences in procedural aspects and complications in patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) implantation has not been explored in a real-life population.

    METHODS: A post-hoc analysis of procedural data and complications in different sexes and factors associated with events was performed from data collected in the European Society of Cardiology CRT Survey II.

    RESULTS: Of all patients (n = 11,088) included, 24.3% were women. The mean age (70 years of age) of male and female recipients was similar. Female patients more frequently had an idiopathic cardiomyopathy (67.4% vs. 44.1%) and fewer comorbidities, including atrial fibrillation (34.8% vs. 42.8%), diabetes (29.1% vs. 32.1%), chronic obstructive lung disease (10.3% vs. 12.6%), and renal failure (28.7% vs. 31.9%), compared with men. More women compared with men had a pacemaker (56.6% vs. 46.3%) and much less often an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (CRT-D) (19.0% vs. 34.7%) implant. Periprocedural event rate was the highest in women with CRT with defibrillator (7.1% vs. 4.8% in men), followed by women with a CRT with pacing (5.5% vs. 4.4% in men). The higher periprocedural event rate in CRT-D women was attributable primarily to the occurrence of pneumothorax (1.4%), coronary sinus dissection (2.1%), and pericardial tamponade (0.3%). The rate of in-hospital major adverse events (6.0%) and complications necessitating reoperation (4.0%) was not different among sex and device type.

    CONCLUSIONS: Women are more likely to experience adverse procedure-related events during CRT implantation. Thus, preventive strategies should be employed to minimize complication rate.

  • 3.
    Baensch, Dietmar
    et al.
    Univ Hosp Rostock, Dept Internal Med 1, Div Cardiol, Heart Ctr Rostock, D-18057 Rostock, Germany..
    Bonnemeier, Hendrik
    Univ Hosp Schleswig Holstein, Dept Internal Med Cardiol & Angiol 3, Kiel, Germany..
    Brandt, Johan
    Skane Univ Hosp, Arrhythmia Dept, Lund, Sweden..
    Bode, Frank
    Univ Hosp Schleswig Holstein, Med Clin Cardiol Angiol & Intens Care Med 2, Lubeck, Germany..
    Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Rigshosp, Dept Cardiol, Ctr Heart, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Univ Copenhagen, Danish Arrhythmia Res Ctr, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Taborsky, Milos
    Fac Hosp Olomouc, Dept Internal Med Cardiol 1, Olomouc, Czech Republic..
    Kuster, Stefan
    DRK Hosp Molln Ratzeburg, Dept Internal Med, Cardiol, Ratzeburg, Germany..
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Felk, Angelika
    Biotronik, Berlin, Germany..
    Hauser, Tino
    Biotronik, Berlin, Germany..
    Suling, Anna
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Dept Med Biometry & Epidemiol, Hamburg, Germany..
    Wegscheider, Karl
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Dept Med Biometry & Epidemiol, Hamburg, Germany..
    Intra-operative defibrillation testing and clinical shock efficacy in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: the NORDIC ICD randomized clinical trial2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no 37, p. 2500-2507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims This trial was designed to test the hypothesis that shock efficacy during follow-up is not impaired in patients implanted without defibrillation (DF) testing during first implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantation. Methods and results Between February 2011 and July 2013, 1077 patients were randomly assigned (1 : 1) to first time ICD implantation with (n = 540) or without (n = 537) DF testing. The intra-operative DF testing was standardized across all participating centres, and all ICD shocks were programmed to 40 J irrespective of DF test results. The primary end point was the average first shock efficacy (FSE) for all true ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation (VT/VF) episodes during follow-up. The secondary end points included procedural data, serious adverse events, and mortality. During a median follow-up of 22.8 months, the model-based FSE was found to be non-inferior in patients with an ICD implanted without a DF test, with a difference in FSE of 3.0% in favour of the no DF test [confidence interval (CI) -3.0 to 9.0%, Pnon-inferiority <0.001 for the pre-defined non-inferiority margin of 210%). A total of 112 procedure-related serious adverse events occurred within 30 days in 94 patients (17.6%) tested compared with 89 events in 74 patients (13.9%) not tested (P = 0.095). Conclusion Defibrillation efficacy during follow-up is not inferior in patients with a 40 J ICD implanted without DF testing. Defibrillation testing during first time ICD implantation should no longer be recommended for routine left-sided ICD implantation.

  • 4.
    Bagge, Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Surgical ablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation in different patient populations: A study of clinical outcomes including rhythm, quality of life, atrial function and safety2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) have markedly reduced quality of life (QoL) and catheter ablation has become a useful tool in the rhythm control therapy. However, because of the poor outcome for patients with persistent AF, new surgical ablation strategies for rhythm control are emerging.

    The aims of this thesis were to evaluate QoL, the main indication for rhythm control, after three different types of surgical ablation for AF, two stand-alone epicardial AF ablation procedures and one concomitant procedure during mitral valve surgery (MVS), and to perform a long-term follow-up of one of the techniques with regard to rhythm outcome, left atrial function, exercise capacity and safety.

    As the first center in the Nordic countries to adopt the video-assisted epicardial pulmonary vein isolation and ganglionated plexi ablation combined with left atrial appendage excision (LAA), the  freedom from AF at one year follow-up was found to be 71% and associated with improved exercise capacity, QoL and symptoms as well as preserved left atrial function and size. The most common complication was bleeding events (14%). After 10 years, the improved symptoms and QoL remained, reaching comparable levels of the general Swedish population, despite a marked decline in the rate of freedom from AF (36%). 4 strokes appeared during follow-up despite LAA excision in 3 of these patients.

    In order to improve the rhythm outcome for patients with longstanding persistent AF a box-lesion was added to the procedure. At one year follow-up, both symptoms and QoL improved and was indistinguishable from those in the Swedish general population.

    Finally, concomitant AF ablation during MVS did not improve QoL compared to MVS alone in a double blinded randomized controlled trial. Moreover, no difference was seen between patients in AF or sinus rhythm at one year follow-up, irrespective of the allocated therapy, indicating that their preoperative symptoms were mainly related to their valve disease.

    In conclusion, the stand-alone procedures using surgical ablation was found to be effective but at the expense of procedural complications. In contrast, the concomitant surgical AF ablation did not improve QoL, a finding that raises concerns regarding current recommendations for this procedure. 

  • 5.
    Bagge, Louise
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Blomström, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Jidéus, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Lönnerholm, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Left atrial function after epicardial pulmonary vein isolation in patients with atrial fibrillation2017In: Journal of interventional cardiac electrophysiology (Print), ISSN 1383-875X, E-ISSN 1572-8595, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 195-201Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bagge, Louise
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Surgical ablation for atrial fibrillation in mitral valve disease: impact of the maze procedure-authors' response2018In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 20, no FI_3, p. f458-f459Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bagge, Louise
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Jansson, Victoria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Blomström, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    10 years follow-up of video-assisted epicardial pulmonary vein isolation and vagal denervation in patients with atrial fibrillationIn: Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bagge, Louise
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Probst, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Blomström, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Thelin, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Quality of Life Is Not Significantly Improved by Adding Epicardial Left Atrial Cryoablation to Mitral Valve Surgery Than if Performed Alone2017In: Cardiovascular Electrophysiology, ISSN 1045-3873, E-ISSN 1540-8167, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 589-590, article id MA19Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Bagge, Louise
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Probst, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Jensen, Steen M
    Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine (Heart centre) Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Blomström, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Thelin, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Holmgren, Anders
    Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Quality of life is not improved after mitral valve surgery combined with epicardial left atrial cryoablation as compared with mitral valve surgery alone: a substudy of the double blind randomized SWEDish Multicentre Atrial Fibrillation study (SWEDMAF)2018In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 20, no FI_3, p. f343-f350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    Concomitant surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery (MVS) has almost become routine despite lack of convincing information about improved quality-of-life (QOL) and clinical benefit. Quality-of-life was therefore assessed after MVS with or without epicardial left atrial cryoablation.

    Methods and results

    Sixty-five patients with permanent AF randomized to MVS with or without left atrial cryoablation, in the double-blinded multicentre SWEDMAF trial, replied to the Short Form 36 QOL survey at 6 and 12 months follow-up. The QOL scores at 12 month follow-up did not differ significantly between patients undergoing MVS combined with cryoablation vs. those undergoing MVS alone regarding Physical Component Summary mean 42.8 (95% confidence interval 38.3–47.3) vs. mean 44.0 (40.1–47.7), P = 0.700 or Mental Component Summary mean 53.1 (49.7–56.4) vs. mean 48.4 (44.6–52.2), P = 0.075. All patients, irrespective of allocated procedure, reached the same QOL after surgery as an age-matched Swedish general population. The Physical Component Summary in patients with sinus rhythm did also not differ from those in AF at 12 months; mean 45.4 (42.0–48.7) vs. mean 40.5 (35.5–45.6), P = 0.096) nor was there a difference in Mental Component Summary; mean 51.0 (48.0–54.1) vs. mean 49.6 (44.6–54.5), P = 0.581).

    Conclusion

    Left atrial cryoablation added to MVS does not improve health-related QOL in patients with permanent AF, a finding that raises concerns regarding recommendations made for this combined procedure.

  • 10.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Berglund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Hedin, Eva-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Flachskampf, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Test-retest reliability of new and conventional echocardiographic parameters of left ventricular systolic function2019In: Clinical Research in Cardiology, ISSN 1861-0684, E-ISSN 1861-0692, Vol. 108, no 4, p. 355-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Reliability of left ventricular function measurements depends on actual biological conditions, repeated registrations and their analyses.

