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  • 1.
    Alenius, G M
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Jonsson, S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Jonsson, S W
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Ny, A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) in patients with psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis2001In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 760-760Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Eriksson, C
    Rantapää Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Interleukin-6 and soluble interleukin-2 receptor alpha-markers of inflammation in patients with psoriatic arthritis?2009In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 120-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a possible systemic effect of joint inflammation in contrast to skin disease only, by measuring IL-6 and IL-2sRalpha. METHODS: Two hundred and nineteen patients (111 male / 108 female, age 50.4+/-14.5 yrs (mean+/-SD)) with psoriasis were clinically and laboratory examined. 134 patients had inflammatory joint manifestations defined as peripheral arthritis and/or axial disease, of whom 37 had measurable inflammation, defined as ESR >25 mm/h and/or CRP >15 mg/L. RESULTS: Interleukin-6 was significantly higher in patients with joint disease and measurable inflammation ((median, Q1-Q3) 4.07, 0.92-14.60), and in patients without measured inflammation (1.22, 0.70-3.46), compared to patients with skin disease only (0.70, 0.70-1.73, p<0.001 and p=0.002 respectively). The difference between the two groups of patients with inflammatory joint manifestations was significant (p=0.001). The levels of IL-6 correlated with the actual number of joints affected with arthritis (p<0.001; rs=0.248), ESR (p<0.001; rs=0.459), CRP (p<0.001; rs=0.314) and IL-2sRalpha (p=0.002; rs=0.210). The levels of IL-2sRalpha. did not differ between the 3 groups. CONCLUSION: In this study, IL-6 was significantly higher in patients with psoriasis and inflammatory joint disease with or without routine measurable inflammatory activity compared with patients having psoriasis of the skin. We found that patients with psoriasis and joint inflammation may have systemic effects that could be captured by serum measurements of IL-6. Soluble IL-2Ralpha was not a marker of inflammation in this study.

  • 3.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Juvenile arthritis - who gets it, where and when?: A review of current data on incidence and prevalence1999In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 367-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epidemiological studies of chronic arthritis in childhood can provide clues to genetic determinants of disease manifestations and environmental triggers. Available data are difficult to compare, however, because of the heterogeneity of the disease, differences in the classification criteria used for definition and inclusion, and differences in source populations and case ascertainment. Nevertheless, when the data are interpreted according to the methodologies used, geographical and ethnic differences can be found with regard to occurrence rates, age at onset, subgroup distribution and immunological markers. Seasonal variations have been detected in systemic disease. Variations in the incidence of childhood arthritis over time have also been observed, indicating environmental influences on disease frequency, while familial aggregations suggest the presence of genetic factors. These epidemiological data from a challenging puzzle which we hope will provide clues to future understanding of etiologies and cures, with the help of basic scientific research.

  • 4.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Fasth, A.
    Wiklund, I.
    Measurement of functional status in juvenile chronic arthritis: evaluation of a Swedish version of the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire1993In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 569-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few well-validated self-and/or parent-administered instruments are available for measuring functional status in children with rheumatic diseases. Parts of the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) have been adapted for use in children in the so-called Child HAQ. The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of this instrument in a Swedish setting. The Child HAQ was administered to 186 patients and 211 patients participating in a population-based follow-up study of juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) in southwestern Sweden. The EULAR criteria were used for inclusion. Children who were 9 years of age or older self-reported. Reliability, evaluated by test-retest, inter-observer correlations and internal reliability, was excellent. Convergent validity was demonstrated by strong correlations of the disability index, pain, and morning stiffness with disease activity and the Steinbrocker functional classes. Discriminant validity was evidenced by the capacity of the instrument to evaluate patients as being active or in remission. Thus, the Child HAQ showed excellent measurement performance in a Swedish setting when using parents or children more than 9 years old as responders.

  • 5.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Ruperto, N.
    Berg, S.
    Hagelberg, S.
    Jonsson, N. O.
    Magnusson, B.
    Martinell, J.
    Erling, A.
    Landgraf, J. M.
    The Swedish version of the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) and the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ)2001In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 19, no 4, Suppl 23, p. S146-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report herein the results of the cross-cultural adaptation and validation into the Swedish language of the parent's version of two health related quality of life instruments. The Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) is a disease specific health instrument that measures functional ability in daily living activities in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ) is a generic health instrument designed to capture the physical and psychosocial well-being of children independently from the underlying disease. The Swedish CHAQ CHQ were already published and therefore were revalidated in this study. A total of 129 subjects were enrolled: 69 patients with JIA (13% systemic onset, 39% polyarticular onset, 25% extended oligoarticular subtype, and 23% persistent oligoarticular subtype) and 60 healthy children. The CHAQ clinically discriminated between healthy subjects and JIA patients, with the systemic, polyarticular and extended oligoarticular subtypes having a higher degree of disability, pain, and a lower overall well-being when compared to their healthy peers. Also the CHQ clinically discriminated between healthy subjects and JIA patients, with the systemic onset, polyarticular onset and extended oligoarticular subtypes having a lower physical and psychosocial well-being when compared to their healthy peers. In conclusion the Swedish version of the CHAQ-CHQ are reliable, and valid tools for the functional, physical and psychosocial assessment of children with JIA.

  • 6. Bengtsson, K.
    et al.
    Klingberg, E.
    Deminger, A.
    Jacobsson, L. T. H.
    Bergfeldt, L.
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    CARDIAC CONDUCTION DISTURBANCES IN PATIENTS WITH ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS - A SWEDISH LONGITUDINAL COHORT STUDY2018In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 714-714Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7. Berglund, S
    et al.
    Södergren, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Wållberg Jonsson, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Rantapää Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Atherothrombotic events in rheumatoid arthritis are predicted by homocysteine: a six-year follow-up study2009In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 822-825Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether homocysteine is linked to atherothrombotic (AT) events in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Analysis of homocysteine (Hcy) levels was carried out in 235 consecutive RA patients. They were followed-up for 6.5 years or until death, with analysis of AT risk factors and the type and length of DMARD and corticosteroid treatment. The disease history before inclusion was collected. Six categories of AT events were defined. In addition, the diagnosis of the patients at follow-up was co-analyzed with the nationwide population-based Swedish Inpatient Register and Death Register to certify all events. RESULTS: The Hcy level was found to be higher in males (p<0.05) and increased with age (p<0.001). Patients with folic acid supplementation had significantly lower levels, while those on corticosteroids had higher levels. High Hcy levels predicted AT events (n=48) during a 6.5-year follow-up adjusted for age and male sex in a logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSION: In this study, RA patients on folic acid had lower Hcy levels. High Hcy levels (in addition to age, sex and diabetes) predicted AT event prospectively.

  • 8.
    Berntson, Lillemor
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Hedlund-Treutiger, I.
    Karolinska Inst Sodersjukhuset, Sachs Childrens Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Anti-inflammatory effect of exclusive enteral nutrition in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis2016In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 941-945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective There is extensive evidence for an influence of gut microbiota on the immune system, which has consequences for inflammatory diseases. Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN), which may change the gut microbiota, is an effective anti-inflammatory treatment for Crohn's disease in children. We wanted to explore the immediate anti-inflammatory effect of EEN in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods Thirteen patients with JIA (7-17 years of age), in a disease flare-up, were included in the study. Six children dropped out within 1.5-2.0 weeks of treatment, and seven patients continued, constituting the study cohort. EEN was given for three to eight weeks, with clinical and laboratory status assessed before and after treatment periods. In addition to conventional laboratory tests, 92 inflammatory proteins were analysed with a multiplex system (Proseek Multiplex Inflammation I, Olink Bioscience). Results EEN had a significant anti-inflammatory effect on active joints (p=0.031), JADAS27 (p=0.016) and morning stiffness (p=0.031). In the multiplex analysis of inflammatory proteins, MMP-1 (matrix metalloproteinase), involved in the degradation of collagens in chondrocytes, decreased significantly (p=0.047), as did MCP-4 (p=0.031) and 4E-BP1 (p=0.031). Conclusion Exclusive enteral nutrition for three to eight weeks had anti-inflammatory effect in all children with JIA that continued with EEN for more than two weeks. The study is only exploratory but the result supports an immunologically important role for the intestinal canal in these patients.

  • 9. Björk, Albin
    et al.
    Mofors, Johannes
    Kvarnström, Marika
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Bucher, Sara Magnusson
    Hillert, Jan
    Eriksson, Per
    Mandl, Thomas
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for developing primary Sjögren's syndrome with Ro/SSA and La/SSB autoantibodies2018In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. S330-S330Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Björk, Albin
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mofors, Johannes
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kvarnström, Marika
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Rheumatol, Umea, Sweden.
    Bucher, Sara Magnusson
    Orebro Univ, Dept Rheumatol, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    Hillert, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Per
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Mandl, Thomas
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Malmo, Sweden.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for developing primary Sjögren's syndrome with Ro/SSA and La/SSB autoantibodies2018In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. S330-S330Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Brito-Zeron, P.
    et al.
    Hosp CIMA Sanitas, Dept Med, Autoimmune Dis Unit, Barcelona, Spain;Univ Barcelona, Sjogrens Syndrome Res Grp AGAUR, Lab Autoimmune Dis Josep Font,Hosp Clin, IDIBAPS,CELLEX,Dept Autoimmune Dis,ICMiD, Barcelona, Spain.
    Acar-Denizli, N.
    Mimar Sinan Fine Arts Univ, Fac Sci & Letters, Dept Stat, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Ng, W. F.
    Newcastle Univ, Inst Cellular Med, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.
    Zeher, M.
    Univ Debrecen, Fac Med, Div Clin Immunol, Debrecen, Hungary.
    Rasmussen, A.
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Arthrit & Clin Immunol Res Program, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA.
    Mandl, T.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp Malmo, Dept Rheumatol, Malmo, Sweden.
    Seror, R.
    Univ Paris Sud, Hop Univ Paris Sud, AP HP, Ctr Immunol Viral Infect & Autoimmune Dis,INSERM, Paris, France.
    Li, X.
    Anhui Prov Hosp, Dept Rheumatol & Immunol, Hefei, Anhui, Peoples R China.
    Baldini, C.
    Univ Pisa, Rheumatol Unit, Pisa, Italy.
    Gottenberg, J. -E
    Danda, D.
    Christian Med Coll & Hosp, Dept Clin Immunol & Rheumatol, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Quartuccio, L.
    Univ Hosp Santa Maria della Misericordia, Dept Med Area DAME, Clin Rheumatol, Udine, Italy.
    Priori, R.
    Sapienza Univ Rome, Rheumatol Clin, Dept Internal Med & Med Specialties, Rome, Italy.
    Hernandez-Molina, G.
    Inst Nacl Ciencias Med & Nutr Salvador Zubiran, Dept Rheumatol & Immunol, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.
    Armagan, B.
    Hacettepe Univ, Fac Med, Dept Internal Med, Ankara, Turkey.
    Kruize, A. A.
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Dept Rheumatol & Clin Immunol, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Kwok, S. -K
    Kvarnstrom, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Praprotnik, S.
    Univ Med Ctr, Dept Rheumatol, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Sene, D.
    Paris Diderot Univ, Lariboisiere Hosp, AP HP, Dept Internal Med, Paris, France.
    Bartoloni, E.
    Univ Perugia, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Perugia, Italy.
    Solans, R.
    Hosp Valle De Hebron, Dept Internal Med, Barcelona, Spain.
    Rischmueller, M.
    Univ Western Australia, Sch Med, Dept Rheumatol, Crawley, Australia.
    Suzuki, Y.
    Kanazawa Univ Hosp, Div Rheumatol, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan.
    Isenberg, D. A.
    UCL, Div Med, Ctr Rheumatol, London, England.
    Valim, V.
    Univ Espirito Santo, Dept Med, Vitoria, Brazil;Univ Hosp HUCAM EBSERH, Vitoria, Brazil.
    Wiland, P.
    Wroclaw Med Hosp, Dept Rheumatol & Internal Med, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Fraile, G.
    Hosp Ramon & Cajal, Dept Internal Med, Madrid, Spain.
    Bootsma, H.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Rheumatol & Clin Immunol, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Nakamura, T.
    Nagasaki Univ, Grad Sch Biomed Sci, Dept Radiol & Canc Biol, Nagasaki, Japan.
    Giacomelli, R.
    Univ Aquila, Sch Med, Clin Unit Rheumatol, Laquila, Italy.
    Devauchelle-Pensec, V.
    Brest Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Brest, France.
    Knopf, A.
    Tech Univ Munich, Klinikum Rechts Isar, Otorhinolaryngol Head & Neck Surg, Munich, Germany.
    Bombardieri, M.
    Queen Mary Univ London, Ctr Expt Med & Rheumatol, London, England.
    Trevisani, V. -F
    Univ Fed Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Hammenfors, D.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Bergen, Norway.
    Pasoto, S. G.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Fac Med, Hosp Clin, Div Rheumatol, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Retamozo, S.
    Univ Nacl Cordoba, Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn CONICET, Inst Invest Ciencias Salud INICSA, Hosp Privado Univ Cordoba,IUCBC, Cordoba, Argentina.
    Gheita, T. A.
    Cairo Univ, Kasr Al Ainy Sch Med, Dept Rheumatol, Cairo, Egypt.
    Atzeni, F.
    IRCCS Galeazzi Orthopaed Inst, Milan, Italy;Univ Messina, Rheumatol Unit, Messina, Italy.
    Morel, J.
    Montpellier Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Montpellier, France;Univ Montpellier, Montpellier, France.
    Vollenveider, C.
    German Hosp, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina.
    Horvath, I-F
    Sivils, K. L.
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Arthrit & Clin Immunol Res Program, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA.
    Olsson, P.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp Malmo, Dept Rheumatol, Malmo, Sweden.
    De Vita, S.
    Univ Hosp Santa Maria della Misericordia, Dept Med Area DAME, Clin Rheumatol, Udine, Italy.
    Sanchez-Guerrero, J.
    Inst Nacl Ciencias Med & Nutr Salvador Zubiran, Dept Rheumatol & Immunol, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.
    Kilic, L.
    Hacettepe Univ, Fac Med, Dept Internal Med, Ankara, Turkey.
    Wahren-Herlenius, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mariette, X.
    Univ Paris Sud, Hop Univ Paris Sud, AP HP, Ctr Immunol Viral Infect & Autoimmune Dis,INSERM, Paris, France.
    Ramos-Casals, M.
    Univ Barcelona, Sjogrens Syndrome Res Grp AGAUR, Lab Autoimmune Dis Josep Font,Hosp Clin, IDIBAPS,CELLEX,Dept Autoimmune Dis,ICMiD, Barcelona, Spain.
    How immunological profile drives clinical phenotype of primary Sjögren's syndrome at diagnosis: analysis of 10,500 patients (Sjögren Big Data Project)2018In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. S102-S112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of the main immunological markers on the disease phenotype at diagnosis in a large international cohort of patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome (SjS).

    Methods: The Big Data Sjogren Project Consortium is an international, multicentre registry created in 2014. As a first step, baseline clinical information from leading centres on clinical research in SjS of the 5 continents was collected. The centres shared a harmonised data architecture and conducted cooperative online efforts in order to refine collected data under the coordination of a big data statistical team. Inclusion criteria were the fulfillment of the 2002 classification criteria. Immunological tests were carried out using standard commercial assays.

    Results: By January 2018, the participant centres had included 10,500 valid patients from 22 countries. The cohort included 9,806 (93%) women and 694 (7%) men, with a mean age at diagnosis of primary SjS of 53 years, mainly White (78%) and included from European countries (71%). The frequency of positive immunological markers at diagnosis was 79.3% for ANA, 73.2% for anti-Ro, 48.6% for RF, 45.1% for anti-La, 13.4% for low C3 levels, 14.5% for low C4 levels and 7.3% for cryoglobulins. Positive autoantibodies (ANA, Ro, La) correlated with a positive result in salivary gland biopsy, while hypocomplementaemia and especially cryoglobulinaemia correlated with systemic activity (mean ESSDAI score of 17.7 for ctyoglobulins, 11.3 for low C3 and 9.2 for low C4, in comparison with 3.8 for negative markers). The immunological markers with a great number of statistically-significant associations (p<0.001) in the organ-by-organ ESSDAI evaluation were cryoglobulins (9 domains), low C3 (8 domains), anti-La (7 domains) and low C4 (6 domains).

    Conclusion: We confirm the strong influence of immunological markers on the phenotype of primary SjS at diagnosis in the largest multi-ethnic international cohort ever analysed, with a greater influence for cryoglobulinaemic-related markers in comparison with Ro/La autoantibodies and ANA. Immunological patterns play a central role in the phenotypic expression of the disease already at the time of diagnosis, and may guide physicians to design a specific personalised management during the follow-up of patients with primary SjS.

  • 12. Damoiseaux, J.
    et al.
    Agmon-Levin, N.
    Van Blerk, M.
    Chopyak, V.
    Eriksson, Catharina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Heijnen, I.
    Herold, M.
    Hogasen, K.
    Musset, L.
    Radice, A.
    Rego de Sousa, M. J.
    Viander, M.
    Shoenfeld, Y.
    From ANA-screening to antigen-specificity: an EASI-survey on the daily practice in European countries2014In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 539-546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    One of the main goals of the European Autoimmunity Standardisation Initiative (EASI) is the harmonisation of test-algorithms for autoantibodies related to systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD).

    Methods

    A questionnaire was used to gather information on methodology, interpretation, and the algorithm for detection of anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) in relation to their antigen-specificity. The questionnaire was sent to 1200 laboratories in 12 European countries.

    Results

    The response rate was 47.2%. The results reveal not only apparent differences between countries, but also within countries.

    Conclusion

    Awareness of these differences may as such already stimulate harmonisation, but the observed differences may also direct recommendations that may further contribute to achieving the EASI goal of harmonisation of autoimmune diagnostics for SARD.

  • 13. Deminger, A.
    et al.
    Klingberg, E.
    Lorentzon, M.
    Carlsten, H.
    Jacobsson, L. T. H.
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH CHANGES IN VOLUMETRIC BONE MINERAL DENSITY IN PATIENTS WITH ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS: A FIVE-YEAR PROSPECTIVE STUDY USING HRpQCT2018In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 706-706Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14. Esbjornsson, A-C
    et al.
    Aalto, K.
    Univ Helsinki, Childrens Hosp, Dept Paediat, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Cent Hosp, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland..
    Brostrom, E. W.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Children Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fasth, A.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Pediat, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Herlin, T.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Paediat, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark..
    Nielsen, S.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Rigshosp, Dept Pediat Rheumatol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Nordal, E.
    Univ Hosp North Norway, Dept Paediat, Tromso, Norway.;Arctic Univ Norway, UIT, Inst Clin Med, Tromso, Norway..
    Peltoniemi, S.
    Univ Helsinki, Childrens Hosp, Dept Paediat, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Cent Hosp, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland..
    Rygg, M.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Lab Med Childrens & Womens Hlth, N-7034 Trondheim, Norway.;St Olavs Hosp, Dept Paediat, Trondheim, Norway..
    Zak, M.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Rigshosp, Dept Pediat Rheumatol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Berntson, Lillemor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Ankle arthritis predicts polyarticular disease course and unfavourable outcome in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis2015In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 751-757Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To evaluate the occurrence, clinical characteristics and prognostic factors associated with ankle arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods 440 children with JIA were followed for eight years in a prospective Nordic population-based cohort study. Data on remission was available for 427 of these children. Occurrence of clinically assessed ankle arthritis was analysed in relation to JIA category, clinical characteristics and remission data eight years after disease onset. Results In 440 children with JIA, 251 (57%) experienced ankle arthritis during the first eight years of disease. Ankle arthritis was least common in the persistent oligoarticular category (25%) and most common in children with extended oligoarticular (83%) and polyarticular RF-negative (85%) JIA. Children who developed ankle arthritis during the first year of disease were younger at disease onset (median age 4.9 (IQR 2.1-8.8) vs. 6.6 (IQR 2.8-10.1) years, p<0.003) and had more cumulative affected joints at 8-year follow-up (median involved joints 10 (IQR 6-16) vs. 3 (IQR 2-9), p<0.001). The odds ratio for not achieving remission eight years after disease onset, if the ankle joint was involved during the first year of disease was 2.0 (95 %.0, p<0.001). Hind-, mid- and forefoot involvements were more common compared to patients without ankle arthritis. Conclusion In this Nordic population-based 8-year follow-up study, occurrence of ankle arthritis during the first year was associated with an unfavourable disease outcome. We suggest that ankle arthritis should be recognised in the assessment of prognosis and choice of treatment strategy in JIA.

  • 15. Exarchou, S.
    et al.
    Lindström, U.
    Sigurdardottir, V
    Sundström, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Askling, J.
    Eriksson, J. K.
    Forsblad d'Elia, H.
    Turesson, C.
    Kristensen, L. E.
    Jacobsson, L.
    Validity of ankylosing spondylitis and spondyloarthritis diagnoses in the swedish national patient register2014In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 802-802Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16. Gron, K. L.
    et al.
    Ornbjerg, L. M.
    Hetland, M. L.
    Aslam, F.
    Khan, N. A.
    Jacobs, J. W. G.
    Henrohn, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Rasker, J. J.
    Kauppi, M. J.
    Lang, H. -C
    Mota, L. M. H.
    Aggarwal, A.
    Yamanaka, H.
    Badsha, H.
    Gossec, L.
    Cutolo, M.
    Ferraccioli, G.
    Gremese, E.
    Lee, E. Bong
    Inanc, N.
    Direskeneli, H.
    Taylor, P.
    Huisman, M.
    Alten, R.
    Pohl, C.
    Oyoo, O.
    Stropuviene, S.
    Drosos, A. A.
    Kerzberg, E.
    Ancuta, C.
    Mofti, A.
    Bergman, M.
    Detert, J.
    Selim, Z. I.
    Abda, E. A.
    Rexhepi, B.
    Sokka, T.
    The association of fatigue, comorbidity burden, disease activity, disability and gross domestic product in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.: Results from 34 countries participating in the Quest-RA programme2014In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 869-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim is to assess the prevalence of comorbidities and to further analyse to which degree fatigue can be explained by comorbidity burden, disease activity, disability and gross domestic product (GDP) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Nine thousands eight hundred seventy-four patients from 34 countries, 16 with high GDP (>24.000 US dollars [USD] per capita) and 18 low-GDP countries (<24.000 USD) participated in the Quantitative Standard monitoring of Patients with RA (QUEST-RA) study. The prevalence of 31 comorbid conditions, fatigue (0-10 cm visual analogue scale [VAS] [10 worst]), disease activity in 28 joints (DAS28), and physical disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire score MAW) were assessed. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the association between fatigue and comorbidities, disease activity, disability and GDP. Results Overall, patients reported a median of 2 comorbid conditions of which hypertension (31.5%), osteoporosis (17.6%), osteoarthritis (15.5%) and hyperlipidaemia (14.2%) were the most prevalent. The majority of comorbidities were more common in high-GDP countries. The median fatigue score was 4.4 (4.8 in low-GDP countries and 3.8 in high-GDP countries, p<0.001). In low-GDP countries 25.4% of the patients had a high level of fatigue (>6.6) compared with 23.0% in high-GDP countries (p<0.001). In univariate analysis, fatigue increased with increasing number of comorbidities, disease activity and disability in both high- and low-GDP countries. In multivariate analysis of all countries, these 3 variables explained 29.4% of the variability, whereas GDP was not significant. Conclusion Fatigue is a widespread problem associated with high comorbidity burden, disease activity and disability regardless of GDP.

  • 17.
    Jonsson, E.
    et al.
    Dept Rheumatol, Östersund, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology. Inst Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Östersund, Sweden.
    Rantapää Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Quality of life in SLE of various disease durations and in correlation to disease burden: a cross sectional study2015In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 33, no 3 Supplement: 90, p. S40-S40, article id Meeting Abstract: P5.09Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Juneblad, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Mortality and cardiovascular comorbidity in psoriatic arthritis2014In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 796-796Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Khanam, Sharmily
    et al.
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Arthrit & Clin Immunol Res Progam, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA.
    Joachims, Michelle L.
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Arthrit & Clin Immunol Res Progam, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA.
    Means, Nicholas
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Arthrit & Clin Immunol Res Progam, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA;Univ Oklahoma, Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Pathol, Oklahoma City, OK USA.
    Adrianto, Indra
    Henry Ford Hlth Syst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI USA.
    Rasmussen, Astrid
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Arthrit & Clin Immunol Res Progam, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA.
    Bowman, Simon J.
    Univ Hosp Birmingham, Rheumatol Dept, Birmingham, W Midlands, England.
    Lewis, David M.
    Univ Oklahoma, Coll Dent, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Pathol, Oklahoma City, OK USA.
    Radfar, Lida
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Arthrit & Clin Immunol Res Progam, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA;Univ Oklahoma, Coll Dent, Oral Diag & Radiol Dept, Oklahoma City, OK USA.
    Omdal, Roald
    Stavanger Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Clin Immunol Unit, Stavanger, Norway.
    Wahren-Herleniuss, Marie
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alevizos, Ilias
    Natl Inst Dent & Craniofacial Res, Sjogrens Syndrome Clin, Bethesda, MD USA.
    Witte, Torsten
    Hannover Nted Sch, Dept Clin Immunol & Rheumatol, Hannover, Germany.
    Jonsson, Roland
    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Bergen, Norway;Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Broegelmann Res Lab, Bergen, Norway.
    Rischmueller, Maureen
    Queen Elizabeth Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Adelaide, SA, Australia;Univ Adelaide, Discipline Med, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
    Gaffney, Patrick M.
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Arthrit & Clin Immunol Res Progam, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA.
    James, Judith A.
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Arthrit & Clin Immunol Res Progam, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA;Univ Oklahoma, Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Pathol, Oklahoma City, OK USA;Univ Oklahoma, Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Med, Oklahoma City, OK USA.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Theander, Elke
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Malmo, Sweden.
    Rhodus, Nelson L.
    Univ Minnesota, Sch Dent, Dept Oral Surg, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA.
    Segal, Barbara M.
    Univ Minnesota, Sch Med, Div Rheumatol, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA.
    Scofield, R. Hal
    Univ Oklahoma, Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Med, Oklahoma City, OK USA;Dept Vet Affairs Med Ctr, Oklahoma City, OK USA.
    Montgomery, Courtney G.
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Arthrit & Clin Immunol Res Progam, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA.
    Mariette, Xavier
    Univ Paris Sud, Hop Univ Paris Sud, AP HP, INSERM,U1012, Paris, France.
    Ng, Wan-Fai
    Newcastle Univ, Inst Cellular Med, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sivils, Kathy L.
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Arthrit & Clin Immunol Res Progam, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA;Univ Oklahoma, Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Pathol, Oklahoma City, OK USA.
    Lessard, Christopher J.
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Arthrit & Clin Immunol Res Progam, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA;Univ Oklahoma, Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Pathol, Oklahoma City, OK USA.
    Functional characterization of the Sjögren's syndrome-associated locus DDX6-CXCR52018In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. S286-S287Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20. Klingberg, E.
    et al.
    Magnusson, M.
    Strid, H.
    Deminger, A.
    Carlsten, H.
    Ohman, L.
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    GUT DYSBIOSIS IN ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED FECAL CALPROTECTIN2018In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 696-696, article id Meeting Abstract: O1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Knight, Ann
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Ekbom, Anders
    Brandt, Lena
    Askling, Johan
    What is the significance in routine care of c-ANCA/PR3-ANCA in the abscence of systemic vasculitis?: A case series2008In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 26, no 3, p. S53-S56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. ANCA has come to play an important role in diagnosing vasculitis. In selected populations c-ANCA/PR3-ANCA has a high specificity and sensitivity for vasculitis. In clinical practice, how individuals with c-ANCA/PR3-ANCA but without sufficient evidence of systemic vasculitis should be managed is unclear. We therefore retrospectively assessed the disease panorama and outcome in a consecutive series of individuals with c-ANCA/PR3-ANCA, and studied in detail those individuals who turned out not to fulfil criteria for vasculitic disease.

    Methods. The study population consisted of 74 consecutive patients who all had a positive test for C-ANCA and PR3-ANCA between 1992 and 2002 at the Immunology laboratory at Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. The patients' medical files were reviewed and their diagnosis re-evaluated through June 2006.

    Results. 18 of the 74 ANCA-positive individuals did not present clinical evidence supportive of, or insufficient to support, a diagnosis of systemic vasculitis, but presented a range of other diseases. During a mean follow-up of 6.8 years, none of these 18 patients developed vasculitis.

    Conclusions. Individuals with a positive c-ANCA and PR3-ANCA but no vasculitis at the time of testing run an unknown but likely small risk of later developing vasculitis. In this group, a positive ANCA may represent background noise (borderline titres) or be a marker of inflammatory activity rather than of vasculitic disease (high titres).

