Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Hua, Wenjing
    et al.
    McMaster Univ, Dept Biol, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada.
    Vogan, Aaron A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. McMaster Univ, Dept Biol, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada.
    Xu, Jianping
    McMaster Univ, Dept Biol, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada.
    Genotypic and Phenotypic Analyses of Two "Isogenic" Strains of the Human Fungal Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans2019In: Mycopathologia, ISSN 0301-486X, E-ISSN 1573-0832, Vol. 184, no 2, p. 195-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Cryptococcus neoformans species complex is a model organism for fungal studies. Many studies have used two strains, JEC20 and JEC21, and their derivatives. These two strains were obtained through 10 rounds of backcrosses and have been assumed near identical except at the mating-type locus. Here we obtained and compared the JEC20 genome sequence with the published JEC21 genome. Our comparison revealed 5322 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with the majority (N=3816, 71.7%) located in three genomic regions, including the previously noted mating-type region. The remaining 1506 SNPs (28.3%) were distributed throughout all 14 chromosomes, predominantly at chromosomal ends. To study the potential effects of these three SNP-rich regions on phenotypes, 24 progenies from the JEC20xJEC21 cross representing eight recombinant genotypes were analyzed for their mating ability, melanin production, capsule formation, and growths at 30 degrees C and 40 degrees C. Significant phenotypic variations were found among the progeny. However, the observed phenotypic variations could not be explained by the three SNP-rich regions. Further genome sequencing of our JEC21 and the 24 progenies revealed only six segregating SNPs outside of the three SNP-rich regions between JEC20 and JEC21, a result indicating that the 1500 SNPs identified in the published JEC21 genome might be caused by sequencing errors and/or strain mixing. However, the six SNPs and the three SNP-rich regions could not explain the observed phenotypic variations. Our analyses suggest that spontaneous mutations accumulated under laboratory conditions could have significant effects on phenotypes and on our interpretations of experimental results.

  • 2.
    Kofteridis, Diamantis P.
    et al.
    Univ Hosp Heraklion, Dept Internal Med, Infect Dis Unit, Iraklion 71110, Greece..
    Valachis, Antonis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Malarsjukhuset, Dept Oncol, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Dimopoulou, Dimitra
    Univ Hosp Heraklion, Dept Internal Med, Infect Dis Unit, Iraklion 71110, Greece..
    Andrianaki, Angeliki M.
    Univ Hosp Heraklion, Dept Internal Med, Infect Dis Unit, Iraklion 71110, Greece..
    Christidou, Athanasia
    Univ Hosp Heraklion, Clin Microbiol, Iraklion 71110, Crete, Greece..
    Maraki, Sofia
    Univ Hosp Heraklion, Clin Microbiol, Iraklion 71110, Crete, Greece..
    Spernovasilis, Nikolaos A.
    Univ Hosp Heraklion, Dept Internal Med, Infect Dis Unit, Iraklion 71110, Greece..
    Samonis, George
    Univ Hosp Heraklion, Dept Internal Med, Infect Dis Unit, Iraklion 71110, Greece..
    Factors Influencing Non-albicans Candidemia: A Case-Case-Control Study2017In: Mycopathologia, ISSN 0301-486X, E-ISSN 1573-0832, Vol. 182, no 7-8, p. 665-672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study identified factors predisposing to non-albicans candidemia with special interest to prior antimicrobial treatment. A retrospective, case-case-control study was performed at the University Hospital of Heraklion, Greece, from November 2007 through September 2011 including adult patients. The study had three groups. The first included 58 patients with non-albicans candidemia, the second 48 with C. albicans candidemia, while the third (control) 104 without candidemia. Each of the two candidemia groups was compared with the control using multivariate logistic regression model. The mean (SD) age of the non-albicans, the albicans and the control patients was 67 (12), 67 (18) and 59 (19) years, respectively. The most common non-albicans Candida spp. isolated were C. parapsilosis in 19 patients (33%), C. glabrata in 17 (29%) and C. tropicalis in 15 (26%). Independent risk factors for non-albicans candidemia were prior treatment with quinolones (p < 0.001), b-lactam-b-lactamase inhibitors (p = 0.011) and presence of central venous catheter (p = 0.05), while for C. albicans candidemia were prior treatment with quinolones (p < 0.001), carbapenems (p = 0.003) along with cardiac disease (p < 0.001). Neither duration of hospitalization nor in-hospital mortality [41% for the non-albicans vs 29% for C. albicans group (p = 0.192)] was significantly different between the two candidemia groups. The study reveals the role of antimicrobial exposure as a risk factor for candidemia caused by different species. Prior treatment with b-lactam-b-lactamase inhibitors was associated with non-albicans, while with carbapenems with C. albicans candidemia. Prior use of quinolones was associated with candidemia in general.

  • 3.
    Kofteridis, Diamantis P.
    et al.
    Infectious Disease Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Heraklion, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.
    Valachis, Antonis
    Department of Oncology, Mälarsjukhuset, Eskilstuna, Sweden; University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Dimopoulou, Dimitra
    Infectious Disease Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Heraklion, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.
    Andrianaki, Angeliki M.
    Infectious Disease Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Heraklion, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.
    Christidou, Athanasia
    Clinical Microbiology, University Hospital of Heraklion, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.
    Maraki, Sofia
    Clinical Microbiology, University Hospital of Heraklion, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.
    Spernovasilis, Nikolaos A.
    Infectious Disease Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Heraklion, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.
    Samonis, George
    Infectious Disease Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Heraklion, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.
    Factors Influencing Non-albicans Candidemia: A Case-Case-Control Study2017In: Mycopathologia, ISSN 0301-486X, E-ISSN 1573-0832, Vol. 182, no 7-8, p. 665-672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study identified factors predisposing to non-albicans candidemia with special interest to prior antimicrobial treatment. A retrospective, case-case-control study was performed at the University Hospital of Heraklion, Greece, from November 2007 through September 2011 including adult patients. The study had three groups. The first included 58 patients with non-albicans candidemia, the second 48 with C. albicans candidemia, while the third (control) 104 without candidemia. Each of the two candidemia groups was compared with the control using multivariate logistic regression model. The mean (SD) age of the non-albicans, the albicans and the control patients was 67 (12), 67 (18) and 59 (19) years, respectively. The most common non-albicans Candida spp. isolated were C. parapsilosis in 19 patients (33%), C. glabrata in 17 (29%) and C. tropicalis in 15 (26%). Independent risk factors for non-albicans candidemia were prior treatment with quinolones (p < 0.001), b-lactam-b-lactamase inhibitors (p = 0.011) and presence of central venous catheter (p = 0.05), while for C. albicans candidemia were prior treatment with quinolones (p < 0.001), carbapenems (p = 0.003) along with cardiac disease (p < 0.001). Neither duration of hospitalization nor in-hospital mortality [41% for the non-albicans vs 29% for C. albicans group (p = 0.192)] was significantly different between the two candidemia groups. The study reveals the role of antimicrobial exposure as a risk factor for candidemia caused by different species. Prior treatment with b-lactam-b-lactamase inhibitors was associated with non-albicans, while with carbapenems with C. albicans candidemia. Prior use of quinolones was associated with candidemia in general.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf