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  • 1.
    Aalberg, Toril
    et al.
    Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Norge.
    Strömbäck, Jesper
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    de Vreese, Claes H.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    The framing of politics as strategy and game: A review of concepts, operationalizations and key findings2012In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 162-178Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key concept in research on the media coverage of politics is the game or strategy frame. Contrasted with coverage of politics as issues, theframing of politics as a strategic game is marked by features such as winning and losing as the central concern and a focus on how candidates or parties are doing in opinion polls. The pervasiveness of such framing is, however, disputed since (1) the way in which the frames are conceptualized and operationalized differs significantly; and (2) while some use terms such as 'game frame' and 'strategy frame' as synonymous, others argue that there is a conceptual difference between them. Against this background, this article reviews research on the media's framing ofpolitics as a strategic game, what concepts have been used, and how they have been operationalized; and suggests a synthesis and ways of improving conceptual clarity and comparability in research on the media's use of strategy and/or game frames. © SAGE Publications 2011.

  • 2.
    Allern, Sigurd
    et al.
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Pollack, Ester
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Journalism as a public good: A Scandinavian perspective2017In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The democratic importance of journalism is related to public good aspects of media products, as well as news media’s positive externalities. Journalism of high quality helps ensure we are all better informed and thus benefits democracy. Lack of investigative journalism may incur large social costs. However, journalism as a public good is difficult to fund on a commercial basis. Historically, an economic solution for media companies has been advertising subsidies, plus different types of public and private support. Today, the long-time marriage between news organisations and advertisers is severely weakened, and nothing so far suggests that digital revenues alone can finance a varied, broad and original news production. In the eyes of capitalist investors, news organisations represent the past, not the future. This article discusses, on the basis of Scandinavian media experiences and recent policy reforms, the necessity of a media policy and a funding system that acknowledges quality journalism as societal knowledge production and a public good.

  • 3.
    Andén-Papadopoulos, Kari
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Pantti, Mervi
    Re-imagining crisis reporting: Professional ideology of journalists and citizen eyewitness images2013In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 960-977Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study, based on interviews with journalists representing major news organizations in Finland and Sweden, explores how the professional ideology of journalists is shaped by the international trend of citizen witnessing. Citizen-created photographs and videos that have become a routine feature of mainstream news coverage are approached as a potential force of change that transforms professional imaginaries of journalism vis-a-vis crisis events. From journalists' lines of thought three interpretative repertoires were identified: resistance, resignation and renewal. Our results hint at a rethinking of the professional norms and roles of journalists.

  • 4.
    Barkho, Leon
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies. Qatar University, Qatar.
    Editorial policies and news discourse – how Al Jazeera’s implicit guidelines shape its coverage of middle east conflicts2019In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines Al Jazeera’s internal guidelines. It focuses attention on the broadcaster’s editorial policies and practices, how they are created, the way they shape news content, and whether they are documented or not. It attempts to shed light on the role of external stakeholders and regulatory devices with a say on the editorial line and subsequently the type of internal editorial policies and practices journalists are required to pursue. It presents a comparative study and analysis of the network’s two major and most influential channels, namely Al Jazeera Arabic and Al Jazeera English, the arguments in support of their editorial policies and practices, and the arguments opposing them. It scrutinizes how different forms of internal guidelines and regulatory frameworks affect the network’s discourse, ties with its financiers, and relations with the outside world. Finally and based on the findings obtained through interviews, and linguistic discourse analysis, the article outlines how internal guidelines come into being in the case of Al Jazeera and how they eventually influence the final product. 

  • 5.
    Becker, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Gestures of Seeing: Amateur photographers in the news2015In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 451-469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the amateur photographer as a common figure in contemporary news photographs, focusing on how the amateur’s gestures signify in journalism’s coverage of media events. Drawing on theories of photography as performance and ritual, I argue that the presence of the non-professional in the news photograph destabilizes journalistic discourse by challenging the role of the professional photographer and by redefining the event and its meanings. This is especially critical in coverage of catastrophic events, when the amateur’s gestures become a form of witnessing from a participant’s perspective, carrying both private and collective meanings for how the event will be understood in the future, and undermining the authority of journalism.