    Objective: To investigate test–retest reliability of speckle-tracking-derived strain measurements and its determinants compared to the conventional parameters, such as ejection fraction (EF), LV volumes and mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE).

    Methods: In 30 patients with a wide range of left ventricular function (mean EF 46.4 ± 16.4%, range 14–73%), standard echo views were acquired independently in a blinded fashion by two different echocardiographers in immediate sequence and analyzed off-line by two independent readers, creating 4 data sets per patient. Test–retest reliability of studied parameters was calculated using the smallest detectable change (SDC) and a total, inter-acquisition and inter-reader intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC).

    Results: The smallest detectable change normalized to the mean absolute value of the measured parameter (SDCrel) was lowest for MAPSE (10.7%). SDCrel for EF was similar to GLS (14.2 and 14.7%, respectively), while SDCrel for CS was much higher (35.6%). The intra-class correlation coefficient was excellent (> 0.9) for all measures of the left ventricular function. Intra-patient inter-acquisition reliability (ICCacq) was significantly better than inter-reader reliability (ICCread) (0.984 vs. 0.950, p = 0.03) only for EF, while no significant difference was observed for any other LV function parameter. Mean intra-subject standard deviations were significantly correlated to the mean values for CS and LV volumes, but not for the other studied parameters.

    Conclusions: In a test–retest setting, both with normal and impaired left ventricular function, the smallest relative detectable change of EF, GLS and MAPSE was similar (11–15%), but was much higher for CS (35%). Surprisingly, reliability of GLS was not superior to that of EF. Acquisition and reader to a similar extent influenced the reliability of measurements of all left ventricular function measures except for ejection fraction, where the reliability was more dependent on the reader than on the acquisition.

  • 11.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Christersson, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Hjorthén, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hedin, Eva-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Flachskampf, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Changes in global longitudinal strain and left ventricular ejection fraction during the first year after myocardial infarction: results from a large consecutive cohort2018In: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2404, E-ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 19, no 10, p. 1165-1173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To determine changes of global longitudinal strain (GLS) and their predictors in relation to classical echocardiographic parameters of left ventricular (LV) function, over 1 year, in consecutive patients with myocardial infarction (MI) and initially normal or impaired LV ejection fraction (EF).

    Methods and results: A total of 285 patients with MI prospectively included in the REBUS (RElevance of Biomarkers for future risk of thromb-oembolic events in UnSelected post-myocardial infarction patients) study underwent echocardiography within 72 h from admission and after 1 year. At baseline, 213 (74.7%) of MI patients had a normal EF (≥52% in men or ≥54% in women), but in 70.4% of them, an impaired GLS ( ≥ -18.0%) was observed. During 1-year follow-up, in patients with normal EF at baseline, GLS improved from -15.8% to - 17.4% (10.1% relative change); EF decreased from 62.5% to 59.9% (4.0% relative change); indexed end-diastolic volume, indexed end-systolic volume, and indexed stroke volume increased with 15.6%, 24.8%, and 10.0% of relative change, respectively (P < 0.001 for all the comparisons). In the whole cohort, initial impairment of LV function [by EF, wall motion score index (WMSI), or GLS], male gender, non-smoking, and treatment with beta-blockers were the independent predictors of GLS improvement. In the group with initially impaired EF, over 1 year GLS improved from -11.9% to - 14.8% (24.4% relative change) and EF from 44.6% to 52.6% (18.2% relative change) (P < 0.001 for both). Improvement in GLS significantly correlated with EF increase in the group with impaired EF (r = -0.41, P = 0.001) but not in the patients with normal EF (r = -0.14, P = ns).

    Conclusions: Despite diveregent evolution of GLS compared with EF and ventricular volumes, one year after MI GLS significantly improved in patients with initially both normal and impaired EF. Initial impairment of LV function (by EF, WMSI, or GLS), male gender, non-smoking, and treatment with beta-blockers were independent predictors of GLS improvement. LV remodelling was present even in patients with normal EF at baseline and during follow-up, confirming limited functional assessment by EF alone.

  • 12.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Flachskampf, Frank A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Johansson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hedin, Eva-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Christersson, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Usefulness of traditional echocardiographic parameters in assessment of left ventricular function in patients with normal ejection fraction early after acute myocardial infarction: results from a large consecutive cohort2016In: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2404, E-ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 413-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of left ventricular (LV) systolic function impairment using classical echocardiographic parameters and their relation to myocardial damage in patients hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction (MI) with normal LV ejection fraction (LVEF ≥52% in males or ≥54% in females).

    METHODS AND RESULTS: All 421 consecutive patients with MI included in the REBUS (RElevance of Biomarkers for future risk of thromboembolic events in UnSelected post-myocardial infarction patients) study underwent two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography within 72 h after admission. A normal LVEF was present in 262 (73.8%) of the 355 patients ultimately enrolled in the study. Patients with normal LVEF more often presented with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction and had less comorbidities when compared with those with impaired LVEF. No differences in demographic factors or relevant medications were observed. Higher value of mean annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE), lower wall motion score index (WMSI), lower LV as well as left atrial volumes characterized patients with normal LVEF. Impaired MAPSE was present in 64.4%, WMSI >1 in 72.1%, and dilated left atrium in 33.6% of those patients. Maximal cardiac troponin concentration reflecting infarct size showed the strongest association with WMSI (β = 0.35), followed by LVEF (β = -0.29), MAPSE (β = -0.25), and indexed LV end-systolic volume (β = 0.19; P < 0.001 for all the models).

    CONCLUSION: In two-third of patients with MI and normal LVEF, at least one of the other markers of systolic function was outside of the normal range. WMSI reflected the size of MI better than global LV function parameters as LVEF or MAPSE.

  • 13.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Örndahl, Lovisa Holm
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Kero, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Hedin, Eva-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Ståhle, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Flachskampf, Frank A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Comparison of left ventricular volumes and regurgitant volumes by echocardiography and magnetic resonance in patients with severe degenerative mitral regurgitation2016In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 37, p. 1239-1239Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Bertaglia, Emanuele
    et al.
    Blank, Benjamin
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Brandes, Axel
    Cabanelas, Nuno
    Dan, G-Andrei
    Dichtl, Wolfgang
    Goette, Andreas
    de Groot, Joris R
    Lubinski, Andrzej
    Marijon, Eloi
    Merkely, Béla
    Mont, Lluis
    Piorkowski, Christopher
    Sarkozy, Andrea
    Sulke, Neil
    Vardas, Panos
    Velchev, Vasil
    Wichterle, Dan
    Kirchhof, Paulus
    Atrial high-rate episodes: prevalence, stroke risk, implications for management, and clinical gaps in evidence.2019In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, article id euz172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-terminating atrial arrhythmias are commonly detected on continuous rhythm monitoring, e.g. by pacemakers or defibrillators. It is unclear whether the presence of these arrhythmias has therapeutic consequences. We sought to summarize evidence on the prevalence of atrial high-rate episodes (AHREs) and their impact on risk of stroke. We performed a comprehensive, tabulated review of published literature on the prevalence of AHRE. In patients with AHRE, but without atrial fibrillation (AF), we reviewed the stroke risk and the potential risk/benefit of oral anticoagulation. Atrial high-rate episodes are found in 10-30% of AF-free patients. Presence of AHRE slightly increases stroke risk (0.8% to 1%/year) compared with patients without AHRE. Atrial high-rate episode of longer duration (e.g. those >24 h) could be associated with a higher stroke risk. Oral anticoagulation has the potential to reduce stroke risk in patients with AHRE but is associated with a rate of major bleeding of 2%/year. Oral anticoagulation is not effective in patients with heart failure or survivors of a stroke without AF. It remains unclear whether anticoagulation is effective and safe in patients with AHRE. Atrial high-rate episodes are common and confer a slight increase in stroke risk. There is true equipoise on the best way to reduce stroke risk in patients with AHRE. Two ongoing trials (NOAH-AFNET 6 and ARTESiA) will provide much-needed information on the effectiveness and safety of oral anticoagulation using non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants in patients with AHRE.

  • 15. Bianchi, Stefano
    et al.
    Rossi, Pietro
    Schauerte, Patrick
    Elvan, Arif
    Blomström Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Kornet, Lilian
    Gal, Pim
    Mörtsell, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Wouters, Griet
    Gemein, Christopher
    Increase of Ventricular Interval During Atrial Fibrillation by Atrioventricular Node Vagal Stimulation: Chronic Clinical Atrioventricular-Nodal Stimulation Download Study2015In: Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, ISSN 1941-3149, E-ISSN 1941-3084, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 562-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: -Patients with a high ventricular rate during atrial fibrillation (AF) are at increased risk of receiving inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks. The objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of high frequency atrioventricular-nodal stimulation (AVNS) to reduce the ventricular rate during AF to prevent inappropriate ICD shocks.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: -Patients with a new atrial lead placement as part of a CRT-D implant and a history of paroxysmal or persistent AF were eligible. If proper atrial lead position was confirmed, AVNS software was uploaded to the CRT device, tested and optimized. AVNS was delivered via a right atrial pacing lead positioned in the posterior right atrium. Software allowed initiation of high frequency bursts triggered on rapidly conducted AF. Importantly, the efficacy was evaluated during spontaneous AF episodes between 1 and 6 months after implant. Forty-four patients were enrolled in 4 centers. Successful atrial lead placement occurred in 74%. Median implant time of the AVNS lead was 37 minutes. In 26 (81%) patients, manual AVNS tests increased the ventricular interval by > 25%. Between 1 and 6 months, automatic AVNS activations occurred in 4 patients with rapidly conducted AF, and in 3 patients, AVNS slowed the ventricular rate out of the ICD shock zone. No adverse events were associated with the AVNS software.

    CONCLUSIONS: -The present study demonstrated the feasibility of implementation of AVNS in a CRT-D system. AVNS increased ventricular interval > 25% in 81% of patients. AVNS did not influence the safety profile of the CRT-D system.

  • 16.
    Blomström Lundqvist, Carina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Auricchio, Angelo
    Brugada, Josep
    Boriani, Giuseppe
    Bremerich, Jens
    Cabrera, Jose Angel
    Frank, Herbert
    Gutberlet, Matthias
    Heidbuchel, Hein
    Kuck, Karl-Heinz
    Lancellotti, Patrizio
    Rademakers, Frank
    Winkels, Gerard
    Wolpert, Christian
    Vardas, Panos E
    The use of imaging for electrophysiological and devices procedures: a report from the first European Heart Rhythm Association Policy Conference, jointly organized with the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI), the Council of Cardiovascular Imaging and the European Society of Cardiac Radiology2013In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 927-936Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implantations of cardiac devices therapies and ablation procedures frequently depend on accurate and reliable imaging modalities for pre-procedural assessments, intra-procedural guidance, detection of complications, and the follow-up of patients. An understanding of echocardiography, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear cardiology, X-ray computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and vascular ultrasound is indispensable for cardiologists, electrophysiologists as well as radiologists, and it is currently recommended that physicians should be trained in several imaging modalities. There are, however, no current guidelines or recommendations by electrophysiologists, cardiac imaging specialists, and radiologists, on the appropriate use of cardiovascular imaging for selected patient indications, which needs to be addressed. A Policy Conference on the use of imaging in electrophysiology and device management, with representatives from different expert areas of radiology and electrophysiology and commercial developers of imaging and device technologies, was therefore jointly organized by European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), the Council of Cardiovascular Imaging and the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR). The objectives were to assess the state of the level of evidence and a first step towards a consensus document for currently employed imaging techniques to guide future clinical use, to elucidate the issue of reimbursement structures and health economy, and finally to define the need for appropriate educational programmes to ensure clinical competence for electrophysiologists, imaging specialists, and radiologists.

  • 17.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Atrial fibrillation: from atrial extrasystoles to atrial cardiomyopathy - what have we learned from basic science and interventional procedures?2016In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 279, no 5, p. 406-411Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    CABANA Trial, another favourable view.2018In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 39, no 30, p. 2771-2772Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    CABANATrial, another favourable view2018In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 39, no 30, p. 2771-2772Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Blomström, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Safety and efficacy of pharmacological cardioversion of atrial fibrillation using intravenous vernakalant, a new antiarrhythmic drug with atrial selectivity2012In: Expert Opinion on Drug Safety, ISSN 1474-0338, E-ISSN 1744-764X, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 671-679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia that due to its frequent hospitalizations and increased complication rates imposes a significant health economic burden. Many patients with recurrent AF are admitted to the hospital for cardioversion to restore sinus rhythm. Given this knowledge, it is clearly important to identify a feasible and effective approach for cardioversion of these patients. Cardioversion always requires careful assessment of potential complications, which apart from thromboembolic risks, include proarrhythmias and those related to the deep sedation required for electrical cardioversion. Even though electrical cardioversion is proven to be safe and effective, the need for anesthesia makes alternative strategies more attractive.

    Areas covered:

    The research discussed is the alternative strategies for cardioversion, including electrical cardioversion and the new relatively atrial-selective antiarrhythmic drug, vernakalant. The literature search methodology undertaken included search in PubMed (cardioversion, vernakalant, conversion as key words).

    Expert opinion:

    Vernakalant is shown to have good conversion rates, an apparently safe antiarrhythmic profile and is well tolerated in patients with a history of ischemic heart disease. In most cases of recent-onset AF, pharmacological cardioversion can provide a probably more cost-effective and safer alternative to electrical cardioversion, which can then be used as a second option for those who failed the first attempt of cardioversion.

  • 21.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Gizurarson, Sigfus
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Mol & Clin Med Cardiol, Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Schwieler, Jonas
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Heart & Vasc Theme, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jensen, Steen M
    Umea Univ, Ctr Heart, Umea, Sweden;Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Bergfeldt, Lennart
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Mol & Clin Med Cardiol, Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kennebäck, Göran
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Heart & Vasc Theme, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rubulis, Aigars
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Mol & Clin Med Cardiol, Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Malmborg, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Raatikainen, Pekka
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Ctr Heart, Tampere, Finland.
    Lönnerholm, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Höglund, Niklas
    Umea Univ, Ctr Heart, Umea, Sweden;Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Mörtsell, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Effect of Catheter Ablation vs Antiarrhythmic Medication on Quality of Life in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: The CAPTAF Randomized Clinical Trial2019In: JAMIA Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, ISSN 1067-5027, E-ISSN 1527-974X, Vol. 321, no 11, p. 1059-1068Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Quality of life is not a standard primary outcome in ablation trials, even though symptoms drive the indication. OBJECTIVE To assess quality of life with catheter ablation vs antiarrhythmic medication at 12 months in patients with atrial fibrillation. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Randomized clinical trial at 4 university hospitals in Sweden and 1 in Finland of 155 patients aged 30-70 years with more than 6 months of atrial fibrillation and treatment failure with 1 antiarrhythmic drug or beta-blocker, with 4-year follow-up. Study dateswere July 2008-September 2017. Major exclusionswere ejection fraction <35%, left atrial diameter > 60 mm, ventricular pacing dependency, and previous ablation. INTERVENTIONS Pulmonary vein isolation ablation (n= 79) or previously untested antiarrhythmic drugs (n= 76). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcomewas the General Health subscale score (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey) at baseline and 12 months, assessed unblinded (range, 0 [worst] to 100 [best]). There were 26 secondary outcomes, including atrial fibrillation burden (% of time) from baseline to 12 months, measured by implantable cardiac monitors. The first 3 months were excluded from rhythm analysis. RESULTS Among 155 randomized patients (mean age, 56.1 years; 22.6% women), 97% completed the trial. Of 79 patients randomized to receive ablation, 75 underwent ablation, including 2 who crossed over to medication and 14 who underwent repeated ablation procedures. Of 76 patients randomized to receive antiarrhythmic medication, 74 received it, including 8 who crossed over to ablation and 43 for whom the first drug used failed. General Health score increased from 61.8 to 73.9 points in the ablation group vs 62.7 to 65.4 points in the medication group (between-group difference, 8.9 points; 95% CI, 3.1-14.7; P=.003). Of 26 secondary end points, 5 were analyzed; 2 were null and 2 were statistically significant, including decrease in atrial fibrillation burden (from 24.9% to 5.5% in the ablation group vs 23.3% to 11.5% in the medication group; difference -6.8%[95% CI, -12.9% to -0.7%]; P=.03). Of the Health Survey subscales, 5 of 7 improved significantly. Most common adverse events were urosepsis (5.1%) in the ablation group and atrial tachycardia (3.9%) in the medication group. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Among patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation despite use of antiarrhythmic medication, the improvement in quality of life at 12 months was greater for those treated with catheter ablation compared with antiarrhythmic medication. Although the study was limited by absence of blinding, catheter ablation may offer an advantage for quality of life.

  • 22.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Potpara, Tatjana S
    Univ Belgrade, Sch Med, Belgrade, Serbia.
    Malmborg, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Supraventricular Arrhythmias in Patients with Adult Congenital Heart Disease.2017In: Arrhythmia & electrophysiology review, ISSN 2050-3369, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 42-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing number of patients with congenital heart disease survive to adulthood; such prolonged survival is related to a rapid evolution of successful surgical repairs and modern diagnostic techniques. Despite these improvements, corrective atrial incisions performed at surgery still lead to subsequent myocardial scarring harbouring a potential substrate for macro-reentrant atrial tachycardia. Macroreentrant atrial tachycardias are the most common (75 %) type of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) in patients with adult congenital heart disease (ACHD). Patients with ACHD, atrial tachycardias and impaired ventricular function - important risk factors for sudden cardiac death (SCD) - have a 2-9 % SCD risk per decade. Moreover, ACHD imposes certain considerations when choosing antiarrhythmic drugs from a safety aspect and also when considering catheter ablation procedures related to the inherent cardiac anatomical barriers and required expertise. Expert recommendations for physicians managing these patients are therefore mandatory. This review summarises current evidence-based developments in the field, focusing on advances in and general recommendations for the management of ACHD, including the recently published recommendations on management of SVT by the European Heart Rhythm Association.

  • 23. Bongiorni, Maria G
    et al.
    Burri, Haran
    Deharo, Jean C.
    Starck, Christoph
    Kennergren, Charles
    Saghy, Laszlo
    Rao, Archana
    Tascini, Carlo
    Lever, Nigel
    Kutarski, Andrzej
    Fernandez Lozano, Ignacio
    Strathmore, Neil
    Costa, Roberto
    Epstein, Laurence
    Love, Charles
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Fauchier, Laurent
    Defaye, Pascal
    Arnar, David O.
    Klug, Didier
    Boveda, Serge
    Cosedis Nielsen, Jens
    Boriani, Giuseppe
    Zhang, Shu
    Martin, Andrew Paul
    Prutkin, Jordan M.
    de Zuloaga, Claudio
    2018 EHRA expert consensus statement on lead extraction: recommendations on definitions, endpoints, research trial design, and data collection requirements for clinical scientific studies and registries: endorsed by APHRS/HRS/LAHRS2018In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 20, no 7, article id 1217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) implantations has increased over recent years as a result of population growth, increasing life expectancy, adoption of guidelines, and better access to healthcare. Transvenous lead extraction (TLE), as a part of an overall lead management strategy, has also been increasing, not only as a consequence of this growth, but also because of increasing rates of infection, lead failure, awareness of indications for lead management, and development of extraction tools. Clinical research is essential for understanding efficacy and risks of TLE, which has important implications regarding decision-making and therapeutic strategies in patients who are candidates for this procedure. Data on TLE have mainly come from retrospective series, with variable reporting of endpoints. Recently, the ELECTRa registry conducted by the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), has reported the largest prospective experience on lead extraction published to date in 3555 patients recruited from 19 European countries. There remain unresolved issues, which is a strong incentive for conducting further specifically-designed clinical trials to answer important questions in this area. In addition to clinical studies, national registries are potentially useful for evaluating epidemiology of TLE as well as for quality control and understanding resource implications. Standardization of definitions and reporting of parameters are paramount in order to analyse, compare, and pool data for scientific purposes. Expert consensus statements on lead extraction have been published by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) in 2009 and 2017, and by EHRA in 2012. Experience from the ELECTRa registry has been valuable for identifying challenges faced with conducting scientific studies in this field, and provides a framework for future endeavours.

    This writing group has been commissioned by EHRA to provide recommendations for designing scientific studies, reports and registries relating to lead extraction.

  • 24. Bongiorni, Maria Grazia
    et al.
    Chen, Jian
    Dagres, Nikolaos
    Estner, Heidi
    Hernandez-Madrid, Antonio
    Hocini, Meleze
    Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard
    Pison, Laurent
    Potpara, Tatjana
    Proclemer, Alessandro
    Sciaraffia, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Todd, Derick
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    EHRA research network surveys: 6 years of EP wires activity2015In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 17, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical practice should follow guidelines and recommendations mainly based on the results of controlled trials, which are often conducted in selected populations and special conditions, whereas clinical practice may be influenced by factors different from controlled scientific studies. Hence, the real-world setting is better assessed by the observational registries enrolling patients for longer periods of time. However, this may be difficult, expensive, and time-consuming. In 2009, the Scientific Initiatives Committee of the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has instigated a series of surveys covering the controversial issues in clinical electrophysiology (EP). With this in mind, an EHRA EP research network has been created, which included EP centres in Europe among which the surveys on 'hot topic' were circulated. This review summarizes the overall experience conducting EP wires over the past 6 years, categorizing and assessing the topics regarding clinical EP, and evaluating the acceptance and feedback from the responding centres, in order to improve participation in the surveys and better address the research needs and aspirations of the European EP community.

  • 25.
    Bongiorni, Maria Grazia
    et al.
    Univ Hosp Pisa, Dept Cardiol, Via Paradisa 2, I-56124 Pisa, Italy..
    Kennergren, Charles
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Butter, Christian
    Heart Ctr Brandenburg Bernau, Dept Cardiol, Ladeburger Str 17m, D-16321 Bernau, Germany.;Med Sch Brandenburg, Ladeburger Str 17m, D-16321 Bernau, Germany..
    Deharo, Jean Claude
    CHU La Timone, La Timone Univ Hosp, Arrhythmias Unit, Dept Cardiol, 265 Rue St Pierre, F-13005 Marseille, France..
    Kutarski, Andrzej
    Med Univ Lublin, Dept Cardiol, Ul Jaczewskiego 8, PL-20954 Lublin, Poland..
    Rinaldi, Christopher A.
    Guys & St Thomas Hosp, Cardiol Dept, 6th Floor East Wing,Westminster Bridge Rd, London SE1 7EH, England..
    Romano, Simone L.
    Univ Hosp Pisa, Dept Cardiol, Via Paradisa 2, I-56124 Pisa, Italy..
    Maggioni, Aldo P.
    European Soc Cardiol, European Heart House,2035 Route Colles, F-06903 Sophia Antipolis, France.;ANMCO Res Ctr, Via La Marmora 34, I-50121 Florence, Italy..
    Andarala, Maryna
    European Soc Cardiol, European Heart House,2035 Route Colles, F-06903 Sophia Antipolis, France..
    Auricchio, Angelo
    Fdn Cardioctr Ticino, Div Cardiol, Via Tesserete 48, CH-6900 Lugano, Switzerland..
    Kuck, Karl-Heinz
    Asklepios Klin St Georg, Dept Cardiol, Lohmuhlenstr 5, D-20099 Hamburg, Germany..
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia. Uppsala Univ, Inst Med Sci, Dept Cardiol, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    The European Lead Extraction ConTRolled (ELECTRa) study: a European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) Registry of Transvenous Lead Extraction Outcomes2017In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 38, no 40, p. 2995-3005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims The European Lead Extraction ConTRolled Registry (ELECTRa), is a prospective registry of consecutive transvenous lead extraction (TLE) procedures conducted by the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) in order to identify the safety and efficacy of the current practice of TLE Methods and results European centres performing TLE, invited by the organizing committee on behalf of EHRA, prospectively recruited all consecutive patients undergoing TLE at their institution. The primary endpoint was TLE safety defined by pre-discharge major procedure-related complications including death. Secondary endpoints included clinical and radiological success and overall complication rates. Outcomes were compared between Low Volume (LoV) vs. High Volume (HiV) centers (LoV < 30 and HiV >= 30 procedures/year). A total of 3555 consecutive patients (pts) of whom 3510 underwent TLE at 73 centres in 19 European countries were enrolled between November 2012 and May 2014. The primary endpoint of in-hospital procedure-related major complication rate was 1.7% [95% CI 1.3-2.1%] (58/3510 pts) including a mortality of 0.5% [95% CI 0.3-0.8%] (17/3510 pts). Approximately two-thirds (37/58) of these complications occurred during the procedure and one-third (21/58) in the post-operative period. The most common procedure related complications were those requiring pericardiocentesis or chest tube and/or surgical repair (1.4% [95% CI 1.0-1.8%]). Complete clinical and radiological success rates were 96.7% [95% CI 96.1-97.3%] and 95.7% [95% CI 95.2-96.2%], respectively. The all cause in-hospital major complications and deaths were significantly lower in HiV centres vs. LoV centres (2.4% [95% CI 1.9-3.0%] vs. 4.1% [95% CI 2.7-6.0%], P = 0.0146; and 1.2% [95% CI 0.8-1.6%] vs. 2.5% [95% CI 1.5-4.1%] P = 0.0088), although those related to the procedure did not reach statistical significance. Radiological and clinical successes were more frequent in HiV vs. LoV centres. Conclusion The ELECTRa study is the largest prospective registry on TLE and confirmed the safety and efficacy of the current practice of TLE. Lead extraction was associated with a higher success rate with lower all cause complication and mortality rates in high volume compared with low volume centres.

  • 26. Bongiorni, Maria Grazia
    et al.
    Proclemer, Alessandro
    Dobreanu, Dan
    Marinskis, Germanas
    Pison, Laurent
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Preferred tools and techniques for implantation of cardiac electronic devices in Europe: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey2013In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 1664-1668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess clinical practice in relation to the tools and techniques used for cardiac implantable electronic devices procedures in the European countries. Responses to the questionnaire were received from 62 members of the EHRA research network. The survey involved high-, medium-, and low-volume implanting centres, performing, respectively, more than 200, 100199 and under 100 implants per year. The following topics were explored: the side approach for implantation, surgical techniques for pocket incision, first venous access for lead implantation, preference of lead fixation, preferred coil number for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) leads, right ventricular pacing site, generator placement site, subcutaneous ICD implantation, specific tools and techniques for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), lead implantation sequence in CRT, coronary sinus cannulation technique, target site for left ventricular lead placement, strategy in left ventricular lead implant failure, mean CRT implantation time, optimization of the atrioventricular (AV) and ventriculo-ventricular intervals, CRT implants in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation, AV node ablation in patients with permanent AF. This panoramic view allows us to find out the operator preferences regarding the techniques and tools for device implantation in Europe. The results showed different practices in all the fields we investigated, nevertheless the survey also outlines a good adherence to the common standards and recommendations.

  • 27. Bongiorni, Maria Grazia
    et al.
    Romano, Simone L
    Kennergren, Charles
    Butter, Christian
    Deharo, Jean Claude
    Kutarsky, Andrzej
    Rinaldi, Christopher Aldo
    Maggioni, Aldo P
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Auricchio, Angelo
    ELECTRa (European Lead Extraction ConTRolled) Registry-Shedding light on transvenous lead extraction real-world practice in Europe2013In: Herzschrittmachertherapie & Elektrophysiologie, ISSN 0938-7412, E-ISSN 1435-1544, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 171-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the growing recognition of the clinical need and wider indications for cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIED), the number of implant procedures has increased considerably. Consequently, the rate of complications related to these devices has also increased. Transvenous lead extraction (TLE) is the gold standard in the treatment of CIED-related infective complications and is often required in the management of lead malfunction. An increasing number of centers currently perform TLE procedures. The ELECTRa (European Lead Extraction ConTRolled) Registry is the first large prospective multicenter registry of consecutive patients undergoing TLE in Europe, conducted by the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and managed by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) EURObservational Research Department. The primary objective of the registry is to evaluate the acute and long-term safety of TLE; the secondary objective is to describe the characteristics of the patients, the leads, the indications for TLE, and the tools and techniques currently used for TLE. About 100 centers will be enrolled on a voluntary basis from European countries; they are anonymous and stratified on the basis of their volume of activity into high-volume centers (> 30 patients/year) and low-volume centers: (≤ 30 patients/year). Each participating center will have to enroll and follow up for 1 year consecutively assessed patients undergoing TLE from November 2012 to January 2014. The target is to achieve a sample size of at least 3,500 patients for statistical analysis. Data will be collected using a Web-based system and will be audited at randomly selected centers. The official start was on 6 November. Eighty-nine centers have joined so far, 65 centers are currently active, those who have already obtained the approval of their own ethics committee, and 1,099 patients were enrolled at the end of June 2013. The independence of the registry, the consecutiveness of the patient enrolment, and the monitoring of the study are characteristics of this registry that will contribute to the scientific validity of the objectives to be achieved.

  • 28. Boriani, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Hohnloser, Stefan H
    Bergfeldt, Lennart
    Botto, Giovanni L
    Capucci, Alessandro
    Lozano, Ignacio Fernández
    Goette, Andreas
    Israel, Carsten W
    Merino, José L
    Camm, A John
    Safety and efficacy of dronedarone from clinical trials to real-world evidence: implications for its use in atrial fibrillation.2019In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, article id euz193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficacy and safety of dronedarone was shown in the ATHENA trial for paroxysmal or persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. Further trials revealed safety concerns in patients with heart failure and permanent AF. This review summarizes insights from recent real-world studies and meta-analyses, including reports on efficacy, with focus on liver safety, mortality risk in patients with paroxysmal/persistent AF, and interactions of dronedarone with direct oral anticoagulants. Reports of rapidly progressing liver failure in dronedarone-prescribed patients in 2011 led to regulatory cautions about potential liver toxicity. Recent real-world evidence suggests dronedarone liver safety profile is similar to other antiarrhythmics and liver toxicity could be equally common with many Class III antiarrhythmics. Dronedarone safety concerns (increased mortality in patients with permanent AF) were raised based on randomized controlled trials (RCT) (ANDROMEDA and PALLAS), but comedication with digoxin may have increased the mortality rates in PALLAS, considering the dronedarone-digoxin pharmacokinetic (PK) interaction. Real-world data on apixaban-dronedarone interactions and edoxaban RCT observations suggest no significant safety risks for these drug combinations. Median trough plasma concentrations of dabigatran 110 mg during concomitant use with dronedarone are at acceptable levels, while PK data on the rivaroxaban-dronedarone interaction are unavailable. In RCTs and real-world studies, dronedarone significantly reduces AF burden and cardiovascular hospitalizations, and demonstrates a low risk for proarrhythmia in patients with paroxysmal or persistent AF. The concerns on liver safety must be balanced against the significant reduction in hospitalizations in patients with non-permanent AF and low risk for proarrhythmias following dronedarone treatment.

  • 29. Boriani, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Fauchier, Laurent
    Aguinaga, Luis
    Beattie, James M
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Cohen, Ariel
    Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei
    Genovesi, Simonetta
    Israel, Carsten
    Joung, Boyoung
    Kalarus, Zbigniew
    Lampert, Rachel
    Malavasi, Vincenzo L
    Mansourati, Jacques
    Mont, Lluis
    Potpara, Tatjana
    Thornton, Andrew
    Lip, Gregory Y H
    European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus document on management of arrhythmias and cardiac electronic devices in the critically ill and post-surgery patient, endorsed by endorsed by Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), Cardiac Arrhythmia Society of Southern Africa (CASSA), and Latin American Heart Rhythm Society (LAHRS).2019In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 7-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30. Brugada, Josep
    et al.
    Blom, Nico
    Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Deanfield, John
    Janousek, Jan
    Abrams, Dominic
    Bauersfeld, Urs
    Brugada, Ramon
    Drago, Fabrizio
    de Groot, Natasja
    Happonen, Juha-Matti
    Hebe, Joachim
    Yen Ho, Siew
    Marijon, Eloi
    Paul, Thomas
    Pfammatter, Jean-Pierre
    Rosenthal, Eric
    Pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapy for arrhythmias in the pediatric population: EHRA and AEPC-Arrhythmia Working Group joint consensus statement2013In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 15, no 9, p. 1337-1382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In children with structurally normal hearts, the mechanisms of arrhythmias are usually the same as in the adult patient. Some arrhythmias are particularly associated with young age and very rarely seen in adult patients. Arrhythmias in structural heart disease may be associated either with the underlying abnormality or result from surgical intervention. Chronic haemodynamic stress of congenital heart disease (CHD) might create an electrophysiological and anatomic substrate highly favourable for re-entrant arrhythmias.As a general rule, prescription of antiarrhythmic drugs requires a clear diagnosis with electrocardiographic documentation of a given arrhythmia. Risk-benefit analysis of drug therapy should be considered when facing an arrhythmia in a child. Prophylactic antiarrhythmic drug therapy is given only to protect the child from recurrent supraventricular tachycardia during this time span until the disease will eventually cease spontaneously. In the last decades, radiofrequency catheter ablation is progressively used as curative therapy for tachyarrhythmias in children and patients with or without CHD. Even in young children, procedures can be performed with high success rates and low complication rates as shown by several retrospective and prospective paediatric multi-centre studies. Three-dimensional mapping and non-fluoroscopic navigation techniques and enhanced catheter technology have further improved safety and efficacy even in CHD patients with complex arrhythmias.During last decades, cardiac devices (pacemakers and implantable cardiac defibrillator) have developed rapidly. The pacing generator size has diminished and the pacing leads have become progressively thinner. These developments have made application of cardiac pacing in children easier although no dedicated paediatric pacing systems exist.

  • 31. Brugada, Josep
    et al.
    Katritsis, Demosthenes G
    Arbelo, Elena
    Arribas, Fernando
    Bax, Jeroen J
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Calkins, Hugh
    Corrado, Domenico
    Deftereos, Spyridon G
    Diller, Gerhard-Paul
    Gomez-Doblas, Juan J
    Gorenek, Bulent
    Grace, Andrew
    Ho, Siew Yen
    Kaski, Juan-Carlos
    Kuck, Karl-Heinz
    Lambiase, Pier David
    Sacher, Frederic
    Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia
    Suwalski, Piotr
    Zaza, Antonio
    2019 ESC Guidelines for the management of patients with supraventricular tachycardiaThe Task Force for the management of patients with supraventricular tachycardia of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).2019In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, article id ehz467Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32. Calkins, Hugh
    et al.
    Hindricks, Gerhard
    Cappato, Riccardo
    Kim, Young-Hoon
    Saad, Eduardo B
    Aguinaga, Luis
    Akar, Joseph G
    Badhwar, Vinay
    Brugada, Josep
    Camm, John
    Chen, Peng-Sheng
    Chen, Shih-Ann
    Chung, Mina K
    Cosedis Nielsen, Jens
    Curtis, Anne B
    Davies, D Wyn
    Day, John D
    d'Avila, André
    Natasja de Groot, N M S
    Di Biase, Luigi
    Duytschaever, Mattias
    Edgerton, James R
    Ellenbogen, Kenneth A
    Ellinor, Patrick T
    Ernst, Sabine
    Fenelon, Guilherme
    Gerstenfeld, Edward P
    Haines, David E
    Haissaguerre, Michel
    Helm, Robert H
    Hylek, Elaine
    Jackman, Warren M
    Jalife, Jose
    Kalman, Jonathan M
    Kautzner, Josef
    Kottkamp, Hans
    Kuck, Karl Heinz
    Kumagai, Koichiro
    Lee, Richard
    Lewalter, Thorsten
    Lindsay, Bruce D
    Macle, Laurent
    Mansour, Moussa
    Marchlinski, Francis E
    Michaud, Gregory F
    Nakagawa, Hiroshi
    Natale, Andrea
    Nattel, Stanley
    Okumura, Ken
    Packer, Douglas
    Pokushalov, Evgeny
    Reynolds, Matthew R
    Sanders, Prashanthan
    Scanavacca, Mauricio
    Schilling, Richard
    Tondo, Claudio
    Tsao, Hsuan-Ming
    Verma, Atul
    Wilber, David J
    Yamane, Teiichi
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    2017 HRS/EHRA/ECAS/APHRS/SOLAECE expert consensus statement on catheter and surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation.2018In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 20, no 1, p. e1-e160Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Camm, A. J.
    et al.
    St Georges Univ London, Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 0RE, England..
    Savelieva, I.
    St Georges Univ London, Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 0RE, England..
    Potpara, T.
    Univ Belgrade, Cardiol Clin, Sch Med, Clin Ctr Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia..
    Hindriks, G.
    Herzzentrum Leipzig GmbH, Dept Electrophysiol, Leipzig, Germany..
    Pison, L.
    Maastricht Univ, Dept Cardiol, Med Ctr, NL-6200 MD Maastricht, Netherlands.;Univ Limburg, Cardiovasc Res Inst, NL-6200 MD Maastricht, Netherlands..
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    The changing circumstance of atrial fibrillation: progress towards precision medicine2016In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 279, no 5, p. 412-427Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in the general population is between 1% and 2% in the developed world and is higher in men than in women. The arrhythmia occurs much more commonly in the elderly, and the estimated lifetime risk of developing AF is one in four for men and women aged 40 years and above. Projected data from multiple population-based studies in the USA and Europe predict a two- to threefold increase in the number of AF patients by 2060. The high lifetime risk of AF and increased longevity underscore the important public health burden posed by this arrhythmia worldwide. AF has multiple aetiologies and a broad variety of presentations. The primary pathologies underlying or promoting the occurrence of AF vary more than for any other cardiac arrhythmia, ranging from autonomic imbalance to organic heart disease and metabolic disorders, such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, hyperthyroidism and kidney disease, and lifestyle factors such as smoking, alcohol consumption and participation in endurance sports. Biomarkers are increasingly being investigated and, together with clinical and genetic factors, will eventually lead to a clinically valuable detailed classification of AF which will also incorporate pathophysiological determinants and mechanisms of the arrhythmia. In turn, this will allow the development and application of precision medicine to this troublesome arrhythmia.

