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  • 1.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Bond University, Gold Coast, Australia.
    Möller, Hans
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gerdhem, Paul
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    CONTRAIS: CONservative TReatment for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: a randomised controlled trial protocol2013In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 14, article id 261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Idiopathic scoliosis is a three-dimensional structural deformity of the spine that occurs in children and adolescents. Recent reviews on bracing and exercise treatment have provided some evidence for effect of these interventions. The purpose of this study is to improve the evidence base regarding the effectiveness of conservative treatments for preventing curve progression in idiopathic scoliosis.

    Methods/design:

    Patients: Previously untreated girls and boys with idiopathic scoliosis, 9 to 17 years of age with at least one year of remaining growth and a curve Cobb angle of 25–40 degrees will be included. A total of 135 participants will be randomly allocated in groups of 45 patients each to receive one of the three interventions.Interventions: All three groups will receive a physical activity prescription according to the World Health Organisation recommendations. One group will additionally wear a hyper-corrective night-time brace. One group will additionally perform postural scoliosis-specific exercises.Outcome: Participation in the study will last until the curve has progressed, or until cessation of skeletal growth. Outcome variables will be measured every 6 months. The primary outcome variable, failure of treatment, is defined as progression of the Cobb angle more than 6 degrees, compared to the primary x-ray, seen on two consecutive spinal standing x-rays taken with 6 months interval. Secondary outcome measures include the SRS-22r and EQ5D-Y quality of life questionnaires, the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) short form, and Cobb angle atend of the study.

    Discussion:This trial will evaluate which of the tested conservative treatment approaches that is the most effective for patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Trial registration: NCT01761305

  • 2.
    Abdul-Hussein, Saba
    et al.
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    van der Ven, Peter F. M.
    Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute for Cell Biology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Clinical and Medical Genetics, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Expression profiles of muscle disease-associated genes and their isoforms during differentiation of cultured human skeletal muscle cells2012In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 13, article id 262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The formation of contractile myofibrils requires the stepwise onset of expression of muscle specific proteins. It is likely that elucidation of the expression patterns of muscle-specific sarcomeric proteins is important to understand muscle disorders originating from defects in contractile sarcomeric proteins.

    METHODS: We investigated the expression profile of a panel of sarcomeric components with a focus on proteins associated with a group of congenital disorders. The analyses were performed in cultured human skeletal muscle cells during myoblast proliferation and myotube development.

    RESULTS: Our culture technique resulted in the development of striated myotubes and the expression of adult isoforms of the sarcomeric proteins, such as fast TnI, fast TnT, adult fast and slow MyHC isoforms and predominantly skeletal muscle rather than cardiac actin. Many proteins involved in muscle diseases, such as beta tropomyosin, slow TnI, slow MyBPC and cardiac TnI were readily detected in the initial stages of muscle cell differentiation, suggesting the possibility of an early role for these proteins as constituent of the developing contractile apparatus during myofibrillogenesis. This suggests that in disease conditions the mechanisms of pathogenesis for each of the mutated sarcomeric proteins might be reflected by altered expression patterns, and disturbed assembly of cytoskeletal, myofibrillar structures and muscle development.

    CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, we here confirm that cell cultures of human skeletal muscle are an appropriate tool to study developmental stages of myofibrillogenesis. The expression of several disease-associated proteins indicates that they might be a useful model system for studying the pathogenesis of muscle diseases caused by defects in specific sarcomeric constituents.

  • 3.
    Aili, Katarina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport. Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Maria
    Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden & University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark & Syddansk Universitet, Graasten, Danmark.
    Haglund, Emma
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing. Spenshult Research and Development Center, FoU Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sleep problems and fatigue as predictorsfor the onset of chronic widespread painover a 5- and 18-year perspective2018In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research suggests that sleep problems may be an important predictor for chronic widespread pain (CWP). With this study we investigated both sleep problems and fatigue as predictors for the onset of CWP over a 5-year and an 18-year perspective in a population free from CWP at baseline.

    Methods: To get a more stable classification of CWP, we used a wash-out period, including only individuals who had not reported CWP at baseline (1998) and three years prior baseline (1995). In all, data from 1249 individuals entered the analyses for the 5-year follow-up and 791 entered for the 18-year follow-up. Difficulties initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, early morning awakening, non-restorative sleep and fatigue were investigated as predictors separately and simultaneously in binary logistic regression analyses.

    Results: The results showed that problems with initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, early awakening and non-restorative sleep predicted the onset of CWP over a 5-year (OR 1.85 to OR 2.27) and 18-year (OR 1.54 to OR 2.25) perspective irrespective of mental health (assessed by SF-36) at baseline. Also fatigue predicted the onset of CWP over the two-time perspectives (OR 3.70 and OR 2.36 respectively) when adjusting for mental health. Overall the effect of the sleep problems and fatigue on new onset CWP (over a 5-year perspective) was somewhat attenuated when adjusting for pain at baseline but remained significant for problems with early awakening, non-restorative sleep and fatigue. Problems with maintaining sleep predicted CWP 18 years later irrespective of mental health and number of pain regions (OR 1.72). Reporting simultaneous problems with all four aspects of sleep was associated with the onset of CWP over a five-year and 18-yearperspective, irrespective of age, gender, socio economy, mental health and pain at baseline. Sleep problems and fatigue predicted the onset of CWP five years later irrespective of each other.

    Conclusion: Sleep problems and fatigue were both important predictors for the onset of CWP over a five-year perspective. Sleep problems was a stronger predictor in a longer time-perspective. The results highlight the importance of the assessment of sleep quality and fatigue in the clinic. © The Author(s). 2018

  • 4.
    Albertsson, Daniel
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden;Region Kronoberg, Sweden.
    Mellström, Dan
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Petersson, Christer
    Region Kronoberg, Sweden.
    Thulesius, Hans
    Region Kronoberg, Sweden.
    Eggertsen, Robert
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden;Mölnlycke Primary Hlth Care & Res Ctr, Sweden.
    Hip and fragility fracture prediction by 4-item clinical risk score and mobile heel BMD: a women cohort study.2010In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 11, p. 1-11, article id 55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: One in four Swedish women suffers a hip fracture yielding high morbidity and mortality. We wanted to revalidate a 4-item clinical risk score and evaluate a portable heel bone mineral density (BMD) technique regarding hip and fragility fracture risk among elderly women.

    METHODS: In a population-based prospective cohort study we used clinical risk factors from a baseline questionnaire and heel BMD to predict a two-year hip and fragility fracture outcome for women, in a fracture preventive program. Calcaneal heel BMD was measured by portable dual X-ray laser absorptiometry (DXL) and compared to hip BMD, measured with stationary dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) technique.

    RESULTS: Seven women suffered hip fracture and 14 women fragility fracture/s (at hip, radius, humerus and pelvis) among 285 women; 60% having heel BMD <or= -2.5 SD. The 4-item FRAMO (Fracture and Mortality) Index combined the clinical risk factors age >or=80 years, weight <60 kg, prior fragility fracture, and impaired rise-up ability. Women having 2-4 risk factors showed odds ratio (OR) for hip fracture of 5.9 and fragility fracture of 4.4. High risk group hip fracture risk was 2.8% annually compared to 0.5% for the low risk majority (69%). Heel BMD showed hip fracture OR of 3.1 and fragility fracture OR of 2.6 per SD decrease. For 30 DXA assessed participants mean hip BMD at -2.5 SD level corresponded to a lower BMD at the heel. Five of seven hip fractures occurred within a small risk group of 32 women, identified by high FRAMO Index + prior fragility fracture + heel T-score <or=-3.5 SD.

    CONCLUSIONS: In a follow-up study we identified high risk groups for hip and fragility fracture with our plain 4-item risk model. Increased fracture risk was also related to decreasing heel BMD in calcaneal bone, measured with a mobile DXL technique. A combination of high FRAMO Index, prior fragility fracture, and very low BMD restricted the high risk group to 11%, among whom most hip fractures occurred (71%). These practical screening methods could eventually reduce hip fracture incidence by concentrating preventive resources to high fracture risk women.

  • 5.
    Albin, Björn
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, and Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, and Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Lower prevalence of hip fractures in foreign-born individuals than in Swedish-born individuals during the period 1987-19992010In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 11, p. 203-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: This is the first longitudinal study with a 22-year follow-up, based on a national and complete sample, to determine whether the prevalence of hip fracture and the age when it occurs are influenced by migration and by being foreign-born. Cultural background and environmental factors such as UV-radiation and lifestyle during childhood and adolescence may influence the risk of a hip fracture event later in life. Differences in prevalence might occur between the indigenous population and those who have migrated to a country.

    METHODS: The study was based on national population data. The study population consisted of 321,407 Swedish-born and 307,174 foreign-born persons living in Sweden during the period 1987-1999.

    RESULTS: Foreign-born individuals had a reduced risk of hip fracture, with odds ratios (ORs) of 0.47-0.77 for men and 0.42-0.88 for women. Foreign-born women had the hip fracture event at a higher age on average, but a longer time spent in Sweden was associated with a small but significant increase in risk.

    CONCLUSIONS: We found that there was a reduced risk of hip fracture in all foreign-born individuals, and that the hip fracture event generally happened at a higher age in foreign-born women. Migration must therefore be considered in relation to the prevalence and risk of hip fracture. Migration can therefore have a positive effect on one aspect of the health of a population, and can influence and lower the total cost of healthcare due to reduced risk and prevalence of hip fracture.

  • 6.
    Albin, Björn
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Institutionen för Hälsa, Vård och Samhälle, Avd för Geriatrik, Lunds universitet.
    Lower prevalence of hip fractures in foreign-born individuals than in Swedish-born individuals during the period 1987-19992010In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 11, p. Article ID: 203-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultural background and environmental factors such as UV-radiation and lifestyle during childhood and adolescence may influence the risk of a hip fracture event later in life. Differences in prevalence might occur between the indigenous population and those who have migrated to a country.

    METHODS: The study was based on national population data. The study population consisted of 321,407 Swedish-born and 307,174 foreign-born persons living in Sweden during the period 1987-1999.

    RESULTS: Foreign-born persons had reduced risk of hip fracture, with odds ratios (ORs) of 0.47-0.77 for men and 0.42-0.88 for women respectively. Foreign-born women had the hip fracture event at a higher age on average, but a longer time spent in Sweden was associated with a small but significant increase in risk.

    CONCLUSIONS: There was a reduced risk of hip fracture in all foreign-born individuals, and that the hip fracture event generally happened at a higher age in foreign-born women. Migration must therefore be considered in relation to the prevalence and risk of hip fracture. Migration can therefore have a positive effect on one aspect of the health of a population, and can influence and lower the total cost of healthcare due to reduced risk and prevalence of hip fracture.

     

     

     

     

  • 7.
    Alipour, Akbar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ghaffari, Mostafa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Jensen, Irene
    Shariati, Batoul
    Vingård, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Reliability and validity study of Persian modified version of MUSIC (musculoskeletal intervention center) - Norrtalje questionnaire2007In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 8, p. 88-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a major health problem in the world. Self-reported questionnaires are a known method for estimating the prevalence of MSDs among the population. One of the studies concerning MSDs and their relation to work-related physical and psychosocial factors, as well as non-work-related factors, is the MUSIC-Norrtalje study in Sweden. In this study, the research group developed a questionnaire, which has been validated during its development process and is now considered a well-known instrument. The aim of this study is to validate the Persian version of this questionnaire.

    Methods

    The first step was to establish two expert panel groups in Iran and Sweden. The Focus Group Discussion (FGD) method was used to detect questionnaire face and content validity. To detect questionnaire reliability, we used the test-retest method.

    Results

    Except for two items, all other questions that respondents had problems with in the focus group (20 of 297), had unclear translations; the ambiguity was related to the stem of the questions and the predicted answers were clear for the participants. The concepts of 'household/spare time' and 'physical activity in the workplace' were not understood by the participants of FGD; this has been solved by adding further descriptions to these phrases in the translation. In the test-retest study, the reliability coefficient was relatively high in most items (only 5 items out of 297 had an ICC or kappa below 0.7).

    Conclusion

    The findings from the present study provide evidence that the Persian version of the MUSIC questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument.

  • 8.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. ADULT.
    Bergman, Stefan
    FoU-centrum Spenshult.
    Factors promoting health-related quality of life in people with rheumatic diseases: a 12 month longitudinal study2011In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 12, no 102, p. -13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rheumatic diseases have a significant adverse impact on the individual from physical, mental and social aspects, resulting in a low health-related quality of life (HRQL). There is a lack of longitudinal studies on HRQL in people with rheumatic diseases that focus on factors promoting HRQL instead of risk factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between suggested health promoting factors at baseline and outcome in HRQL at a 12 month follow-up in people with rheumatic diseases.

    Methods: A longitudinal cohort study was conducted in 185 individuals with rheumatic diseases with questionnaires one week and 12 months after rehabilitation in a Swedish rheumatology clinic. HRQL was assessed by SF-36 together with suggested health factors. The associations between SF-36 subscales and the health factors were analysed by multivariable logistic regressions.

    Results: Factors predicting better outcome in HRQL in one or several SF-36 subscales were being younger or middle-aged, feeling painless, having good sleep structure, feeling rested after sleep, performing low effort of exercise more than twice per week, having strong sense of coherence (SOC), emotional support and practical assistance, higher educational level and work capacity. The most important factors were having strong SOC, feeling rested after sleep, having work capacity, being younger or middle-aged, and having good sleep structure.

    Conclusions: This study identified several factors that promoted a good outcome in HRQL to people with rheumatic diseases. These health factors could be important to address in clinical work with rheumatic diseases in order to optimise treatment strategies.

  • 9.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre Spenshult, Spenshult hospital for rheumatic diseases, Oskarström, Sweden & School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Gjøvik University College, Faculty of Nursing Science, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences & Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden & School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre Spenshult, Spenshult hospital for rheumatic diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Factors promoting health-related quality of life in people with rheumatic diseases: a 12 month longitudinal study2011In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 12, article id 102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rheumatic diseases have a significant adverse impact on the individual from physical, mental and social aspects, resulting in a low health-related quality of life (HRQL). There is a lack of longitudinal studies on HRQL in people with rheumatic diseases that focus on factors promoting HRQL instead of risk factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between suggested health promoting factors at baseline and outcome in HRQL at a 12 month follow-up in people with rheumatic diseases.

    Methods: A longitudinal cohort study was conducted in 185 individuals with rheumatic diseases with questionnaires one week and 12 months after rehabilitation in a Swedish rheumatology clinic. HRQL was assessed by SF-36 together with suggested health factors. The associations between SF-36 subscales and the health factors were analysed by multivariable logistic regressions.

    Results: Factors predicting better outcome in HRQL in one or several SF-36 subscales were being younger or middle-aged, feeling painless, having good sleep structure, feeling rested after sleep, performing low effort of exercise more than twice per week, having strong sense of coherence (SOC), emotional support and practical assistance, higher educational level and work capacity. The most important factors were having strong SOC, feeling rested after sleep, having work capacity, being younger or middle-aged, and having good sleep structure.

    Conclusions: This study identified several factors that promoted a good outcome in HRQL to people with rheumatic diseases. These health factors could be important to address in clinical work with rheumatic diseases in order to optimise treatment strategies. © 2011 Arvidsson et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 10.
    Asker, Martin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Naprapathogskolan Scandinavian Coll Naprapath Man, Sweden.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Hässleholm Kristianstad Ystad Hospital, Sweden.
    Kallberg, Henrik
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Holm, Lena W.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Skillgate, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Naprapathogskolan Scandinavian Coll Naprapath Man, Sweden.
    A prospective cohort study identifying risk factors for shoulder injuries in adolescent elite handball players: the Karolinska Handball Study (KHAST) study protocol2017In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 18, article id 485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Handball is a physical contact sport that includes frequent overhead throwing, and this combination leads to a high rate of shoulder injuries. Several factors have been associated with shoulder injuries in overhead athletes, but strong scientific evidence is lacking for most suggested risk factors. We therefore designed the Karolinska Handball Study (KHAST) with the aim to identify risk factors for shoulder injuries in adolescent male and female elite handball players studying at handball-profiled secondary schools in Sweden. Secondary objectives are to investigate whether shoulder function changes during the competition season and whether the physical profile of the players changes during their time in secondary school. Methods: Players aged 15 to 19 years were included during the pre-season period of the 2014-2015 and the 2015-2016 seasons. At inclusion, players signed informed consent and filled in a questionnaire regarding playing position, playing level, previous handball experience, history of shoulder problems and athletic identity. Players also completed a detailed test battery at baseline evaluating the shoulder, neck and trunk. Players were then prospectively monitored weekly during the 2014-2015 and/or 2015-2016 competitive seasons regarding injuries and training/match workload. Results from the annual routine physical tests in the secondary school curriculum including bench press, deep squat, hand grip strength, clean lifts, squat jumps, counter movement jumps, amp;lt;30 m sprints, chins, dips and Coopers test will be collected until the end of the competitive season 2017-2018. The primary outcome is the incidence of shoulder injuries and shoulder problems. The secondary outcome is the prevalence of shoulder injuries and shoulder problems. Discussion: Shoulder problems are frequent among handball players and a reduction of these injuries is therefore warranted. However, in order to introduce appropriate preventive measures, a detailed understanding of the underlying risk factors is needed. Our study has a high potential to identify important risk factors for shoulder injuries in adolescent elite handball players owing to a large study sample, a high response rate, data collection during consecutive seasons, and recording of potential confounding factors.

  • 11.
    Axén, Iben
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, The Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, The Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, The Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Halasz, Laszlo
    Private practise, Lund, Sweden.
    Lange, Fredrik
    Private practise, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lövgren, Peter W.
    Private practise, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rosenbaum, Annika
    Private practise, Linköping, Sweden.
    Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte
    Institute of Regional Health Research, Spine Centre of Southern Denmark, Hospital Lillebælt, University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark.
    Jensen, Irene
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, The Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Clustering patients on the basis of their individual course of low back pain over a six month period2011In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 12, article id 99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several researchers have searched for subgroups in the heterogeneous population of patients with non-specific low back pain (LBP). To date, subgroups have been identified based on psychological profiles and the variation of pain.

    Methods: This multicentre prospective observational study explored the 6- month clinical course with measurements of bothersomeness that were collected from weekly text messages that were sent by 176 patients with LBP. A hierarchical cluster analysis, Ward's method, was used to cluster patients according to the development of their pain.

    Results: Four clusters with distinctly different clinical courses were described and further validated against clinical baseline variables and outcomes. Cluster 1, a "stable" cluster, where the course was relatively unchanged over time, contained young patients with good self- rated health. Cluster 2, a group of "fast improvers" who were very bothered initially but rapidly improved, consisted of patients who rated their health as relatively poor but experienced the fewest number of days with bothersome pain of all the clusters. Cluster 3 was the "typical patient" group, with medium bothersomeness at baseline and an average improvement over the first 4-5 weeks. Finally, cluster 4 contained the "slow improvers", a group of patients who improved over 12 weeks. This group contained older individuals who had more LBP the previous year and who also experienced most days with bothersome pain of all the clusters.

    Conclusions: It is possible to define clinically meaningful clusters of patients based on their individual course of LBP over time. Future research should aim to reproduce these clusters in different populations, add further clinical variables to distinguish the clusters and test different treatment strategies for them.

  • 12. Bengtsson, Karin
    et al.
    Jacobsson, Lennart T H
    Rydberg, Barbro
    Kvist, Göran
    Torstenson, Tomas
    Dehlin, Mats
    Hilme, Elisabet
    Lindhé, Anna
    Wallerstedt, Susanna Maria
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology. Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Box 480, S-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Comparisons between comorbid conditions and health care consumption in rheumatoid arthritis patients with or without biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs: a register-based study2016In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Symptoms and prognosis of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have improved with more intensive therapy, including the biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs). Real life data concerning how comorbidities are distributed among patients treated or not treated with bDMARDs are scarce. Our objective was to investigate differences in comorbidity and health care consumption in RA patients, with and without bDMARDs.

    METHODS: This cross-sectional study was performed in the Southwestern part of Sweden. Patients, aged ≥ 18 years and diagnosed with RA in secondary health care during 2009-2010, were identified in the regional health care database. Aggregated data of comorbidity and health care consumption were retrieved between 2006 and 2010. RA patients treated with bDMARDs on 31st December 2010 were identified in the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register (SRQ), which includes the biologics register Anti-Rheumatic Therapy in Sweden (ARTIS). Descriptive, comparative, univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with bDMARDs.

    RESULTS: Seven thousand seven hundred and twelve (7712) RA patients were identified (age 64.8 ± 14.9 years, women 74.3%), of whom 1137 (14.7%) were treated with bDMARDs. Overall, the most common comorbidities were infections (69.2%), hypertension (41.1%), chronic respiratory disease (15.3%), ischemic heart disease (14.0%) and malignancy (13.7%). Patients without bDMARDs were older and had more comorbidity. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, older age, cerebrovascular and chronic respiratory disease, heart failure, depression and malignancy were all associated with no present bDMARDs. Infections were associated with bDMARDs. Patients treated with bDMARDs consumed more secondary outpatient care but less visits in primary health care compared to patients without bDMARDs.

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients treated with bDMARDs versus no bDMARDs were younger and had significantly lower period prevalence for most common comorbidities, with the exception of infections. Differences in comorbidities between RA patients with or without bDMARDs should be taken into consideration when evaluating effectiveness and safety of bDMARDs in ordinary care.

  • 13.
    Berglund, Britta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Pettersson, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Pigg, Maritta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Kristiansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Self-reported quality of life, anxiety and depression in individuals with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS): a questionnaire study2015In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 16, article id 89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many individuals with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) are hypermobile, suffer from long term pain, and have complex health problems. Since these sometimes have no objective physical signs, individuals with EDS sometimes are referred for psychiatric evaluation. The aim was therefore to identify the level of anxiety and quality of life in a Swedish group of individuals with EDS. Methods: A postal survey in 2008 was distributed to 365 members over 18 years of the Swedish National EDS Association and 250 with EDS diagnosis responded. Two questionnaires, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and SF-36, were used. A Swedish population study was used to compare results from SF-36. Independent Student's t-test was used to compare differences between groups, possible relationships were tested using Spearman's correlation coefficient and the General Linear Model was used for regression analyses. Higher scores on HADS represent higher levels of anxiety and depression and higher scores on SF-36 represent higher quality of health. Results: Of the respondents 74.8% scored high on anxiety and 22.4% scored high on depression on the HADS. Age, tiredness and back pain was independently associated with the HAD anxiety score in a multiple regression analysis, When comparing the SF-36 scores from the EDS group and a Swedish population group, the EDS group scored significantly lower, indicating lower health-related quality of health than the general population (p < 0.001). Conclusions: In comparison with a Swedish population group, a lower health-related quality of life was found in the EDS group. Also, higher levels of anxiety and depression were detected in individuals with EDS. The importance to explore the factors behind these results and what initiatives can be taken to alleviate the situation for this group is emphasized.

  • 14.
    Bergman, Stefan
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Research & Development Center, Spenshult Rheumatology Hospital, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Symeonidou, Sofia
    Research & Development Center, Spenshult Rheumatology Hospital, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Andersson, Maria L.
    Research & Development Center, Spenshult Rheumatology Hospital, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Söderlin, Maria K.
    Research & Development Center, Spenshult Rheumatology Hospital, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Alcohol consumption is associated with lower self-reported disease activity and better health-related quality of life in female rheumatoid arthritis patients in Sweden: data from BARFOT, a multicenter study on early RA2013In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 14, p. Article 218-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Earlier studies have found a positive effect of alcohol consumption, with a reduced disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to assess alcohol consumption and its association with disease activity and health related quality of life (HRQL) in Swedish RA patients.

    METHODS: Between 1992 and 2005, 2,800 adult patients were included in the BARFOT study of early RA in Sweden. In 2010 a self-completion postal questionnaire was sent to all 2,102 prevalent patients in the BARFOT study enquiring about disease severity, HRQL, and lifestyle factors. Alcohol consumption was assessed using the validated AUDIT-C questionnaire.

    RESULTS: A total of 1,238 out of 1,460 patients answering the questionnaire had data on alcohol consumption: 11% were non-drinkers, 67% had a non-hazardous drinking, and 21% were classified as hazardous drinkers. Women who drank alcohol reported lower disease activity and better HRQL, but there were no association between alcohol consumption and disease activity in men. For current smokers, alcohol use was only associated with fewer patient-reported swollen joints. The outcome was not affected by kind of alcohol consumed.

    CONCLUSIONS: There was an association between alcohol consumption and both lower self-reported disease activity and higher HRQL in female, but not in male, RA patients. © 2013 Bergman et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 15.
    Bergström, Cecilia
    et al.
    Division of Intervention and Implementation Research, Department of Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Jan
    Division of Intervention and Implementation Research, Department of Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Division of Intervention and Implementation Research, Department of Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jensen, Irene
    Division of Intervention and Implementation Research, Department of Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Division of Intervention and Implementation Research, Department of Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Using a psychosocial subgroup assignment to predict sickness absence in a working population with neck and back pain2011In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 12, article id 81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The overall objective was to evaluate the predictive validity of a subgroup classification based on the Swedish version of the MPI, the MPI-S, among gainfully employed workers with neck pain (NP) and/or low back pain (LBP) during a follow-up period of 18 and 36 months.

    Methods: This is a prospective cohort study that is part of a larger longitudinal multi-centre study entitled Work and Health in the Process and Engineering Industries (AHA). The attempt was to classify individuals at risk for developing chronic disabling NP and LBP. This is the first study using the MPI-questionnaire in a working population with NP and LBP.

    Results: Dysfunctional individuals (DYS) demonstrated more statistically significant sickness absence compared to adaptive copers (AC) after 36 months. DYS also had a threefold increase in the risk ratio of long-term sickness absence at 18 months. Interpersonally distressed (ID) subgroup showed overall more sickness absence compared to the AC subgroup at the 36-month follow-up and had a twofold increase in the risk ratio of long-term sickness absence at 18 months. There was a significant difference in bodily pain, mental and physical health for ID and DYS subgroups compared to the AC group at both follow-ups.

    Conclusions: The present study shows that this multidimensional approach to the classification of individuals based on psychological and psychosocial characteristics can distinguish different groups in gainfully employed working population with NP/LBP. The results in this study confirm the predictive validity of the MPI-S subgroup classification system.

  • 16.
    Bergström, Cecilia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Persson, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Nergard, Kari-Anne
    Mogren, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Prevalence and predictors of persistent pelvic girdle pain 12 years postpartum2017In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 18, article id 399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pelvic girdle pain (PGP) is not always a self-limiting condition. Women with more pronounced persistent PGP (PPGP) report poorer health status compared to women with less pronounced symptoms. The knowledge concerning the long-term consequences of PPGP is limited, thus more knowledge in this area is needed. The overall aim was to study the prevalence and predictors of PPGP 12 years after delivery. Methods: This is a long-term follow-up study based on a previous cohort study that commenced in 2002. New questionnaire data 12 years postpartum were collected in 2014 and early 2015. The questionnaire was distributed to a total of 624 women from the initial cohort. Results: In total, 295 women (47.3%) responded to the questionnaire where 40.3% (n = 119) reported pain to a various degree and 59% (n = 174) reported no pain. Increased duration and/or persistency of pain, self-rated health, sciatica, neck and/or thoracic spinal pain, sick leave the past 12 months, treatment sought, and prescription and/or non-prescription drugs used were all associated with an statistically significant increase in the odds of reporting pain 12 years postpartum. Widespread pain was common and median expectation of improvement score was 5 on an 11-point numeric scale (interquartile range 2-7.50). More than one of five women (21.8%) reporting pain stated that they had been on sick leave the past 12 months and nearly 11% had been granted disability pension due to PPGP. No statistically significant differences were found between respondents and non-respondents regarding most background variables. Conclusions: This study is unique as it is one of few long-term follow-up studies following women with PPGP of more than 11 years. The results show that spontaneous recovery with no recurrences is an unlikely scenario for a subgroup of women with PPGP. Persistency and/or duration of pain symptoms as well as widespread pain appear to be the strongest predictors of poor long-term outcome. Moreover, widespread pain is commonly associated with PPGP and may thus contribute to long-term sick leave and disability pension. A screening tool needs to be developed for the identification of women at risk of developing PPGP to enable early intervention.

  • 17.
    Bjersing, Jan L.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anette
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Palstam, Annie
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Monika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Kosek, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm Spine Centre, Sweden.
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Benefits of resistance exercise in lean women with fibromyalgia: involvement of IGF-1 and leptin2017In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 18, article id 106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic pain and fatigue improves by exercise in fibromyalgia (FM) but underlying mechanisms are not known. Obesity is increased among FM patients and associates with higher levels of pain. Symptom improvement after aerobic exercise is affected by body mass index (BMI) in FM. Metabolic factors such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and leptin may be involved. In this study, the aim was to evaluate the role of metabolic factors in lean, overweight and obese women during resistance exercise, in relation to symptom severity and muscle strength in women with FM. Methods: Forty-three women participated in supervised progressive resistance exercise, twice weekly for 15-weeks. Serum free and total IGF-1, IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), adiponectin, leptin and resistin were determined at baseline and after 15-weeks. Level of current pain was rated on a visual analogue scale (0-100 mm). Level of fatigue was rated by multidimensional fatigue inventory (MFI-20) subscale general fatigue (MFIGF). Knee extension force, elbow flexion force and handgrip force were assessed by dynamometers. Results: Free IGF-1 (p = 0.047), IGFBP3 (p = 0.025) and leptin (p = 0.008) were significantly decreased in lean women (n = 18), but not in the overweight (n = 17) and the obese (n = 8). Lean women with FM benefited from resistance exercise with improvements in current pain (p= 0.039, n = 18), general fatigue (MFIGF, p = 0.022, n = 18) and improved elbow-flexion force (p = 0.017, n = 18). In overweight and obese women with FM there was no significant improvement in pain or fatigue but an improvement in elbow flexion (p = 0.049; p = 0.012) after 15 weeks of resistance exercise. Conclusion: The clearest clinical response to resistance exercise was found in lean patients with FM. In these individuals, individualized resistance exercise was followed by changes in IGF-1 and leptin, reduced pain, fatigue and improved muscular strength. In overweight and obese women FM markers of metabolic signaling and clinical symptoms were unchanged, but strength was improved in the upper limb. Resistance exercise combined with dietary interventions might benefit patients with FM and overweight.

  • 18. Bjersing, Jan L
    et al.
    Larsson, Anette
    Palstam, Annie
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre
    Löfgren, Monika
    Gerdle, Björn
    Kosek, Eva
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    Benefits of resistance exercise in lean women with fibromyalgia: involvement of IGF-1 and leptin2017In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pain and fatigue improves by exercise in fibromyalgia (FM) but underlying mechanisms are not known. Obesity is increased among FM patients and associates with higher levels of pain. Symptom improvement after aerobic exercise is affected by body mass index (BMI) in FM. Metabolic factors such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and leptin may be involved. In this study, the aim was to evaluate the role of metabolic factors in lean, overweight and obese women during resistance exercise, in relation to symptom severity and muscle strength in women with FM.

    METHODS: Forty-three women participated in supervised progressive resistance exercise, twice weekly for 15-weeks. Serum free and total IGF-1, IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), adiponectin, leptin and resistin were determined at baseline and after 15-weeks. Level of current pain was rated on a visual analogue scale (0-100 mm). Level of fatigue was rated by multidimensional fatigue inventory (MFI-20) subscale general fatigue (MFIGF). Knee extension force, elbow flexion force and handgrip force were assessed by dynamometers.

    RESULTS: Free IGF-1 (p = 0.047), IGFBP3 (p = 0.025) and leptin (p = 0.008) were significantly decreased in lean women (n = 18), but not in the overweight (n = 17) and the obese (n = 8). Lean women with FM benefited from resistance exercise with improvements in current pain (p= 0.039, n = 18), general fatigue (MFIGF, p = 0.022, n = 18) and improved elbow-flexion force (p = 0.017, n = 18). In overweight and obese women with FM there was no significant improvement in pain or fatigue but an improvement in elbow flexion (p = 0.049; p = 0.012) after 15 weeks of resistance exercise.

    CONCLUSION: The clearest clinical response to resistance exercise was found in lean patients with FM. In these individuals, individualized resistance exercise was followed by changes in IGF-1 and leptin, reduced pain, fatigue and improved muscular strength. In overweight and obese women FM markers of metabolic signaling and clinical symptoms were unchanged, but strength was improved in the upper limb. Resistance exercise combined with dietary interventions might benefit patients with FM and overweight.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial was registered 21 of October 2010 with ClinicalTrials.gov identification number: NCT01226784 .

