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  • 1.
    Ahlstrand, I.
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center. School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Pain and activity limitations in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared to 10 years ago: the Swedish TIRA project2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 259-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To study differences regarding pain and activity limitations during the 3 years following diagnosis in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared with their counterparts who were diagnosed 10 years earlier. Method: This study was based on patients recruited to the Early Intervention in RA (TIRA) project. In the first cohort (TIRA-1) 320 patients were included in time for diagnosis during 1996-1998 and 463 patients were included in the second cohort (TIRA-2) during 2006-2009. Disease activity, pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS), bodily pain (BP) in the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), activity limitations (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ), and medication were reported at inclusion and at follow-up after 1, 2, and 3 years. Results: Disease activity, pain, and activity limitations were pronounced at inclusion across both genders and in both cohorts, with some improvement observed during the first year after diagnosis. Disease activity did not differ between cohorts at inclusion but was significantly lower at the follow-ups in the TIRA-2 cohort, in which the patients were prescribed traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and biological agents more frequently. In TIRA-2, patients reported significantly lower pain and activity limitations at all follow-ups, with men reporting lower pain than women. Women reported significantly higher activity limitations at all time points in TIRA-2. Conclusions: Pain and activity limitations were still pronounced in the contemporary treated early RA cohort compared with their counterparts diagnosed 10 years earlier and both of these factors need to be addressed in clinical settings.

  • 2.
    Alfandari, Defne
    et al.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Vriend, Chris
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Amsterdam Neurosci, Netherlands.
    Heslenfeld, Dirk J.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Versfeld, Niek J.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Brain Volume Differences Associated With Hearing Impairment in Adults2018In: TRENDS IN HEARING, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 22, article id 2331216518763689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Speech comprehension depends on the successful operation of a network of brain regions. Processing of degraded speech is associated with different patterns of brain activity in comparison with that of high-quality speech. In this exploratory study, we studied whether processing degraded auditory input in daily life because of hearing impairment is associated with differences in brain volume. We compared TI-weighted structural magnetic resonance images of 17 hearing-impaired (HI) adults with those of 17 normal-hearing (NH) controls using a voxel-based morphometry analysis. HI adults were individually matched with NH adults based on age and educational level. Gray and white matter brain volumes were compared between the groups by region-of-interest analyses in structures associated with speech processing, and by whole-brain analyses. The results suggest increased gray matter volume in the right angular gyrus and decreased white matter volume in the left fusiform gyrus in HI listeners as compared with NH ones. In the HI group, there was a significant correlation between hearing acuity and cluster volume of the gray matter cluster in the right angular gyrus. This correlation supports the link between partial hearing loss and altered brain volume. The alterations in volume may reflect the operation of compensatory mechanisms that are related to decoding meaning from degraded auditory input.

  • 3.
    Alickovic, Emina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, 20 Rortangvej, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Gustafsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A System Identification Approach to Determining Listening Attention from EEG Signals2016In: 2016 24TH EUROPEAN SIGNAL PROCESSING CONFERENCE (EUSIPCO), IEEE , 2016, p. 31-35Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We still have very little knowledge about how ourbrains decouple different sound sources, which is known assolving the cocktail party problem. Several approaches; includingERP, time-frequency analysis and, more recently, regression andstimulus reconstruction approaches; have been suggested forsolving this problem. In this work, we study the problem ofcorrelating of EEG signals to different sets of sound sources withthe goal of identifying the single source to which the listener isattending. Here, we propose a method for finding the number ofparameters needed in a regression model to avoid overlearning,which is necessary for determining the attended sound sourcewith high confidence in order to solve the cocktail party problem.

  • 4.
    Andersen Helland, Wenche
    et al.
    Stord Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Lundervold, Astri
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Posserud, Maj-Britt
    Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Stable associations between behavioral problems and language impairments across childhood - the importance of pragmatic language problems2014In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 943-951Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated language function associated with behavior problems, focusing on pragmatics. Scores on the Children’s Communication Checklist Second Edition (CCC-2) in a group of 40 adolescents (12–15 years) identified with externalizing behavior problems (BP) in childhood was compared to the CCC-2 scores in a typically developing comparison group (n=37). Behavioral, emotional and language problems were assessed by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and 4 language items, when the children in the BP group were 7–9 years (T1). They were then assessed with the SDQ and the CCC-2 when they were 12–15 years (T2). The BP group obtained poorer scores on 9/10 subscales on the CCC-2, and 70% showed language impairments in the clinical range. Language, emotional and peer problems at T1 were strongly correlated with pragmatic language impairments in adolescence. The findings indicate that assessment of language, especially pragmatics, is vital for follow-up and treatment of behavioral problems in children and adolescents.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cuijpers, Pim
    VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Carlbring, Per
    University of Stockholm, Sweden.
    Riper, Heleen
    VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Leuphana University, Lünebrug, Germany.
    Hedman, Erik
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Guided Internet-based vs. face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy for psychiatric and somatic disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis2014In: World Psychiatry, ISSN 1723-8617, E-ISSN 2051-5545, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 288-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) has been tested in many research trials, but to a lesser extent directly compared to face-to-face delivered cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of trials in which guided ICBT was directly compared to face-to-face CBT. Studies on psychiatric and somatic conditions were included. Systematic searches resulted in 13 studies (total N=1053) that met all criteria and were included in the review. There were three studies on social anxiety disorder, three on panic disorder, two on depressive symptoms, two on body dissatisfaction, one on tinnitus, one on male sexual dysfunction, and one on spider phobia. Face-to-face CBT was either in the individual format (n=6) or in the group format (n=7). We also assessed quality and risk of bias. Results showed a pooled effect size (Hedges' g) at post-treatment of -0.01 (95% CI: -0.13 to 0.12), indicating that guided ICBT and face-to-face treatment produce equivalent overall effects. Study quality did not affect outcomes. While the overall results indicate equivalence, there are still few studies for each psychiatric and somatic condition and many conditions for which guided ICBT has not been compared to face-to-face treatment. Thus, more research is needed to establish equivalence of the two treatment formats.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Tore
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lundén, Charlotte
    Landstinget Dalarna.
    Henriksson, Oskar
    Psykologifabriken AB.
    Fattahi, Kidjan
    Psykologpartners , Linköping.
    Zetterqvist Westin, Vendela
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Internet-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for tinnitus patients2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hummerdal, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bergman Nordgren, Lise
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Psychology , Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    A 3.5-year follow-up of Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for major depression2013In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 155-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundInternet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for major depression has been tested in several trials, but only with follow-ups up to 1.5 years.

    AimThe aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of ICBT 3.5 years after treatment completion.Methods

    A total of 88 people with major depression were randomized to either guided self-help or e-mail therapy in the original trial. One-third was initially on a waiting-list. Treatment was provided for eight weeks and in this report long-term follow-up data were collected. Also included were data from post-treatment and six-month follow-up. A total of 58% (51/88) completed the 3.5-year follow-up. Analyses were performed using a random effects repeated measures piecewise growth model to estimate trajectory shape over time and account for missing data.

    ResultsResults showed continued lowered scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). No differences were found between the treatment conditions. A large proportion of participants (55%) had sought and received additional treatments in the follow-up period. A majority (56.9%) of participants had a BDI score lower than 10 at the 3.5-year follow-up.

    ConclusionsPeople with mild to moderate major depression may benefit from ICBT 3.5-years after treatment completion.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon AS, Denmark; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Preminger, Jill E.
    University of Louisville, KY 40292 USA.
    Internet and Audiology: A Review of the First International Meeting2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 269-270Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this research forum article is to describe the impetus for holding the First International Meeting on Internet and Audiology (October 2014) and to introduce the special research forum that arose from the meeting. Method: The rationale for the First International Meeting on Internet and Audiology is described. This is followed by a short description of the research sections and articles appearing in the special issue. Six articles consider the process of health care delivery over the Internet; this includes health care specific to hearing, tinnitus, and balance. Four articles discuss the development of effective Internet-based treatment programs. Six articles describe and evaluate Internet-based interventions specific to adult hearing aid users. Conclusion: The fledgling field of Internet and audiology is remarkably broad. The Second International Meeting on Internet and Audiology ocurred in September 2015.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sarkohi, Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Karlsson, Johan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bjärehed, Jonas
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of Two Forms of Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Depression on Future Thinking2013In: Cognitive Therapy and Research, ISSN 0147-5916, E-ISSN 1573-2819, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate if future thinking would change following two forms of Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for major depression. A second aim was to study the association between pre-post changes in future thinking and prepost changes in depressive symptoms.

    Background: Effects of psychological treatments are most often tested with self-report inventories and seldom with tests of cognitive function.

    Method: We included data from 47 persons diagnosed with major depression who received either e-mail therapy or guided self-help during 8 weeks. Participants completed the future thinking task (FTT), in which they were asked to generate positive and negative events that they thought were going to happen in the future and rated the events in terms of emotion and likelihood. The FTT was completed before and after treatment. Data on depressive symptoms were also collected.

    Results: FTT index scores for negative events were reduced after  treatment. There was no increase for the positive events. Change scores for the FTT negative events and depression symptoms were significantly correlated.

    Conclusions: We conclude that ICBT may lead to decreased negative future thinking and that changes in depression symptoms correlate to some extent with reductions in negative future thinking.

  • 10.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxnell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Spens, Karl-Erik
    Cognitive correlates of visual speech understanding in hearing impaired individuals2001In: Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, ISSN 1081-4159, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 103-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the extent to which different measures ofspeechreading performance correlated with particular cognitiveabilities in a population of hearing-impaired people. Althoughthe three speechreading tasks (isolated word identification,sentence comprehension, and text tracking) were highly intercorrelated,they tapped different cognitive skills. In this population,younger participants were better speechreaders, and, when agewas taken into account, speech tracking correlated primarilywith (written) lexical decision speed. In contrast, speechreadingfor sentence comprehension correlated most strongly with performanceon a phonological processing task (written pseudohomophone detection)but also on a span measure that may have utilized visual, nonverbalmemory for letters. We discuss the implications of this pattern.