  • 22.
    Kumar, A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Do, Lan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Hellman, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    OVEREXPRESSION OF MACROPHAGE MIGRATION INHIBITORY FACTOR IN PATIENTS WITH ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS AND ITS RELATION TO SEX, INFLAMMATION AND TREATMENT2018In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 716-716Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Law, Lucy
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Beckman Rehnman, Jeannette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Deminger, A.
    Klingberg, E.
    Jacobsson, L. T. H.
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology. Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    FACTORS RELATED TO HEALTH RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE IN ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS, OVERALL AND STRATIFIED BY SEX2018In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 714-714, article id P36Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Lindqvist, U.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Wernroth, M. L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Husmark, T.
    Falun Cent Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Falu, Sweden..
    Larsson, P.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Geijer, M.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden.;Univ Hosp, Dept Radiol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Teleman, A.
    Spenshult Hosp, Spenshult AB, Oskarstrom, Sweden..
    Theander, E.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp Malmo, Dept Rheumatol, Lund, Sweden..
    Alenius, G. -M
    DAPSA, DAS28 and MDA predict long-term treatment regime in psoriatic arthritis. The Swedish Early Psoriatic Arthritis Cohort2017In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 936-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To describe treatment patterns in the Swedish early psoriatic arthritis cohort (SwePsA) of the mono-/oligo-arthritic (M/O) and polyarthritis (P) and identify early predictive factors for treatment with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic (DMARD), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), and tumour necrosis factor inhibition (TNFi) after 5 years. Methods Data for 198 M/O and P PsA were obtained within the programme for SwePsA. Multinomial and binary logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between early predictive factors and treatment after 5 years adjusted for age at inclusion. The analysis of DMARD/NSAID was adjusted for medication at inclusion. Results After inclusion visit, DMARD was prescribed in 30% of M/O and 56% of P PsA; mainly methotrexate. TNFi was not prescribed at inclusion, but 23 patients were treated at 5-year follow-up. The adjusted OR (95% CI) for treatment with both DMARD and NSAID after 5 years was 3.65 (1.34 - 9.89) (p=0.010) for Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28) >3.2 and 2.90 (1.20-6.99) (p=0.038) for Disease Activity Index in Psoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) >14 at inclusion. TNFi treatment was, after adjusting for age, associated with high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.0043), high C-reactive protein (p=0.013), DAPSA (p<0.001), not reaching minimal disease activity (p=0.001) high health assessment questionnaire (p=0.001), patient's overall assessment on the visual analogue scale (VAS) (p=0.009), high pain VAS (p=0.007), and high number of tender and swollen joints (p=0.031) at inclusion. Conclusion Disease activity in early M/O and P PsA is to be considered in deciding the level of health care assessment and future pharmacological treatment. DAS28 >3.2 and DAPSA>14 early in the disease predict subsequent treatment with DMARD. For prediction of biological treatment, not reaching MDA at onset of disease, would be the composite index of choice.

  • 25. Lindqvist, U.
    et al.
    Wernroth, M. -L
    Husmark, T.
    Larsson, P.
    Geijer, M.
    Teleman, A.
    Theander, E.
    Alenius, Gerd-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    DAPSA, DAS28 and MDA predict long-term treatment regime in psoriatic arthritis: the Swedish Early Psoriatic Arthritis Cohort2017In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 936-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe treatment patterns in the Swedish early psoriatic arthritis cohort (SwePsA) of the mono-/oligo-arthritic (M/O) and polyarthritis (P) and identify early predictive factors for treatment with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic (DMARD), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), and tumour necrosis factor inhibition (TNFi) after 5 years. Methods: Data for 198 M/O and P PsA were obtained within the programme for SwePsA. Multinomial and binary logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between early predictive factors and treatment after 5 years adjusted for age at inclusion. The analysis of DMARD/NSAID was adjusted for medication at inclusion. Results: After inclusion visit, DMARD was prescribed in 30% of M/O and 56% of P PsA; mainly methotrexate. TNFi was not prescribed at inclusion, but 23 patients were treated at 5-year follow-up. The adjusted OR (95% CI) for treatment with both DMARD and NSAID after 5 years was 3.65 (1.34 - 9.89) (p=0.010) for Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28) >3.2 and 2.90 (1.20-6.99) (p=0.038) for Disease Activity Index in Psoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) >14 at inclusion. TNFi treatment was, after adjusting for age, associated with high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.0043), high C-reactive protein (p=0.013), DAPSA (p<0.001), not reaching minimal disease activity (p=0.001) high health assessment questionnaire (p=0.001), patient's overall assessment on the visual analogue scale (VAS) (p=0.009), high pain VAS (p=0.007), and high number of tender and swollen joints (p=0.031) at inclusion. Conclusion: Disease activity in early M/O and P PsA is to be considered in deciding the level of health care assessment and future pharmacological treatment. DAS28 >3.2 and DAPSA>14 early in the disease predict subsequent treatment with DMARD. For prediction of biological treatment, not reaching MDA at onset of disease, would be the composite index of choice.

  • 26.
    Lindqvist, U.
    et al.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wernroth, M. -L
    Uppsala Clinical Research Centre, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Husmark, T.
    Department of Rheumatology, Falu Hospital, Falun, Sweden.
    Larsson, P.
    Department of Rheumatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Geijer, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Teleman, A.
    Spenshult Hospital, Spenshult AB, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Theander, E.
    Department of Rheumatology, Skåne University Hospital Malmö, Lund University, Sweden.
    Alenius, G. -M
    Department of Public Health and Clinical, Medicine/Rheumatology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    DAPSA, DAS28 and MDA predict long-term treatment regime in psoriatic arthritis: The Swedish Early Psoriatic Arthritis Cohort2017In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 936-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe treatment patterns in the Swedish early psoriatic arthritis cohort (SwePsA) of the mono-/oligo-arthritic (M/O) and polyarthritis (P) and identify early predictive factors for treatment with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic (DMARD), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), and tumour necrosis factor inhibition (TNFi) after 5 years.

    Methods: Data for 198 M/O and P PsA were obtained within the programme for SwePsA. Multinomial and binary logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between early predictive factors and treatment after 5 years adjusted for age at inclusion. The analysis of DMARD/NSAID was adjusted for medication at inclusion.

    Results: After inclusion visit, DMARD was prescribed in 30% of M/O and 56% of P PsA; mainly methotrexate. TNFi was not prescribed at inclusion, but 23 patients were treated at 5-year follow-up. The adjusted OR (95% CI) for treatment with both DMARD and NSAID after 5 years was 3.65 (1.34 - 9.89) (p=0.010) for Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28) >3.2 and 2.90 (1.20-6.99) (p=0.038) for Disease Activity Index in Psoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) >14 at inclusion. TNFi treatment was, after adjusting for age, associated with high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.0043), high C-reactive protein (p=0.013), DAPSA (p<0.001), not reaching minimal disease activity (p=0.001) high health assessment questionnaire (p=0.001), patient's overall assessment on the visual analogue scale (VAS) (p=0.009), high pain VAS (p=0.007), and high number of tender and swollen joints (p=0.031) at inclusion.

    Conclusion: Disease activity in early M/O and P PsA is to be considered in deciding the level of health care assessment and future pharmacological treatment. DAS28 >3.2 and DAPSA>14 early in the disease predict subsequent treatment with DMARD. For prediction of biological treatment, not reaching MDA at onset of disease, would be the composite index of choice.

  • 27.
    Lindqvist, Ulla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Gudbjornsson, B.
    Iversen, L.
    Paimela, L.
    Laasonen, L.
    Ejstrup, L.
    Ternowitz, T.
    Stahle, M.
    Quality of Life of Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis Mutilans - The Nordic Pam Study2014In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 778-778Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Lindqvist, Ulla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Husmark, T.
    Aleniu, G. M.
    Larsson, P. T.
    Teleman, A.
    Geijer, M.
    Theander, E.
    Treatment in Mono-/Oligo- and Polyarthritic Patients: a 5-Year Study on the Swedish Early Psoriatic Arthritis Cohort (SWEPSA)2012In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 642-642Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Ljung, Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Engstrand, S
    Wållberg-Jonsson, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist is associated with both lipid metabolism and inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis2007In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 617-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is a relationship between cardiovascular morbidity, inflammatory activity, and changes in the lipid profile in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), although the mechanisms are not fully elaborated. Recent know-ledge that white adipose tissue (WAT) is a producer of immunologically and metabolically active substances gives another perspective to study.

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and variables associated with WAT and inflammation in RA.

    METHODS: Anthropometric, inflammatory and metabolic variables were assessed in 23 women with RA and 23 matched controls. Spearman, partial correlation and factor analyses were performed.

    RESULTS: Inflammatory markers were increased in patients. In both groups, IL-1Ra correlated with leptin independent of age and BMI. IL-1Ra also correlated with haptoglobin and apolipoprotein (Apo) B in patients and with soluble TNF receptor (sTNFR) 1 in controls. In factor analysis, three latent factors were identified among patients. The first loaded on IL-1Ra, leptin, BMI, ApoB and body fat content (BF%), the second loaded on IL1-Ra and sTNF-receptors and the third showed inverse loadings on ApoA-I together with loadings on ESR, haptoglobin, orosomucoid, BF% and BMI.

    CONCLUSION: IL-1Ra was associated with markers of inflammation and with fat-related factors in RA patients, suggesting a dualistic relationship of IL-1Ra in RA. IL-1Ra correlated independently with leptin in both patients and controls, indicating a relationship between inflammation and leptin.

  • 30.
    Lourenco, F.
    et al.
    Hosp Curry Cabral, Autoimmune Dis Unit, CHLC, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Katsarogiannis, Evangelos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Berntsson, Shala
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Moraes-Fontes, M. F.
    Hosp Curry Cabral, Autoimmune Dis Unit, CHLC, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Systemic Lupus Erythematous and Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy: focus on lymphopenia2015In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 33, no 3, p. S33-S33Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Mathsson Alm, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Thermo Fisher Sci, Immuno Diagnost, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Fountain, D. L.
    PHMR Ltd, London, England..
    Cadwell, K. K.
    PHMR Ltd, London, England..
    Madrigal, A. M.
    PHMR Ltd, London, England..
    Gallo, G.
    Thermo Fisher Sci, Immuno Diagnost, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Poorafshar, M.
    Thermo Fisher Sci, Immuno Diagnost, Uppsala, Sweden..
    The performance of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide assays in diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis2018In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 144-152Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. We assessed the ability of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) tests to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis (RA), comparing the effect of manufacturer assay type, study design (single-and two-gated) and duration of disease (early vs. established). Methods. We searched seven data-bases for relevant diagnostic studies containing data on CCP tests in known or suspected RA patients. We used a bi-variate model to produce summary estimates for test sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios. Summary Receiver Operating Characteristic (sROC) curves were derived to compare early versus established RA. Results. 83 studies were identified and included. For individual manufacturer tests there was considerable variation in both pooled sensitivity (range 67-83%) and specificity (range 90-96%) estimates. This heterogeneity was also observed when grouping studies into two-gated and single-gated designs. Study design and disease duration impacted on sensitivity, with single-gated study designs and early RA patients resulting in lower estimates than two-gated and established disease, respectively. Conclusion. This review highlights the large number of CCP tests that are now commercially available and the considerable variation in their diagnostic performance. This variation, although partly influenced in this analysis by the study design (single-gated vs. two-gated), seems to have different levels of impact depending on the manufacturers. The Thermo Fisher Scientific EliA and Inova Diagnostics Quanta Lite (CCP2) tests showed the least between-study variation in sensitivity and specificity suggesting they have the most consistent diagnostic performance overall.

  • 32.
    Matt, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Chemical Biology.
    Lindqvist, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    FC Gamma Receptors in Active Psoriatic Arthritis (PSA)2012In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 634-634Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Mattsson, Malin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Möller, Bozena
    Sunderby sjukhus, Luleå, Department of Rheumatology, Sunderby Hospital.
    Stamm, Tanja A.
    Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Rheumatology, Medical University of Vienna.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Boström, C.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet.
    Uncertainties and opportunities for patients with SLE2015In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 33, no 3, p. S5-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Mobarrez, F.
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Vikerfors, A.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gustafsson, J.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gunnarsson, I.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zickert, A.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Larsson, Anders
    Akad Hosp, Dept Clin Chem & Pharmacol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Pisetsky, D.
    Duke Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Med Res Serv, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    Wallen, H.
    Danderyd Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci, Div Cardiovasc Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Svenungsson, E.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    The Expression Of Microparticles In The Blood Of Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): Phenotypic Characterization And Clinical Associations2016In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 34, no 4, p. S70-S70Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Mofors, Johannes
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Arkema, Elisabeth V.
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westermark, Linnea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Bjorki, Albin
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kvarnstrom, Marika
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Rheumatol, Umea, Sweden.
    Bucher, Sara Magnusson
    Orebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Dept Rheumatol, Orebro, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Per
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Mandl, Thomas
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Scania, Sweden.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Infections predispose to developing primary Sjögren's syndrome2018In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. S248-S249Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36. Mofors, Johannes
    et al.
    Arkema, Elisabeth V.
    Westermark, Linnea
    Bjorki, Albin
    Kvarnström, Marika
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Bucher, Sara Magnusson
    Eriksson, Per
    Mandl, Thomas
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Infections predispose to developing primary Sjogren's syndrome2018In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. S248-S249Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Mofors, Johannes
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westermark, Linnea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Bjork, Albin
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kvarnstrom, Marika
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Rheumatol, Umea, Sweden.
    Bucher, Sara Magnusson
    Orebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Dept Rheumatol, Orebro, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Per
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Mandl, Thomas
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Malmo, Sweden.
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Primary Sjögren's syndrome increases the risk of cardiovascular events, with the highest risk in SSA/SSB autoantibody positive patients2018In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. S331-S332Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38. Mofors, Johannes
    et al.
    Westermark, Linnea
    Björk, Albin
    Kvarnström, Marika
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Bucher, Sara Magnusson
    Eriksson, Per
    Mandl, Thomas
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Primary Sjögren's syndrome increases the risk of cardiovascular events, with the highest risk in SSA/SSB autoantibody positive patients2018In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. S331-S332Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39. Naranjo, A.
    et al.
    Toloza, S.
    Guimaraes da Silveira, I.
    Lazovskis, J.
    Hetland, M. L.
    Hamoud, H.
    Peets, T.
    Makinen, H.
    Gossec, L.
    Herborn, G.
    Skopouli, F. N.
    Rojkovich, B.
    Aggarwal, A.
    Minnock, P.
    Cazzato, M.
    Yamanaka, H.
    Oyoo, O.
    Rexhepi, S.
    Andersone, D.
    Baranauskaite, A.
    Hajjaj-Hassouni, N.
    Jacobs, J. W. G.
    Haugeberg, G.
    Sierakowski, S.
    Ionescu, R.
    Karateew, D.
    Dimic, A.
    Henrohn, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Gogus, F.
    Badsha, H.
    Choy, E.
    Bergman, M.
    Sokka, T.
    Smokers and non-smokers with rheumatoid arthritis have similar clinical status: data from the multinational QUEST-RA database2010In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 820-827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To analyse clinical severity/activity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) according to smoking status. Methods The QUEST-RA multinational database reviews patients for Core Data Set measures including 28 swollen and tender joint count, physician global estimate, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), HAQ-function, pain, and patient global estimate, as well as DAS28, rheumatoid factor (RE), nodules, erosions and number of DMARDs were recorded. Smoking status was assessed by self-report as "never smoked", "currently smoking" and "former smokers". Patient groups with different smoking status were compared for demographic and RA measures. Results Among the 7,307 patients with smoking data available, status as "never smoked," "current smoker" and "former smoker" were reported by 65%, 15% and 20%. Ever smokers were more likely to be RF-positive (OR 1.32; 1.17-1.48, p<0.001). Rheumatoid nodules were more frequent in ever smokers (OR 1.41; 1.24-1.59, p<0.001). The percentage of patients with erosive arthritis and extra-articular disease was similar in all smoking categories. Mean DAS28 was 4.4 (SD 1.6) in non-smokers vs. 4.0 (SD 1.6) in those who had ever smoked. However, when adjusted by age, sex, disease duration, and country gross domestic product, only ESR remained significantly different among Core Data Set measures (mean 31.7mm in non-smokers vs. 26.8mm in ever smoked category). Conclusion RA patients who had ever smoked were more likely to have RF and nodules, hut values for other clinical status measures were similar in all smoking categories (never smoked, current smokers and former smokers).

  • 40.
    Oke, V.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Brauner, S.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Gustafsson, J.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zickert, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gunnarsson, I.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Svenungsson, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Increased Serum Levels Of IFN-Lambda 1 Correlate With TH17 Axis Cytokines And Independently To IFN-Alpha Identify Patient Group With Higher Organ Damage2016In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 34, no 4, p. S45-S45Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Ostlie, Ingrid Landgraff
    et al.
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic School of Public Health NHV.
    Aasland, A
    Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and 4 Department of Rheumatology, Rikshospitalet Medical Center, Oslo, Norway.
    Johansson, I
    Department of Nursing, Gj ö vik University College, Norway, Department of Nursing, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Flatö, B
    Department of Rheumatology, Rikshospitalet Medical Center, Oslo, Norway.
    Möller, Anders
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic School of Public Health NHV.
    A longitudinal follow-up study of physical and psychosocial health in young adults with chronic childhood arthritis.2009In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 1039-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to describe physical and psychosocial health status in a second follow-up of a cohort of patients with chronic childhood arthritis, to compare results from the present study with the first follow-up, and to explore the course of physical and psychosocial functioning from baseline.

    METHODS: At a median of 18.3 years after symptom onset 55 patients answered the self-administered questionnaires Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) of pain, fatigue and illness, and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) 30-item version. Results from the current study were compared to first follow-up median 8.7 years after symptom onset, and the course of physical and psychosocial function from baseline was discussed.

    RESULTS: At second follow-up, 38% reported HAQ-DI above 0 indicating physical disability, 22% had a GHQ-30 score in the clinical range indicating psychiatric distress, and fatigue seemed to be an overarching aspect of the health status. Pain was an important correlate of physical disability at first and second follow-up. At second follow-up psychiatric distress was a significant correlate of pain and fatigue, indicating a relation to disease severity. The association between psychosocial functioning and chronic family difficulties observed at first follow-up is not evident at second follow-up.

    CONCLUSIONS: The favourable physical and psychosocial outcome reported at first follow-up seems to persist. However, arthritis-related ill-health is still evident in a considerable proportion of the patients, indicating a constant impact of the disease on every-day life of the individual.

  • 42.
    Retamozo, S.
    et al.
    UNC, Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn CONICET, Inst Invest Ciencias Salud INICSA, Cordoba, Argentina;IUCBC, Cordoba, Argentina.
    Acar-Denizli, N.
    Mimar Sinant Fine Arts Univ, Fac Sci & Letters, Dept Stat, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Rasmussen, A.
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Arthrit & Clin Immunol Res Programme, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA.
    Horvath, I. F.
    Univ Debrecen, Fac Med, Div Clin Immunol, Debrecen, Hungary.
    Baldini, C.
    Univ Pisa, Rheumatol Unit, Pisa, Italy.
    Priori, R.
    Sapienza Univ Rome, Rheumatol Clin, Dept Internal Med & Med Specialties, Rome, Italy.
    Sandhya, P.
    Christian Med Coll & Hosp, Dept Clin Immunol & Rheumatol, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Hernandez-Molina, G.
    Inst Nacl Ciencias Med & Nutr Salvador Zubiran, Immunol & Rheumatol Dept, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.
    Armagan, B.
    Hacettepe Univ, Fac Med, Dept Internal Med, Ankara, Turkey.
    Praprotnik, S.
    Univ Med Ctr, Dept Rheumatol, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Kvarnstrom, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Expt Rheumatol, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gerli, R.
    Univ Perugia, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Perugia, Italy.
    Sebastian, A.
    Wroclaw Med Univ, Dept Rheumatol & Internal Med, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Solans, R.
    Hosp Valle De Hebron, Dept Internal Med, Barcelona, Spain.
    Rischmueller, M.
    Queen Elizabeth Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Adelaide, SA, Australia;Univ Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
    Pasoto, S. G.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Fac Med, HCFMUSP, Hosp Clin,Rheumatol Div, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Valim, V.
    Univ Fed Espirito Santo, Dept Med, Vitoria, ES, Brazil.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Kruize, A. A.
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Dept Rheumatol & Clin Immunol, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Nakamura, H.
    Nagasaki Univ, Grad Sch Biomed Sci, Div Adv Prevent Med Sci, Dept Immunol & Rheumatol, Nagasaka, Yamanashi, Japan.
    Hofauer, B.
    Univ Freiburg, Otorhinolaryngol Head & Neck Surg, Freiburg, Germany.
    Giacomelli, R.
    Univ Aquila, Sch Med, Clin Unit Rheumatol, Laquila, Italy.
    Fernandes Moca Trevisani, V.
    Univ Fed Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Devauchelle-Pensec, V.
    Brest Univ Hosp, Rheumatol Dept, Paris, France.
    Atzeni, F.
    Univ Messina, Inst Milan, IRCCS Galeazzi Orthopaed, Messina, Italy;Univ Messina, Rheumatol Unit, Messina, Italy.
    Gheita, T. A.
    Cairo Univ, Kasr Al Amny Sch Med, Rheumatol Dept, Cairo, Egypt.
    Consani-Fernandez, S.
    Hosp Maciel, Internal Med, Montevideo, Uruguay;Univ Republ UdelaR, Montevideo, Uruguay.
    Szanto, A.
    Univ Debrecen, Fac Med, Div Clin Immunol, Debrecen, Hungary.
    Sivils, K.
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Arthrit & Clin Immunol Res Programme, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA.
    Gattamelata, A.
    Sapienza Univ Rome, Rheumatol Clin, Dept Internal Med & Med Specialties, Rome, Italy.
    Danda, D.
    Christian Med Coll & Hosp, Dept Clin Immunol & Rheumatol, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Kilic, L.
    Hacettepe Univ, Fac Med, Dept Internal Med, Ankara, Turkey.
    Bartoloni, E.
    Bombardieri, S.
    Sanchez-Guerrero, J.
    Inst Nacl Ciencias Med & Nutr Salvador Zubiran, Immunol & Rheumatol Dept, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.
    Wahren-Herlenius, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Expt Rheumatol, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mariette, X.
    Univ Paris Sud, Ctr Immunol Viral Infect & Autoimmune Dis, Hop Univ Paris Sud, AP HP,UMR1184,INSERM, Paris, France.
    Ramos-Casals, M.
    Univ Barcelona, Sjogrens Syndrome Res Grp AGAUR, Lab Autoimmune Dis Josep Font,Hosp Clin, IDIBAPS CELLEX,Dept Autoimmune Dis ICMiD, Barcelona, Spain.
    Brito-Zeron, P.
    Univ Barcelona, Sjogrens Syndrome Res Grp AGAUR, Lab Autoimmune Dis Josep Font,Hosp Clin, IDIBAPS CELLEX,Dept Autoimmune Dis ICMiD, Barcelona, Spain;Hosp CIMA Sanitas, Dept Med, Autoinmmne Dis Unit, Barcelona, Spain.
    Systemic manifestations of primary Sjogren's syndrome out of the ESSDAI classification: prevalence and clinical relevance in a large international, multi-ethnic cohort of patients2019In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 37, no 3, p. S97-S106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To analyse the frequency and characterise the systemic presentation of primary Sjogren's syndrome (SS) out of the ESSDAI classification in a large international, multi-ethnic cohort of patients. Methods: The Big Data Sjogren Project Consortium is an international, multicentre registry based on world-wide data-sharing and cooperative merging of pre-existing clinical SS databases from leading centres in clinical research in SS from the five continents. A list of 26 organ-by-organ systemic features not currently included in the ESSDAI classification was defined according to previous studies; these features were retrospectively recorded. Results: Information about non-ESSDAI features was available in 6331 patients [5,917 female, mean age at diagnosis 52 years, mainly White (86.3%)]. A total of 1641 (26%) patients had at least one of the ESSDAI systemic features. Cardiovascular manifestations were the most frequent organ-specific group of non-ESSDAI features reported in our patients (17% of the total cohort), with Raynaud's phenomenon being reported in 15%. Patients with systemic disease due to non-ESSDAI features had a lower frequency of dry mouth (90.7% vs. 94.1%, p<0.001) and positive minor salivary gland biopsy (86.7% vs. 89%, p=0.033), a higher frequency of anti-Ro/SSA (74.7% vs. 68.7%, p<0.001), anti-La/SSB antibodies (44.5% vs. 40.4%, p=0.004), ANA (82.7% vs. 79.5%, p=0.006), low C3 levels (17.4% vs. 9.7%, p<0.001), low C4 levels (14.4% vs. 9.6%, p<0.001), and positive serum cryoglobulins (8.6% vs. 5.5%, p=0.001). Systemic activity measured by the ESSDAI, clinESSDAI and DAS was higher in patients with systemic disease out of the ESSDAI in comparison with those without these features (p<0.001 for all comparisons). Conclusions: More than a quarter of patients with primary SS may have systemic manifestations not currently included in the ESSDAI classification, with a wide variety of cardiovascular, digestive, pulmonary, neurological, ocular, ENT (ear, nose, and throat), cutaneous and urological features that increase the scope of the systemic phenotype of the disease. However, the individual frequency of each of these non-ESSDAI features was very low, except for Raynaud's phenomenon.

  • 43.
    Retamozo, Soledad
    et al.
    Univ Barcelona, Sjogren Syndrome Res Grp AGAUR, Lab Autoinumme Dis Josep Font, IDIBAPS CELLEX,Dept Autoimmune Dis,Hosp Clin,ICMi, Barcelona, Spain;Hosp Privado Univ Cordoba, Inst Univ Ciencias Biomed Cordoba IUCBC, Cordoba, Argentina;Univ Nacl Cordoba UNC, Inst Invest Ciencias Salud INICSA, Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn CONICET, Cordoba, Argentina.
    Acar-Denizli, Nihan
    Mimar Sinn Fine Arts Univ, Dept Stat, Fac Sci & Letters, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Zeher, Margit
    Univ Debrecen, Div Clin Immunol, Fac Med, Debrecen, Hungary.
    Sivils, Kathy
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Arthrit & Clin Immunol Res Program, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA.
    Mandl, Thomas
    Lund Univ, Malmo Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Lund, Sweden.
    Seror, Raphaele
    Hop Univ Paris Sud, AP HP, Ctr Immunol Viral Infect & Autoimmune Dis, Le Kremlin Bicetre, France;Univ Paris Sud, INSERM, Paris, France.
    Li, Xiaomei
    Anhui Prov Hosp, Dept Rheumatol & Immunol, Hefei, Anhui, Peoples R China.
    Baldini, Chiara
    Univ Pisa, Rheumatol Unit, Pisa, Italy.
    Mariette, Xavier
    Hop Univ Paris Sud, AP HP, Ctr Immunol Viral Infect & Autoimmune Dis, Le Kremlin Bicetre, France;Univ Paris Sud, INSERM, Paris, France.
    Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric
    Univ Strasbourg, Strasboure Univ Hosp, CNRS, Dept Rheumatol, Strasbourg, France.
    Danda, Debashish
    Christian Med Coll & Hosp, Dept Clin Immunol & Rheumatol, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Priori, Roberta
    Sapienza Univ Rome, Dept Internal Med & Med Specialties, Rheumatol Clin, Rome, Italy.
    Quartuccio, Luca
    Univ Hosp Santa Maria della Misericordia, Dept Med & Biol Sci, Clin Rheumatol, Udine, Italy.
    Hernandez-Molina, Gabriela
    Inst Nacl Ciencias Med & Nutr Salvador Zubiran, Dept Immunol & Rheumatol, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.
    Armagan, Berkan
    Hacettepe Univ, Dept Internal Med, Div Rheumatol, Fac Med, Ankara, Turkey.
    Kruize, Aike A.
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Dept Rheumatol & Clin Immunol, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Kwok, Seung-Ki
    Catholic Univ Korea, Seoul St Marys Hosp, Seoul, South Korea.
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Unit Expt Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Praprotnik, Sonja
    Univ Med Ctr, Dept Rheumatol, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Sene, Damien
    Univ Paris VII, Hop Lariboisiere, AP HP, Serv Med Interne 2, Paris 2, France.
    Bartoloni, Elena
    Univ Perugia, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Perugia, Italy.
    Rischmueller, Maureen
    Univ Western Australia, Sch Med, Dept Rhetunatol, Crawley, Australia.
    Solans, Roser
    Hosp Valle De Hebron, Dept Internal Med, Barcelona, Spain.
    Suzuki, Yasunori
    Kanazawa Univ Hosp, Div Rheumatol, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan.
    Isenberg, David
    UCL, Ctr Rheumatol, Div Med, London, England.
    Valim, Valeria
    Univ Fed Espirito Santo, Dept Med, Vitoria, Brazil.
    Wiland, Piotr
    Wroclaw Med Hosp, Dept Rheumatol & Internal Med, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Fraile, Guadalupe
    Hosp Ramon & Cajal, Dept Internal Med, Madrid, Spain.
    Bootsma, Hendrika
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Rheumatol & Clin Immunol, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Nakamura, Takashi
    Nagasaki Univ, Dept Radiol & Canc Biol, Grad Sch Biomed Sci, Nagasaki, Japan.
    Giacomelli, Roberto
    Univ Aquila, Clin Unit Rheumatol, Sch Med, Laquila, Italy.
    Devauchelle-Pensec, Valerie
    Brest Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Brest, France.
    Hofauer, Benedikt
    Tech Univ Munich, Hals Nasen Ohrenklin & Poliklin, Munich, Germany.
    Bombardieri, Michele
    Queen Mary Univ London, Ctr Expt Med & Rheumatol, London, England.
    Moca Trevisani, Virginia Fernandes
    Univ Fed Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Hammenfors, Daniel
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Bergen, Norway.
    Pasoto, Sandra G.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Rheumatol Div, Hosp Clin, Fac Med, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Carsons, Steven E.
    SUNY Stony Brook, Winthrop Univ Hosp, Sch Med, Div Rheumatol Allergy & Immunol, Mineola, NY 11501 USA.
    Gheita, Tamer A.
    Cairo Univ, Kasr Al Ainy Sch Med, Dept Rheumatol, Cairo, Egypt.
    Atzeni, Fabiola
    IRCCS Galeazzi Orthoped Inst, Milan, Italy.
    Morel, Jacques
    Teaching Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Montpellier, France;Univ Montpellier, Montpellier, France.
    Vollenveider, Cristina
    German Hosp, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina.
    Brito-Zeron, Pilar
    Univ Barcelona, Sjogren Syndrome Res Grp AGAUR, Lab Autoinumme Dis Josep Font, IDIBAPS CELLEX,Dept Autoimmune Dis,Hosp Clin,ICMi, Barcelona, Spain;Hosp CIMA Sanitas, Autoimmune Dis Unit, Dept Med, Barcelona, Spain.
    Ramos-Casals, Manuel
    Univ Barcelona, Sjogren Syndrome Res Grp AGAUR, Lab Autoinumme Dis Josep Font, IDIBAPS CELLEX,Dept Autoimmune Dis,Hosp Clin,ICMi, Barcelona, Spain.
    Systemic Sjögren presenting without sicca syndrome: characterization of 240 patients according to the new 2017 ACR/EULAR Classification Criteria2018In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. S268-S269Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Retamozo, Soledad
    et al.
    Univ Barcelona, Sjogren Syndrome Res Grp AGAUR, Lab Autoimmune Dis Josep Font, Dept Autoimmune Dis,ICMiD,Hosp Clin,IDIBAPS CELLE, Barcelona, Spain;Hosp Privado Univ Cordoba, Inst Univ Ciencias Biomed Cordoba IUCBC, Cordoba, Argentina;Univ Nacl Cordoba UNC, Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn CONICET, Inst Invest Ciencias Salud INICSA, Cordoba, Argentina.
    Kostov, Belchin
    GESCLINIC, Ctr Assistencia Primaria ABS Corts, Primary Care Res Grp, IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain.
    Zeher, Margit
    Univ Debrecen, Div Clin Immunol, Fac Med, Debrecen, Hungary.
    Sivils, Kathy
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Arthrit & Clin Immunol Res Program, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA.
    Mandl, Thomas
    Lund Univ, Malmo Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Lund, Sweden.
    Seror, Raphaele
    Hop Univ Paris Sud, AP HP, Ctr Immunol Viral Infect & Autoimmune Dis, Le Kremlin Bicetre, France;Univ Paris Sud, INSERM, Paris, France.
    Li, Xiaomei
    Anhui Prov Hosp, Hefei, Peoples R China.
    Baldini, Chiara
    Univ Pisa, Rheumatol Unit, Pisa, Italy.
    Mariette, Xavier
    Hop Univ Paris Sud, AP HP, Ctr Immunol Viral Infect & Autoimmune Dis, Le Kremlin Bicetre, France;Univ Paris Sud, INSERM, Paris, France.
    Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric
    Univ Strasbourg, Strasbourg Univ Hosp, CNRS, Dept Rheumatol, Strasbourg, France.
    Danda, Debashish
    Christian Med Coll & Hosp, Dept Clin Immunol & Rheumatol, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Priori, Roberta
    Sapienza Univ Rome, Dept Internal Med & Med Specialties, Rheumatol Clin, Rome, Italy.
    Quartuccio, Luca
    Univ Hosp Santa Maria della Misericordia, Dept Med & Biol Sci, Clin Rheumatol, Udine, Italy.
    Hernandez-Molina, Gabriela
    Inst Nacl Ciencias Med & Nutr Salvador Zubiran, Dept Immunol & Rheumatol, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.
    Armagan, Berkan
    Hacettepe Univ, Dept Internal Med, Div Rheumatol, Fac Med, Ankara, Turkey.
    Kruize, Aike A.
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Dept Rheumatol & Clin Immunol, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Kwok, Seung-Ki
    Catholic Univ Korea, Seoul St Marys Hosp, Seoul, South Korea.
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Unit Expt Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Praprotnik, Sonja
    Univ Med Ctr, Dept Rheumatol, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Sene, Damien
    Univ Paris VII, Hop Lariboisiere, AP HP, Serv Med Interne 2, Paris 2, France.
    Bartoloni, Elena
    Univ Perugia, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Perugia, Italy.
    Rischmueller, Maureen
    Univ Western Australia, Dept Rheumatol, Sch Med, Crawley, Australia.
    Solans, Roser
    Hosp Valle De Hebron, Dept Internal Med, Barcelona, Spain.
    Suzuki, Yasunori
    Kanazawa Univ Hosp, Div Rheumatol, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan.
    Isenberg, David
    UCL, Div Med, Ctr Rheumatol, London, England.
    Valim, Valeria
    Univ Fed Espirito Santo, Dept Med, Vitoria, Brazil.
    Wiland, Piotr
    Wroclaw Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol & Internal Med, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Fraile, Guadalupe
    Hosp Ramon & Cajal, Dept Internal Med, Madrid, Spain.
    Bootsma, Hendrika
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Rheumatol & Clin Immunol, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Nakamura, Takashi
    Nagasaki Univ, Grad Sch Biomed Sci, Dept Radiol & Canc Biol, Nagasaki, Japan.
    Giacomelli, Roberto
    Univ Aquila, Clin Unit Rheumatol, Sch Med, Laquila, Italy.
    Devauchelle-Pensec, Valerie
    Brest Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Brest, France.
    Hofauer, Benedikt
    Tech Univ Munich, Hals Nasen Ohrenklin & Poliklin, Munich, Germany.
    Bombardieri, Michele
    Queen Mary Univ London, Ctr Expt Med & Rheumatol, London, England.
    Moca Trevisani, Virginia Fernandes
    Univ Fed Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Hammenfors, Daniel
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Bergen, Norway.
    Pasoto, Sandra G.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Fac Med, Hosp Clin, Div Rheumatol, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Carsons, Steven E.
    SUNY Stony Brook, Winthrop Univ Hosp, Div Rheumatol Allergy & Immunol, Sch Med, Mineola, NY 11501 USA.
    Gheita, Tamer A.
    Cairo Univ, Kasr Al Ainy Sch Med, Dept Rheumatol, Cairo, Egypt.
    Atzeni, Fabiola
    IRCCS Galeazzi Orthoped Inst, Milan, Italy.
    Morel, Jacques
    Teaching Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Montpellier, France;Univ Montpellier, Montpellier, France.
    Vollenveider, Cristina
    German Hosp, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina.
    Brito-Zeron, Pilar
    Univ Barcelona, Sjogren Syndrome Res Grp AGAUR, Lab Autoimmune Dis Josep Font, Dept Autoimmune Dis,ICMiD,Hosp Clin,IDIBAPS CELLE, Barcelona, Spain;Hosp CIMA Sanitas, Autoimmune Dis Unit, Dept Med, Barcelona, Spain.
    Ramos-Casals, Manuel
    Univ Barcelona, Sjogren Syndrome Res Grp AGAUR, Lab Autoimmune Dis Josep Font, Dept Autoimmune Dis,ICMiD,Hosp Clin,IDIBAPS CELLE, Barcelona, Spain.
    Clinical and immunological disease patterns of primary Sjögren syndrome driven by gender and age at diagnosis2018In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. S269-S270Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Retamozo, Soledad
    et al.
    Univ Barcelona, Sjogren Syndrome Res Grp AGAUR, Lab Autoimmune Dis Josep Font, Dept Autoimmune Dis,ICMiD,Hosp Clin,IDIBAPS CELLE, Barcelona, Spain;Hosp Privado Univ Cordoba, Inst Univ Ciencias Biomed Cordoba IUCBC, Cordoba, Argentina;Univ Nacl Cordoba UNC, Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn CONICET, Inst Invest Ciencias Salud INICSA, Cordoba, Argentina.
    Kostov, Belchin
    GESCLINIC, Primary Care Res Grp, Ctr Assistencia Primaria ABS Les Corts, IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain.
    Zeher, Margit
    Univ Debrecen, Div Clin Immunol, Fac Med, Debrecen, Hungary.
    Sivils, Kathy
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Arthrit & Clin Immunol Res Program, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA.
    Mandl, Thomas
    Lund Univ, Malmo Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Lund, Sweden.
    Seror, Raphaele
    Hop Univ Paris Sud, AP HP, Ctr Immunol Viral Infect & Autoimmune Dis, Le Kremlin Bicetre, France;Univ Paris Sud, INSERM, Paris, France.
    Li, Xiaomei
    Anhui Prov Hosp, Dept Rheumatol & Immunol, Hefei, Anhui, Peoples R China.
    Baldini, Chiara
    Univ Pisa, Rheumatol Unit, Pisa, Italy.
    Mariette, Xavier
    Hop Univ Paris Sud, AP HP, Ctr Immunol Viral Infect & Autoimmune Dis, Le Kremlin Bicetre, France;Univ Paris Sud, INSERM, Paris, France.
    Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric
    Univ Strasbourg, Strasbourg Univ Hosp, CNRS, Dept Rheumatol, Strasbourg, France.
    Danda, Debashish
    Christian Med Coll & Hosp, Dept Clin Immunol & Rheumatol, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Priori, Roberta
    Sapienza Univ Rome, Dept Internal Med & Med Specialties, Rheumatol Clin, Rome, Italy.
    Quartuccio, Luca
    Univ Hosp Santa Maria della Miseticordia, Clin Rheumatol, Dept Med & Biol Sci, Udine, Italy.
    Hernandez-Molina, Gabriela
    Inst Nacl Ciencias Med & Nutr Salvador Zubiran, Dept Immunol & Rheumatol, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.
    Armagan, Berkan
    Hacettepe Univ, Dept Internal Med, Div Rheumatol, Fac Med, Ankara, Turkey.
    Kruize, Aike A.
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Dept Rheumatol & Clin Immunol, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Kwok, Seung-Ki
    Catholic Univ Korea, Seoul St Marys Hosp, Seoul, South Korea.
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Unit Expt Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Praprotnik, Sonja
    Univ Med Ctr, Dept Rheumatol, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Sene, Damien
    Univ Paris VII, Serv Med Interne 2, Hop Lariboisiere, AP HP, Paris 2, France.
    Bartoloni, Elena
    Univ Perugia, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Perugia, Italy.
    Rischmueller, Maureen
    Univ Western Australia, Sch Med, Dept Rheumatol, Crawley, Australia.
    Solans, Roser
    Hosp Valle De Hebron, Dept Internal Med, Barcelona, Spain.
    Suzuki, Yasunori
    Kanazawa Univ Hosp, Div Rheumatol, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan.
    Isenberg, David
    UCL, Div Med, Ctr Rheumatol, London, England.
    Valim, Valeria
    Univ Fed Espirito Santo, Dept Med, Vitoria, Brazil.
    Wiland, Piotr
    Wroclaw Med Hosp, Dept Rheumatol & Internal Med, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Fraile, Guadalupe
    Hosp Ramon & Cajal, Dept Internal Med, Madrid, Spain.
    Bootsma, Hendrika
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Rheumatol & Clin Immunol, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Nakamura, Takashi
    Nagasaki Univ, Dept Radiol & Canc Biol, Grad Sch Biomed Sci, Nagasaki, Japan.
    Giacomelli, Roberto
    Univ Aquila, Sch Med, Clin Unit Rheumatol, Laquila, Italy.
    Devauchelle-Pensec, Valerie
    Brest Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Brest, France.
    Hofauer, Benedikt
    Tech Univ Munich, Halls Nasen Ohrenklin & Poliklin, Munich, Germany.
    Bombardieri, Michele
    Queen Mary Univ London, Ctr Expt Med & Rheumatol, London, England.
    Moca Trevisani, Virginia Fernandes
    Univ Fed Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Hammenfors, Daniel
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Bergen, Norway.
    Pasoto, Sandra G.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Fac Med, Div Rheumatol, Hosp Clin, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Carsons, Steven E.
    SUNY Stony Brook, Winthrop Univ Hosp, Sch Med, Div Rheumatol Allergy & Immunol, Mineola, NY 11501 USA.
    Gheita, Tamer A.
    Cairo Univ, Kasr Al Ainy Sch Med, Dept Rheumatol, Cairo, Egypt.
    Atzeni, Fabiola
    IRCCS Galeazzi Orthoped Inst, Milan, Italy.
    Morel, Jacques
    Teaching Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Montpellier, France;Univ Montpellier, Montpellier, France.
    Vollenveider, Cristina
    German Hosp, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina.
    Brito-Zeron, Pilar
    Univ Barcelona, Sjogren Syndrome Res Grp AGAUR, Lab Autoimmune Dis Josep Font, Dept Autoimmune Dis,ICMiD,Hosp Clin,IDIBAPS CELLE, Barcelona, Spain;Hosp CIMA Sanitas, Autoimmune Dis Unit, Dept Med, Barcelona, Spain.
    Ramos-Casals, Manuel
    Univ Barcelona, Sjogren Syndrome Res Grp AGAUR, Lab Autoimmune Dis Josep Font, Dept Autoimmune Dis,ICMiD,Hosp Clin,IDIBAPS CELLE, Barcelona, Spain.
    How ethnicity modifies systemic activity of primary Sjögren syndrome: analysis of baseline ESSDAI scores in a multi-ethnic international cohort2018In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. S270-S270Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Retamozo, Soledad
    et al.
    Univ Barcelona, Sjogren Syndrome Res Grp AGAUR, Lab Autoimmune Dis Josep Font,Hosp Clin, IDIBAPS CELLEX,Dept Autoimmune Dis,ICMiD, Barcelona, Spain;Hosp Privado Univ Cordoba, IUCBC, Cordoba, Argentina;UNC, CONICET, Inst Invest Ciencias Salud INIC SA, Cordoba, Argentina.
    Kostov, Belchin
    GESCLINIC, Ctr Assistencia Primaria ABS Corts, IDIBAPS, Primary Care Res Grp, Barcelona, Spain.
    Zeher, Margit
    Univ Debrecen, Div Clin Immunol, Fac Med, Debrecen, Hungary.
    Sivils, Kathy
    Oklahoma Med Res Fdn, Arthrit & Clin Immunol Res Program, 825 NE 13th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 USA.
    Mandl, Thomas
    Lund Univ, Malmo Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Lund, Sweden.
    Seror, Raphaele
    Hop Univ Paris Sud, AP HP, Ctr Immunol Viral Infect & Autoimmune Dis, Le Kremlin Bicetre, France;Univ Paris Sud, INSERM, Paris, France.
    Li, Xiaomei
    Anhui Prov Hosp, Dept Rheumatol & Immunol, Hefei, Anhui, Peoples R China.
    Baldini, Chiara
    Univ Pisa, Rheumatol Unit, Pisa, Italy.
    Mariette, Xavier
    Hop Univ Paris Sud, AP HP, Ctr Immunol Viral Infect & Autoimmune Dis, Le Kremlin Bicetre, France;Univ Paris Sud, INSERM, Paris, France.
    Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric
    Univ Strasbourg, Strasbourg Univ Hosp, CNRS, Dept Rheumatol, Strasbourg, France.
    Danda, Debashish
    Christian Med Coll & Hosp, Dept Clin Immunol & Rheumatol, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Priori, Roberta
    Sapienza Univ Rome, Rheumatol Clin, Dept Internal Med & Med Specialties, Rome, Italy.
    Quartuccio, Luca
    Univ Hosp Santa Maria della Misericordia, Clin Rheumatol, Dept Med & Biol Sci, Udine, Italy.
    Hernandez-Molina, Gabriela
    Inst Nacl Ciencias Med & Nutr Salvador Zubiran, Dept Immunol & Rheumatol, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.
    Armagan, Berkan
    Hacettepe Univ, Fac Med, Dept Internal Med, Div Rheumatol, Ankara, Turkey.
    Kruize, Aike A.
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Dept Rheumatol & Clin Immunol, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Kwok, Seung-Ki
    Catholic Univ Korea, Seoul St Marys Hosp, Seoul, South Korea.
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Karolinska Inst, Unit Expt Rheumatol, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Praprotnik, Sonja
    Univ Med Ctr, Dept Rheumatol, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Sene, Damien
    Univ Paris VII, Hop Lariboisiere, AP HP, Serv Med Interne 2, Paris 2, France.
    Bartoloni, Elena
    Univ Perugia, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Perugia, Italy.
    Rischmueller, Maureen
    Univ Western Australia, Sch Med, Dept Rheumatol, Crawley, Australia.
    Solans, Roser
    Hosp Valle De Hebron, Dept Internal Med, Barcelona, Spain.
    Suzuki, Yasunori
    Kanazawa Univ Hosp, Div Rheumatol, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan.
    Isenberg, David
    UCL, Div Med, Ctr Rheumatol, London, England.
    Valim, Valeria
    Univ Fed Espirito Santo, Dept Med, Vitoria, Brazil.
    Wiland, Piotr
    Wroclaw Med Hosp, Dept Rheumatol & Internal Med, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Fraile, Guadalupe
    Hosp Ramon & Cajal, Dept Internal Med, Madrid, Spain.
    Bootsma, Hendrika
    Univ Groningen, Dept Rheumatol & Clin Immunol, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Nakamura, Takashi
    Nagasaki Univ, Dept Radiol & Canc Biol, Grad Sch Biomed Sci, Nagasaki, Japan.
    Giacomelli, Roberto
    Univ Aquila, Sch Med, Clin Unit Rheumatol, Laquila, Italy.
    Devauchelle-Pensec, Valerie
    Brest Univ Hosp, Rheumatol Dept, Brest, France.
    Hofauer, Benedikt
    Tech Univ Munich, Hals Nasen Ohrenklin & Poliklin, 35Hals Nasen Ohreddinik & Poliklinik, Munich, Germany.
    Bombardieri, Michele
    Queen Mary Univ London, Ctr Expt Med & Rheumatol, London, England.
    Moca Trevisani, Virginia Fernandes
    Univ Fed Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Hammenfors, Daniel
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Bergen, Norway.
    Pasoto, Sandra G.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Fac Med, Hosp Clin, Rheumatol Div, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Carsons, Steven E.
    SUNY Stony Brook, Winthrop Univ Hosp, Div Rheumatol Allergy & Immunol, Mineola, NY 11501 USA.
    Gheite, Tamer A.
    Cairo Univ, Kasr Al Ainy Sch Med, Rheumatol Dept, Cairo, Egypt.
    Atzeni, Fabiola
    IRCCS Galeazzi Orthoped Inst, Milan, Italy.
    Morel, Jacques
    Teaching Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Montpellier, France;Univ Montpellier, Montpellier, France.
    Vollenveider, Cristina
    German Hosp, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina.
    Brito-Zeron, Pilar
    Univ Barcelona, Sjogren Syndrome Res Grp AGAUR, Lab Autoimmune Dis Josep Font,Hosp Clin, IDIBAPS CELLEX,Dept Autoimmune Dis,ICMiD, Barcelona, Spain;Hosp CIMA Sanitas, Dept Med, Autoimmune Dis Unit, Barcelona, Spain.
    Ramos-Casals, Manuel
    Univ Barcelona, Sjogren Syndrome Res Grp AGAUR, Lab Autoimmune Dis Josep Font,Hosp Clin, IDIBAPS CELLEX,Dept Autoimmune Dis,ICMiD, Barcelona, Spain.
    How the different systemic organ involvements are overlapped in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome: analysis using a mathematical model2018In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. S316-S317Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Immune complex mediated activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells in SLE2015In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 33, no 3, p. S4-S5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Targeting The Type I Interferon System In SLE2016In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 34, no 4, p. S84-S84Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    The importance of the type I interferon system in autoimmunity2016In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 34, no 4, p. S21-S24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The type I interferon (IFN) system is our main defense against viral infections and consists of a large number of sensors of nucleic acid that can trigger the production of more than 15 different proteins with antiviral and immunostimulatory capacity. There are several observations suggesting an important role for this system in the etiopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other auto immune diseases. Among these are the development of autoimmune diseases during IFN-alpha treatment, a prominent increase in the expression of type I IFN regulated genes (an IFN signature) in a number of rheumatic diseases, the existence of endogenous IFN inducers in SLE patients and a genetic association between autoimmune diseases and gene variants within the type I IFN signalling pathway. Collectively, these observations suggests that inhibition of the type I IFN system could be beneficial in SLE and possible also,,other autoimmune diseases. Many different therapeutic targets exist and several studies are in progress aiming to block or down-regulate the activated type I IFN system. A number of studies with monoclonal anti-IFN-alpha antibodies in SLE patients have been reported, and a small study investigating vaccination with an interferon-alpha-kinoid against IFN-alpha has been published. Trials targeting the type I IFN receptor are under way, and other possibilities include elimination of the endogenous IFN inducers and inhibition of key molecules in the type I IFN signalling pathway. Results so far show that it is possible to partially suppress the IFN signature, improve several biomarkers and ameliorate clinical manifestations by some of these new treatment strategies.

  • 50.
    Sandling, Johanna K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Imgenberg-Kreuz, Juliana
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Carlsson Almlöf, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Padyukov, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gunnarsson, I.
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Svenungsson, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sjowall, C.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Rheumatol AIR, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in systemic lupus erythematosus2015In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, ISSN 0392-856X, E-ISSN 1593-098X, Vol. 33, no 3, p. S74-S74Article in journal (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 65
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