  • 19.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Wetterö, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöwall, Christoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Quality of life and acquired organ damage are intimately related to activity limitations in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus2015In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 16, no 188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune multi-organ disease, characterized by episodes of disease flares and remissions over time, which may restrain affected patients ability to perform daily activities. The purpose of the present study was to characterize variation in activity limitations among well-defined SLE patients, and to describe disease phenotypes, acquired organ damage and their relations to activity limitation and self-reported health, respectively. Methods: The disease phenotypes were organized into 4 different clinical groups and logistic regression analyses were used to identify how an elevated health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) score was related to disease variables such as phenotypes, disease activity and damage accrual. Correlation and multiple linear regression analyses were used to examine the association between each group of variables - background variables, disease variables and self-reported measurements - and the degree of elevated HAQ. Results: We found a higher proportion of activity limitation in patients with skin and joint involvement compared to others. The presence of activity limitation, as detected by the HAQ instrument, was significantly associated with quality of life (EuroQol-5D) and accrual of organ damage using the Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics/ACR damage index. Conclusions: The findings highlight the differing requirements of the multi-professional rehabilitation interventions for the various SLE phenotypes in order to optimize the clinical care of the patients.

  • 20.
    Björklund, Martin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF.
    Djupsjöbacka, Mats
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF.
    Svedmark, Åsa
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF.
    Häger, Charlotte
    Inst samhällsmedicin och rehabilitering, sjukgymnastik, Umeå univeristet.
    Effects of tailored neck-shoulder pain treatment based on a decision model guided by clinical assessments and standardized functional tests. A study protocol of a randomized controlled trial2012In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 13, no 75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    A major problem with rehabilitation interventions for neck pain is that the condition may have multiple causes, thus a single treatment approach is seldom efficient. The present study protocol outlines a single blinded randomised controlled trial evaluating the effect of tailored treatment for neck-shoulder pain. The treatment is based on a decision model guided by standardized clinical assessment and functional tests with cut-off values. Our main hypothesis is that the tailored treatment has better short, intermediate and long-term effects than either non-tailored treatment or treatment-as-usual (TAU) on pain and function. We sub-sequentially hypothesize that tailored and non-tailored treatment both have better effect than TAU.

    Methods

    120 working women with minimum six weeks of nonspecific neck-shoulder pain aged 20-65, are allocated by minimisation with the factors age, duration of pain, pain intensity and disability in to the groups tailored treatment (T), non-tailored treatment (NT) or treatment-as-usual (TAU). Treatment is given to the groups T and NT for 11 weeks (27 sessions evenly distributed). An extensive presentation of the tests and treatment decision model is provided. The main treatment components are manual therapy, cranio-cervical flexion exercise and strength training, EMG-biofeedback training, treatment for cervicogenic headache, neck motor control training. A decision algorithm based on the baseline assessment determines the treatment components given to the each participant of T- and NT-groups. Primary outcome measures are physical functioning (Neck Disability Index) and average pain intensity last week (Numeric Rating Scale). Secondary outcomes are general improvement (Patient Global Impression of Change scale), symptoms (Profile Fitness Mapping neck questionnaire), capacity to work in the last 6 weeks (quality and quantity) and pressure pain threshold of m. trapezius. Primary and secondary outcomes will be reported for each group with effect size and its precision.

    Discussion

    We have chosen not to include women with psychological ill-health and focus on biomedical aspects of neck pain. Future studies should aim at including psychosocial aspects in a widened treatment decision model. No important adverse events or side-effects are expected. Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials registration ISRCTN49348025. Key words: Neck, trapezius, myalgia, neck-shoulder pain, RCT, individualized treatment, rehabilitation, physiotherapy, tailored

  • 21.
    Björklund, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Djupsjöbacka, Mats
    Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Svedmark, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Häger, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Effects of tailored neck-shoulder pain treatment based on a decision model guided by clinical assessments and standardized functional tests: a study protocol of a randomized controlled trial2012In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 13, article id 75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A major problem with rehabilitation interventions for neck pain is that the condition may have multiple causes, thus a single treatment approach is seldom efficient. The present study protocol outlines a single blinded randomised controlled trial evaluating the effect of tailored treatment for neck-shoulder pain. The treatment is based on a decision model guided by standardized clinical assessment and functional tests with cut-off values. Our main hypothesis is that the tailored treatment has better short, intermediate and long-term effects than either non-tailored treatment or treatment-as-usual (TAU) on pain and function. We sub-sequentially hypothesize that tailored and non-tailored treatment both have better effect than TAU.

    METHODS: 120 working women with minimum six weeks of nonspecific neck-shoulder pain aged 20-65, are allocated by minimisation with the factors age, duration of pain, pain intensity and disability in to the groups tailored treatment (T), non-tailored treatment (NT) or treatment-as-usual (TAU). Treatment is given to the groups T and NT for 11 weeks (27 sessions evenly distributed). An extensive presentation of the tests and treatment decision model is provided. The main treatment components are manual therapy, cranio-cervical flexion exercise and strength training, EMG-biofeedback training, treatment for cervicogenic headache, neck motor control training. A decision algorithm based on the baseline assessment determines the treatment components given to the each participant of T- and NT-groups. Primary outcome measures are physical functioning (Neck Disability Index) and average pain intensity last week (Numeric Rating Scale). Secondary outcomes are general improvement (Patient Global Impression of Change scale), symptoms (Profile Fitness Mapping neck questionnaire), capacity to work in the last 6 weeks (quality and quantity) and pressure pain threshold of m. trapezius. Primary and secondary outcomes will be reported for each group with effect size and its precision.

    DISCUSSION: We have chosen not to include women with psychological ill-health and focus on biomedical aspects of neck pain. Future studies should aim at including psychosocial aspects in a widened treatment decision model. No important adverse events or side-effects are expected.

    Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials registration ISRCTN49348025.

  • 22.
    Blomgren, Johannes
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Strandell, Erika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Jull, Gwendolen
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation. Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Australia.
    Vikman, Irene
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Röijezon, Ulrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Effects of deep cervical flexor training on impaired physiological functions associated with chronic neck pain: a systematic review2018In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 19, article id 415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Neck pain is a major health issue with high rates of recurrence. It presents with a variety ofaltered sensorimotor functions. Exercise is a cornerstone of rehabilitation and many training methods areused. Exercise is evaluated in most randomized controlled trials on its pain relieving effects. No review hasassessed the effect of exercise on the altered physiological functions or determined if there are differentialeffects of particular training methods. This review investigated the effects of deep cervical flexor (DCF)training, a training method commonly used for patients with neck pain, and compared it to other trainingmethodsornotrainingonoutcomesofcervicalneuromuscular function, muscle size, kinematics and kinetics.Methods:Web of Science, Scopus, CINAHL, PubMed were searched from inception until January 2018. Twelverandomized controlled trials were included that compared DCF training as sole intervention to other trainingor no interventions in persons with neck pain. The Cochrane Risk of Bias tool was used to assess the methodquality. All outcome measures were analysed descriptively and meta-analyses were performed for measuresevaluated in three or more studies.Results:DCF training was compared to cervical endurance, strength, proprioception and mobility training,muscle stretching, and no intervention control groups. Physiological outcome measures includedneuromuscular co-ordination (craniocervical flexion test), functional tasks, muscle fatigability, muscle size,kinematics (joint position sense, posture and range of motion) and kinetics (strength, endurance andcontraction accuracy). Strong evidence was found for effectiveness of DCF training on neuromuscularcoordination, but it had no or small effects on strength and endurance at higher loads. DCF trainingimproved head and cervical posture, while evidence was limited or contradictory for other measures.Conclusions:DCF training can successfully address impaired neuromuscular coordination, but not cervicalflexor strength and endurance at higher contraction intensities. A multimodal training regime is proposedwhen the aim is to specifically address various impaired physiological functions associated with neck pain

  • 23.
    Bohman, Tony
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Côté, Pierre
    Boyle, Eleanor
    Cassidy, J David
    Carroll, Linda J
    Skillgate, Eva
    Prognosis of patients with whiplash-associated disorders consulting physiotherapy: development of a predictive model for recovery2012In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 13, article id 264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Patients with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) have a generally favourable prognosis, yet some develop longstanding pain and disability. Predicting who will recover from WAD shortly after a traffic collision is very challenging for health care providers such as physical therapists. Therefore, we aimed to develop a prediction model for the recovery of WAD in a cohort of patients who consulted physical therapists within six weeks after the injury.

    METHODS: Our cohort included 680 adult patients with WAD who were injured in Saskatchewan, Canada, between 1997 and 1999. All patients had consulted a physical therapist as a result of the injury. Baseline prognostic factors were collected from an injury questionnaire administered by Saskatchewan Government Insurance. The outcome, global self-perceived recovery, was assessed by telephone interviews six weeks, three and six months later. Twenty-five possible baseline prognostic factors were considered in the analyses. A prediction model was built using Cox regression. The predictive ability of the model was estimated with concordance statistics (c-index). Internal validity was checked using bootstrapping.

    RESULTS: Our final prediction model included: age, number of days to reporting the collision, neck pain intensity, low back pain intensity, pain other than neck and back pain, headache before collision and recovery expectations. The model had an acceptable level of predictive ability with a c-index of 0.68 (95% CI: 0.65, 0.71). Internal validation showed that our model was robust and had a good fit.

    CONCLUSIONS: We developed a model predicting recovery from WAD, in a cohort of patients who consulted physical therapists. Our model has adequate predictive ability. However, to be fully incorporated in clinical practice the model needs to be validated in other populations and tested in clinical settings.

  • 24.
    Brorsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sport and Health Science. School of Business and Engineering, Department of Exercise Physiology, Biomechanics and Health, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Nilsdotter, Anna
    Department of Research and Education, Halmstad County Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Thorstensson, Carina
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden ; Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Section of Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden 7 Research and Development Center, Spenshult, Oskarstrom, Sweden.
    Differences in muscle activity during hand dexterity tasks between women with arthritis and a healthy reference group2014In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 15, article id 154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Impaired hand function is common in patients with arthritis and it affects performance of daily activities; thus, hand exercises are recommended. There is little information on the extent to which the disease affects activation of the flexor and extensor muscles during these hand-dexterity tasks. The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activation during such tasks in subjects with arthritis and in a healthy reference group.

    Methods. Muscle activation was measured in m. extensor digitorium communis (EDC) and in m. flexor carpi radialis (FCR) with surface electromyography (EMG) in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, n = 20), hand osteoarthritis (HOA, n = 16) and in a healthy reference group (n = 20) during the performance of four daily activity tasks and four hand exercises. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) was measured to enable intermuscular comparisons, and muscle activation is presented as %MVIC.

    Results. The arthritis group used a higher %MVIC than the reference group in both FCR and EDC when cutting with a pair of scissors, pulling up a zipper and—for the EDC—also when writing with a pen and using a key (p < 0.02). The exercise “rolling dough with flat hands” required the lowest %MVIC and may be less effective in improving muscle strength.

    Conclusions. Women with arthritis tend to use higher levels of muscle activation in daily tasks than healthy women, and wrist extensors and flexors appear to be equally affected. It is important that hand training programs reflect real-life situations and focus also on extensor strength.

  • 25.
    Brorsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS). Health and Welfare, Dala Sports Academy, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Nilsdotter, Anna
    Department of Research and Education, Halmstad County Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Thorstensson, Carina
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS). Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Section of Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Research and Development Center, Spenshult, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Differences in muscle activity during hand-dexterity tasks between women with arthritis and a healthy reference group2014In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Impaired hand function is common in patients with arthritis and it affects performance of daily activities; thus, hand exercises are recommended. There is little information on the extent to which the disease affects activation of the flexor and extensor muscles during these hand-dexterity tasks. The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activation during such tasks in subjects with arthritis and in a healthy reference group.