  • 11.
    Andin, Josefine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Dealing with Digits: Arithmetic, Memory and Phonology in Deaf Signers2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Deafness has been associated with poor abilities to deal with digits in the context of arithmetic and memory, and language modality-specific differences in the phonological similarity of digits have been shown to influence short-term memory (STM). Therefore, the overall aim of the present thesis was to find out whether language modality-specific differences in phonological processing between sign and speech can explain why deaf signers perform at lower levels than hearing peers when dealing with digits. To explore this aim, the role of phonological processing in digit-based arithmetic and memory tasks was investigated, using both behavioural and neuroimaging methods, in adult deaf signers and hearing non-signers, carefully matched on age, sex, education and non-verbal intelligence. To make task demands as equal as possible for both groups, and to control for material effects, arithmetic, phonological processing, STM and working memory (WM) were all assessed using the same presentation and response mode for both groups. The results suggested that in digit-based STM, phonological similarity of manual numerals causes deaf signers to perform more poorly than hearing non-signers. However, for  digit-based WM there was no difference between the groups, possibly due to differences in allocation of resources during WM. This indicates that similar WM for the two groups can be generalized from lexical items to digits. Further, we found that in the present work deaf signers performed better than expected and on a par with hearing peers on all arithmetic tasks, except for multiplication, possibly because the groups studied here were very carefully matched. However, the neural networks recruited for arithmetic and phonology differed between groups. During multiplication tasks, deaf signers showed an increased  reliance on cortex of the right parietal lobe complemented by the left inferior frontal gyrus. In contrast, hearing non-signers relied on cortex of the left frontal and parietal lobes during multiplication. This suggests that while hearing non-signers recruit phonology-dependent arithmetic fact retrieval processes for multiplication, deaf signers recruit non-verbal magnitude manipulation processes. For phonology, the hearing non-signers engaged left lateralized frontal and parietal areas within the classical perisylvian language network. In deaf signers, however, phonological processing was limited to cortex of the left occipital lobe, suggesting that sign-based phonological processing does not necessarily activate the classical language network. In conclusion, the findings of the present thesis suggest that language modality-specific differences between sign and speech in different ways can explain why deaf signers perform at lower levels than hearing non-signers on tasks that include dealing with digits.

  • 12.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Deaf signers and hearing non-signers recruit similar networks for arithmetic and phonological tasks2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Profoundly deaf individuals sometimes have difficulty with arithmetic and phonological tasks. In the present study we investigate if these differences can be attributed to differences in recruitment of neurobiological networks. Seventeen hearing non-signers (HN) and sixteen deaf signers (DS) matched on age, gender and non-verbal intelligence took part in an fMRI study. In the scanner three digit/letter pairs were visually presented and the participants performed six different blocked tasks tapping processing of digit and letter order, multiplication, subtraction and phonological ability. Data were analysed using two 2x2x2 ANOVAs; process (arithmetic, language) x level (high, low) x group (DS, HN). A main effect of process revealed language networks in the left inferior frontal gryus, supramarginal gyrus, fusiform gyrus and insula. Arithmetic networks included left middle orbital gyrus and superior medial gyrus. A main effect of level revealed low level processing (digit/letter order) in the right middle occipital gyrus and the right precuneus and high level processing (subtraction/multiplication/phonological ability) in left inferior frontal gyrus. There was no main effect of group but a significant task x group interaction in the right temporal pole which in DS (but not HN) was activated more for arithmetic than language processing (pfwe = .022) when multiplication was included in the analysis. This region is implicated in conceptual representation. These results suggest that both arithmetic and language are processed similarly by DS and HN with possible between-group differences in the use of conceptual representation in arithmetic and language tasks.

  • 13.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fransson, Peter
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Deaf signers use magnitude manipulatioin strategies for mulitplication: fMRI evidence2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence suggests that the lag reported in mathematics for deaf signers derives from difficulties related to the verbal system of number processing as described in the triple code model. For hearing individuals the verbal system has been shown to be recruited for both arithmetic and language tasks. In the present study we investigate for the first time neuronal representations of arithmetic in deaf signers. We examine if the neural network supporting arithmetic and language, including the horizontal portion of the intraparietal sulcus (HIPS), the superior parietal lobule (SPL) bilaterally, the left angular gyrus (AG), pars opercularis (POPE) and pars triangularis (PTRI) of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), is differently recruited for deaf and hearing individuals. Imaging data were collected from 16 deaf signers and 16 well-matched hearing nonsigners, using the same stimulus material for all tasks, but with different cues. During multiplication, deaf signers recruited rHIPS more than hearing non-signers, suggesting greater involvement of magnitude manipulation processes related to the quantity system, whereas there was no evidence that the verbal system was recruited. Further, there was no support for the notion of a common representation of phonology for sign and speech as previously suggested.

  • 14.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ingvar, Martin
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phonological processing during arithmetic processing across language modalities2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Ingvar, Martin
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phonological recruitment during arithmetic processing across language modalities2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Phonology and arithmetic in the language-calculation network2015In: Brain and Language, ISSN 0093-934X, E-ISSN 1090-2155, Vol. 143, p. 97-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arithmetic and language processing involve similar neural networks, but the relative engagement remains unclear. In the present study we used fMRI to compare activation for phonological, multiplication and subtraction tasks, keeping the stimulus material constant, within a predefined language-calculation network including left inferior frontal gyrus and angular gyrus (AG) as well as superior parietal lobule and the intraparietal sulcus bilaterally. Results revealed a generally left lateralized activation pattern within the language-calculation network for phonology and a bilateral activation pattern for arithmetic, and suggested regional differences between tasks. In particular, we found a more prominent role for phonology than arithmetic in pars opercularis of the left inferior frontal gyrus but domain generality in pars triangularis. Parietal activation patterns demonstrated greater engagement of the visual and quantity systems for calculation than language. This set of findings supports the notion of a common, but regionally differentiated, language-calculation network. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 17.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Arithmetic and phonological processes in deaf native signers2008In: The first meeting of the federation of the European societies of neuropsychology,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Arithmetic and phonological processes in deaf signers and hearing non-signers - a cognitive study2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Arithmetic and phonological processing in deaf native signers and hearing non-signers2008In: First European Congress of Neuropsychology,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Complex symbol precessing in deaf native signers and hearing non-signers2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Deaf signers use phonology to do arithmetic2014In: Learning and individual differences, ISSN 1041-6080, E-ISSN 1873-3425, Vol. 32, p. 246-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deaf students generally lag several years behind hearing peers in arithmetic, but little is known about the mechanisms behind this. In the present study we investigated how phonological skills interact with arithmetic. Eighteen deaf signers and eighteen hearing non-signers took part in an experiment that manipulated arithmetic and phonological knowledge in the language modalities of sign and speech. Independent tests of alphabetical and native language phonological skills were also administered. There was no difference in performance between groups on subtraction, but hearing non-signers performed better than deaf signers on multiplication. For the deaf signers but not the hearing non-signers, multiplicative reasoning was associated with both alphabetical and phonological skills. This indicates that deaf signing adults rely on language processes to solve multiplication tasks, possibly because automatization of multiplication is less well established in deaf adults.

  • 22.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dealing with digits: short-term memory differences in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2011Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Language modality specific affects on simple spans in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2010In: Second European Congress of Neuropsychology, September, Amsterdam, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Language modality specific effects on simple spans in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phonological similarity and sensory memory traces modulate span size in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rhyme and Reason - do deaf signers use phonology to do arithmetic?2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Simple spans in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2010In: BEHAVIOURAL NEUROLOGY, ISSN 0953-4180, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 207-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 28.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Simple spans in deaf signers and hearing nonsigners2010In: Behavioural Neurology, ISSN 0953-4180, E-ISSN 1875-8584, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 207-208Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Andreassen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Boman, I-L
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyd University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet Stockholm, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Digital Support for Persons with Cognitive Impairment2017In: Harnessing the Power of Technology to Improve Lives / [ed] Cudd P.,de Witte L., IOS Press, 2017, Vol. 242, p. 5-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive impairment may cause difficulties in planning and initiating daily activities, as well as remembering to do what is scheduled. This study investigates the effectiveness of an interactive web-based mobile reminder calendar that sends text messages to the users mobile phone as support in everyday life, for persons with cognitive impairment due to neurological injury/diagnoses. The study has a randomised controlled trail design with data collection at baseline and at follow-up sessions after two and four months. Data collection started in August 2016 and continues until December 2017. The interactive web-based mobile reminder calendar may give the needed support to remind the person and thus increase the ability to perform activities and to be independence in everyday life. Preliminary results will be presented regarding what effect the interactive web-based mobile reminder calendar have for the participants performance of everyday life activities as well as perceived quality of life.

  • 30.
    Arehart, Kathryn H.
    et al.
    University of Colorado Boulder, Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences.
    Souza, Pamela
    Northwestern University, Evanston, Communication Sciences and Disorders.
    Kates, James M.
    University of Colorado Boulder, Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre,Denmark.
    Pedersen, Michael Syskind
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Relationship between distortion, hearing loss and working memory for digital noise reduction2015In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 505-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study considered speech modified by additive babble combined with noise-suppression processing. The purpose was to determine the relative importance of the signal modifications, individual peripheral hearing loss, and individual cognitive capacity on speech intelligibility and speech quality.

    Design: The participant group consisted of 31 individuals with moderate high-frequency hearing loss ranging in age from 51 to 89 years (mean = 69.6 years). Speech intelligibility and speech quality were measured using low-context sentences presented in babble at several signal-to-noise ratios. Speech stimuli were processed with a binary mask noise-suppression strategy with systematic manipulations of two parameters (error rate and attenuation values). The cumulative effects of signal modification produced by babble and signal processing were quantified using an envelope-distortion metric. Working memory capacity was assessed with a reading span test. Analysis of variance was used to determine the effects of signal processing parameters on perceptual scores. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to determine the role of degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity in individual listener response to the processed noisy speech. The model also considered improvements in envelope fidelity caused by the binary mask and the degradations to envelope caused by error and noise.

    Results: The participants showed significant benefits in terms of intelligibility scores and quality ratings for noisy speech processed by the ideal binary mask noise-suppression strategy. This benefit was observed across a range of signal-to-noise ratios and persisted when up to a 30% error rate was introduced into the processing. Average intelligibility scores and average quality ratings were well predicted by an objective metric of envelope fidelity. Degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity were significant factors in explaining individual listener’s intelligibility scores for binary mask processing applied to speech in babble. Degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity did not predict listeners’ quality ratings.

    Conclusions: The results indicate that envelope fidelity is a primary factor in determining the combined effects of noise and binary mask processing for intelligibility and quality of speech presented in babble noise. Degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity are significant factors in explaining variability in listeners’ speech intelligibility scores but not in quality ratings.

  • 31.
    Arehart, Kathryn
    et al.
    University of Colorado, CO 80309 USA.
    Souza, Pamela
    Northwestern University, IL USA.
    Kates, James
    University of Colorado, CO 80309 USA.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Syskind Pedersen, Michael
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Relationship Among Signal Fidelity, Hearing Loss, and Working Memory for Digital Noise Suppression2015In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 505-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study considered speech modified by additive babble combined with noise-suppression processing. The purpose was to determine the relative importance of the signal modifications, individual peripheral hearing loss, and individual cognitive capacity on speech intelligibility and speech quality. Design: The participant group consisted of 31 individuals with moderate high-frequency hearing loss ranging in age from 51 to 89 years (mean = 69.6 years). Speech intelligibility and speech quality were measured using low-context sentences presented in babble at several signal-to-noise ratios. Speech stimuli were processed with a binary mask noise-suppression strategy with systematic manipulations of two parameters (error rate and attenuation values). The cumulative effects of signal modification produced by babble and signal processing were quantified using an envelope-distortion metric. Working memory capacity was assessed with a reading span test. Analysis of variance was used to determine the effects of signal processing parameters on perceptual scores. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to determine the role of degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity in individual listener response to the processed noisy speech. The model also considered improvements in envelope fidelity caused by the binary mask and the degradations to envelope caused by error and noise. Results: The participants showed significant benefits in terms of intelligibility scores and quality ratings for noisy speech processed by the ideal binary mask noise-suppression strategy. This benefit was observed across a range of signal-to-noise ratios and persisted when up to a 30% error rate was introduced into the processing. Average intelligibility scores and average quality ratings were well predicted by an objective metric of envelope fidelity. Degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity were significant factors in explaining individual listeners intelligibility scores for binary mask processing applied to speech in babble. Degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity did not predict listeners quality ratings. Conclusions: The results indicate that envelope fidelity is a primary factor in determining the combined effects of noise and binary mask processing for intelligibility and quality of speech presented in babble noise. Degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity are significant factors in explaining variability in listeners speech intelligibility scores but not in quality ratings.

  • 32.
    Arehart, Kathryn
    et al.
    University of Colorado, UCB 409, Boulder, Departmen of Speech , Language and Hearing Sciences.
    Souza, Pamela
    Northwestern University, Roxelyn and Richard Pepper Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, United States.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Syskin Pedersen, Michael
    Oticon.
    James M, Kate
    University of Colorado at Boulder , Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences (SLHS), Electrical Engineering..
    Relationship between distortion and working memory for digital noise-reduction processing in hearing aids2014In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, Vol. 133, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several recent studies have shown a relationship between working memory and the ability of older adults to benefit from specific advanced signal processing algorithms in hearing aids. In this study, we quantify tradeoffs between benefit due to noise reduction and the perceptual costs associated with distortion caused by the noise reduction algorithm. We also investigate the relationship between these tradeoffs and working memory abilities. Speech intelligibility, speech quality, and perceived listening effort were measured in a cohort of elderly adults with hearing loss. Test materials were low-context sentences presented in fluctuating noise conditions at several signal-to-noise ratios. Speech stimuli were processed with a binary mask noise-reduction strategy. The amount of distortion produced by the noise reduction algorithm was parametrically varied by manipulating two binary mask parameters, error rate, and attenuation rate. Working memory was assessed with a reading span test. Results will be discussed in terms of the extent to which intelligibility, quality, and effort ratings are explained by the amount of distortion and/or noise and by working memory ability. [Funded by NIH, Oticon, and GN ReSound.].

  • 33.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sternäng, Ola
    Stockholm University.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Psykologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Nilsson, L-G
    Auditory deficits are related to episodic long-term memory deficits2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wengelin, Åsa
    Lunds universitet.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet.
    Narrative writing assessed with keystroke-logging in children with CI2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    et al.
    Section of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Section of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Section of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    The Relationship between Reading Comphehension, Working Memory and Language in Children with Cochlear Implants2007In: Acta Neuropsychologica, ISSN 1730-7503, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 163-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    and profound hearing impairment treated by cochlear implants (CI). In this study we explore this relationship in sixteen Swedish children with CI. We found that over 60% of the children with CI performed at the level of their hearing peers in a reading comprehension test. Demographic factors were not predictive of reading comprehension, but a complex working memory task was. Reading percentile was significantly correlated to the working memory test, but no other correlations between reading and cognitive/linguistic factors remained significant after age was factored out. Individual results from a comparison of the two best and the two poorest readers corroborate group results, confirming the important role of working memory for reading as measured by comprehension of words and sentences in this group of children.

  • 36.
    Basner, Mathias
    et al.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Brink, Mark
    Noise and NIR Div, Switzerland.
    Bristow, Abigail
    University of Loughborough, England.
    de Kluizenaar, Yvonne
    Netherlands Org Appl Science Research TNO, Netherlands.
    Finegold, Lawrence
    Finegold and So Consultants, OH 45459 USA.
    Hong, Jiyoung
    Korea Railrd Research Institute, South Korea.
    Janssen, Sabine A.
    Netherlands Org Appl Science Research TNO, Netherlands.
    Klaeboe, Ronny
    Institute Transport Econ TOI, Norway.
    Leroux, Tony
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Liebl, Andreas
    Fraunhofer Institute Bldg Phys IBP, Germany.
    Matsui, Toshihito
    Hokkaido University, Japan.
    Schwela, Dieter
    University of York, England.
    Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola
    Nofer Institute Occupat Med, Poland.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. University of Gavle, Sweden.
    ICBEN review of research on the biological effects of noise 2011-20142015In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 17, no 75, p. 57-82Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mandate of the International Commission on Biological Effects of Noise (ICBEN) is to promote a high level of scientific research concerning all aspects of noise-induced effects on human beings and animals. In this review, ICBEN team chairs and co-chairs summarize relevant findings, publications, developments, and policies related to the biological effects of noise, with a focus on the period 2011-2014 and for the following topics: Noise-induced hearing loss; nonauditory effects of noise; effects of noise on performance and behavior; effects of noise on sleep; community response to noise; and interactions with other agents and contextual factors. Occupational settings and transport have been identified as the most prominent sources of noise that affect health. These reviews demonstrate that noise is a prevalent and often underestimated threat for both auditory and nonauditory health and that strategies for the prevention of noise and its associated negative health consequences are needed to promote public health.

  • 37.
    Bellon-Harn, Monica L.
    et al.
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Hartwell Azios, Jamie
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Dockens, Ashley L.
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Speech-language pathologists preferences for patient-centeredness2017In: Journal of Communication Disorders, ISSN 0021-9924, E-ISSN 1873-7994, Vol. 68, p. 81-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Preferences for patient-centeredness is an important indicator in healthcare service delivery. However, it remains largely unexplored in the field of communication science and disorders. This study investigated speech-language pathologists (SLPs) preferences for patient-centeredness Method: The study involved a cross-sectional survey design. SLPs (n = 102) fully completed the modified Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale (PPOS; Krupat et al, 2000) and also provided demographic details. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlation, and linear regression methods. Results: Mean PPOS scores indicated that SLPs value patient-centeredness. There was a strong positive correlation among sharing and caring subscales with the full-scale. Results from the linear regression modeling suggested no relationship between demographic factors and preferences for patient-centeredness. Conclusions: SLPs value patient-centeredness, although there may be regional and cultural variations. Qualitative investigations may help uncover dimensions of patient-centeredness that were not captured in the PPOS scale. In addition, further research should explore congruence in preferences for patient-centeredness among SLPs and patients.

  • 38.
    Bendelin, Nina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Internet treatment of chronic pain: Results and predictors of two RCT’s2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Bendelin, Nina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    The role of acceptance in increased functioning in chronic pain: When, how and why does change occur?2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Bendelin, Nina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Internet-delivered intervention for relapse prevention after pain management program2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Bernstein, Joshua G
    et al.
    National Military Audiology and Speech Pathology Center Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Spectrotemporal modulation sensitivity as a predictor of speech intelligibility in noise with hearing aids2014In: Spectrotemporal modulation sensitivity as a predictor of speech intelligibility in noise with hearing aids, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The audiogram predicts less than a third of the variance in speech reception thresholds (SRTs) for hearing-impaired (HI) listeners properly fit with individualized frequency-dependent gain. The remaining variance is often attributed to a combination of su-prathreshold distortion in the auditory pathway and non-auditory factors such as cogni-tive processing. Distinguishing between these factors requires a measure of suprathresh-old auditory processing to account for the non-cognitive contributions. Preliminary re-sults in 12 HI listeners identified a correlation between spectrotemporal modulation (STM) sensitivity and speech intelligibility in noise presented over headphones. The cur-IHCON 2014 27 August 13-17, 2014rent study assessed the effectiveness of STM sensitivity as a measure of suprathreshold auditory function to predict free-field SRTs in noise for a larger group of 47 HI listeners with hearing aids.SRTs were measured for Hagerman sentences presented at 65 dB SPL in stationary speech-weighted noise or four-talker babble. Pre-recorded speech and masker stimuli were played through a small anechoic chamber equipped with a master hearing aid pro-grammed with individualized gain. The output from an IEC711 Ear Simulator was played binaurally through insert earphones. Three processing algorithms were examined: linear gain, linear gain plus noise reduction, or fast-acting compressive gain.STM stimuli consist of spectrally-rippled noise with spectral-peak frequencies that shift over time. STM with a 2-cycle/octave spectral-ripple density and a 4-Hz modulation rate was applied to a 2-kHz lowpass-filtered pink-noise carrier. Stimuli were presented over headphones at 80 dB SPL (±5-dB roving). The threshold modulation depth was estimated adaptively in a two-alternative forced-choice task.STM sensitivity was strongly correlated (R2=0.48) with the global SRT (i.e., the SRTs averaged across masker and processing conditions). The high-frequency pure-tone aver-age (3-8 kHz) and age together accounted for 23% of the variance in global SRT. STM sensitivity accounted for an additional 28% of the variance in global SRT (total R2=0.51) when combined with these two other metrics in a multiple-regression analysis. Correla-tions between STM sensitivity and SRTs for individual conditions were weaker for noise reduction than for the other algorithms, and marginally stronger for babble than for sta-tionary noise.The results are discussed in the context of previous work suggesting that STM sensitivity for low rates and low carrier frequencies is impaired by a reduced ability to use temporal fine-structure information to detect slowly shifting spectral peaks. STM detection is a fast, simple test of suprathreshold auditory function that accounts for a substantial pro-portion of variability in hearing-aid outcomes for speech perception in noise.

  • 42.
    Bernstein, Joshua G. W.
    et al.
    Walter Reed National Mil Medical Centre, MD 20889 USA.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Spectrotemporal Modulation Sensitivity as a Predictor of Speech-Reception Performance in Noise With Hearing Aids2016In: TRENDS IN HEARING, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 20, article id 2331216516670387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The audiogram predicts amp;lt;30% of the variance in speech-reception thresholds (SRTs) for hearing-impaired (HI) listeners fitted with individualized frequency-dependent gain. The remaining variance could reflect suprathreshold distortion in the auditory pathways or nonauditory factors such as cognitive processing. The relationship between a measure of suprathreshold auditory function-spectrotemporal modulation (STM) sensitivity-and SRTs in noise was examined for 154 HI listeners fitted with individualized frequency-specific gain. SRTs were measured for 65-dB SPL sentences presented in speech-weighted noise or four-talker babble to an individually programmed master hearing aid, with the output of an ear-simulating coupler played through insert earphones. Modulation-depth detection thresholds were measured over headphones for STM (2cycles/octave density, 4-Hz rate) applied to an 85-dB SPL, 2-kHz lowpass-filtered pink-noise carrier. SRTs were correlated with both the high-frequency (2-6 kHz) pure-tone average (HFA; R-2 = .31) and STM sensitivity (R-2 = .28). Combined with the HFA, STM sensitivity significantly improved the SRT prediction (Delta R-2 = .13; total R-2 = .44). The remaining unaccounted variance might be attributable to variability in cognitive function and other dimensions of suprathreshold distortion. STM sensitivity was most critical in predicting SRTs for listenersamp;lt;65 years old or with HFA amp;lt;53 dB HL. Results are discussed in the context of previous work suggesting that STM sensitivity for low rates and low-frequency carriers is impaired by a reduced ability to use temporal fine-structure information to detect dynamic spectra. STM detection is a fast test of suprathreshold auditory function for frequencies amp;lt;2 kHz that complements the HFA to predict variability in hearing-aid outcomes for speech perception in noise.

  • 43.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Kristianstad Univ, Sweden.
    Relationships between physical education (PE) teaching and student self-efficacy, aptitude to participate in PE and functional skills: with a special focus on students with disabilities2018In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 387-401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Students with disability show an increasing incidence of school failure. Quality teaching and appropriate support may foster high self-efficacy, a predictive factor for successful school outcomes. Physical Education (PE) can provide students with a context in which self-efficacy and participation are promoted leading to improved academic achievement. The transition into secondary school can be challenging for many students with increased educational demands, developmental changes and individual social identification coinciding. A disability may add to the challenge of success.Methods: Three groups of students, aged 13 years and enrolled in Swedish mainstream schools were targeted (n=439). Groups included students with 1.A diagnosed disability, 2.Low grades in PE (D-F) and 3.High grades (A-C) in PE. Questionnaires were collected and analyzed from 30/439 students with a diagnosed disability (physical, neuro-developmental and intellectual) from 26 classes, their classmates and their PE-teachers (n=25). Relationships between student self-reports and PE-teachers self-ratings were investigated. Also examined was the potential to which students functional skills could predict elevated general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. Results were compared with the total sample and between the three target groups (n=121).Results: For students with disabilities, better self-rated teaching skills were related to lower student perceived general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. The impact of classroom climate in PE was more obvious among students with disabilities. Perceived functional skills were associated with elevated general school self-efficacy, PE specific self-efficacy and aptitude to participate in PE. Better socio-cognitive functional skills had an overall positive effect on all outcomes. Students with disabilities reported results similar to the total sample, the D-F group scored lower and the A-C group higher than the total sample and the disability group. Elevated self-efficacy in PE is six times less probable in students with disabilities, compared to the A-C group.Conclusions: Our findings that better teacher planning and grading skills, are detrimental to students disadvantaged by disability is contradictive. Improving the establishment and communication of adapted learning standards at the transition to secondary school is a crucial and a predictive factor for promoting positive school experiences for students with disability. Students with disabilities need to be assured that the intended learning outcomes can be reached by doing activities differently than their typically functioning peers. Consideration of class composition is suggested as a means of promoting a positive learning climate, which would particularly benefit students with disabilities. Allocation of resources to support student socio-cognitive skills would improve experiences for the D-F group and likely promote a positive learning environment.

  • 44.
    Besser, Jana
    et al.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands; Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Festen, Joost M.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands; Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Theo Goverts, S.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands; Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands; Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. University of Toronto, Canada; Toronto Rehabil Institute, Canada; Rotman Research Institute, Canada.
    Speech-in-Speech Listening on the LiSN-S Test by Older Adults With Good Audiograms Depends on Cognition and Hearing Acuity at High Frequencies2015In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 24-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The main objective was to investigate age-related differences on the listening in spatialized noise-sentences (LiSN-S) test in adults with normal audiometric thresholds in most of the speech range. A second objective was to examine the contributions of auditory, cognitive, and linguistic abilities to LiSN-S outcomes. Design: The LiSN-S test was administered to participants in an older group (M-Age = 72.0, SD = 4.3 years) and a younger group (M-Age = 21.7, SD = 2.6 years) with N = 26 per group. All the participants had clinically normal audiometric thresholds at frequencies up to and including 3000 Hz. The LiSN-S test yields a speech reception threshold (SRT) in each of the four speech-in-speech listening conditions that differ in the availability of voice difference cues and/or spatial separation cues. Based on these four SRTs, the scores were calculated for the talker advantage, the spatial advantage, and the total advantage as a result of both the types of cues. Additionally, the participants completed four auditory temporal-processing tests, a cognitive screening test, a vocabulary test, and tests of linguistic closure for high-and low-context sentences. The contributions of these predictor variables and measures of pure-tone hearing acuity to LiSN-S outcomes were analyzed for both the groups using regression analyses. Results: Younger listeners outperformed the older listeners on all four LiSN-S SRTs and all the three LiSN-S advantage measures. Age-related differences were larger for conditions involving the use of spatial cues. For the younger group, all LiSN-S SRTs were predicted by the measure of linguistic closure in low-context sentences; in addition, the SRT for the condition with voice difference cues but without spatial separation cues was predicted by vocabulary, and the SRT for the condition with both voice difference cues and spatial separation cues was predicted by temporal resolution at low frequencies. Vocabulary also contributed to the talker advantage in the younger group, whereas the spatial advantage was predicted by high-frequency pure-tone hearing acuity in the range 6,000 to 10,000 Hz (pure-tone average [ PTA] HIGH). For the older group, the LiSN-S SRT in the condition with neither voice difference cues nor spatial separation cues was predicted by age; their other three LiSN-S SRTs and all advantage measures were predicted by PTA HIGH. In addition, for the older group, cognition predicted LiSN-S SRT outcomes in three of the four conditions. Measures of auditory temporal processing, linguistic abilities, or hearing acuity up to and including 4000 Hz did not predict LiSN-S outcomes in this group. Conclusions: LiSN-S outcomes were poorer for adults aged 65 years or older, even those with good audiograms, compared with younger adults and also compared with people up to the age of 60 years from a previous study. In the present study, regardless of the types of cues, auditory and cognitive interactions were reflected by the combined influences on LiSN-S outcomes of high-frequency hearing acuity and measures of linguistic and cognitive processing. The data also suggest a hierarchy in the deployment of processing resources, which would account for the observed shift from linguistic abilities in the younger group to general cognitive abilities in the older group.

  • 45.
    Besser, Jana
    et al.
    VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Koelewijn, Thomas
    VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Festen, Joost M.
    VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    How Linguistic Closure and Verbal Working Memory Relate to Speech Recognition in Noise-A Review2013In: Trends in Amplification, ISSN 1084-7138, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 75-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to recognize masked speech, commonly measured with a speech reception threshold (SRT) test, is associated with cognitive processing abilities. Two cognitive factors frequently assessed in speech recognition research are the capacity of working memory (WM), measured by means of a reading span (Rspan) or listening span (Lspan) test, and the ability to read masked text (linguistic closure), measured by the text reception threshold (TRT). The current article provides a review of recent hearing research that examined the relationship of TRT and WM span to SRTs in various maskers. Furthermore, modality differences in WM capacity assessed with the Rspan compared to the Lspan test were examined and related to speech recognition abilities in an experimental study with young adults with normal hearing (NH). Span scores were strongly associated with each other, but were higher in the auditory modality. The results of the reviewed studies suggest that TRT and WM span are related to each other, but differ in their relationships with SRT performance. In NH adults of middle age or older, both TRT and Rspan were associated with SRTs in speech maskers, whereas TRT better predicted speech recognition in fluctuating nonspeech maskers. The associations with SRTs in steady-state noise were inconclusive for both measures. WM span was positively related to benefit from contextual information in speech recognition, but better TRTs related to less interference from unrelated cues. Data for individuals with impaired hearing are limited, but larger WM span seems to give a general advantage in various listening situations.

  • 46.
    Besser, Jana
    et al.
    VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands .
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands .
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands .
    New measures of masked text recognition in relation to speech-in-noise perception and their associations with age and cognitive abilities2012In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 194-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This research aimed to increase the analogy between text reception threshold (TRT) and speech reception threshold (SRT) and to examine the TRT's value in estimating cognitive abilities important for speech comprehension in noise.

    Method: We administered five TRT versions, SRT tests in stationary (SRTSTAT) and modulated (SRTMOD) noise, and two cognitive tests: a reading span (RSpan) test for working memory capacity, and a letter-digit-substitution test for information processing speed. Fifty-five normal hearing adults (18–78 years, mean = 44) participated. We examined mutual associations of the tests and their predictive value for the SRTs with correlation and linear regression analyses.

    Results: SRTs and TRTs were well associated, also when controlling for age. Correlations for the SRTSTAT were generally lower than for the SRTMOD. The cognitive tests were only correlated to the SRTs when age was not controlled for. Age and the TRTs were the only significant predictors of SRTMOD. SRTSTATwas predicted by level of education and some of the TRT versions.

    Conclusions: TRTs and SRTs are robustly associated, nearly independent of age. The association between SRTs and RSpan is largely age-dependent. The TRT test and the RSpan test measure different non-auditory components of linguistic processing relevant for speech perception in noise.

  • 47.
    Besser, Jana
    et al.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre.
    Recognition of masked text and speech in noise in association with age and cognitive abilities2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Besser, Jana
    et al.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    The Test Reception Threshold test revisited - strengthening associations with SRT and working memory2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Besser, Jana
    et al.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    The Text Reception Threshold as a Measure for the Non-Auditory Components of Speech Understanding in Noise2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Besser, Jana
    et al.
    (ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    (ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    The Text Reception Threshold (TRT) as a measure of the non-auditory component of speech comprehension in noise2010Conference paper (Other academic)
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