  • 34. Camm, A John
    et al.
    Amarenco, Pierre
    Haas, Sylvia
    Hess, Susanne
    Kirchhof, Paulus
    Kuhls, Silvia
    van Eickels, Martin
    Turpie, Alexander G G
    Blomström Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    XANTUS: a real-world, prospective, observational study of patients treated with rivaroxaban for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.2016In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 37, no 14, p. 1145-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: Although non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants are recommended for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) based on clinical trial results, there is a need for safety and efficacy data from unselected patients in everyday clinical practice. XANTUS investigated the safety and efficacy of the Factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban in routine clinical use in the NVAF setting.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: Consecutive consenting patients with NVAF newly started on rivaroxaban were eligible and were followed up at ∼3-month intervals for 1 year, or for at least 30 days after permanent discontinuation. All adverse events (AEs) were recorded as AEs or serious AEs; major outcomes (including major bleeding, symptomatic thromboembolic events [stroke, systemic embolism, transient ischaemic attack, and myocardial infarction], and all-cause death) were centrally adjudicated. There were 6784 patients treated with rivaroxaban at 311 centres in Europe, Israel, and Canada. Mean patient age was 71.5 years (range 19-99), 41% were female, and 9.4% had documented severe or moderate renal impairment (creatinine clearance <50 mL/min). The mean CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores were 2.0 and 3.4, respectively; 859 (12.7%) patients had a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 0 or 1. The mean treatment duration was 329 days. Treatment-emergent major bleeding occurred in 128 patients (2.1 events per 100 patient-years), 118 (1.9 events per 100 patient-years) died, and 43 (0.7 events per 100 patient-years) suffered a stroke.

    CONCLUSION: XANTUS is the first international, prospective, observational study to describe the use of rivaroxaban in a broad NVAF patient population. Rates of stroke and major bleeding were low in patients receiving rivaroxaban in routine clinical practice.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01606995.

  • 35. Camm, A John
    et al.
    Lip, Gregory Y H
    Caterina, Raffaele De
    Savelieva, Irene
    Atar, Dan
    Hohnloser, Stefan H
    Hindricks, Gerhard
    Kirchhof, Paulus
    Bax, Jeroen J
    Baumgartner, Helmut
    Ceconi, Claudio
    Dean, Veronica
    Deaton, Christi
    Fagard, Robert
    Funck-Brentano, Christian
    Hasdai, David
    Hoes, Arno
    Kirchhof, Paulus
    Knuuti, Juhani
    Kolh, Philippe
    McDonagh, Theresa
    Moulin, Cyril
    Popescu, Bogdan A
    Reiner, Zeljko
    Sechtem, Udo
    Anton Sirnes, Per
    Tendera, Michal
    Torbicki, Adam
    Vahanian, Alec
    Windecker, Stephan
    Vardas, Panos
    Al-Attar, Nawwar
    Alfieri, Ottavio
    Angelini, Annalisa
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Colonna, Paolo
    De Sutter, Johan
    Ernst, Sabine
    Goette, Andreas
    Gorenek, Bulent
    Hatala, Robert
    Heidbüchel, Hein
    Heldal, Magnus
    Dalby Kristensen, Steen
    Kolh, Philippe
    Le Heuzey, Jean-Yves
    Mavrakis, Hercules
    Mont, Lluís
    Perrone Filardi, Pasquale
    Ponikowski, Piotr
    Prendergast, Bernard
    Rutten, Frans H
    Schotten, Ulrich
    Van Gelder, Isabelle C
    Verheugt, Freek W A
    Actualización detallada de las guías de la ESC para el manejo de la fibrilación auricular de 2012: Actualización de las guías de la Sociedad Europea de Cardiología (ESC) para el manejo de la fibrilación auricular de 2010 Elaborada en colaboración con la Asociación Europea del Ritmo Cardiaco2013In: Revista Española de Cardiología, ISSN 0300-8932, E-ISSN 1579-2242, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 54.e1-54.e24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36. Chen, Jian
    et al.
    Dagres, Nikolaos
    Hocini, Melece
    Fauchier, Laurent
    Bongiorni, Maria Grazia
    Defaye, Pascal
    Hernandez-Madrid, Antonio
    Estner, Heidi
    Sciaraffia, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: results from the first European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA) Part II2015In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 17, no 11, p. 1727-1732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA) is a prospective, multicentre snapshot survey collecting patient-based data on current clinical practices during atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. The participating centres were asked to prospectively enrol consecutive patients during a 6-week period (from September to October 2014). A web-based case report form was employed to collect information of patients and data of procedures. A total of 455 eligible consecutive patients from 13 countries were enrolled (mean age 59 ± 10.8 years, 28.8% women). Distinct strategies and endpoints were collected for AF ablation procedures. Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) was performed in 96.7% and served as the endpoint in 91.3% of procedures. A total of 52 (11.5%) patients underwent ablation as first-line therapy. The cryoballoon technique was employed in 31.4% of procedures. Procedure, ablation, and fluoroscopy times differed among various types of AF ablation. Divergences in patient selection and complications were observed among low-, medium-, and high-volume centres. Adverse events were observed in 4.6% of AF ablation procedures. In conclusion, PVI was still the main strategy for AF ablation. Procedure-related complications seemed not to have declined. The centre volume played an important role in patient selection, strategy choice, and had impact on the rate of periprocedural complication.

  • 37. Chen, Jian
    et al.
    Hocini, Mélèze
    Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard
    Proclemer, Alessandro
    Sciaraffia, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Clinical management of arrhythmias in elderly patients: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey2015In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 314-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this survey was to assess clinical practice in management of cardiac arrhythmias in elderly patients (age ≥75 years) in the European countries. The data are based on an electronic questionnaire sent to the European Heart Rhythm Association Research Network members. Responses were received from 50 centres in 20 countries. The results of the survey have shown that management of cardiac arrhythmias is generally in accordance with the guidelines and consensus recommendations on management of cardiac arrhythmias, although there are some areas of variation, especially on age limit and exclusion of elderly patients for anticoagulation, ablation, and device therapy.

  • 38. Chen, Jian
    et al.
    Todd, Derick M
    Hocini, Mélèze
    Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard
    Bongiorni, Maria Grazia
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Current periprocedural management of ablation for atrial fibrillation in Europe: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.2014In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 378-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this EP Wire survey was to assess clinical practice in periprocedural management of atrial fibrillation ablation. This survey is based on an electronic questionnaire sent to the European Heart Rhythm Association Research Network members. Responses were received from 78 centres in 20 countries. The results of the survey have shown that periprocedural management is generally in accordance with guidelines and consensus recommendations on ablation for atrial fibrillation ablation, although there are some areas of variation. Differences between high- and low-volume centres are observed with respect to patient selection, antiarrhythmic drug management, and heparin bridging.

  • 39. Chen, Jian
    et al.
    Todd, Derick M
    Proclemer, Alessandro
    Sciaraffia, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Estner, Heidi L
    Broadhurst, Paul
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Management of patients with ventricular tachycardia in Europe: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey2015In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 1294-1299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess clinical practice in the management of ventricular tachycardia (VT). The data are based on an electronic questionnaire sent to the members of the EHRA Research Network. Responses were received from 31 centres in 16 countries. The results of the survey show that the management of VT is in general in accordance with guidelines. Antiarrhythmic drugs are still frequently used for VT treatment. In patients at high risk of sudden cardiac death, an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator is routinely recommended, while the treatment options vary for patients with moderate or low risk. A discreet attitude is adopted for catheter ablation in high-risk patients as demonstrated by a relatively low rate of catheter ablation.

  • 40. Dagres, Nikolaos
    et al.
    Bongiorni, Maria Grazia
    Dobreanu, Dan
    Madrid, Antonio
    Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Current investigation and management of patients with syncope: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey2013In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 15, no 12, p. 1812-1815Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to provide an insight into the current practice of work-up and management of patients with syncope among members of the EHRA electrophysiology research network. Responses were received from 43 centres. The majority of respondents (74%) had no specific syncope unit and only 42% used a standardized assessment protocol or algorithm. Hospitalization rates varied from 10% to 25% (56% of the centres) to >50% (21% of the centres). The leading reasons for hospitalization were features suggesting arrhythmogenic syncope (85% of respondents), injury (80%), structural heart disease (73%), significant comorbidities (54%), and older age (41%). Most widely applied tests were electrocardiogram (ECG), echocardiography, and Holter monitoring followed by carotid sinus massage and neurological evaluation. An exercise test, tilt table test, electrophysiological study, and implantation of a loop recorder were performed only if there was a specific indication. The use of a tilt table test varied widely: 44% of respondents almost always performed it when neurally mediated syncope was suspected, whereas 37% did not perform it when there was a strong evidence for neurally mediated syncope. Physical manoeuvres were the most widely (93%) applied standard treatment for this syncope form. The results of this survey suggest that there are significant differences in the management of patients with syncope across Europe, specifically with respect to hospitalization rates and indications for tilt table testing in neurally mediated syncope. The majority of centres reported using ECG, echocardiography, and Holter monitoring as their main diagnostic tools in patients with syncope, whereas a smaller proportion of centres applied specific assessment algorithms. Physical manoeuvres were almost uniformely reported as the standard treatment for neurally mediated syncope.

  • 41. Dagres, Nikolaos
    et al.
    Bongiorni, Maria Grazia
    Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard
    Hernandez-Madrid, Antonio
    Pison, Laurent
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Current ablation techniques for persistent atrial fibrillation: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association Survey2015In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 17, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this survey was to provide insight into current practice regarding ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) among members of the European Heart Rhythm Association electrophysiology research network. Thirty centres responded to the survey. The main ablation technique for first-time ablation was stand-alone pulmonary vein isolation (PVI): in 67% of the centres for persistent but not long-standing AF and in 37% of the centres for long-standing persistent AF as well. Other applied techniques were ablation of fractionated electrograms, placement of linear lesions, stepwise approach until AF termination, and substrate mapping and isolation of low-voltage areas. However, the percentage of centres applying these techniques during first ablation did not exceed 25% for any technique. When stand-alone PVI was performed in patients with persistent but not long-standing AF, the majority (80%) of the centres used an irrigated radiofrequency ablation catheter whereas 20% of the respondents used the cryoballoon. Similar results were reported for ablation of long-standing persistent AF (radiofrequency 90%, cryoballoon 10%). Neither rotor mapping nor one-shot ablation tools were used as the main first-time ablation methods. Systematic search for non-pulmonary vein triggers was performed only in 10% of the centres. Most common 1-year success rate off antiarrhythmic drugs was 50-60%. Only 27% of the centres knew their 5-year results. In conclusion, patients with persistent AF represent a significant proportion of AF patients undergoing ablation. There is a shift towards stand-alone PVI being the primary choice in many centres for first-time ablation in these patients. The wide variation in the use of additional techniques and in the choice of endpoints reflects the uncertainties and lack of guidance regarding the most optimal approach. Procedural success rates are modest and long-term outcomes are unknown in most centres.

  • 42. Dagres, Nikolaos
    et al.
    Lewalter, Thorsten
    Lip, Gregory Y. H.
    Pison, Laurent
    Proclemer, Alessandro
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Current practice of antiarrhythmic drug therapy for prevention of atrial fibrillation in Europe: The European Heart Rhythm Association survey2013In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 478-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this survey was to provide insight into current practice regarding the use of antiarrhythmic drugs for atrial fibrillation (AF) among members of the European Heart Rhythm Association research network. Thirty-seven centres responded. Rhythm control was preferred in patients with significant AF-related symptoms by 73 of centres, in all patients after a first detected episode by 59, and in young patients even if AF was well tolerated by 49 of centres. The most common strategy after successful conversion of the first AF episode was a wait-and-see approach without initiation of antiarrhythmic drugs (49). Conventional -blockers were always or sometimes used as first-choice drugs for AF prevention by 76 of centres. Only 11 used dronedarone regularly as a first-choice drug. The diagnostic work-up for exclusion of heart disease prior to initiation of class IC antiarrhythmic drugs was limited. Markers monitored for proarrhythmia risk were QRS duration for class IC drugs (68) and the QT interval for sotalol and amiodarone (65). In conclusion, rhythm control is more widely employed than expected. Beta-blockers are widely used for AF prevention in contrast to the limited use of the new drug dronedarone.

  • 43.
    Deharo, Jean-Claude
    et al.
    Univ Hosp La Timone, Dept Cardiol, Marseilles, France..
    Sciaraffia, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Leclercq, Christophe
    Univ Hosp Pontchaillou, Dept Cardiol, CIC IT 804, INSERM 1099, Rennes, France..
    Amara, Walid
    GHI Le Raincy Montfermeil, Dept Cardiol, Montfermeil, France..
    Doering, Michael
    Univ Leipzig, Ctr Heart, Dept Electrophysiol, D-04109 Leipzig, Germany..
    Bongiorni, Maria G.
    Univ Hosp Pisa, Cardiol Dept 2, Pisa, Italy..
    Chen, Jian
    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Heart Dis, N-5021 Bergen, Norway.;Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway..
    Dagres, Nicolaus
    Univ Leipzig, Ctr Heart, Dept Electrophysiol, D-04109 Leipzig, Germany..
    Estner, Heidi
    Univ Munich, Dept Cardiol, Med Klin 1, Campus Grosshadern,Marchioninistr 15, D-81377 Munich, Germany..
    Larsen, Torben B.
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, AF Study Grp, Dept Cardiol, Aalborg, Denmark..
    Johansen, Jens B.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark..
    Potpara, Tatjana S.
    Univ Belgrade, Sch Med, Cardiol Clin, Clin Ctr Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia..
    Proclemer, Alessandro
    IRCAB Fdn Udine, Univ Hosp S Maria della Misericordia, Dept Cardiol, Udine, Italy..
    Pison, Laurent
    Maastricht Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Maastricht POB 5800, NL-6200 MD Maastricht, Netherlands.;Cardiovasc Res Inst, Maastricht POB 5800, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Brunet, Caroline
    Univ Hosp La Timone, Dept Cardiol, Marseilles, France..
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Perioperative management of antithrombotic treatment during implantation or revision of cardiac implantable electronic devices: the European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines for Electronic Device Implantation (ESS-PREDI)2016In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 778-784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines for Electronic Device Implantation (ESS-PREDI) was a prospective European survey of consecutive adults who had undergone implantation/surgical revision of a cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) on chronic antithrombotic therapy (enrolment March-June 2015). The aim of the survey was to investigate perioperative treatment with oral anticoagulants and antiplatelets in CIED implantation or surgical revision and to determine the incidence of complications, including clinically significant pocket haematomas. Information on antithrombotic therapy before and after surgery and bleeding and thromboembolic complications occurring after the intervention was collected at first follow-up. The study population comprised 723 patients (66.7% men, 76.9% aged a parts per thousand yen66 years). Antithrombotic treatment was continued during surgery in 489 (67.6%) patients; 6 (0.8%) had their treatment definitively stopped; 46 (6.4%) were switched to another antithrombotic therapy. Heparin bridging was used in 55 out of 154 (35.8%) patients when interrupting vitamin K antagonist (VKA) treatment. Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulant (NOAC) treatment was interrupted in 88.7% of patients, with heparin bridging in 25.6%, but accounted for only 25.3% of the oral anticoagulants used. A total of 108 complications were observed in 98 patients. No intracranial haemorrhage or embolic events were observed. Chronic NOAC treatment before surgery was associated with lower rates of minor pocket haematoma (1.4%; P= 0.042) vs. dual antiplatelet therapy (13.0%), VKA (11.4%), VKA + antiplatelet (9.2%), or NOAC + antiplatelet (7.7%). Similar results were observed for bleeding complications (P= 0.028). Perioperative management of patients undergoing CIED implantation/surgical revision while on chronic antithrombotic therapy varies, with evidence of a disparity between guideline recommendations and practice patterns in Europe. Haemorrhagic complications were significantly less frequent in patients treated with NOACs. Despite this, the incidence of severe pocket haematomas was low.

  • 44. Di Cori, Andrea
    et al.
    Auricchio, Angelo
    Regoli, François
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Butter, Christian
    Dagres, Nikolaos
    Deharo, Jean-Claude
    Maggioni, Aldo P
    Kutarski, Andrzej
    Kennergren, Charles
    Laroche, Cécile
    Rinaldi, Christopher A
    Dovellini, Emilio Vincenzo
    Golzio, Pier Giorgio
    Thøgersen, Anna Margrethe
    Bongiorni, Maria Grazia
    Clinical impact of antithrombotic therapy in transvenous lead extraction complications: a sub-analysis from the ESC-EORP EHRA ELECTRa (European Lead Extraction ConTRolled) Registry.2019In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 1096-1105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: A sub-analysis of the ESC-EHRA European Lead Extraction ConTRolled (ELECTRa) Registry to evaluate the clinical impact of antithrombotic (AT) on transvenous lead extraction (TLE) safety and efficacy.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: ELECTRa outcomes were compared between patients without AT therapy (No AT Group) and with different pre-operative AT regimens, including antiplatelets (AP), anticoagulants (AC), or both (AP + AC). Out of 3510 pts, 2398 (68%) were under AT pre-operatively. AT patients were older with more comorbidities (P < 0.0001). AT subgroups, defined as AP, AC, or AP + AC, were 1096 (31.2%), 985 (28%), and 317 (9%), respectively. Regarding AP patients, 1413 (40%) were under AP, 1292 (91%) with a single AP, interrupted in 26% about 3.8 ± 3.7 days before TLE. In total, 1302 (37%) patients were under AC, 881 vitamin K antagonist (68%), 221 (17%) direct oral anticoagulants, 155 (12%) low weight molecular heparin, and 45 (3.5%) unfractionated heparin. AC was 'interrupted without bridging' in 696 (54%) and 'interrupted with bridging' in 504 (39%) about 3.3 ± 2.3 days before TLE, and 'continued' in 87 (7%). TLE success rate was high in all subgroups. Only overall in-hospital death (1.4%), but not the procedure-related one, was higher in the AT subgroups (P = 0.0500). Age >65 years and New York Heart Association Class III/IV, but not AT regimens, were independent predictors of death for any cause. Haematomas were more frequent in AT subgroups, especially in AC 'continued' (P = 0.025), whereas pulmonary embolism in the No-AT (P < 0.01).

    CONCLUSIONS: AT minimization is safe in patients undergoing TLE. AT does not seem to predict death but identifies a subset of fragile patients with a worse in-hospital TLE outcome.

  • 45. Dickstein, Kenneth
    et al.
    Normand, Camilla
    Anker, Stefan D.
    Auricchio, Angelo
    Blomstrom, Carina Lundqvist
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Bogale, Nigussie
    Cleland, John
    Filippatos, Gerasimos
    Gasparini, Maurizio
    Gitt, Anselm
    Hindricks, Gerhard
    Kuck, Karl-Heinz
    Ponikowski, Piotr
    Stellbrink, Christoph
    Ruschitzka, Frank
    Linde, Cecilia
    European Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Survey II: rationale and design2015In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 137-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) Survey II is a 6 months snapshot survey initiated by two ESC Associations, the European Heart Rhythm Association and the Heart Failure Association, which is designed to describe clinical practice regarding implantation of CRT devices in a broad sample of hospitals in 47 ESC member countries. The large volume of clinical and demographic data collected should reflect current patient selection, implantation, and follow-up practice and provide information relevant for assessing healthcare resource utilization in connection with CRT. The findings of this survey should permit representative benchmarking both nationally and internationally across Europe.

  • 46.
    Dickstein, Kenneth
    et al.
    Stavanger Univ Hosp, Cardiol Div, Gerd Ragna Block Thorsensgate 8, N-4003 Stavanger, Norway;Univ Bergen, Inst Internal Med, Bergen, Norway.
    Normand, Camilla
    Stavanger Univ Hosp, Cardiol Div, Gerd Ragna Block Thorsensgate 8, N-4003 Stavanger, Norway;Univ Bergen, Inst Internal Med, Bergen, Norway.
    Auricchio, Angelo
    Fdn Cardioctr Ticino, Div Cardiol, Lugano, Switzerland.
    Bogale, Nigussie
    Stavanger Univ Hosp, Cardiol Div, Gerd Ragna Block Thorsensgate 8, N-4003 Stavanger, Norway.
    Cleland, John G.
    Imperial Coll London, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, London, England;Univ Glasgow, Robertson Ctr Biostat & Clin Trails, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.
    Gitt, Anselm K.
    Univ Cyprus, Sch Med, Nicosia, Cyprus;Klinikum Stadt Ludwigshafen, Med Klin B, Ludwigshafen, Germany;Stiftung Inst Herzinfarktforsch Ludwigshafen, Ludwigshafen, Germany.
    Stellbrink, Christoph
    Klinikum Bielefeld, Dept Cardiol, Bielefeld, Germany.
    Anker, Stefan D.
    Charite, Div Cardiol & Metab, Berlin, Germany;Charite, Dept Cardiol CVK, Berlin, Germany;Charite, German Ctr Cardiovasc Res DZHK, Partner Site Berlin, Berlin, Germany;Charite, Berlin Brandenburg Ctr Regenerat Therapies BCRT, Berlin, Germany;Univ Med Gottingen, Dept Cardiol & Pneumol, Gottingen, Germany;German Ctr Cardiovasc Res DZHK, Gottingen, Germany.
    Filippatos, Gerasimos
    Univ Athens, Athens Univ Hosp Attikon, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Athens, Greece.
    Gasparini, Maurizio
    Humanitas Res Hosp IRCCS, Rozzano, Italy.
    Hindricks, Gerhard
    HELIOS Heart Ctr Leipzig, Dept Cardiac Surg, Leipzig, Germany.
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Ponikowski, Piotr
    Med Acad Wroclaw, Dept Heart Dis, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Ruschitzka, Frank
    Univ Zurich Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Botto, Giovanni Luca
    St Anna Hosp, Como, Italy.
    Bulava, Alan
    Univ South Bohemia, Fac Hlth & Social Sci, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic;Ceske Budejovice Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic;Palacky Univ, Fac Med & Dent, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    Duray, Gabor
    Hungarian Def Forces, Med Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Clin Electrophysiol, Budapest, Hungary.
    Israel, Carsten
    Evangel Krankenhaus Bielefeld, Klin Innere Med Kardiol Diabetol & Nephrol, Bielefeld, Germany.
    Leclercq, Christophe
    Univ Rennes, Rennes Univ Hosp, Rennes, France.
    Margitfalvi, Peter
    Natl Inst Cardiovasc Dis, Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Cano, Oscar
    Hosp Univ & Politecn La Fe, Unidad Arritmias, Valencia, Spain.
    Plummer, Chris
    Freeman Rd Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Freeman Rd, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.
    Sarigul, Nedim Umutay
    Med Pk Goztepe Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Istanbul, Turkey;Kardio Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Sterlinski, Maciej
    Inst Cardiol, Heart Rhythm Dept, Warsaw, Poland.
    Linde, Cecilia
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Heart & Vessels Theme, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    CRT Survey II: a European Society of Cardiology survey of cardiac resynchronisation therapy in 11 088 patients-who is doing what to whom and how?2018In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 1039-1051Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) reduces morbidity and mortality in appropriately selected patients with heart failure and is strongly recommended for such patients by guidelines. A European Society of Cardiology (ESC) CRT survey conducted in 2008-2009 showed considerable variation in guideline adherence and large individual, national and regional differences in patient selection, implantation practice and follow-up. Accordingly, two ESC associations, the European Heart Rhythm Association and the Heart Failure Association, designed a second prospective survey to describe contemporary clinical practice regarding CRT. Methods and results A survey of the clinical practice of CRT-P and CRT-D implantation was conducted from October 2015 to December 2016 in 42 ESC member countries. Implanting centres provided information about their hospital and CRT service and were asked to complete a web-based case report form collecting information on patient characteristics, investigations, implantation procedures and complications during the index hospitalisation. The 11 088 patients enrolled represented 11% of the total number of expected implantations in participating countries during the survey period; 32% of patients were aged >= 75 years, 28% of procedures were upgrades from a permanent pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and 30% were CRT-P rather than CRT-D. Most patients (88%) had a QRS duration >= 130 ms, 73% had left bundle branch block and 26% were in atrial fibrillation at the time of implantation. Large geographical variations in clinical practice were observed. Conclusion CRT Survey II provides a valuable source of information on contemporary clinical practice with respect to CRT implantation in a large sample of ESC member states. The survey permits assessment of guideline adherence and demonstrates variations in patient selection, management, implantation procedure and follow-up strategy.

  • 47. Dobreanu, Dan
    et al.
    Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup
    Lewalter, Thorsten
    Hernández-Madrid, Antonio
    Lip, Gregory Y H
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Current practice for diagnosis and management of silent atrial fibrillation: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey2013In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 15, no 8, p. 1223-1225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although it is well known that silent atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with morbidity and mortality rates similar to those of symptomatic AF, no specific strategy for screening and management of this form of AF has been advocated. The purpose of this survey was to identify current practices for the diagnosis and management of silent AF. This survey is based on an electronic questionnaire sent to the European Heart Rhythm Association Research Network partners. Responses were received from 33 centres in 16 countries. The preferred screening methods for silent AF in patients with rhythm control by pharmacological therapy was 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) at outpatient visits (31.3%) and periodical 24 h Holter ECG recordings (34.4%), while after pulmonary vein isolation the corresponding figures were 6.3 and 65.6%, respectively. No consensus has been reached concerning the therapeutic approach for such patients. Most responders preferred rate control over rhythm control in patients with silent AF, although some favoured pulmonary vein isolation in young patients. However, oral anticoagulant therapy in patients at high thromboembolic risk was considered mandatory by most, provided that at least one episode of silent AF was documented, without recommending further investigations. The results of this survey have confirmed that there is currently no consensus regarding the screening and management of patients with silent AF and that clinical practice is not always consistent with the few existing evidence-based recommendations.

  • 48. Ernst, S.
    et al.
    Chung, M. K.
    Russo, A.
    Hoffmann, E.
    Eisenberg, S.
    Birgesdotter-Green, U.
    Blomström-Lundquist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Poole, J.
    How do female electrophysiologists deal with radiation exposure during pregnancy: Results from the EPIC global survey2012In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 33, no Suppl 1, p. 694-694Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 49. Ernst, S.
    et al.
    Chung, M. K.
    Russo, A.
    Hoffmann, E.
    Eisenberg, S.
    Birgesdotter-Green, U.
    Blomström-Lundquist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Poole, J.
    Radiation exposure during electrophysiology procedures: results from the EPIC global survey2012In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 33, no Suppl 1, p. 695-695Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50. Estner, Heidi L
    et al.
    Chen, Jian
    Potpara, Tatjana
    Proclemer, Alessandro
    Todd, Derick
    Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia.
    Personnel, equipment, and facilities for electrophysiological and catheter ablation procedures in Europe: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association Survey2014In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 1078-1082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical electrophysiology (EP) and catheter ablation of arrhythmias are rapidly evolving in recent years. More than 50 000 catheter ablations are performed every year in Europe. Emerging indications, an increasing number of procedures, and an expected high quality require national and international standards as well as trained specialists. The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess the practice of requirements for EP personnel, equipment, and facilities in Europe. Responses to the questionnaire were received from 52 members of the EHRA research network. The survey involved high-, medium-, and low-volume EP centres, performing >400, 100-399, and under 100 implants per year, respectively. The following topics were explored: (i) EP personnel issues including balance between female and male operators, responsibilities within the EP department, age profiles, role and training of fellows, and EP nurses, (ii) the equipments available in the EP laboratories, (iii) source of patient referrals, and (iv) techniques used for ablation for different procedures including sedation, and peri-procedural use of anticoagulation and antibiotics. The survey reflects the current EP personnel situation characterized by a high training requirement and specialization. Arrhythmia sections are still most often part of cardiology departments and the head of cardiology is seldom a heart rhythm specialist. Currently, the vast majority of EP physicians are men, although in the subgroup of physicians younger than 40 years, the proportion of women is increasing. Uncertainty exists regarding peri-procedural anticoagulation, antibiotic prophylaxis, and the need for sedation during specific procedures.

123 1 - 50 of 141
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf