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  • 1.
    Ahlstrand, I.
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center. School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Pain and activity limitations in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared to 10 years ago: the Swedish TIRA project2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 259-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To study differences regarding pain and activity limitations during the 3 years following diagnosis in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared with their counterparts who were diagnosed 10 years earlier. Method: This study was based on patients recruited to the Early Intervention in RA (TIRA) project. In the first cohort (TIRA-1) 320 patients were included in time for diagnosis during 1996-1998 and 463 patients were included in the second cohort (TIRA-2) during 2006-2009. Disease activity, pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS), bodily pain (BP) in the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), activity limitations (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ), and medication were reported at inclusion and at follow-up after 1, 2, and 3 years. Results: Disease activity, pain, and activity limitations were pronounced at inclusion across both genders and in both cohorts, with some improvement observed during the first year after diagnosis. Disease activity did not differ between cohorts at inclusion but was significantly lower at the follow-ups in the TIRA-2 cohort, in which the patients were prescribed traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and biological agents more frequently. In TIRA-2, patients reported significantly lower pain and activity limitations at all follow-ups, with men reporting lower pain than women. Women reported significantly higher activity limitations at all time points in TIRA-2. Conclusions: Pain and activity limitations were still pronounced in the contemporary treated early RA cohort compared with their counterparts diagnosed 10 years earlier and both of these factors need to be addressed in clinical settings.

  • 2.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Dahlström, Ö
    Linköping University.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Pain and activity limitations in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared to 10 years ago: the Swedish TIRA project2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 259-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To study differences regarding pain and activity limitations during the 3 years following diagnosis in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared with their counterparts who were diagnosed 10 years earlier.

    METHOD: This study was based on patients recruited to the Early Intervention in RA (TIRA) project. In the first cohort (TIRA-1) 320 patients were included in time for diagnosis during 1996-1998 and 463 patients were included in the second cohort (TIRA-2) during 2006-2009. Disease activity, pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS), bodily pain (BP) in the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), activity limitations (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ), and medication were reported at inclusion and at follow-up after 1, 2, and 3 years.

    RESULTS: Disease activity, pain, and activity limitations were pronounced at inclusion across both genders and in both cohorts, with some improvement observed during the first year after diagnosis. Disease activity did not differ between cohorts at inclusion but was significantly lower at the follow-ups in the TIRA-2 cohort, in which the patients were prescribed traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and biological agents more frequently. In TIRA-2, patients reported significantly lower pain and activity limitations at all follow-ups, with men reporting lower pain than women. Women reported significantly higher activity limitations at all time points in TIRA-2.

    CONCLUSIONS: Pain and activity limitations were still pronounced in the contemporary treated early RA cohort compared with their counterparts diagnosed 10 years earlier and both of these factors need to be addressed in clinical settings.

  • 3.
    Alberdi-Saugstrup, M.
    et al.
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine; Naestved Hospital, Department of Paediatrics; Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Institute for Inflammation Research.
    Enevold, C.
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Institute for Inflammation Research.
    Zak, M.
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.
    Nielsen, S.
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.
    Nordal, E.
    University Hospital of North Norway, Department of Paediatrics.
    Berntson, Lillemor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Fasth, A.
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Paediatrics.
    Rygg, M.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children’s and Women’s Health.
    Müller, K.
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine; Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Institute for Inflammation Research.
    Non-HLA gene polymorphisms in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: associations with disease outcome2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 369-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that non-HLA single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are risk factors for an unfavourable disease outcome at long-term follow-up.

    Methods: The Nordic JIA cohort is a prospective multicentre study cohort of patients from the Nordic countries. In all, 193 patients met the inclusion criteria of having an 8year follow-up assessment and available DNA sample. Seventeen SNPs met the inclusion criteria of having significant associations with JIA in at least two previous independent study cohorts. Clinical endpoints were disease remission, actively inflamed joints and joints with limitation of motion (LOM), articular or extra-articular damage, and history of uveitis.

    Results: Evidence of associations between genotypes and endpoints were found for STAT4, ADAD1-IL2-IL21, PTPN2, and VTCN1 (p=0.003-0.05). STAT4_rs7574865 TT was associated with the presence of actively inflamed joints [odds ratio (OR) 20.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.2->100, p=0.003] and extra-articular damage (OR 7.9, 95% CI 1-56.6, p=0.057). ADAD1_rs17388568 AA was associated with a lower risk of having joints with LOM (OR 0.1, 95% CI 0-0.55, p=0.016). PTPN2_rs1893217 CC was associated with a lower risk of having joints with LOM (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0-0.99, p=0.026), while VTCN1_rs2358820 GA was associated with uveitis (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1-12.1, p=0.029).

    Conclusion: This exploratory study, using a prospectively followed JIA cohort, found significant associations between long-term outcome and SNPs, all previously associated with development of JIA and involved in immune regulation and signal transduction in immune cells.

  • 4. Almehed, K
    et al.
    Carlsten, H
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Health-related quality of life in systemic lupus erythematosus and its association with disease and work disability.2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 39, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its relationship to disease variables, vertebral fractures, and employment status in female patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    METHODS: HRQOL was assessed with the Swedish version of the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) 36-Item Short Form Survey (SF-36) in female patients (n=163) and in age- and sex-matched controls (n=1045). Associations between the SF-36 score and demographics, disease variables, prevalent vertebral fractures, and employment status were analysed.

    RESULTS: The SLE patients, aged 20 to 82 years, scored significantly lower than the controls on all SF-36 subscales. Patients with vertebral fractures were older, had greater disease damage, and lower physical functioning (PF) than patients without fractures. Of the SLE patients of working age (n=142), 54% worked full or part time. These patients scored their HRQOL significantly higher (better) than patients not working. Being able to work was significantly associated with low age and high scores in PF and role physical (RP): the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for these variables was 0.82, confidence interval 0.75-0.89.

    CONCLUSIONS: HRQOL is substantially lower in SLE than in the general population but working ability indicates better health. We encourage further research regarding the effects on HRQOL by preventive actions taken against work disability in SLE.