  • 6.
    Camauër, Leonor
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Media menus of Arabic speakers: Stockholm2010In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 751-754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines preliminary results of a focus group study where Arabic speakers living in Stockholm discuss matters of citizenship and belonging in relation to their use of Arabic- and Swedish-language television. The study relies on theories on diasporic groups' media use. The paper concludes that belonging to the country of origin appears as more clearly and strongly felt than belonging to the pan-Arabic community, and that participants' sense of belonging does not relate in any direct way to their media choices.

  • 7.
    Carlsson, Eric
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Technologies of participation: community news and social media in northern Sweden2016In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 1113-1128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how different meanings of 'participation' are developed in the intersection between local journalism and social media. The study is based on qualitative interviews with media professionals working in community media organisations in northern Sweden. Three key themes are identified: participation as marketisation, participation and production, and participation and democracy. This article discusses how these three different forms of participation contribute to the constitution of journalistic identities in a local context and to its meanings within the media sphere in general. This article argues that the emergence of new digital media has not so much renewed the role of the media professional as it has led to a cementing of their professional identity. Social media are a necessity for the development of journalism and are celebrated for their potential to include audiences; yet journalists paradoxically seem to consider these same technologies of participation as a threat, not only to journalism but also to democracy.

  • 8.
    Carpentier, Nico
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel.
    Identity, Contingency and Rigidity. The (counter-)hegemonic constructions of the identity of the media professional2005In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 199-219Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Carpentier, Nico
    et al.
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel.
    Trioen, Marit
    The particularity of objectivity. A post-structuralist and psycho-analytical reading of the gap between objectivity-as-value and objectivity-as-practice in the 2003 Iraqi war coverage2010In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 311-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    /

  • 10.
    Dimitrova, Daniela V.
    et al.
    Iowa State University, Ames, USA.
    Strömbäck, Jesper
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Election News in Sweden and the United States: A Comparison of Sources and Media Frames2012In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 604-619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compares election news coverage in two different countries-Sweden and the United States, focusing on the use of the strategic game frame and the conflict frame and the association between these two frames and different types of news sources. The content analysis includes early evening newscasts from CBS Evening News, NBC Nightly News and ABC World News in the USA and Rapport, Aktuellt and TV4 Nyheterna inSweden. The findings show that the strategic game frame is used more frequently in the US coverage and is correlated with the use of media analysts and campaign operatives in both countries. Ordinary citizens as sources contribute to issue framing while domestic political actors tend to be associated with conflict framing. Differences in media framing between public and private media are also identified and discussed in the context of national political and media systems. © 2011 The Author(s).

  • 11.
    Doudaki, Vaia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media. Cyprus University of Technology, Cyprus.
    Boubouka, Angeliki
    Tzalavras, Christos
    Framing the Cypriot economic crisis: In the service of the neoliberal vision2016In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 349-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the framing of the bailout-related news in Cyprus, adopting a critical analytical perspective. The examination of the actors’ associations with the main framing components (actors, causes, solutions and effects), as presented in the Cypriot elite press, revealed the dependency, the (non)liability and the economistic frame. These frames reproduce the hegemonic neoliberal discourse over the crisis, while disconnecting the responsibility for the crisis from the agents involved, protecting, thus, the legitimacy of their actions and of their authority. The media studied advocate the implementation of neoliberal policies (expressed in harsh austerity and protection of the banking system), legitimating them as the optimal model not only of the economy, but also of politics and social practice.

  • 12. Doudaki, Vaia
    et al.
    Spyridou, Lia-Paschalia
    News content online: patterns and norms under convergence dynamics2015In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 257-277Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Ekström, Mats
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Moberg, Ulla
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    'Welcome to participate': host activities and caller's position in Swedish election campaign phone-ins in the 1970s and the 2000s2014In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 654-671Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a study of Swedish election campaign phone-ins from 1970 and from the last decade (2002–2010), with a focus on how different organizations of the interaction, and the activities of the journalist/host, influence the position and power of the caller. Based on Conversation Analysis, two distinct parts of the conversations are explored: the openings of the call and the third turns following a politician’s answer to a caller’s question. The study shows that the power of the caller has decreased in recent election campaigns and this is related to changes in the mediation work by the host. Although the idea of the programs is to support citizen participation, the journalist activities tend to make it hard for the caller to establish a direct dialogue with the politician. The study contributes to previous research on callers’ positions in phone-ins, as well as the general debate about the journalistic efforts to involve citizens in various forms of broadcast communication.

  • 14.
    Enghel, Florencia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Who’s reporting Africa now?: Non-governmental organizations, journalists, and multimedia2019In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 20, no 3, SI, p. 484-486Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Adversarial moments: a study of short-form interviews in the news2011In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 51-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through an analysis of news journalism in Sweden, the development of a more adversarial, critical or interpretive news journalism is discussed in this article. A frequent form of politicians’ appearances in the news is in short-form interviews in news stories. Such interviews are often reduced to single turns or answers. The aim of this study is to identify the more communicative techniques used, when politicians’ answers are cut and incorporated into news stories, and how these techniques are related to the roles set up for politicians and reporters. What potential relationships are set up between politicians, reporters and the viewers? Swedish television data from 1978, 1993 and 2003 have been analysed. The analysis shows that in the early period, news journalism appears as a mediator or interrogator. In the latter periods, news journalism appears in an adversarial role. It becomes more of an interpreter or a critical interrogator of politician’s actions.

  • 16.
    Esser, Frank
    et al.
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Strömbäck, Jesper
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    de Vreese, Claes H.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Reviewing key concepts in research on political news journalism: Conceptualizations, operationalizations, and propositions for future research2012In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 139-143Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    The immediacy of online news, the visibility of journalistic processes and a restructuring of journalistic authority2011In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 279-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transparency has been emphasized as a new norm within journalism and has received a great deal of attention. The credo of transparency is openness, and the interactive potential of digital media has been identified as one key element in achieving openness. In this essay it is argued that by exposing previously hidden journalistic processes, the high speed of online news plays a part in this orientation towards transparency in journalism.

  • 18.
    Karlsson, Michael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Clerwall, Christer
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Nord, L.
    Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    The public doesn’t miss the public. Views from the people: Why news by the people?2018In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 577-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the main debates within journalism research during the last decade has been the role of citizens as contributors or, conversely, as threats to the practice of journalism. While participation has been explored from many different theoretical, empirical, and methodological perspectives, one perspective remains noticeably underexplored – the perspective of the citizens themselves. Using social contract theory as a backdrop, this study draws on a representative survey (N = 2091) and focus groups (N = 82) in Sweden. The results show that although citizens do not bring up participation as an important element of journalism, they become more skeptical the more participation affects journalism. Furthermore, they expect journalists to moderate citizen contributions according to established journalistic standards. From the perspective of social contract theory, participation in journalism appears to be more of a problem than a benefit to citizens.

  • 19.
    Karlsson, Michael
    et al.
    Karlstad universitet.
    Clerwall, Christer
    Karlstad universitet.
    Nord, Lars
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    The public doesn't miss the public: Views from the people: Why news by the people?2018In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 577-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the main debates within journalism research during the last decade has been the role of citizens as contributors or, conversely, as threats to the practice of journalism. While participation has been explored from many different theoretical, empirical, and methodological perspectives, one perspective remains noticeably underexplored – the perspective of the citizens themselves. Using social contract theory as a backdrop, this study draws on a representative survey (N = 2091) and focus groups (N = 82) in Sweden. The results show that although citizens do not bring up participation as an important element of journalism, they become more skeptical the more participation affects journalism. Furthermore, they expect journalists to moderate citizen contributions according to established journalistic standards. From the perspective of social contract theory, participation in journalism appears to be more of a problem than a benefit to citizens.

  • 20.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The before and after of a political interview on TV: Observations of off-camera interactions between journalists and politicians2010In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 167-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the organization of off-camera interactions between journalists and politicians. What kinds of talk transpire between the participants before and after the broadcast interview? What functions do the before and after interview interaction seem to have? What social norms and conventions seem to influence the character of the pre-interview and post-interview discourse? How are their respective professional roles negotiated in these settings? The framing of the interview as an object of study in its production context aims to contribute to existing research on the news interview, specifically within Conversation Analysis (e.g. Clayman and Heritage 2002), which has not studied processes of production, but has mostly restricted itself to analyses of that which is broadcast to the audience.

  • 21.
    Ljungberg, Emilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Travel journalism: Exploring production, impact and culture2016In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 798-800Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Malmelin, Nando
    et al.
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Virta, Sari
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). University of Tampere, Finland.
    Seizing the serendipitous moments: Coincidental creative processes in media work2017In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the phenomenon of serendipity in media work and in media organizations. Based on an empirical analysis of diary material, we identify and elaborate three types of serendipitous processes in creative work, that is, serendipitous, semi-serendipitous and antiserendipitous processes. In addition, we discuss the role of lucky incidents and human capabilities in serendipity, and consider their value to creative processes in media organizations. We argue that conceptual frameworks and theories of serendipity are useful in identifying, evaluating and harnessing unpredicted and accidental creative incidents and processes. The article shows that serendipity offers valuable conceptualizations and insights for scholars and practitioners alike in the context of the rapidly changing media industry and media work.

  • 23.
    Merrill, Samuel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Walking together?: The mediatised performative commemoration of 7/7’s tenth anniversary.2017In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the #WalkTogether initiative which commemorated the 10th anniversary of the 7 July 2005 London bombings by encouraging people to individually re-enact and share on social media the moment when following the bombings, in the absence of a functioning public transport network, Londoners walked to and from work together. It asks what forms of togetherness did the initiative promote and what was the role of professional journalists and news organisations in facilitating this togetherness? To answer these questions, the article conceives of togetherness as hybrid and unfolding within broader media and memory ecologies. This encourages the use of innovative combinations of methods and the introduction of the concepts of ‘mediatised performative commemoration’ and ‘digital gestural remains’. In turn, this allows a number of specific enquiries into the characteristics of #WalkTogether’s commemoration, communities, remembrance and reporting a decade after 7/7 took place and a discussion of the extent to which the initiative resulted in forms of clicktivism and commemorative silos.

  • 24.
    Nilsson, Maria
    University of Iowa.
    Against the Grain: Photojournalism in Transition-era Spain2004In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 440-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the fascist dictatorship (1939-75) in Spain, photojournalism was circumscribed by censorship, as were all other aspects of media and culture. In the early 1970s, however, in tandem with a growing opposition movement, pro-democracy journalists and periodicals sought to push the boundaries of censorship by giving voice and visibility to critics of the government. In this context, photography became a tool for denouncing and critiquing the regime. This article traces this shift by examining photographs of a pro-democracy demonstration held in Barcelona in February of 1976, three months after the death of dictator Francisco Franco. Drawing on personal interviews with photojournalists and analysis of photographs and publication context, the author analyzes photographic practices and the relationship between politics and aesthetics in photographs, and concludes that the examined photographs and practices during a period of censorship in Spain were effective tools for advocacy.

  • 25.
    Nord, Lars
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Strömbäck, Jesper
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Reporting More, Informing Less.: A Comparison of the Swedish media coverage of September 11 and the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq2006In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 85-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to examine and compare how leading Swedish news media in television and the press covered and described the terrorist attacks in the USA on September 11 in 2001, the US attacks on Afghanistan later in 2001 and the war in Iraq in 2003. The article examines factors influencing news decisions and media ability to maintain fair news reporting. The study looks specifically at the sources that are used, the occurrence of speculations and whether the coverage was anti-American or anti-Muslim. The central questions are: what were the most frequently used sources?, how frequent were different types of speculation?, and how frequent were anti-American and anti-Muslim rhetorical figures respectively?

  • 26.
    Nord, Lars W
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Investigative Journalism in Sweden: A not so noticeable noble art2007In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 517-521Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Olsson, Eva-Karin
    Swedish National Defence College, Department of Security and Strategic Studies (ISS), CRISMART (National Center for Crisis Management Research and Training).
    Rule regimes in news organization decision making: explaining diversity in the actions of news organizations during extraordinary events2009In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 758--776Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Olsson, Eva-Karin
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College, Sweden.
    Nord, Lars
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Paving The Way for Crisis Exploitation: The Role of Journalistic Styles and Standards2015In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 341-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crises tend to be crucial political events with the ability to determine the public's faith in political actors. If well managed, crises provide windows of opportunities for political actors to show action, strengthening credibility and pushing through new policies. This article explores one such instance of successful crisis exploitation: the Swedish government's management of the financial crisis in 2008. During the worst turbulence, the government was able to successfully frame the event, without being challenged by contrasting frames, as a crisis managed with great competence and in the best interest of ordinary citizens. We explain this phenomenon through journalistic styles and standards. The article concludes by discussing the findings where we propose that issue framing, in combination with descriptive journalism, contributes to portraying political actors as credible crisis managers rather than tactical politicians, with the result being that they appear more trustworthy and competent. Moreover, due to unbalanced coverage, actors who are framed as competent crisis managers succeed in further strengthening their positions.

  • 29.
    Olsson, Eva-Karin
    et al.
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), CRISMART (National Center for Crisis Management Research and Training).
    Nord, Lars
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Paving the way for crisis exploitation: the role of journalistic styles and standards2015In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 341-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crises tend to be crucial political events with the ability to determine the public’s faith in political actors. If well managed, crises provide windows of opportunities for political actors to show action, strengthening credibility and pushing through new policies. This article explores one such instance of successful crisis exploitation: the Swedish government’s management of the financial crisis in 2008. During the worst turbulence, the government was able to successfully frame the event, without being challenged by contrasting frames, as a crisis managed with great competence and in the best interest of ordinary citizens. We explain this phenomenon through journalistic styles and standards. The article concludes by discussing the findings where we propose that issue framing, in combination with descriptive journalism, contributes to portraying political actors as credible crisis managers rather than tactical politicians, with the result being that they appear more trustworthy and competent. Moreover, due to unbalanced coverage, actors who are framed as competent crisis managers succeed in further strengthening their positions.

  • 30.
    Price Schultz, Cindy J.
    et al.
    University of Wyoming.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Discouraging stereotypes? US newspaper coverage of ethnic minority entrepreneurs before the economic downturn2013In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 14, no 8, p. 1059-1075Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While research shows that ethnic minority entrepreneurs make a relevant contribution to economies, academic studies often convey a rather negative image of their entrepreneurship as necessity- rather than opportunity-driven, and with little innovation. This study examined the US newspaper coverage of these entrepreneurs during the five years before the economic downturn. It found that only one-tenth of the articles were negative, while two-thirds were positive. Two-thirds of the articles mentioned assistance programs that could help entrepreneurs. The vast majority of the articles presented positive frames of minority entrepreneurs and their contributions. This study found that newspapers can be important sources for ethnic minority individuals interested in becoming entrepreneurs and provide information useful in formulating public policy.

  • 31.
    Salgado, Susana
    et al.
    New University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    Strömbäck, Jesper
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Interpretive journalism: A review of concepts, operationalizations and key findings2012In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 144-161Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall purpose of this article is to review theory and research on interpretive journalism, one of the key concepts in research on the style and character of news journalism. While it is often claimed that news journalism over recent decades has changed from being predominantly descriptive to becoming increasingly interpretive, our review suggests that there is a lack of systematic research in this area. The literature is furthermore characterized by different conceptualizations and operationalizations of interpretive journalism, as well as by different normative assumptions. Taken together, this suggests not only insufficient conceptual clarity, but also problems related to the comparability and cumulativity of findings. To remedy this, and based on our review of how interpretive journalism has been conceptualized and operationalized, this article suggests how interpretive journalism should be conceptualized and operationalized in order to increase conceptual clarity, comparability across studies, and ultimately research cumulativity. © SAGE Publications 2011.

  • 32.
    Tjernström, Vanni
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Nordic Newspapers on the EU. European Political Communication after Non and Nee2008In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 516-536Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Widholm, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Roosvall, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Abundance or crisis? Transformations in the media ecology of Swedish cultural journalism over four decades2019In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to map and scrutinize developments within Swedish cultural journalism, with a particular focus on transformations in genres, text types and thematic repertoires. Drawing on a constructed week sample from press, television and radio during four decades (1985, 1995, 2005, 2015), we address three aspects of 'the crisis discourse' of cultural journalism: (1) the potential decline in cultural coverage due to economic cutbacks and downsized cultural desks; (2) cultural journalism's perceived 'quality crisis' connected to transformations of thematic repertoires; and (3) the alleged decline of cultural expertise related to changes in cultural journalism's generic structures. The study makes a unique contribution to cultural journalism scholarship by identifying media-specific differences and complementary relationships between media forms, building on media ecology and genre theory. In contrast to the crisis discourse, results show that cultural journalism has expanded significantly through popularization and thematic and generic diversification, but the transformations are different in press, radio and television due to differing role positions in the larger media ecosystem. In addition, some parts of the cultural journalism media ecology appear to be endangered.

  • 34.
    Ödmark, Sara
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Making news funny: Differences in news framing between journalists and comedians2018In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Classic agenda setting and news framing research focuses on traditional media actors: journalists, political figures, professional communicators. However, the personalization of politics and journalism, as well as the rise of social media, is creating new spaces for other actors, like comedians. In the separation of vertical media (media which are still aiming for a wide audience with content of general relevance) and horizontal media (more specific media actors building a community around the content they produce), comedians can be considered actors in horizontal media, who help provide the community agenda. This study compares how comedians in horizontal media frame news and current affairs with how journalists in vertical media frame similar news. The study is performed via a quantitative content analysis of Swedish political comedy and traditional Swedish news coverage, with a focus on the emerging podcast medium. It shows that the comedic framing is dramatically more personal and emotional. It is also more thematic and more often on a societal level, while the journalistic news framing is more episodic and on an individual level. The comedic framing is also more focused on issues of political figures and processes, more negative, and more inclusive of different types of societal actors when compared to the news reporting of vertical media.

  • 35.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Journalism cannot solve journalism's problems2019In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 226-228Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Technology and journalism-as-labour: historical perspectives2010In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 57-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technological determinism is common among journalists when reflecting on changes in their profession; several studies show that journalists ascribe great power and independent agency to technology. There are at least two reasons for the persistence of technological determinism as an explanatory factor among journalists vis-a-vis their own work: first, technology is a highly integrated and therefore very tangible part of the everyday working life of journalists; and second, the technological paradigm for explaining change in journalism has deep historical roots. It is argued that analysing journalism as labour presents a way to address both the integration of technology in the everyday working practices of journalists, and the history of the inter-relations between journalism and technology. It is further argued that journalism studies as a field has not paid much attention to journalism as labour. This article is concerned with the second part of this programme for research, i.e. the historical analysis of journalism as labour. The framework of analysis is based on labour process theory, focusing on four themes in the history of journalism: (1) the importance of the separation of conception and execution of labour; (2) the increased differentiation of the labour process; (3) the use of technology to increase productivity; and (4) the deskilling of labour.

  • 37.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Mellado, Claudia
    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile.
    Valued skills among journalists: An exploratory comparison of six European nations2016In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cross-national comparative studies of journalists generally focus on the demographic characteristics and/or the values and role-perception of journalists. Systematic studies of journalistic skills have been rare, however. This article reports the findings from a comparative study of journalists from Britain, Estonia, Germany, Italy, Poland, and Sweden. Based on an email survey of 2238 news professionals, journalistic skills can be grouped into three distinctive dimensions: reporting, editing, and networking skills.

    The data also show a number of similarities, but also important differences regarding the importance journalists give to different professional skills in different European countries.

1 - 37 of 37
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