    METHODS: Muscle activation was measured in m. extensor digitorium communis (EDC) and in m. flexor carpi radialis (FCR) with surface electromyography (EMG) in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, n = 20), hand osteoarthritis (HOA, n = 16) and in a healthy reference group (n = 20) during the performance of four daily activity tasks and four hand exercises. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) was measured to enable intermuscular comparisons, and muscle activation is presented as %MVIC.

    RESULTS: The arthritis group used a higher %MVIC than the reference group in both FCR and EDC when cutting with a pair of scissors, pulling up a zipper and-for the EDC-also when writing with a pen and using a key (p < 0.02). The exercise "rolling dough with flat hands" required the lowest %MVIC and may be less effective in improving muscle strength.

    CONCLUSIONS: Women with arthritis tend to use higher levels of muscle activation in daily tasks than healthy women, and wrist extensors and flexors appear to be equally affected. It is important that hand training programs reflect real-life situations and focus also on extensor strength. © 2014 Brorsson et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 26.
    Charlesworth, Jonathon
    et al.
    Australasian Coll Sport and Exercise Phys, Australia.
    Fitzpatrick, Jane
    Australasian Coll Sport and Exercise Phys, Australia; Univ Melbourne, Australia; Univ Melbourne, Australia.
    Perera, Nirmala
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Australasian Coll Sport and Exercise Phys, Australia.
    Orchard, John
    Australasian Coll Sport and Exercise Phys, Australia; Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Osteoarthritis- a systematic review of long-term safety implications for osteoarthritis of the knee2019In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 20, article id 151Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is no cure for knee osteoarthritis (KOA) and typically patients live approximately 30-years with the disease. Most common medical treatments result in short-term palliation of symptoms with little consideration of long-term risk. This systematic review aims to appraise the current evidence for the long-term (amp;gt;= 12 months) safety of common treatments for knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Methods: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Medline and PubMed were systematically searched from 1990 to July 2017, inclusive. Inclusion criteria were 1) peer-reviewed publications investigating treatments for KOA referred to in the Australian Clinical Care Standard and/or Therapeutic Guidelines: Rheumatology 2) specifically addressing safety of the treatments 3) with amp;gt;= 12 months of follow-up and 4) Downs and Black quality score amp;gt;= 13. Results: Thirty-four studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Lifestyle modifications (moderate exercise and weight loss), paracetamol, glucosamine, Intraarticular Hyaluronic Acid (IAHA) and platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) injections have a low risk of harm and beneficial amp;gt;= 12 month outcomes. Although Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) provide pain relief, they are associated with increased risk of medical complications. Cortisone injections are associated with radiological cartilage degeneration at amp;gt; 12 months. Arthroscopy for degenerative meniscal tears in KOA leads to a 3-fold increase in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). TKA improves primary outcomes of KOA but has a low rate of significant medical complications. Conclusions: Given the safety and effectiveness of lifestyle interventions such as weight loss and exercise, these should be advocated in all patients due to the low risk of harm. The use of NSAIDs should be minimized to avoid gastrointestinal complications. Treatment with opioids has a lack of evidence for use and a high risk of long-term harm. The use of IAHA and PRP may provide additional symptomatic benefit without the risk of harm. TKA is associated with significant medical complications but is justified by the efficacy of joint replacement in late-stage disease.

  • 27.
    Dahlqvist, Camilla
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Occupat & Environm Med, SE-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Nordander, Catarina
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Occupat & Environm Med, SE-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Forsman, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Enquist, Henrik
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Occupat & Environm Med, SE-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Self-recordings of upper arm elevation during cleaning - comparison between analyses using a simplified reference posture and a standard reference posture2018In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 19, article id 402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background To reduce ergonomic risk factors in terms of awkward and constrained postures and high velocities, it is important to perform adequate risk assessments. Technical methods provide objective measures of physical workload. These methods have so far mainly been used by researchers. However, if written instructions how to apply the sensors and how to adopt the reference posture are provided, together with triaxial accelerometers, it may be possible for employees to record their own physical workload. The exposure in terms of e.g. upper arm elevations could then easily be assessed for all workers in a workplace. The main aims of this study were: 1) to compare analyses for self-recording of upper arm elevation during work using a simplified reference posture versus using a standard reference posture, and 2) to compare the two reference postures.MethodsTwenty-eight cleaners attached an accelerometer to their dominant upper arm and adopted a simplified reference according to a written instruction. They were thereafter instructed by a researcher to adopt a standard reference. Upper arm elevations were recorded for 2 or 3 days. Each recording was analysed twice; relative to the simplified reference posture and relative to the standard reference posture. The group means of the differences in recorded upper arm elevations between simplified and standard reference analyses were assessed using Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Furthermore, we calculated the group mean of the differences between the simplified reference posture and the standard reference posture.ResultsFor arm elevation during work (50(th) percentile), the group mean of the differences between the two analyses was 0.2 degrees (range-7 - 10 degrees). The group mean of the differences between the two references was 9 degrees (range 1-21 degrees). The subjects were able to follow the instructions in the protocol and performed self-recording of upper arm elevation and velocity.ConclusionsThe small difference between the two analyses indicates that recordings performed by employees themselves are comparable, on a group level, with those performed by researchers. Self-recordings in combination with action levels would provide employers with a method for risk assessment as a solid basis for prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

  • 28.
    Dean, E.
    et al.
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada .
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    What is the role of lifestyle behaviour change associated with non-communicable disease risk in managing musculoskeletal health conditions with special reference to chronic pain?2015In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Other than activity and exercise, lifestyle practices such as not smoking and healthy nutrition, well established for preventing and managing lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases (i.e., heart disease, cancer, hypertension, stroke, obstructive lung disease, diabetes, and obesity), are less emphasized in the physical therapy guidelines for addressing chronic pain, e.g., back pain. This state-of-the-art review examines the relationships between lifestyle behaviours and musculoskeletal health, with special reference to chronic pain, and their clinical and research implications. Discussion: A state-of-the-art review was conducted to synthesize evidence related to lifestyle factors (not smoking, healthy diet, healthy weight, optimal sleep and manageable stress, as well as physical activity) and musculoskeletal health, with special reference to chronic pain. The findings support that health behaviour change competencies (examination/assessment and intervention/treatment) may warrant being included in first-line management of chronic pain, either independently or in conjunction with conventional physical therapy interventions. To address knowledge gaps in the literature however three lines of clinical trial research are indicated: 1) to establish the degree to which traditional physical therapy interventions prescribed for chronic pain augment the benefits of lifestyle behaviour change; 2) to establish the degree to which adopting healthier lifestyle practices, avoids or reduces the need for conventional physical therapy; and 3) to establish whether patients/clients with healthier lifestyles and who have chronic pain, respond more favourably to conventional physical therapy interventions than those who have less healthy lifestyles. Summary: Lifestyle behaviour change is well accepted in addressing lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases. Compelling evidence exists however supporting the need for elucidation of the role of negative lifestyle behaviours on the incidence of chronic pain, and the role of positive lifestyle behaviours on its incidence and effective management. Addressing lifestyle behaviour change in patients/clients with chronic pain, e.g., back pain, as a first-line intervention might not only constitute a novel approach, but also reduce the socioeconomic burden related to chronic pain as well as non-communicable diseases.

  • 29.
    Dedering, Åsa
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Halvorsen, Marie
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cleland, Joshua
    Franklin Pierce University, Denver, CO, USA .
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Neck-specific training with a cognitive behavioural approach compared with prescribed physical activity in patients with cervical radiculopathy: a protocol of a prospective randomised clinical trial2014In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 15, no 274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with cervical radiculopathy often have neck- and arm pain, neurological changes, activity limitations and difficulties in returning to work. Most patients are not candidates for surgery but are often treated with different conservative approaches and may be sick-listed for long periods. The purpose of the current study is to compare the effectiveness of neck- specific training versus prescribed physical activity. Methods/Design: The current protocol is a two armed intervention randomised clinical trial comparing the outcomes of patients receiving neck specific training or prescribed physical activity. A total of 144 patients with cervical radiculopathy will be randomly allocated to either of the two interventions. The interventions will be delivered by experienced physiotherapists and last 14 weeks. The primary outcome variable is neck- and arm pain intensity measured with a Visual Analogue Scale accompanied with secondary outcome measures of impairments and subjective health measurements collected before intervention and at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after base-line assessment. Discussion: We anticipate that the results of this study will provide evidence to support recommendations as to the effectiveness of conservative interventions for patients with cervical radiculopathy.

  • 30. Ekblom, Anna Gerber
    et al.
    Dahlin, Lars B
    Rosberg, Hans-Eric
    Wiig, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Hand Surgery.
    Werner, Michael
    Arner, Marianne
    Hand function in children with radial longitudinal deficiency2013In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 14, p. 116-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    In children with hypoplasia or aplasia of the radius (radial longitudinal deficiency) manual activity limitations may be caused by several factors; a short and bowed forearm, radial deviation of the wrist, a non-functional or absent thumb, limited range of motion in the fingers and impaired grip strength. The present study investigates the relation between these variables and activity and participation in children with radial dysplasia.

    METHODS:

    Twenty children, age 4-17 years, with radial longitudinal dysplasia Bayne type II-IV were examined with focus on the International Classification of Functioning and Health, version for Children and Youth (ICF-CY) context. Body function/structure was evaluated by measures of range of motion, grip strength, sensibility and radiographic parameters. Activity was examined by Box and Block Test and Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA). Participation was assessed by Children's Hand-use Experience Questionnaire (CHEQ). Statistical correlations between assessments of body function/structure and activity as well as participation were examined.

    RESULTS:

    The mean total active motion of wrist (49.6°) and digits (447°) were less than norms. The mean hand forearm angle was 34° radially. Ulnar length ranged from 40 to 80% of age-related norms. Grip strength (mean 2.7 kg) and Box and Block Test (mean 33.8 blocks/minute) were considerably lower than for age-related norms. The mean score for the AHA was 55.9 and for CHEQ Grasp efficiency 69.3. The AHA had significant relationship with the total range of motion of digits (p = 0.042). Self-experienced time of performance (CHEQ Time) had significant relationship with total active motion of wrist (p = 0.043). Hand forearm angle did not show any significant relationship with Box and Block Test, AHA or CHEQ.

    CONCLUSION:

    In radial longitudinal deficiency total range of motion of digits and wrist may be of more cardinal importance to the child's activity and participation than the angulation of the wrist.

  • 31.
    Eklund, Andreas
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Axén, Iben
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Research Department, Spine Center of Southern Denmark, Hospital Lillebaelt, Institute of Regional Health Research, Middelfart, Denmark.
    Do psychological and behavioral factors classified by the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (Swedish version) predict the early clinical course of low back pain in patients receiving chiropractic care?2016In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To investigate if psychological and behavioral factors (as determined by the Swedish version of the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory, MPI-S) can predict the early clinical course of Low Back Pain (LBP).

    Methods: MPI-S data from patients (18–65 years of age) seeking chiropractic care for recurrent and persistent LBP were collected at the 1st visit. A follow-up questionnaire was administered at the 4th visit. The predictive value of the MPI-S subgroups Adaptive Copers (AC), Interpersonally Distressed (ID) and Dysfunctional (DYS) was calculated against the subjective improvement at the 4th visit and clinically relevant difference in pain intensity between the 1st and 4th visit.

    Results: Of the 666 subjects who were included at the 1st visit, 329 completed the questionnaire at the 4th visit. A total of 64.7 % (AC), 68.0 % (ID) and 71.3 % (DYS) reported a definite improvement. The chance of “definite improvement”, expressed as relative risk (95 % CI) with the AC group as reference, was 1.05 (.87–1.27) for the ID and 1.10 (.93–1.31) for the DYS groups, respectively. The DYS and ID groups reported higher values in pain intensity both at the 1st and the 4th visit. The proportion of subjects who reported an improvement in pain intensity of 30 % or more (clinically relevant) were 63.5 % AC, 72.0 % ID and 63.2 % DYS. Expressed as relative risk (95 % CI) with the AC group as reference, this corresponded to 1.26 (.91–1.76) for the ID and 1.09 (.78–1.51) for the DYS groups, respectively.

    Conclusions: The MPI-S instrument could not predict the early clinical course of recurrent and persistent LBP in this sample of chiropractic patients.

  • 32.
    Eklund, Andreas
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Axén, Iben
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Research Department, Spine Center of Southern Denmark, Institute of Regional Health Research, Hospital Lillebælt, Middelfart, Denmark.
    Psychological and behavioral differences between low back pain populations: a comparative analysis of chiropractic, primary and secondary care patients2015In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 16, article id 306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Psychological, behavioral and social factors have long been considered important in the development of persistent pain. Little is known about how chiropractic low back pain (LBP) patients compare to other LBP patients in terms of psychological/behavioral characteristics.

    Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the aim was to investigate patients with LBP as regards to psychosocial/behavioral characteristics by describing a chiropractic primary care population and comparing this sample to three other populations using the MPI-S instrument. Thus, four different samples were compared. A: Four hundred eighty subjects from chiropractic primary care clinics. B: One hundred twenty-eight subjects from a gainfully employed population (sick listed with high risk of developing chronicity). C: Two hundred seventy-three subjects from a secondary care rehabilitation clinic. D: Two hundred thirty-five subjects from secondary care clinics. The Swedish version of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI-S) was used to collect data. Subjects were classified using a cluster analytic strategy into three pre-defined subgroups (named adaptive copers, dysfunctional and interpersonally distressed).

    Results: The data show statistically significant overall differences across samples for the subgroups based on psychological and behavioral characteristics. The cluster classifications placed (in terms of the proportions of the adaptive copers and dysfunctional subgroups) sample A between B and the two secondary care samples C and D.

    Conclusions: The chiropractic primary care sample was more affected by pain and worse off with regards to psychological and behavioral characteristics compared to the other primary care sample. Based on our findings from the MPI-S instrument the 4 samples may be considered statistically and clinically different.

  • 33.
    El-Habta, Roine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Chen, Jialin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Pingel, Jessica
    Backman, Ludvig J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Tendinosis-like changes in denervated rat Achilles tendon2018In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 19, article id 426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Tendon disorders are common and lead to significant disability and pain. Our knowledge of the ‘tennis elbow’, the ‘jumpers knee’, and Achilles tendinosis has increased over the years, but changes in denervated tendons is yet to be described in detail. The aim of the present study was to investigate the morphological and biochemical changes in tendon tissue following two weeks of denervation using a unilateral sciatic nerve transection model in rat Achilles tendons.

    Methods: Tendons were compared with respect to cell number, nuclear roundness, and fiber structure. The non-denervated contralateral tendon served as a control. Also, the expression of neuromodulators such as substance P and its preferred receptor neurokinin-1 receptor, NK-1R, was evaluated using real-time qRT-PCR.

    Results: Our results showed that denervated tendons expressed morphological changes such as hypercellularity; disfigured cells; disorganization of the collagen network; increased production of type III collagen; and increased expression of NK-1R.

    Conclusion: Taken together these data provide new insights into the histopathology of denervated tendons showing that denervation causes somewhat similar changes in the Achilles tendon as does tendinosis in rats.

  • 34.
    Emilson, C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Åsenlöf, P.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pettersson, S.
    Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Bergman, S.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Sandborgh, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Martin, C.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Demmelmaier, I.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Physical therapists' assessments, analyses and use of behavior change techniques in initial consultations on musculoskeletal pain: Direct observations in primary health care2016In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Behavioral medicine (BM) treatment is recommended to be implemented for pain management in physical therapy. Its implementation requires physical therapists (PTs), who are skilled at performing functional behavioral analyses based on physical, psychological and behavioral assessments. The purpose of the current study was to explore and describe PTs' assessments, analyses and their use of behavioral change techniques (BCTs) in initial consultations with patients who seek primary health care due to musculoskeletal pain. Methods: A descriptive and explorative research design was applied, using data from video recordings of 12 primary health care PTs. A deductive analysis was performed, based on a specific protocol with definitions of PTs' assessment of physical and psychological prognostic factors (red and yellow flags, respectively), analysis of the clinical problem, and use of BCTs. An additional inductive analysis was performed to identify and describe the variation in the PTs' clinical practice. Results: Red and yellow flags were assessed in a majority of the cases. Analyses were mainly based on biomedical assessments and none of the PTs performed functional behavioral analyses. All of the PTs used BCTs, mainly instruction and information, to facilitate physical activity and improved posture. The four most clinically relevant cases were selected to illustrate the variation in the PTs' clinical practice. The results are based on 12 experienced primary health care PTs in Sweden, limiting the generalizability to similar populations and settings. Conclusion: Red and yellow flags were assessed by PTs in the current study, but their interpretation and integration of the findings in analyses and treatment were incomplete, indicating a need of further strategies to implement behavioral medicine in Swedish primary health care physical therapy. 

  • 35.
    Emilson, C.
    et al.
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Åsenlöf, Pernilla
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Susanne
    Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden & Department of Rheumatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult, Oskarström, Sweden & Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sandborgh, Maria
    School of Health Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Martin, Cathrin
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Demmelmaier, Ingrid
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Physical therapists’ assessments, analyses and use of behavior change techniques in initial consultations on musculoskeletal pain: direct observations in primary health care2016In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 17, article id 316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Behavioral medicine (BM) treatment is recommended to be implemented for pain management in physical therapy. Its implementation requires physical therapists (PTs), who are skilled at performing functional behavioral analyses based on physical, psychological and behavioral assessments. The purpose of the current study was to explore and describe PTs' assessments, analyses and their use of behavioral change techniques (BCTs) in initial consultations with patients who seek primary health care due to musculoskeletal pain.

    METHODS: A descriptive and explorative research design was applied, using data from video recordings of 12 primary health care PTs. A deductive analysis was performed, based on a specific protocol with definitions of PTs' assessment of physical and psychological prognostic factors (red and yellow flags, respectively), analysis of the clinical problem, and use of BCTs. An additional inductive analysis was performed to identify and describe the variation in the PTs' clinical practice.

    RESULTS: Red and yellow flags were assessed in a majority of the cases. Analyses were mainly based on biomedical assessments and none of the PTs performed functional behavioral analyses. All of the PTs used BCTs, mainly instruction and information, to facilitate physical activity and improved posture. The four most clinically relevant cases were selected to illustrate the variation in the PTs' clinical practice. The results are based on 12 experienced primary health care PTs in Sweden, limiting the generalizability to similar populations and settings.

    CONCLUSION: Red and yellow flags were assessed by PTs in the current study, but their interpretation and integration of the findings in analyses and treatment were incomplete, indicating a need of further strategies to implement behavioral medicine in Swedish primary health care physical therapy. © 2016 The Author(s).

  • 36.
    Emilson, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
    Åsenlöf, Pernilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
    Pettersson, S.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Physiotherapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bergman, S.
    Res & Dev Ctr Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Sandborgh, M.
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Martin, Cathrin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
    Demmelmaier, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
    Physical therapists' assessments, analyses and use of behavior change techniques in initial consultations on musculoskeletal pain: direct observations in primary health care2016In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 17, article id 316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Behavioral medicine (BM) treatment is recommended to be implemented for pain management in physical therapy. Its implementation requires physical therapists (PTs), who are skilled at performing functional behavioral analyses based on physical, psychological and behavioral assessments. The purpose of the current study was to explore and describe PTs' assessments, analyses and their use of behavioral change techniques (BCTs) in initial consultations with patients who seek primary health care due to musculoskeletal pain. Methods: A descriptive and explorative research design was applied, using data from video recordings of 12 primary health care PTs. A deductive analysis was performed, based on a specific protocol with definitions of PTs' assessment of physical and psychological prognostic factors (red and yellow flags, respectively), analysis of the clinical problem, and use of BCTs. An additional inductive analysis was performed to identify and describe the variation in the PTs' clinical practice. Results: Red and yellow flags were assessed in a majority of the cases. Analyses were mainly based on biomedical assessments and none of the PTs performed functional behavioral analyses. All of the PTs used BCTs, mainly instruction and information, to facilitate physical activity and improved posture. The four most clinically relevant cases were selected to illustrate the variation in the PTs' clinical practice. The results are based on 12 experienced primary health care PTs in Sweden, limiting the generalizability to similar populations and settings. Conclusion: Red and yellow flags were assessed by PTs in the current study, but their interpretation and integration of the findings in analyses and treatment were incomplete, indicating a need of further strategies to implement behavioral medicine in Swedish primary health care physical therapy.

  • 37. Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Bartonek, Asa
    Ponten, Eva
    Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Biomechanics. Karolinska institutet, Sweden.
    Gait dynamics in the wide spectrum of children with arthrogryposis: a descriptive study2015In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita (AMC) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by multiple joint contractures at birth. Greater movements in the trunk and pelvis during walking have been observed in children with AMC using orthoses compared to those wearing only shoes. This study investigated gait dynamics in children with AMC and identified compensatory mechanisms that accommodate walking. Methods: Twenty-six children with AMC who walked with orthoses or shoes and a control group consisting of 37 typically-developing children were evaluated in 3D gait analysis. Children with AMC were divided into subgroups based on which joints needed to be stabilized in the sagittal plane; AMC1 used knee-ankle-foot orthoses (KAFOs) with locked knee joints, AMC2 used KAFOs with open knee joints or ankle-foot orthoses, and AMC3 used shoes. Results: The Gait Deviation Index was lower in AMC groups than in the control group, with the lowest in AMC1. Excessive trunk movements in frontal and transverse planes were observed in AMC2 and especially in AMC1. Lower hip flexion moment was found in AMC1, while AMC2 and AMC3 showed similar hip flexion moments as the control group. Knee extension moments were similar between the groups. In the frontal plane there were only small differences between the groups in hip abduction moment. A joint work analysis indicated greater contribution from the hip muscles to overall positive work in AMC groups, particularly in AMC1, than in the control group. Conclusion: All AMC groups showed less hip extension than the control group, but hip flexion moment was significantly lower only in AMC1, which can be attributed to their gait strategy with bilateral locked KAFOs. AMC1, who had weak knee extensors, were helped by their locked KAFOs and therefore showed similar knee extension moment as the other groups. This finding, together with their gait patterns, demonstrates the children's high reliance on hip muscles and presumably trunk muscles to provide propulsion. Our study shows that with adequate orthotic support, children with AMC and even with severe weakness and contractures can achieve walking.

  • 38.
    Ernstgård, Anna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science. Capio Artro Clinic AB.
    PirouziFard, MirNabi
    Centre of Registers Västra Götaland.
    Thorstensson, Carina A.
    University of Gothenburg ; Centre of Registers Västra Götaland.
    Health enhancing physical activity in patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis - an observational intervention study2017In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 18, article id 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Osteoarthritis is one of the leading causes of inactivity worldwide. The recommended level of health enhancing physical activity (HEPA) is at least 150 min of moderate intensity physical activity per week. The purpose of this study was to explore how the proportion of patients, who reached the recommended level of HEPA, changed following a supported osteoarthritis self-management programme in primary care, and to explore how reaching the level of HEPA was influenced by body mass index (BMI), gender, age and comorbidity. Methods: An observational study was conducted using data from a National Quality Registry in which 6810 patients in primary care with clinically verified hip or knee osteoarthritis with complete data at baseline, 3 and 12 months follow-up before December 31st 2013 were included. HEPA was defined as self-reported physical activity of at least moderate intensity either a) at least 30 min per day on four days or more per week, or b) at least 150 min per week. HEPA was assessed at baseline, and again at 3 and 12 months follow-up. Cochran's Q test was used to determine change in physical activity over time. The association between reaching the level of HEPA and time, age, BMI, gender, and Charnley classification was investigated using the generalized estimation equation (GEE) model. Results: The proportion of patients who reached the level of HEPA increased by 345 patients, from 77 to 82%, from baseline to 3 months follow-up. At 12 months, the proportion of patients who reached the level of HEPA decreased to 76%. Not reaching the level of HEPA was associated with overweight, obesity, male gender and Charnley category C, i.e. osteoarthritis in multiple joint sites (hip and knee), or presence of any other disease that affects walking ability. Conclusions: Following the supported osteoarthritis self-management programme there was a significant increase in the proportion of patients who reached the recommended level of HEPA after 3 months. Improvements were lost after 12 months. To increase physical activity and reach long-lasting changes in levels of physical activity, more follow-up sessions might be needed.

  • 39.
    Farhang, Mehdy
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Mukka, Sebastian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Bergström, Ulrica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Svensson, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Sayed-Noor, Arkan S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    The trend of radiological severity of hip fractures over a 30 years period: a cohort study2019In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Despite advances in operative techniques and preoperative care, proximal femur fractures (PFF) still represent a great public health problem. Displacement and fracture stability have been assumed as important determinants of treatment modality and outcome in such fractures. Purpose of this study was to determine whether the radiological severity of PFF fractures has increased over time.

    METHODS: In a cohort study, the plain radiographs of all patients with PFF aged over 50 years who were admitted to Umeå University Hospital in 1981/82, 2002 and 2012 were recruited to examine the types of fractures.

    RESULTS: The ratio of undisplaced to displaced femoral neck (FN) fractures was 30 to 70% in 1981/82, 28 to 72% in 2002 and 25 to 75% in 2012. The ratio of stable to unstable intertrochanteric (IT) fractures was 64 to 36% in 1981/82, 68 to 32% in 2002 and 75 to 25% in 2012. The ratio of simple to comminute subtrochanteric fractures was 35 to 65% in 1981/82, 16 to 84% in 2002 and 12 to 88% in 2012. In both FN and IT fractures we found no statistical difference among these 3 study periods, p = 0.67 and p = 0.40. In subtrochanteric fractures we saw a tendency towards more comminute subtrochanteric fractures (1981/82 to 2012), p = 0.09.

    CONCLUSIONS: We found no significant increment in the radiological severity of FN and IT over a 30 years' period. However, there was tendency towards an increase in comminute subtrochanteric fractures.

  • 40. Feldthusen, Caroline
    et al.
    Grimby-Ekman, Anna
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Jacobsson, Lennart
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    Seasonal variations in fatigue in persons with rheumatoid arthritis: a longitudinal study2016In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 17, article id 59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fatigue is a prominent symptom in persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although this symptom has been described to vary in duration and frequency little is known about fluctuations in fatigue over time and season. The aim of this study was to describe monthly and seasonal variations in fatigue, in persons with RA of working age.

    Methods: Sixty-five participants diagnosed with RA and aged 20-65 years were recruited from a rheumatology clinic in Sweden. The participants provided self-assessments of their fatigue at seven time points during the four seasons using a 0-100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Bristol Rheumatoid Arthritis Fatigue Multidimensional Questionnaire (BRAF-MDQ). Multiple regression analysis using mixed models was used to analyze changes in fatigue over time.

    Results: The mean +/- SD of fatigue rated on the VAS was 51 +/- 13, indicating substantial fatigue. Analysis of monthly variation showed statistically significant variation in fatigue ratings concerning VAS fatigue score (p < 0.01) as well as the BRAF-MDQ total score and Living, Cognition (p < 0.001), and Physical (p < 0.05) sub-scores, but not the BRAF-MDQ Emotional sub-score. The greatest variations were seen from January to September, with higher fatigue ratings in January. The changes in VAS fatigue scores over time were considered to be of clinical importance. Analysis of seasonal variation revealed a statistically significant seasonal variation in fatigue levels, with higher fatigue values during the winter as measured by VAS fatigue score (p < 0.01) as well as BRAF-MDQ total score (p < 0.01) and Physical and Living sub-scores (both p < 0.01). The greatest variation was seen between winter and autumn for VAS fatigue and between winter and summer for BRAF-MDQ total score and Physical and Living sub-scores. There were no statistical differences in fatigue levels, monthly or seasonal, between sexes or age groups.

    Conclusions: The majority of rating scales used in this study showed fluctuations in fatigue, general and physical fatigue being significantly greater during the winter. As fatigue is a substantial symptom in many persons with RA, this information is important for rheumatology professionals when dealing with persons with RA in routine care.

  • 41.
    Flodin, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Rolander, B.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Futurum, Sweden.
    Lofgren, H.
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Krapi, Blerim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Nyqvist, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Risk factors for neck pain among forklift truck operators: a retrospective cohort study2018In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 19, article id 44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    No previous research has been performed into neck pain among forklift operators. This is a common complaint among these workers, who number around 150,000 in Sweden and six million in Europe. The aim of the study was to examine long-term exposure to unnatural neck positions among forklift operators as a risk factor for neck pain.

    Methods

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted of all eligible employees at a high-level warehouse. Forklift operators and office workers answered an 18-page questionnaire comprising questions about joint pain, work tasks, work postures and year of start for all items. By using person years in the exposed and less-exposed groups before start of neck pain we were able to calculate Incident Rate ratios for various exposures.

    Results

    Forty nine percent of the forklift operators reported having experienced neck pain compared to 30 % of office workers. Being a forklift operator was associated with an increased risk of neck pain (OR = 5.1, 95% CI 1.4–18.2). Holding the head in an unnatural position resulted in significantly increased risks for neck pain, irrespective of type of position. The risks for neck pain remained after taking other ergonomic exposures and psychosocial aspects into consideration.

    Conclusions

    This is the first published study showing that forklift operators have an increased risk of neck pain. The results are therefore of significance for improving work schedules, the adjustment of work tasks for these workers and the design of the vehicles.

  • 42.
    Flodin, Ulf
    et al.
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rolander, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Futurum, Academy for Health and Care, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Löfgren, H.
    Neuro-Orthopedic Center, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Krapi, B.
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nyqvist, F.
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, C.
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Risk factors for neck pain among forklift truck operators: a retrospective cohort study2018In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 19, no 44, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: No previous research has been performed into neck pain among forklift operators. This is a common complaint among these workers, who number around 150,000 in Sweden and six million in Europe. The aim of the study was to examine long-term exposure to unnatural neck positions among forklift operators as a risk factor for neck pain.

    METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted of all eligible employees at a high-level warehouse. Forklift operators and office workers answered an 18-page questionnaire comprising questions about joint pain, work tasks, work postures and year of start for all items. By using person years in the exposed and less-exposed groups before start of neck pain we were able to calculate Incident Rate ratios for various exposures.

    RESULTS: Forty nine percent of the forklift operators reported having experienced neck pain compared to 30 % of office workers. Being a forklift operator was associated with an increased risk of neck pain (OR = 5.1, 95% CI 1.4-18.2). Holding the head in an unnatural position resulted in significantly increased risks for neck pain, irrespective of type of position. The risks for neck pain remained after taking other ergonomic exposures and psychosocial aspects into consideration.

    CONCLUSIONS: This is the first published study showing that forklift operators have an increased risk of neck pain. The results are therefore of significance for improving work schedules, the adjustment of work tasks for these workers and the design of the vehicles.

  • 43. Gaida, James E
    et al.
    Alfredson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Kiss, Zoltan S
    Bass, Shona L
    Cook, Jill L
    Asymptomatic Achilles tendon pathology is associated with a central fat distribution in men and a peripheral fat distribution in women: a cross sectional study of 298 individuals.2010In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 11, no 41, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Adiposity is a modifiable factor that has been implicated in tendinopathy. As tendon pain reduces physical activity levels and can lead to weight gain, associations between tendon pathology and adiposity must be studied in individuals without tendon pain. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether fat distribution was associated with asymptomatic Achilles tendon pathology. METHODS: The Achilles tendons of 298 individuals were categorised as normal or pathological using diagnostic ultrasound. Fat distribution was determined using anthropometry (waist circumference, waist hip ratio [WHR]) and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. RESULTS: Asymptomatic Achilles tendon pathology was more evident in men (13%) than women (5%) (p = 0.007). Men with tendon pathology were older (50.9 +/- 10.4, 36.3 +/- 11.3, p < 0.001), had greater WHR (0.926 +/- 0.091, 0.875 +/- 0.065, p = 0.039), higher android/gynoid fat mass ratio (0.616 +/- 0.186, 0.519 +/- 0.142, p = 0.014) and higher upper-body/lower body fat mass ratio (2.346 +/- 0.630, 2.022 +/- 0.467, p = 0.013). Men older than 40 years with a waist circumference >83 cm had the greatest prevalence of tendon pathology (33%). Women with tendon pathology were older (47.4 +/- 10.0, 36.0 +/- 10.3, p = 0.008), had less total fat (17196 +/- 3173 g, 21626 +/- 7882 g, p = 0.009), trunk fat (7367 +/- 1662 g, 10087 +/- 4152 g, p = 0.003) and android fat (1117 +/- 324 g, 1616 +/- 811 g, p = 0.005). They had lower central/peripheral fat mass ratios (0.711 +/- 0.321 g, 0.922 +/- 0.194 g, p = 0.004) than women with normal tendons. Women with tendon pathology were more often menopausal (63%, 13%, p = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Men with Achilles tendon pathology were older and had a central fat distribution. Women with tendon pathology were older and had a peripheral fat distribution. An interaction between age and waist circumference was observed among men.

  • 44.
    Garland, Anne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Visby Hosp, Dept Orthopaed, Visby, Sweden; Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rolfson, Ola
    Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register, Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Orthopaed, Gothenburg, Sweden; Harvard Univ, Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Sch Med, Harris Orthopaed Lab, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Garellick, Göran
    Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register, Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Orthopaed, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kärrholm, Johan
    Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register, Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Orthopaed, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hailer, Nils P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Early postoperative mortality after simultaneous or staged bilateral primary total hip arthroplasty: an observational register study from the swedish Hip arthroplasty register2015In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 16, article id 77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Approximately a fifth of all total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients suffers from bilateral osteoarthritis of the hip. It is unclear whether mortality risks differ between simultaneous bilateral THA and staged bilateral THA. We investigated mortality after simultaneous THA compared with staged bilateral THA in the largest cohort hitherto reported. Methods: The 42,238 patients reported to have received bilateral primary THA from 1992 to 2012 in the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register were included. Tumours and fractures as underlying diagnoses were excluded. The time interval between the first and second THA was divided into four categories or treated as a continuous variable. Unadjusted survival was calculated according to Kaplan-Meier and adjusted Cox regression models were fitted in order to calculate crude and adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for the risk of death within different time frames. Results: Patients selected for simultaneous bilateral surgery were younger, more often male, and had lower ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) class than patients receiving staged procedures. The adjusted 90-day mortality after the second procedure did not differ between the four investigated groups (simultaneous bilateral [HR 1.3, CI 0.5-3.3], surgeries within 6 months [HR 1.1, CI 0.6-2.0], surgeries between 7 and 12 months [HR 0.7, CI 0.4-1.2], with second surgery after > 12 months as the reference group). For patients older than 75 years, men, patients with ASA class 3 or above, and for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the 90-day mortality was increased. The unadjusted risk of implant revision of any hip was slightly higher for patients with simultaneous bilateral THA compared to those with staged procedure within one year, but after adjustment for age, gender, diagnosis and implant fixation these differences were no longer statistically significant. Conclusion: There were no clinically relevant differences in early postoperative mortality between simultaneous and staged bilateral surgery in healthy patients. Advanced age, RA, a high ASA class and male sex increased the risk of death within 90 days. There may be an issue with enhanced risk of implant revision in patients with simultaneous bilateral THA that needs to be explored further.

  • 45.
    Garland, Anne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Rolfsson, Ola
    Institute of clinical sciencesSahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Garellick, Göran
    Swedish Hip Artroplasty Register, Institute of clinical sciencesSahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Kärrholm, Johan
    Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register, Institute of clinical sciencesSahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Hailer, Nils P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Erratum to:Early postoperative mortality after simultaneous or staged bilateral primary total hip arthroplasty: an observational register study from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register2015In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 16, p. 263-263Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Gemark Simonsen, Jenny
    et al.
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Swedish Sonographers' perceptions of ergonomic problems at work and their suggestions for improvement2016In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Sonographers' perceptions of ergonomic and work-related pain problems at work have so far mostly been researched in quantitative studies by questionnaires. There is a need of experience-based research to deepen the knowledge about how sonographers perceive ergonomic problems at work. Therefore, the aim of this qualitative study was to describe sonographers' perceptions of ergonomic problems at work, and their suggestions for improvement strategies.

    METHODS:

    Twenty-two female sonographers were individually interviewed regarding different aspects of their physical working environment. Content analysis was applied.

    RESULTS:

    The sonographers perceived different ergonomic problems in their working environment, but to offer patient comfort and to obtain the best possible images were often prioritized over working posture. Echocardiography was considered demanding as the examination is performed with little variation in posture. Ergonomic improvements included reducing the manual handling of the transducer, optimizing the adjustability of equipment, and taking the patient's physique and health into account. As some examinations were perceived to be more ergonomically demanding, variation between examinations was suggested, however, this requires broader skills.

    CONCLUSION:

    Sonography, especially echocardiography is ergonomically demanding but the improvement strategies suggested were perceived useful and applicable.

  • 47. Gerdle, Bjorn
    et al.
    Molander, Peter
    Stenberg, Gunilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Stalnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine. Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, SE-581 85 Linköping, Sweden.
    Weak outcome predictors of multimodal rehabilitation at one-year follow-up in patients with chronic pain: a practice based evidence study from two SQRP centres2016In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 17, article id 490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: For patients with chronic pain, the heterogeneity of clinical presentations makes it difficult to identify patients who would benefit from multimodal rehabilitation programs (MMRP). Yet, there is limited knowledge regarding the predictors of MMRP’s outcomes. This study identifies predictors of outcome of MMRPs at a 12-month follow-up (FU-12) based on data from the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP).

    Methods: Patients with chronic pain from two clinical departments in Sweden completed the SQRP questionnaires—background, pain characteristics, psychological symptoms, function, activity/participation, health and quality of life—on three occasions: 1) during their first visit; 2) immediately after the completion of their MMRP; and 3) 12 months after completing the MMRP (n = 227). During the FU-12, the patients also retrospectively reported their global impressions of any changes in their perception of pain and their ability to handle their life situation in general.

    Results: Significant improvements were found for pain, psychological symptoms, activity/participation, health, and quality of life aspects with low/medium strong effects.

    A general pattern was observed from the analyses of the changes from baseline to FU-12; the largest improvements in outcomes were significantly associated with poor situations according to their respective baseline scores. Although significant regressors of the investigated outcomes were found, the significant predictors were weak and explained a minor part of the variation in outcomes (15–25%). At the FU-12, 53.6% of the patients reported that their pain had decreased and 80.1% reported that their life situation in general had improved. These improvements were associated with high education, low pain intensity, high health level, and work importance (only pain perception). The explained variations were low (9–11%).

    Conclusions: Representing patients in real-world clinical settings, this study confirmed systematic reviews that outcomes of MMRP are associated with broad positive effects. A mix of background and baseline variables influenced the outcomes investigated, but the explained variations in outcomes were low. There is still a need to develop standardized and relatively simple outcomes that can be used to evaluate MMRP in trials, in clinical evaluations at group level, and for individual patients.

  • 48.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Björk, Jonas
    Competence Centre for Clinical Research Lund University Hospital.
    Cöster, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Henriksson, Karl-Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Henriksson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    Bengtsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Prevalence of widespread pain and associations with work status: A population study2008In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. This population study based on a representative sample from a Swedish county investigates the prevalence, duration, and determinants of widespread pain (WSP) in the population using two constructs and estimates how WSP affects work status. In addition, this study investigates the prevalence of widespread pain and its relationship to pain intensity, gender, age, income, work status, citizenship, civil status, urban residence, and health care seeking. Methods. A cross-sectional survey using a postal questionnaire was sent to a representative sample (n = 9952) of the target population (284,073 people, 18-74 years) in a county (Östergötland) in the southern Sweden. The questionnaire was mailed and followed by two postal reminders when necessary. Results. The participation rate was 76.7% (n = 7637), the non-participants were on the average younger, earned less money, and male. Women had higher prevalences of pain in 10 different predetermined anatomical regions. WSP was generally chronic (90-94%) and depending on definition of WSP the prevalence varied between 4.8-7.4% in the population. Women had significantly higher prevalence of WSP than men and the age effect appeared to be stronger in women than in men. WSP was a significant negative factor - together with age 50-64 years, low annual income, and non-Nordic citizen - for work status in the community and in the group with chronic pain. Chronic pain but not the spreading of pain was related to health care seeking in the population. Conclusion. This study confirms earlier studies that report high prevalences of widespread pain in the population and especially among females and with increasing age. Widespread pain is associated with prominent effects on work status. © 2008 Gerdle et al, licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 49. Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Grönlund, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Karlsson, Stefan J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    Roeleveld, Karin
    Altered neuromuscular control mechanisms of the trapezius muscle in fibromyalgia.2010In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 11, p. 42-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: fibromyalgia is a relatively common condition with widespread pain and pressure allodynia, but unknown aetiology. For decades, the association between motor control strategies and chronic pain has been a topic for debate. One long held functional neuromuscular control mechanism is differential activation between regions within a single muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in neuromuscular control, i.e. differential activation, between myalgic trapezius in fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls. METHODS: 27 fibromyalgia patients and 30 healthy controls performed 3 minutes bilateral shoulder elevations with different loads (0-4 Kg) with a high-density surface electromyographical (EMG) grid placed above the upper trapezius. Differential activation was quantified by the power spectral median frequency of the difference in EMG amplitude between the cranial and caudal parts of the upper trapezius. The average duration of the differential activation was described by the inverse of the median frequency of the differential activations. RESULTS: the median frequency of the differential activations was significantly lower, and the average duration of the differential activations significantly longer in fibromyalgia compared with controls at the two lowest load levels (0-1 Kg) (p < 0.04), but not at the two highest load levels (2 and 4 Kg). CONCLUSION: these findings illustrate a different neuromuscular control between fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls during a low load functional task, either sustaining or resulting from the chronic painful condition. The findings may have clinical relevance for rehabilitation strategies for fibromyalgia.

  • 50.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Kristiansen, Jesper
    National Research Centre Working Environm, Denmark.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Saltin, Bengt
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sogaard, Karen
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Sjogaard, Gisela
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Algogenic substances and metabolic status in work-related Trapezius Myalgia: a multivariate explorative study2014In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 15, no 357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study compares the levels of algesic substances between subjects with trapezius myalgia (TM) and healthy controls (CON) and explores the multivariate correlation pattern between these substances, pain, and metabolic status together with relative blood flow changes reported in our previous paper (Eur J Appl Physiol 108: 657-669, 2010). Methods: 43 female workers with (TM) and 19 females without (CON) trapezius myalgia were - using microdialysis - compared for differences in interstitial concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), bradykinin (BKN), serotonin (5-HT), lactate dehydrogenas (LDH), substance P, and N-terminal propeptide of procollagen type I (PINP) in the trapezius muscle at rest and during repetitive/stressful work. These data were also used in multivariate analyses together with previously presented data (Eur J Appl Physiol 108: 657-669, 2010): trapezius muscle blood flow, metabolite accumulation, oxygenation, and pain development and sensitivity. Results: Substance P was significantly elevated in TM (p=0.0068). No significant differences were found in the classical algesic substances (p: 0.432-0.926). The multivariate analysis showed that blood flow related variables, interstitial concentrations of metabolic (pyruvate), and algesic (BKN and K+) substances were important for the discrimination of the subjects to one of the two groups (R-2: 0.19-0.31, pless than0.05). Pain intensity was positively associated with levels of 5-HT and K+ and negatively associated with oxygenation indicators and IL-6 in TM (R-2: 0.24, pless than0.05). A negative correlation existed in TM between mechanical pain sensitivity of trapezius and BKN and IL-6 (R-2: 0.26-0.39, pless than0.05). Conclusion: The present study increased understanding alterations in the myalgic muscle. When considering the system-wide aspects, increased concentrations of lactate, pyruvate and K+ and decreased oxygenation characterized TM compared to CON. There are three major possible explanations for this finding: the workers with pain had relatively low severity of myalgia, metabolic alterations preceded detectable alterations in levels of algesics, or peripheral sensitization and other muscle alterations existed in TM. Only SP of the investigated algesic substances was elevated in TM. Several of the algesics were of importance for the levels of pain intensity and mechanical pain sensitivity in TM. These results indicate peripheral contribution to maintenance of central nociceptive and pain mechanisms and may be important to consider when designing treatments.

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