  • 5. Andersen, M.
    et al.
    Olesen, M. K.
    Nagaev, I.
    Nagaeva, O.
    Wikberg, Jarl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, L.
    Andersen, G. N.
    Adalimumab (Humira (R)) normalizes melanocortin receptor subtype 2, 3, and 4 expression in CD8+, CD14+, and CD19+leucocyte subsets in rheumatoid arthritis2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 43, p. 25-26Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6. Andersen, M.
    et al.
    Olesen, M. K.
    Nagaev, Ivan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wikberg, J.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Andersen, G. N.
    Vendsyssel Hosp, Clin Res Ctr, Rheumatol Unit, Hjorring, Denmark.
    Adalimumab (Humira (R)) normalizes melanocortin receptor subtype 2, 3, and 4 expression in CD8+, CD14+, and CD19+leucocyte subsets in rheumatoid arthritis2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 43, no Suppl. 127, p. 25-26 Meeting Abstr. PP119Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Andersson, H. Ingemar
    et al.
    Department of Community Health Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ejlertsson, Göran
    Kristianstad College for Health Professions.
    Leden, Ido
    Department of Medicine, Central Hospital, Kristianstad.
    Rosenberg, Claes
    Simrishamn Health Care Centre.
    Characteristics of subjects with chronic pain, in relation to local and widespread pain report: a prospective study of symptoms, clinical findings and blood tests in subgroups of a geographically defined population1996In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 146-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relation between reported chronic pain and clinical findings was studied by comparing survey data six months before and eighteen months after a clinical examination. Studied individuals (n = 165) were randomly selected from subsamples of an initial survey (n = 1806) to a general population. Among individuals reporting chronic pain 85% were assessed to have chronic pain at the examination. Diagnoses were found in 22% of examined pain individuals. Myofascial pain syndrome and myalgia were the most common findings. Compared with located neck-shoulder pain, widespread pain had a greater impact on the individual, a worse prognosis regarding pain duration and working capacity, and revealed a raised serum urate level of unclear significance. Although no specific cause of pain is found in individuals with widespread pain it is important to identify and treat this group due to the great effects on functional capacity and the worse prognosis.

  • 8.
    Andersson, H. Ingemar
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Leden, Ido
    Sektionen för reumatologi, Medicinska kliniken Centralsjukhuset, Kristianstad.
    Increased serum uric acid - a marker of non-gouty widespread pain?: a study of female patients with inflammatory and non-inflammatory pain2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 261-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between reported chronic pain and the level of serum urate (SU) among women with various diagnoses of the musculoskeletal system. METHODS: Consecutive female patients (aged 20-70 years, n = 124), at rheumatology and rehabilitation practices, with chronic musculoskeletal pain of different origins were followed for 1 year after an initial survey of pain, lifestyle, quality of life, and disability. Repeated blood samples (including urate, creatinine, cholesterol, and glucose) were analysed. Multiple regression analysis was performed to explain initial variations in SU level in relation to pain and confounding factors. RESULTS: The level of SU was increased among individuals with widespread pain (>5 locations) independent of underlying diagnoses compared to those with fewer pain sites (270.5 vs. 241.2 micromol/L). Serum creatinine, body mass index (BMI), the number of pain locations, and sleep disturbances independently contributed to the SU level and explained 43% of the variation in SU. Individual variation in SU during 4 months was low. CONCLUSIONS: Epidemiological data on the relationship between the extent of body pain and SU were confirmed in a clinical setting. Besides known factors such as impaired renal function and obesity, widespread pain and sleep disturbances were related to an increase in SU. Medication and alcohol intake could not explain the findings. Longitudinal studies are necessary to elucidate whether the level of SU has any implications for the prognosis of chronic pain.

  • 9.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Fasth, A.
    Serum concentration of hyaluronan, IgM and IgA rheumatoid factors in a population based study of juvenile chronic arthritis1994In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 183-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased serum levels of hyaluronan (HA) have been found in patients with liver diseases, psoriasis, malignancies as well as in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. In the two latter groups serum HA levels may reflect the extent of synovial involvement and inflammation, rather than only unspecific information. This study was performed to elucidate the value of measuring HA in children with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) and to study its relation to class specific rheumatoid factors (IgM Rf and IgA Rf). HA was analysed in sera from 271 patients with JCA and 130 controls using a radiometric assay and IgM Rf and IgA Rf were analysed using an enzyme immunoassay. The results were analysed in relation to JCA subgroup, disease activity and functional outcome. In patients and controls higher levels of HA were found in young children than in older. Raised levels of HA and IgM Rf were mainly found in children with polyarticular disease. Impaired functional outcome was related to raised HA levels. No correlation was found between HA levels and IgM Rf or IgA Rf. Measurement of HA levels in JCA is of no diagnostic value because of low sensitivity. Quantification of HA may, however, have prognostic value in a subgroup of patients belonging to the polyarticular subgroup.

  • 10.
    Atroshi, Isam
    et al.
    Department of Orthopedics, Hässleholm-Kristianstad Hospitals.
    Andersson, H. Ingemar
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Kristianstad Hospital.
    Gummesson, Christina
    Department of Orthopedics, Hässleholm-Kristianstad Hospitals.
    Leden, Ido
    Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Kristianstad Hospital.
    Odenbring, Sten
    Department of Orthopedics, Hässleholm-Kristianstad Hospitals.
    Ornstein, Ewald
    Department of Orthopedics, Hässleholm-Kristianstad Hospitals.
    Primary care patients with musculoskeletal pain: value of health-status and sense-of-coherence measures in predicting long-term work disability2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 239-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate long-term sick leave among primary care patients with musculoskeletal disorders and the predictive value of health-status and sense-of-coherence measures. METHODS: Patients aged 17 to 64 years who, during seven weeks, attended one of six primary care centers because of non-traumatic musculoskeletal pain and who completed the SF-36 health questionnaire and the sense of coherence (SOC) scale at baseline and after one year. RESULTS: Of 189 patients, 36 (19%) were sicklisted for at least three months before and/or after their visit; the most common diagnoses were non-specific soft-tissue or multiple joint, low back, and shoulder pain. The long-term sicklisted patients had significantly worse baseline SF-36 and SOC scores than the non-sicklisted patients; moderate improvement in the SF-36 bodily pain but no improvement in the physical functioning scores occurred. The duration of sick leave at baseline and the SF-36 bodily pain score were significant predictors of continuos one-year work disability. CONCLUSION: Long-term sick leave was common among primary care patients with musculoskeletal pain. The physical functioning and return-to-work outcomes after one year were poor. The SF-36 bodily pain scale might be helpful in identifying at risk patients.

  • 11. Baecklund, Eva
    et al.
    Askling, Johan
    Bertilsson, Lennart
    Coster, Lars
    Feltelius, Nils
    Fored, Michael
    Geborek, Pierre
    Jacobsson, Lennart T.
    Klareskog, Lars
    Lindblad, Staffan
    Lysholm, Jorgen
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Saxne, Tore
    van Vollenhoven, Ronald
    The Swedish biologics register (ARTIS): observations of adverse events when using biologics in clinical practice2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 37Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Baecklund, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Backlin, Carin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Rönnelid, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Toes, R
    Huizinga, Twj
    Åhlin, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Askling, J
    Hochberg, F H
    Klareskog, L
    Kay, J
    Smedby, K E
    Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, other common autoantibodies, and smoking as risk factors for lymphoma in patients with rheumatoid arthritis2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 270-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk of lymphoma. There is no biomarker to indicate future lymphoma risk in RA and it is not known whether factors associated with an increased risk of RA also confer an increased risk of lymphoma. We investigated whether anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, other autoantibodies, and smoking, are associated with lymphoma development in RA.

    METHOD: subclasses of anti-CCP antibodies and for 15 antinuclear antibody (ANA)-associated specific autoantibodies. Relative risks were estimated as crude and adjusted odds ratios (adjOR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using logistic regression.

    RESULTS: We found no association between anti-CCP IgG ≥ 25 units/mL (adjOR 1.4, 95% CI 0.7-2.7), anti-CCP IgG ≥ 500 units/mL (adjOR 1.4, 95% CI 0.7-3.0), anti-CCP Ig of other isotypes, other autoantibodies (adjOR any vs none 0.6, 95% CI 0.3-1.2), or cigarette smoking (adjOR ever vs never 1.1, 95% CI 0.5-2.2) and lymphoma risk among patients with RA.

    CONCLUSION: In this study, neither anti-CCP antibodies (IgG, IgG1–4, IgM, or IgA), nor other common autoantibodies, nor smoking predicted lymphoma risk in RA

  • 13.
    Bengtsson, C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Wahlin, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Braune, A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Jonsson, E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Wållberg-Jonsson, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Hydroxychloroquine improves the blood lipid profile in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus after four and eight weeks of treatment: a randomized interventional study2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 47, p. 29-29Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Berg, L.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sundström, Y.
    Karolinska Inst, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Aftab, Obaid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Bergqvist, F.
    Karolinska Inst, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kultima, Kim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Gustafsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Sundström, M.
    Karolinska Inst, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ossipova, E.
    Karolinska Inst, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lengqvist, J.
    Karolinska Inst, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jakobsson, P-J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Rubin, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Characterizing the effects of epigenetic regulation in assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with inflammatory diseases2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 45, p. 44-45Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Berggren, Olof
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Alexsson, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Tandre, Karolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Syvanen, A-C
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Effect of single-nucleotide polymorphisms on type I interferon production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells stimulated with SLE-associated immune complexes2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 43, no S127, p. 92-92Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Berglin, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Kokkonen, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Einarsdottir, E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Ågren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Rantapää Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Influence of female hormonal factors, in relation to autoantibodies and genetic markers, on the development of rheumatoid arthritis in northern Sweden: a case-control study2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 454-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A longer duration of breastfeeding increased the risk of developing RA, especially among individuals seropositive for ACPA or IgM-RF or carrying the PTPN22 1858T variant. Use of OC for ≥ 7 years was associated with a decreased risk.

  • 17.
    Berglin, Ewa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Comparison of the 1987 ACR and 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis in clinical practice: a prospective cohort study2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 362-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare application of the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and 2010 ACR/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) classification criteria for diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical practice. Method: The medical records of patients with early arthritis attending the Rheumatology Department, Umea University Hospital (n = 1026) were analysed. Patients with synovitis in at least one joint, no diagnosis other than RA being better for explaining the synovitis, and duration of symptoms less than 1 year at first visit, and at least 1 year of follow-up were included consecutively. Fulfilment of the 1987 and 2010 criteria at baseline was evaluated. Sensitivity and specificity for each criterion set, where estimated by using the outcome measures: initiation of methotrexate (MTX) therapy during the first year, and a clinical diagnosis of RA at the 1-year follow-up. Radiographs of hands and feet were evaluated using the Larsen score. Results: The study included 313 patients, of whom 56% fulfilled the 1987 ACR criteria, 74% the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria, and 53% both sets of criteria at baseline. The sensitivity/specificity for the 1987 and 2010 criteria with MTX within the first year as the outcome measure was 0.68/0.79 and 0.84/0.54, respectively, and with a diagnosis of RA at follow-up 0.72/0.83 and 0.91/0.65, respectively. Older patients (i.e. >= 60 years) more often fulfilled the 2010 criteria. Patients who fulfilled the 2010 ACR/EULAR but not the 1987 ACR criteria had a lower Larsen score at inclusion and after 2 years. Conclusions: Compared with the 1987 ACR criteria, the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria have higher sensitivity but lower specificity, especially in patients aged >= 60 years. The 1987 ACR criteria are suggested to predict a more erosive disease.

  • 18. Bertilsson, L
    et al.
    Andersson-Gäre, B
    Fasth, A
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, University of Gothenburg.
    A 5-year prospective population-based study of juvenile chronic arthritis: onset, disease process, and outcome.2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 41, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate, in a population-based cohort of patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), onset characteristics, progression, outcome, and prognostic factors longitudinally for 5 years.

    METHODS: This cohort consisted of 132 incidence cases identified between 1984 and 1986 in southwestern Sweden followed for 5 years with annual reports of subgroup, joint assessment, disease activity, eye examinations, laboratory measurements, and medication. At the 5-year follow-up, the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (Child-HAQ) was evaluated. European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria for diagnosis and disease activity were used.

    RESULTS: During the 5 years only four patients were lost to follow-up, 34% changed subgroup and 8% developed uveitis. At the 5-year follow-up the disease was active in 12% of the patients, stable in 28%, inactive in 25%, and in remission in 34%. Among those examined, 24% had radiological changes, of whom half had advanced changes. The Child-HAQ median score at the 5-year follow-up was 0.13 (range 0.0-1.9). The number of involved joints at inclusion correlated positively with active disease at the 5-year follow-up. Age at disease onset, the number of involved joints, and the number of joints with arthritis correlated positively with continuous disease and Child-HAQ score. CONCLUSION. Our study shows a diverse disease course during the first 5 years of JCA where one-third changed subgroup and two-thirds did not reach remission. Age of disease onset, the number of involved joints, and the number of joints with arthritis at inclusion were associated with poor outcome at the 5-year follow-up.

  • 19.
    Bertilsson, L.
    et al.
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Fasth, A
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Forsblad-d'Elia, H.
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A 5-year prospective population-based study of juvenile chronic arthritis: onset, disease process, and outcome2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 379-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate, in a population-based cohort of patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), onset characteristics, progression, outcome, and prognostic factors longitudinally for 5 years. Methods: This cohort consisted of 132 incidence cases identified between 1984 and 1986 in southwestern Sweden followed for 5 years with annual reports of subgroup, joint assessment, disease activity, eye examinations, laboratory measurements, and medication. At the 5-year follow-up, the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (Child-HAQ) was evaluated. European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria for diagnosis and disease activity were used. Results: During the 5 years only four patients were lost to follow-up, 34% changed subgroup and 8% developed uveitis. At the 5-year follow-up the disease was active in 12% of the patients, stable in 28%, inactive in 25%, and in remission in 34%. Among those examined, 24% had radiological changes, of whom half had advanced changes. The Child-HAQ median score at the 5-year follow-up was 0.13 (range 0.0-1.9). The number of involved joints at inclusion correlated positively with active disease at the 5-year follow-up. Age at disease onset, the number of involved joints, and the number of joints with arthritis correlated positively with continuous disease and Child-HAQ score. Conclusion. Our study shows a diverse disease course during the first 5 years of JCA where one-third changed subgroup and two-thirds did not reach remission. Age of disease onset, the number of involved joints, and the number of joints with arthritis at inclusion were associated with poor outcome at the 5-year follow-up.

  • 20.
    Billing, Ewa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    McKenna, S. P.
    Staun, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Lindqvist, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Adaptation of the Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQoL) instrument for Sweden2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 223-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQoL) questionnaire is the first disease-specific patient-derived instrument for assessing QoL in patients with PsA and has been extensively validated in this population. The aim of the adaptation process reported here was to develop a Swedish version of the PsAQoL that was equivalent to, and met the same psychometric and acceptability standards as, the original instrument, which was developed in the UK. Method:Translation of the original questionnaire into Swedish was performed by a professional and a lay panel. Field testing for face and content validity was performed by interviewing 13 patients. Finally, 123 patients with PsA were included in a test-retest postal survey designed to test reproducibility and construct validity. The PsAQoL was administered on two occasions approximately 2 weeks apart. The Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) was used as a comparator instrument. Results: The Swedish version of the PsAQoL questionnaire showed good reliability at both time points and, as expected, correlated with the NHP. The scale was able to distinguish between groups based on self-reported general health and flare-up. Patients with active symptoms of both arthritis and psoriasis had worse QoL. The results also indicated that duration of disease has a progressive impact on PsAQoL scores. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that the adapted PsAQoL can be used for clinical studies in Swedish patients. The instrument provides valuable information on the long-term effects of PsA on QoL.

  • 21. Bjelle, A
    et al.
    Cedergren, B
    Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää
    HLA B27 in the population of northern Sweden1982In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 11, p. 23-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Bjorsenius, I.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Wållberg-Jonsson, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Södergren, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Increased progression of atherosclerosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is partially reflected by disease severity at the time of diagnosis: 11-year prospective follow-up2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 47, p. 20-21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hand function in women and men with early rheumatoid arthritis: A prospective study over three years (the Swedish TIRA project)2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 15-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe the course of hand function in women and men during the first 3 years after diagnosis of recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA), to investigate sex differences in hand function, and to study correlations between and within hand function assessments.

    Methods: A total of 276 patients (69% women) with RA of a maximal duration of 12 months were recruited to the study. Hand function was assessed by the Grip Ability Test (GAT) and Signals of Functional Impairment (SOFI). Peak and average grip force over 10 s in the right and left hand was measured by an electronic device.

    Results: Hand function was affected at diagnosis, but had improved significantly at the 3-months' follow-up and then remained stable (but still affected) in both women and men. As assessed by SOFI, hand function was worse in men than in women, whereas women had significantly lower grip force. GAT, grip force, and SOFI correlated weakly. The average and peak values of grip force correlated strongly, as did the grip force in the right and the left hand.

    Conclusion: Hand function was profoundly affected at diagnosis of RA, but improved significantly within 3 months and remained stable (but still affected) over 3 years. As expected, women on average had significantly lower grip force than men.

  • 24.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Hälsouniversitetet i Linköping.
    Haglund, Lena
    Hälsouniversitetet i Linköping.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Hälsouniversitetet i Linköping.
    Hand function in women and men with early rheumatoid arthritis: A prospective study over three years (the Swedish TIRA project)2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 15-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Trupin, L
    University of California, USA.
    Thyberg, I.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Katz, P.
    University of California, USA.
    Yelin, E.
    University of California, USA.
    Differences in activity limitation, pain intensity, and global health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Sweden and the USA: a 5-year follow-up2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 428-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: In this study we compared activity limitations, pain intensity, and global health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Sweden and the USA and aimed to determine whether nationality is associated with these outcomes.

    Methods: We used longitudinal data from the 'Swedish TIRA project' (n = 149) and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) RA panel study (n = 85). Data were collected annually concerning use of medications [disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), biologics, and corticosteroids], morning stiffness, number of swollen joints, and number of painful joints. Three self-reported outcome measures were examined: pain intensity measured on a 0-100 visual analogue scale (VAS), activity limitation according to the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and global health. To analyse the data, the Student's t-test, the χ(2)-test, and the generalized estimating equation (GEE) method were used.

    Results: Nationality was significantly related to HAQ score and pain intensity, even after adjustment for covariates. The patients in the TIRA cohort reported a lower HAQ score and a higher pain intensity than the patients in the UCSF cohort. Nationality was not related to global health.

    Conclusion: Patients with RA should be assessed with awareness of the psychosocial and cultural context because disability seems to be affected by nationality. Further knowledge to clarify how a multinational setting affects disability could improve the translation of interventions for patients with RA across nationalities.

  • 26.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Avd. för rehabilitering, HHJ, Hälsohögskolan, Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Trupin, L.
    University of California, San Francisco.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Katz, P.
    University of California, San Francisco.
    Yelin, E.
    University of California, San Francisco.
    Differences in activity limitation, pain intensity, and global health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Sweden and the USA: a 5-year follow-up2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 428-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: In this study we compared activity limitations, pain intensity, and global health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Sweden and the USA and aimed to determine whether nationality is associated with these outcomes. Methods: We used longitudinal data from the Swedish TIRA project (n = 149) and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) RA panel study (n = 85). Data were collected annually concerning use of medications [disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), biologics, and corticosteroids], morning stiffness, number of swollen joints, and number of painful joints. Three self-reported outcome measures were examined: pain intensity measured on a 0-100 visual analogue scale (VAS), activity limitation according to the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and global health. To analyse the data, the Students t-test, the chi(2)-test, and the generalized estimating equation (GEE) method were used. Results: Nationality was significantly related to HAQ score and pain intensity, even after adjustment for covariates. The patients in the TIRA cohort reported a lower HAQ score and a higher pain intensity than the patients in the UCSF cohort. Nationality was not related to global health. Conclusion: Patients with RA should be assessed with awareness of the psychosocial and cultural context because disability seems to be affected by nationality. Further knowledge to clarify how a multinational setting affects disability could improve the translation of interventions for patients with RA across nationalities.

  • 27. Brink, M.
    et al.
    Verheul, M. K.
    Rönnelid, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Holmdahl, R.
    Toes, R. E. M.
    Klareskog, L.
    Trouw, L. A.
    Dahlqvist, S. R.
    The presence of anti-carbamylated protein antibodies prior to onset of symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with radiological progression in early RA2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 43, no S127, p. 21-22Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Brink, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Johansson, L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Nygren, E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Arlestig, L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Vitamin D in individuals before onset of rheumatoid arthritis: relation to vitamin D binding protein and its associated genetic variants2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 47, p. 23-24Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Brink, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Verheul, M. K.
    Ronnelid, J.
    Holmdahl, R.
    Toes, R. E. M.
    Klareskog, L.
    Trouw, L. A.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    The presence of anti-carbamylated protein antibodies prior to onset of symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with radiological progression in early RA2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 43, no Suppl. 127, Meeting Abstract: PP109, p. 21-22Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Broström, E W
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Esbjörnsson, A-C
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    von Heideken, J
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, P
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wretenberg, Per
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Iversen, M
    Department of Physical Therapy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Northeastern University, Boston MA, United States.
    Change in Gait Deviation Index after anti-tumour necrosis factor-α treatment in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis: a pilot study2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 356-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors provide fast, effective resolution of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) inflammation. In this study we aimed to quantify the impact of TNF-α treatment on gait dynamics.

    METHOD: The sample comprised 16 subjects [11 female, median age 56 (range 48-66) years, median disease duration 9.5 (range 4.6-20.6) years] with RA who met the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, had lower extremity involvement, did not use walking aids, and had started TNF-α treatment within 1 week of baseline gait analysis. Gait analysis focused on three-dimensional (3D) lower extremity joint kinematics, kinetics, time and distance parameters. The Gait Deviation Index (GDI) and GDI-Kinetic were calculated. Data on gait, disease activity, and physical disability were collected at baseline and at 3.5 months.

    RESULTS: Following treatment with TNF-α, statistically significant improvements were found in disease activity [using the 28-joint Disease Activity Score based on C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP); median difference (m(d)) = 2.3, p < 0.01], physical disability [Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) m(d) = 0.4, p < 0.01], and pain during walking [visual analogue scale (VAS) m(d) = 11.0, p < 0.05]. Reductions in gait deviations were noted (GDI m(d) = 3.7, p = 0.04; GDI-Kinetic m(d) = 4.1, p = 0.05) along with reductions in dimensionless time and distance parameters. A moderate to good negative correlation existed between baseline GDI and GDI change scores (r(s) = -0.7, p < 0.01).

    CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with TNF-α improved gait dynamics in adults with RA. Significant gait deviations were, however, still present after treatment. In this study, GDI and GDI-Kinetic scores appeared to be useful outcome measures to quantify changes in gait deviations after this intervention.

  • 31. Carli, Cheryl
    Charting the possible impact of national guidelines on the management of rheumatoid arthritis.2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, ISSN 0300-9742, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 188-193Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32. Chatzidionysiou, K
    et al.
    Kristensen, L-E
    Eriksson, J
    Askling, J
    van Vollenhoven, R
    Effectiveness and survival-on-drug of certolizumab pegol in rheumatoid arthritis in clinical practice: results from the national Swedish register2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 431-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Evidence regarding the efficacy and effectiveness of certolizumab pegol (CZP) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who have failed to respond to treatment with a tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) is limited. The aim of this study was to describe the effectiveness and survival-on-drug of CZP in a real-life setting, both in TNFi-naïve patients and in patients who had previously failed TNFis, and in relation to disease activity at baseline.

    METHOD: The national Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register (SRQ) was used to identify patients with RA starting treatment with CZP between 2009 and 2013. The effectiveness of treatment was assessed using the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28), the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), measures of remission, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response during 0-6 months from start of treatment, and survival-on-drug during the first 30 months.

    RESULTS: A total of 945 RA patients started treatment with CZP. Of these, 540 (57.1%) received CZP as the first biological treatment, 215 (23%) had failed one previous TNFi, and 190 (20%) had failed at least two TNFis. Overall, 71% achieved at least a EULAR moderate response and 38% had a EULAR good response at 6 months from baseline. TNFi-naïve patients achieved significantly better results and had better survival-on-drug compared to patients who had failed previous TNFis. Around 20% of patients who had not responded to two or more prior TNFis achieved EULAR good response to therapy and a similar percentage achieved remission. Patients who had high baseline disease activity had a higher risk of discontinuing treatment compared to those without high disease activity.

    CONCLUSIONS: In this real-life RA cohort, CZP was associated with significant clinical improvement. The effectiveness and survival-on-drug vary markedly depending on the line of treatment.

  • 33.
    Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Genetic-markers in rheumatoid-arthritis1986In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 15, no Suppl. 58, p. 1-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34. Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää
    et al.
    Bjelle, A
    Frequency of HLA-B 27 in rheumatic diseases in northern Sweden1978In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35. Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää
    et al.
    Bjelle, A
    Nordmark, L
    HLA B27 and involvement in sacro-iliac joints in patients with rheumatiod-arthritis1982In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Mjörndal, Tom
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Acetylator phenotypes in rheumatoid-arthritis patients with or without adverse drug-reactions to sodium-aurothiomalate or d-penicillamine1987In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 235-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acetylator phenotype was determined in 59 patients with classical, seropositive and erosive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with sodium-aurothiomalate or d-penicillamine. Patients with adverse drug reactions (ADR) leading to drug withdrawal (n=29) were compared with a group of patients without ADR (n=30). The frequency of slow acetylators was significantly (p< 0.05) increased in all RA patients, irrespective of the presence of ADR, particularly in the male patients, compared with a control population. No association was found between acetylator phenotype and clinical data or secondary Sjögrens's syndrome (SS).

  • 37.
    Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Ström, Håkan
    Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Danderyd University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bjelle, Anders
    Department of Rheumatology, Sahlgren University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Möller, Erna
    Department of Clinical Immunology, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
    Clinical symptoms and HLA antigens in a family with reiters disease1985In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 149-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A clinical and immunogenetic study was performed on a three-generation family with Reiter's disease (RD). Twelve of 56 members of the family (33 clinically examined) including one in-law, had symptoms of arthritis, urethritis, conjunctivitis, uveitis, and/or mucocutaneous manifestations, but only one had the complete triad of Reiter's syndrome (RS). Radiographic sacro-iliitis was found in 7 individuals, and monoarticular onset was reported in 5 out of 7 with peripheral arthritis. HLA B27 was found in 26 of the 37 family members who were tissue typed (including one in-law). All individuals with RD were B27-positive. Seven different B27 phenotypes were identified. This finding suggests that RD is associated with the B27 antigen itself, and not to a gene closely linked to B27. From a pedigree analysis of this family an autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance or multifactorial inheritance seemed the most probable alternatives. The family history is a useful adjunct in the diagnosis of RD.

  • 38.
    Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Ström, Håkan
    Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm.
    Bjelle, Anders
    Department of Rheumatology, Sahlgren University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Möller, Erna
    Department of Clinical Immunology, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm.
    HLA antigens in rheumatoid-arthritis patients with and without a family history of polyarthritis1985In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 375-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The HLA antigens, A, B and DR, were studied in 141 patients with erosive, seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The frequency of the B27 antigen was significantly increased among patients with a family history of symmetrical polyarthritis compared with blood donor controls (p<0.001) and with patients without a family history of polyarthritis (p<0.005). The frequency of DR4 was significantly (p<0.001) increased among the RA patients, but there was no significant association between DR4 and a family history of polyarthritis.

  • 39.
    Danfors, Torsten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Bergström, M
    Uppsala University PET Centre, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Feltelius, N
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Westerberg, G
    Uppsala University PET Centre, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Långström, Bengt
    Uppsala University PET Centre, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Positron emission tomography with 11C-D-deprenyl in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Evaluation of knee joint inflammation before and after intra-articular glucocorticoid treatment1997In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 43-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seven patients with arthritic disease and with clinical signs of inflammation of the knee joint, were investigated with positron emission tomography (PET) after injection of [N-methyl-11C]-D-deprenyl. Two healthy volunteers were included as controls. In five patients the investigation was repeated after an intra-articular injection of glucocorticoids. All patients showed very high uptake of the tracer in the paraarticular structures of the joint. After treatment there was approximately a 50% reduction of the uptake in the treated knees, both in the high uptake regions and in the surrounding soft tissues. No change was observed in the non-treated knees. In the healthy volunteers, only soft tissue surrounding the joint showed an uptake of the tracer, but at a magnitude which was 6-8 times lower than the high uptake regions in the arthritis patients. Although the mechanisms for the high uptake of 11C-D-deprenyl in affected joints of patients with arthritis is not clear, the present work points to a potential of PET for the assessment of disease intensity and monitoring of treatment.

  • 40. Engvall, I-L
    et al.
    Elkan, A-C
    Tengstrand, B
    Cederholm, T
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Brismar, K
    Hafstrom, I
    Cachexia in rheumatoid arthritis is associated with inflammatory activity, physical disability, and low bioavailable insulin-like growth factor2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 321-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the impact of inflammation, insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and its regulating binding protein (IGFBP-1) on lean body mass (LBM) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: In 60 inpatients (50 women), inflammatory activity was measured by Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28), C-reactive protein (CRP), and interleukin (IL)-6, and physical disability by the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ). LBM was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and fat free mass index (FFMI; kg/m(2)) and fat mass index (FMI; kg/m(2)) were calculated. RESULTS: Median age was 65 years and disease duration 13 years. Fifty per cent of the patients had FFMI below the 10th percentile of a reference population and 45% had FMI above the 90th percentile, corresponding to the condition known as rheumatoid cachexia (loss of muscle mass in the presence of stable or increased FM). DAS28, CRP, and IL-6 correlated negatively with LBM (p = 0.001, 0.001, and 0.018, respectively), as did HAQ (p = 0.001). Mean (confidence interval) IGF-1 was in the normal range, at 130 (116-143) microg/L. IGFBP-1 levels were elevated in patients (median 58 microg/L in women and 59 microg/L in men) compared with a normal population (33 microg/L in women and 24 microg/L in men). The ratio IGF-1/IGFBP-1, which reflects bioavailable IGF-1, was low (2.0 microg/L) and was positively correlated with LBM (p = 0.015). In multiple regression analysis, 42% of the LBM variance was explained by IGF-1/IGFBP-1, HAQ score, and DAS28. CONCLUSION: A large proportion of RA inpatients, mainly women, had rheumatoid cachexia. The muscle wasting was explained by inflammatory activity and physical disability as well as low bioavailable IGF-1.

  • 41.
    Eriksson, Catharina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Sundqvist, KG
    Changes in chemokines and their receptors in blood during treatment with the TNF inhibitor infliximab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 260-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Chemokines are involved in leucocyte recruitment into inflammatory sites, such as the synovial tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The release of certain chemokines is augmented by pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Infliximab, a monoclonal antibody against TNF that blocks the biological effects of TNF, is used in the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. The effect of blocking TNF activity on chemokines is not fully understood.

    Aim. The aim of this study was to analyse the effects on chemokines and their receptors on peripheral mononuclear cells of anti-TNF treatment in RA-patients.

    Material and methods. Twelve patients with established RA who began treatment with infliximab, and nine patients with early RA treated with traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, were followed clinically for 30 weeks and chemokine levels in blood samples and chemokine receptor expression on the surface of T-cells and monocytes analysed. Three SLE-patients, as a small control group of another inflammatory disease, and nine healthy subjects were also included in the study.

    Result. CXCL10/IP-10 was significantly higher in RA-patients compared with healthy controls and decreased significantly two weeks after infliximab infusion. CCL2/MCP-1 and CCL4/MIP-1β decreased significantly after infliximab treatment although the concentrations were not significantly elevated at baseline compared with controls. There was an inverse correlation between the chemokine cleaving molecule dipeptidyl peptidase-IV/CD26 and CCL5/RANTES. Several chemokine receptors on T-cells were elevated in RA patients at inclusion into the study. The CCR2 expression on T-cells decreased significantly after infliximab treatment.

    Conclusion. The chemokines CXCL10/IP-10, CCL2/MCP-1 and CCL4/MIP-1β, mainly targeting the Th1 immune response, decreased after treatment with anti-TNF suggesting a more pronounced effect onTh1 activity than on the Th2 mediated response. Several chemokine receptors on blood T-cells were elevated in RA-patients, suggesting that they may be involved in the recruitment of T-lymphocytes from the blood to affected tissues.

  • 42.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Andersson, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Cassel, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Letter: Increase in Th17-associated CCL20 and decrease in Th2-associated CCL22 plasma chemokines in active ANCA-associated vasculitis2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 80-83Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 43.
    Esbjörnsson, A-C
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rozumalski, A
    Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare, St Paul MN, United States; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis MN, United States.
    Iversen, M D
    Department of Physical Therapy, Bouve College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, Boston MA, United States; Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, United States.
    Schwartz, M H
    Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare, St Paul MN, United States; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis MN, United States; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis MN, United States.
    Wretenberg, Per
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Molecular Medicine, Section of Orthopaedics, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Broström, E W
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Quantifying gait deviations in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis using the Gait Deviation Index2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 124-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: In this study we evaluated the usability of the Gait Deviation Index (GDI), an index that summarizes the amount of deviation in movement from a standard norm, in adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aims of the study were to evaluate the ability of the GDI to identify gait deviations, assess inter-trial repeatability, and examine the relationship between the GDI and walking speed, physical disability, and pain.

    METHOD: Sixty-three adults with RA and 59 adults with typical gait patterns were included in this retrospective case-control study. Following a three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA), representative gait cycles were selected and GDI scores calculated. To evaluate the effect of walking speed, GDI scores were calculated using both a free-speed and a speed-matched reference set. Physical disability was assessed using the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and subjects rated their pain during walking.

    RESULTS: Adults with RA had significantly increased gait deviations compared to healthy individuals, as shown by lower GDI scores [87.9 (SD = 8.7) vs. 99.4 (SD = 8.3), p < 0.001]. This difference was also seen when adjusting for walking speed [91.7 (SD = 9.0) vs. 99.9 (SD = 8.6), p < 0.001]. It was estimated that a change of ≥ 5 GDI units was required to account for natural variation in gait. There was no evident relationship between GDI and low/high RA-related physical disability and pain.

    CONCLUSIONS: The GDI seems to useful for identifying and summarizing gait deviations in individuals with RA. Thus, we consider that the GDI provides an overall measure of gait deviation that may reflect lower extremity pathology and may help clinicians to understand the impact of RA on gait dynamics.

  • 44.
    Forsblad d'Elia, Helena
    et al.
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg.
    Rehnberg, E
    Kvist, G
    Ericsson, A
    Konttinen, Yt
    Mannerkorpi, K
    Fatigue and blood pressure in primary Sjogren's syndrome2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 284-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Primary Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by fatigue. Little is known about the genesis of fatigue. Fatigue is thought to represent a multidimensional concept and it is important to be able to measure it confidently. The aims were to evaluate the reliability and validity of the 20-item Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) in SS and to search for factors associated with this disabling symptom.

    METHODS: Forty-eight women with primary SS completed the MFI-20 questionnaire. The results were compared with age-matched women with fibromyalgia (FM) and healthy controls. Convergent construct validity was assessed by correlations to a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for global fatigue by Spearman's correlation (r(s)). Test-retest reliability was analysed by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) in 28 women. Associations between clinical variables and subscales of the MFI-20 were analysed.

    RESULTS: The SS women scored significantly higher in all subscales of the MFI-20 compared to controls but similar to FM. The ICCs were satisfactory, ranging from 0.66 for general fatigue to 0.85 for the total score of MFI-20. All subscales correlated significantly to VAS for global fatigue, general fatigue showing the highest correlation (r(s) = 0.70). The estimated number of hours of sleep/day was significantly associated with many of the fatigue dimensions. All five subscales of the MFI-20 were inversely associated with diastolic blood pressure (BP) and two with systolic BP.

    CONCLUSIONS: The MFI-20 was found to be a reliable and valid tool for the measurement of fatigue in primary SS. High levels of fatigue were correlated with low BP, suggesting an associated involvement of the autonomic nervous system.

  • 45.
    Frodlund, M.
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Neuro & Inflammat Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Vikerfors, A.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Unit Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elvin, K.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Immunol & Transfus Med, Div Clin Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rönnelid, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Svenungsson, E.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Unit Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjowall, C.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Neuro & Inflammat Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Immunoglobulin A anti-phospholipid antibodies in Swedish cases with systemic lupus erythematosus: associations with disease phenotypes, vascular events, and damage accrual2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 47, p. 48-48Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46. Garcia Rodriguez, LA
    et al.
    Tolosa, LB
    Ruigómez, A
    Johansson, Saga
    Wallander, Mari-Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Rheumatoid arthritis in UK primary care: incidence and prior morbidity2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 173-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the incidence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in primary care and to investigate associations with consultation behaviour, risk factors, and comorbidities, using the UK General Practice Research Database (GPRD). METHODS: Subjects with a first-ever diagnosis of RA between 1 January 1996 and 31 December 1997 (n = 579) were identified from a cohort of 1 206 918 subjects aged 20-79 years without cancer. Controls from the same cohort were frequency-matched to the RA group by age, sex, and calendar year (n = 4234). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of being diagnosed with RA in association with a range of factors were estimated using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: RA incidence was 0.15 per 1000 person-years, was higher in women than in men, and increased with age in both sexes. Consultations and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) prior to diagnosis were increased in subjects with RA. An increased risk of RA was observed in association with anaemia in the previous year (OR 2.63, 95% CI 1.54-4.48) and with smoking (1.33, 1.07-1.67). A decreased risk of RA was observed in association with infectious diseases (0.68, 0.50-0.94) and pregnancy in the previous year (0.22, 0.06-0.77), diabetes (0.45, 0.26-0.78), and hypertension (0.74, 0.57-0.94). We found no association with alcohol intake, obesity, or use of low-dose aspirin, oral contraceptives, or hormone replacement therapy (HRT). CONCLUSIONS: Smoking was identified as the only significant lifestyle-related risk factor for RA. Infection in the previous year was associated with a reduced likelihood of RA.

  • 47. Gudbjornsson, B.
    et al.
    Ejstrup, L.
    Gran, J. T.
    Iversen, L.
    Lindqvist, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Paimela, L.
    Ternowitz, T.
    Stahle, M.
    Psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries: demographics and disease status. The Nordic PAM study2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 373-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries. Method: Patients with putative PAM aged >= 18 years were recruited. Fifty-nine patients were included after clinical examination. Results: The prevalence of PAM in the adult Nordic population was estimated to be 3.69 per million inhabitants [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.75-4.63]. The female to male ratio was close to 1:1. The mean age of skin disease onset was 25 years and the mean age of onset of joint disease was 30 years. The onset of skin disease was 2 years earlier among female patients. At inclusion, the mean duration of arthritis was 27 +/- 11 years for male patients and 33 +/- 11 years for female patients. PAM was most frequently seen in the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints of the toes, followed by the IP joint of the thumb and the DIP joint of the little finger on the left hand. Female and male patients had similar numbers of painful and swollen joints. Enthesitis was found in 19 patients (32%), while 38 patients (64%) had a history of dactylitis. Twenty-three of these 38 patients (61%) had a history of dactylitis in the same finger/toe as they had PAM. At the time of inclusion, 45% of the patients were found to have clear or almost clear skin. Conclusions: PAM in the Nordic countries has a low prevalence, with only three to five cases per million inhabitants. The majority of the patients present with mild skin disease.

  • 48.
    Gudbjornsson, B.
    et al.
    Univ Hosp, Ctr Rheumatol Res, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Laasonen, L.
    Helsinki Med Imaging Ctr, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lindqvist, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Iversen, L.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Dermatol, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Ejstrup, L.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Odense, Denmark.
    Stahle, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dermatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Radiographic features of psoriatic arthritis mutilans: results from the Nordic PAM Study2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 47, p. 60-61Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Gudbjörnsson, B.
    et al.
    Univ Hosp, Ctr Rheumatol Res, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Lindqvist, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Iversen, L.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Paimela, L.
    Univ Helsinki, Cent Hosp, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland..
    Laasonen, L.
    Univ Helsinki, Cent Hosp, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland..
    Ejstrup, L.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Odense, Denmark..
    Ternowitz, T.
    Stavanger Univ Hosp, Stavanger, Norway..
    Stahle, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Disease activity and quality of life of patients with psoriatic arthritis mutilans: the Nordic PAM study2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 45, p. 33-33Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50. Gustafsson, J.
    et al.
    Jensen-Urstad, K.
    Herlitz-Lindberg, M.
    Moller, S.
    Pettersson, S.
    Gunnarsson, I.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Svenungsson, E.
    Atherosclerosis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and controls: an analysis of SLE subgroups2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 43, no S127, p. 7-8Article in journal (Other academic)
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