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  • 1.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Center of Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Anxiety during magnetic resonance imaging of the spine in relation to scanner design and size2019In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging in closed-bore scanners sometimes provokes anxiety but closed-bore designs have gradually become wider and shorter. Open scanners may be easier to tolerate. The aim was to compare patient anxiety during MRI between bore diameters of 60 cm and 70 cm, and to determine the current level of patient anxiety and experience in open scanners in a clinical setrting.

    Methods: Consecutive patients referred for examination of the spine in 60 cm and 70 cm bores and one open scanner participated. Four established/validated questionnaires, answered before, directly after (N = 155) and one week after (N = 109) the MRI-examination were used, measuring anxiety, fear and depression.

    Results: No difference was found in the patient scores of anxiety between the 60 cm and the 70 cm scanners on the examination day. At follow-up, patients in the 70 cm bore rated their examination experience better (p < 0.025), compared to patients in the 60 cm bore. Patients in the open scanner rated higher levels of anxiety (p < 0.001) before, directly after and one week after the examination, compared to the closed bore scanners.

    Conclusion: Scanners with a 70 cm diameter bore seem more tolerable than those with a 60 cm bore. Patients referred to the open scanner had on average a higher tendency to express anxiety. Still, patient anxiety in MRI is challenging and further research required.

    Implications for practice: Patients prefer to be examined in 70 cm bore scanners compared with 60 cm. If open scanners aren't available extended support may be necessary for the most anxious patients.

  • 2.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University.
    Sigstedt, Bo
    Jönköping University.
    Enskär, Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Children's experience of going through an acute radiographic examination2012In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 84-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children’s experience of radiographic examinations remains largely unexplored, although most radiographers examine children on a daily basis. In order to provide the high quality care that meets the needs of patients it was considered important to undertake research focused upon the patients’ experience of radiographic practice.

    The aim of the study was to investigate children’s experiences undergoing a radiographic examination for a suspected fracture.

    Inclusion criteria were Swedish-speaking children between 3 and 15 years of age who were submitted for a radiographic examination with an acute condition of the upper or lower extremity. Patients were informed of the study and together with the escorting parent or relative asked for consent to participate.

    During the examination the child was videotaped and immediately after, the child was interviewed in a nearby facility. The interview contained open-ended questions and was conducted while watching the videotape together with the child and their parent or relative and the researcher.

    Qualitative content analysis was used in analyzing the collected data. The analysis resulted in two categories - “feeling uncomfortable” and “feeling confident”. The subcategories contained in these categories were “pain in relation to injury and examination”, “the waiting time is strenuous”, “worries for the future and consequences of the injury”, “confidence in parental presence”, “confidence in radiographic staff and examination procedure”, and finally “recognition entails familiarity”.

    The results revealed that for the younger children, the experience of undergoing an acute radiographic examination was associated with pain and anxiety, but for the older children, the anxiety was more connected to whether the injury had caused a fracture and any anticipated future consequences or complications.

  • 3.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalens Universitet.
    Sigstedt, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Children's experience of going through an acute radiographic examination.2012In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 84-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children’s experience of radiographic examinations remains largely unexplored, although most radiog- raphers examine children on a daily basis. In order to provide the high quality care that meets the needs of patients it was considered important to undertake research focused upon the patients’ experience of radiographic practice.

    The aim of the study was to investigate children’s experiences undergoing a radiographic examination for a suspected fracture.

    Inclusion criteria were Swedish-speaking children between 3 and 15 years of age who were submitted for a radiographic examination with an acute condition of the upper or lower extremity. Patients were informed of the study and together with the escorting parent or relative asked for consent to participate.

    During the examination the child was videotaped and immediately after, the child was interviewed in a nearby facility. The interview contained open-ended questions and was conducted while watching the videotape together with the child and their parent or relative and the researcher.

    Qualitative content analysis was used in analyzing the collected data. The analysis resulted in two categories e “feeling uncomfortable” and “feeling confident”. The subcategories contained in these categories were “pain in relation to injury and examination”, “the waiting time is strenuous”, “worries for the future and consequences of the injury”, “confidence in parental presence”, “confidence in radio- graphic staff and examination procedure”, and finally “recognition entails familiarity”.

    The results revealed that for the younger children, the experience of undergoing an acute radiographic examination was associated with pain and anxiety, but for the older children, the anxiety was more connected to whether the injury had caused a fracture and any anticipated future consequences or complications.

  • 4.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Sigstedt, Bo
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Enskär, Karin
    Skövde University, Sweden.
    Children's experience of going through an acute radiographic examination2012In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 84-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's experience of radiographic examinations remains largely unexplored, although most radiographers examine children on a daily basis. In order to provide the high quality care that meets the needs of patients it was considered important to undertake research focused upon the patients' experience of radiographic practice.The aim of the study was to investigate children's experiences undergoing a radiographic examination for a suspected fracture.Inclusion criteria were Swedish-speaking children between 3 and 15 years of age who were submitted for a radiographic examination with an acute condition of the upper or lower extremity. Patients were informed of the study and together with the escorting parent or relative asked for consent to participate.During the examination the child was videotaped and immediately after, the child was interviewed in a nearby facility. The interview contained open-ended questions and was conducted while watching the videotape together with the child and their parent or relative and the researcher.Qualitative content analysis was used in analyzing the collected data. The analysis resulted in two categories - " feeling uncomfortable" and " feeling confident" The subcategories contained in these categories were " pain in relation to injury and examination" , " the waiting time is strenuous" , " worries for the future and consequences of the injury" , " confidence in parental presence" , " confidence in radiographic staff and examination procedure" , and finally " recognition entails familiarity" .The results revealed that for the younger children, the experience of undergoing an acute radiographic examination was associated with pain and anxiety, but for the older children, the anxiety was more connected to whether the injury had caused a fracture and any anticipated future consequences or complications. © 2011 The College of Radiographers.

  • 5.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. The Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg.
    Children's and parents' perceptions of care during the peri-radiographic process when the child is seen for a suspected fracture2016In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 71-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Visiting a Radiology department may elicit both positive and negative feelings for children and parents alike. This study investigated children's and parents' perceptions of care during the peri-radiographic process and whether these perceptions correlated with the child's perceptions of pain and distress.

    Methods

    This study utilized a quantitative descriptive design. Its data was collected in five Radiology departments, two where examinations are performed exclusively on children and three that treat both children and adults. Data collection contained questionnaires from children (n = 110) and their parent (n = 110) as well as children's self-reports of pain and distress.

    Results

    The findings illustrated that the children and their parent were satisfied with the care provided throughout the peri-radiographic process, unrelated to the child's self-reported levels of pain and distress or examination setting (i.e. children's department or general department). The highest scores of satisfaction were ascribed to “the radiographer's kindness and ability to help in a sufficient way,” whereas “available time to ask questions and to meet the child's emotional needs” received the lowest scores.

    Conclusions

    Parents and children alike perceived the radiographers as skilled and sensitive throughout the examination, while radiographers' time allocated to interacting with the child was not perceived be sufficiently covered.

  • 6.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Fridell, Kent
    Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tavakol Olofsson, Parvin
    Vårdförbundet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Plausible scenarios for the radiography profession in Sweden in 20252017In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 314-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Radiography is a healthcare speciality with many technical challenges. Advances in engineering and information technology applications may continue to drive and be driven by radiographers. The world of diagnostic imaging is changing rapidly and radiographers must be proactive in order to survive. To ensure sustainable development, organisations have to identify future opportunities and threats in a timely manner and incorporate them into their strategic planning. Hence, the aim of this study was to analyse and describe plausible scenarios for the radiography profession in 2025.

    Method: The study has a qualitative design with an inductive approach based on focus group interviews. The interviews were inspired by the Scenario-Planning method.

    Results: Of the seven trends identified in a previous study, the radiographers considered two as the most uncertain scenarios that would have the greatest impact on the profession should they occur. These trends, labelled "Access to career advancement" and "A sufficient number of radiographers", were inserted into the scenario cross. The resulting four plausible future scenarios were: The happy radiographer, the specialist radiographer, the dying profession and the assembly line.

    Conclusion: It is suggested that "The dying profession" scenario could probably be turned in the opposite direction by facilitating career development opportunities for radiographers within the profession. Changing the direction would probably lead to a profession composed of "happy radiographers" who are specialists, proud of their profession and competent to carry out advanced tasks, in contrast to being solely occupied by "the assembly line".

  • 7. Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Nilsson, Stefan R
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Sigstedt, Bo
    Enskär, Karin
    Children’s pain and distress while undergoing an acute radiographic examination2012In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 191-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pain has been highlighted as a main concern for children in conjunction with an acuteradiographicexamination. The aim of this study was to further investigate children’spain and distress while undergoing an acuteradiographicexamination. The study comprised 29 participants with an age range of 5–15 years who were injured and submitted to an acuteradiographicexamination of the upper or lower extremity when the question at issue was fracture. The Coloured Analogue Scale (CAS) and the Facial Affective Scale (FAS) were used as self-reporting scales to measure the children’spain and distress. The Face, Legs, Activity, Cry and Consolability Behavioural scale (FLACC) was used as an observation tool to assess behaviours associated with pain in children. Descriptive statistics were used when analysing the scores, and the results showed that children experience pain and distress in conjunction with a radiographicexamination after an injury. Spearman’s correlation was used to compare variables, and significant correlations were obtained between the self-reported pain and the observed pain behaviour. Fischer’s Exact test was used to compare groups, and when using the cut-off 3.0 on the self-reporting scale no significant correlation was found concerning the pain reported by children diagnosed with and without a fracture. No significant correlations were found concerning the self-reported distress and pain either, regardless of whether it was a first-time visit and whether a parent was near during the examination.

  • 8.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Sigstedt, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Children’s pain and distress while undergoing an acute radiographic examination2012In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 191-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pain has been highlighted as a main concern for children in conjunction with an acute radiographic examination. The aim of this study was to further investigate children’s pain and distress while undergoing an acute radiographic examination.

    The study comprised 29 participants with an age range of 5–15 years who were injured and submitted to an acute radiographic examination of the upper or lower extremity when the question at issue was fracture. The Coloured Analogue Scale (CAS) and the Facial Affective Scale (FAS) were used as self-reporting scales to measure the children’s pain and distress. The Face, Legs, Activity, Cry and Consolability Behavioural scale (FLACC) was used as an observation tool to assess behaviours associated with pain in children.

    Descriptive statistics were used when analysing the scores, and the results showed that children experience pain and distress in conjunction with a radiographic examination after an injury. Spearman’s correlation was used to compare variables, and significant correlations were obtained between the self-reported pain and the observed pain behaviour. Fischer’s Exact test was used to compare groups, and when using the cut-off 3.0 on the self-reporting scale no significant correlation was found concerning the pain reported by children diagnosed with and without a fracture. No significant correlations were found concerning the self-reported distress and pain either, regardless of whether it was a first-time visit and whether a parent was near during the examination.

  • 9.
    Helenius, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Segelsjö, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Dahlman, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Comparison of four different preparation protocols to achieve bladder distension in patients with gross haematuria undergoing a CT urography2012In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 206-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    CT examination has been shown to be effective in detecting bladder cancer. Proper evaluation of the bladder requires it to be well distended. The purpose of the present study was to establish a preparation protocol to achieve satisfactory bladder distension without causing unacceptable patient discomfort.

    Material and method

    We used four different preparation protocols (1: 0.5 L of fluid intake during a 1-h period, 2: Same as 1 with the addition of IV diuretics when the patient was examined, 3: 1 L of fluid intake during a 2-h period, 4: Same as 3 with the additional instruction to empty the bladder after 1 h. In protocols 1–3, the patients were asked not to empty their bladder during the preparation time). Bladder volume was calculated and bladder distension was judged as satisfactory or not by the radiologist. The patients answered questions about their ability to follow the preparation protocol and were requested to rate their need to empty the bladder pre-, during and post-examination.

    Results

    Protocol 1 had the lowest bladder volume. Protocols 2, 3 and 4 were similar in bladder volume. However, Protocol 2 caused unacceptable patient discomfort, and the compliance was lowest in Protocol 4.

    Conclusion

    Protocol 3, drinking 1 L of fluid during a 2-h period, gave satisfactory bladder distension, did not cause unacceptable discomfort in patients and did not have the lowest compliance.

  • 10. Kruse, J.
    et al.
    Lehto, N.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Tegner, Y.
    Engström, A.
    Scrutinized with inadequate control and support: Interns' experiences communicating with and writing referrals to hospital radiology departments - A qualitative study2016In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 313-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Interns' experiences communicating with and writing referrals to hospital radiology departments are important for patient safety, image quality, and decision-making in the diagnostic process. Understanding roles within the department and in the diagnostic process is important for communication. This study aimed to describe interns' experiences communicating with and writing referrals to their hospital's radiology department. Method: A qualitative study design was used. Data was collected from focus discussions with ten interns in three focus groups in Northern Sweden during 2012. The data were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Results: One theme, "a feeling of being scrutinized and lacking control", was identified in the final categories. The interns experienced that the radiology department placed high demands on them and desired more diagnostic skills training, resources and feedback. The interns suggested the following improvements: enhanced dialogue and feedback, improved education, handy guidelines, and practice writing referrals. Conclusion: Interns need more feedback from, and dialogue with, members of the Department of Radiology. They also need more knowledge of referral guidelines, appropriateness criteria and more practice to develop their knowledge and skill for writing referrals. They describe feelings of inadequate support and feel scrutinized in demanding work conditions and need more collaboration. They also need more time and more control of radiology outcomes, and they are eager to learn. 

  • 11.
    Kruse, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Lehto, Niklas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology, Umeå University.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Scrutinized with inadequate control and support Interns' experiences communicating with and writing referrals to hospital radiology departments: a qualitative study2016In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 313-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionInterns' experiences communicating with and writing referrals to hospital radiology departments are important for patient safety, image quality, and decision-making in the diagnostic process. Understanding roles within the department and in the diagnostic process is important for communication. This study aimed to describe interns' experiences communicating with and writing referrals to their hospital's radiology department.MethodA qualitative study design was used. Data was collected from focus discussions with ten interns in three focus groups in Northern Sweden during 2012. The data were subjected to qualitative content analysis.ResultsOne theme, “a feeling of being scrutinized and lacking control”, was identified in the final categories. The interns experienced that the radiology department placed high demands on them and desired more diagnostic skills training, resources and feedback. The interns suggested the following improvements: enhanced dialogue and feedback, improved education, handy guidelines, and practice writing referrals.ConclusionInterns need more feedback from, and dialogue with, members of the Department of Radiology. They also need more knowledge of referral guidelines, appropriateness criteria and more practice to develop their knowledge and skill for writing referrals. They describe feelings of inadequate support and feel scrutinized in demanding work conditions and need more collaboration. They also need more time and more control of radiology outcomes, and they are eager to learn.

  • 12.
    Larsson, W.
    et al.
    CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aspelin, P.
    CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Magnus
    Department of Informatics, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hillergård, K.
    CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, B.
    Department of Paediatric Radiology, Mölndals Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindsköld, L.
    CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallberg, J.
    CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundberg, N.
    CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The effects of PACS on radiographer's work practice2007In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 235-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper identifies and analyses the effects of picture archiving and communica- tion systems (PACS) on radiographers’ work practice. It shows that the introduction of PACS did not simply entail the transfer of data and information from the analogue world to the digital world, but it also led to the introduction of new ways of communicating, and new activities and responsibilities on the part of radiography staff. Radiographers are called upon to work increasingly independently, and individual practitioners require higher levels of professional expertise. In all, this paper demonstrates that new technical solutions sometimes lead to sub- stantial changes in responsibilities in work. In this example, the radiographers’ work practice has become more highly scientific and they are enjoying a higher level of prestige.

    © 2006 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 

  • 13.
    Lundvall, Lise-Lott
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wirell, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    How do technical improvements change radiographers’ practice: a practice theory perspective2015In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 231-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Technical improvements in medical imaging have led to the replacement of two-plane imaging techniques by multidimensional imaging. How this affects radiographers’ professional practice has not been investigated.

    Aim: To explore how technical development affects the relations between different actors and their actions in the practice of computed tomography.

    Method: A qualitative design was used with data collection by open interviews (n=8) and open observations (n=10) of radiographers during their work with computed tomography. Data was first analysed inductively, resulting in seven preliminary codes. The initial analysis was followed by a phase of abduction, in which the preliminary codes were interpreted theoretically through the lens of practice theory. This resulted in four final themes.

    Result: First theme: Changed materiality makes practical action easier. The actual image production has become practically easier. Second theme: New machines cause conflict between the structural arrangements of the work and the patient’s needs. The time required for the scanner to carry out image production is easy to foresee, but information about the patient’s individual status and needs is missing and this leads to difficulties in giving individual planned care. Third theme: Changing materiality prefigures learning. The different apparatus in use and the continuously changing methods of image production are coconstitutive of the practitioner’s activities and learning. Fourth theme: How the connections between different practices lead to moments of practical reasoning in the radiography process with CT. The practice of image production with computed tomography takes account of patient safety in relation to radiation doses and medical security risks. The different professions in CT practice are interconnected through common material objects such as computers and machines. However, the radiographers, who meet the patients, have to check the accuracy of the planned examination in relation to the clinical observed information about patient safety risks during the examination.

  • 14.
    Lundvall, Lise-Lott
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wirell, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Professionals' experiences of imaging in the radiography process – A phenomenological approach2014In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 48-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Previous studies on radiographers' professional work have shown that this practice covers both technology and patient care. How these two competence areas blend together in practice needs to be investigated. The professionals' experiences of their work have not been studied in depth, and there is a need to focus on their experiences of the main features of their practice.

    The aim

    To explore, from the perspective of the radiographer, the general tasks and responsibilities of their work.

    Method

    Data were generated through a combination of open interviews with radiographers and observations of their work with Computer Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The interviews and observations were analysed using an interpretative phenomenological method.

    Result

    Radiographers' professional work with diagnostic imaging, in a Swedish context, can be viewed as a problem-solving process involving judgments and responsibility for obtaining images that can be used for diagnosis. The examination process comprises three phases; planning, producing the images, and evaluation. In the first phase the radiographer makes judgments on adapting the method to the individual patient, and the second phase involves responsibilities and practical skills for image production. In the third phase, the quality of the images is judged in relation to the actual patient and the imaging process itself.

    Conclusions

    Radiographers consider that the main features of their professional work are patient safety aspects and their knowledge and skills regarding how to produce images of optimal quality, in the actual circumstances of each examination.

  • 15.
    Lundén, Maud
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundgren, S. M.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Morrison-Helme, Morag
    Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
    Lepp, Margret
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Østfold University College, Halden, Norway; School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Nathan, Australia.
    Professional development for radiographers and post graduate nurses in radiological interventions: Building teamwork and collaboration through drama2017In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 330-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The rapid development within Interventional Radiology presents new challenges. Hybrid operating rooms consist of interventional radiology, open surgery, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and other techniques. This means that several disciplines and professionals need to work in new constellations creating a multidisciplinary team around the patient. In accordance with this development, higher professional education must provide new pedagogic strategies to successfully address the knowledge expected in today's complex working life.

    AIM: To explore the use of Applied Drama as a learning medium, focusing on the use of Forum Theatre, to foster team work and collaboration in the field of radiography and learning.

    METHODS: A qualitative approach, closely related to Ethnography, was utilized.

    RESULT: The Drama Workshop utilising Forum Theatre created a dynamic learning environment and enabled the participants from three professions to understand each other's priorities better. The use of drama within health care education allows the students to take different roles in order to find the best way to co-operate.

    CONCLUSION: Forum Theatre is a useful learning medium in order to promote teamwork and collaboration in the radiological intervention field. By choosing a personal working experience, Forum Theatre seem to engage the participants at a deeper level and to experience various communication strategies and how the outcome changed depending on the approach. This can lead to improved teamwork and collaboration.

  • 16.
    Møller Christensen, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Nilsson, S.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg Centre for Person-Centred Care, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stensson, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Developing communication support for interaction with children during acute radiographic procedures2019In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The Convention on the Rights of the Child will be absorbed into Swedish law by 2020, which highlights the need to promote equality in communication between health care professionals and communicatively vulnerable children. In this regard, participation and person-centredness is important in the interaction with each child to provide adequate information on the peri-radiographic process in a way that the child can understand. Hence, the aim was to develop communication support for interaction with children during acute radiographic procedures.

    Method: The study has a qualitative design adapting a multiphase structure. A participatory design was used which included four phases conducted in succession to each other. Interviews were conducted with children from Elementary School and Special School. Questionnaires were collected from their parents and from radiographers in four different Radiology Departments.

    Results: The analysis of the data highlighted the need for information in the peri-radiographic process. Parents and children wanted material that is easy to use and could be adapted in a person-centred way.

    Conclusion: A prototype of the ICIR (interactive communication support in radiology settings), with illustrations and accompanying text was developed that can be useful as information sharing in interaction between children, parents and health care professionals in the radiographic context.

    Implications for practice: The ICIR can be a usable tool for information sharing in the interaction between children, parents and health care professionals during radiographic procedures. 

  • 17.
    Sterlingova, T.
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; Division of Medical Diagnostics, Mammography Department, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lundén, Maud
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Why do women refrain from mammography screening?2018In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 24, no 1, p. E19-E24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Breast cancer is the leading cause of death for middle-aged women in Sweden. Approximately 600,000 women are surveyed annually within the national screening program. However, 20% of Swedish women do not participate in mammography screening. Participation in mammography screening is a complex phenomenon that has many dimensions. The aim of this study was to explore the reasons why women refrain from mammography screening from the perspective of non-attending women.

    Method: A qualitative approach was chosen, and 10 women were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Two categories were identified: individual needs and absence of active promotion. "Non-personalized system" was the main theme that emerged from the analysis.

    Conclusion: The mammography screening does not adapt to the needs of each individual. This may be the reason why some women refrain from mammography screening.

  • 18.
    Sterlingova, Tatiana
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Division of Medical Diagnostics, Mammography Department, Jönköping, Region Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Lundén, M.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Why do women refrain from mammography screening?2018In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 24, no 1, p. e19-e24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Breast cancer is the leading cause of death for middle-aged women in Sweden. Approximately 600,000 women are surveyed annually within the national screening program. However, 20% of Swedish women do not participate in mammography screening. Participation in mammography screening is a complex phenomenon that has many dimensions. The aim of this study was to explore the reasons why women refrain from mammography screening from the perspective of non-attending women.

    Method: A qualitative approach was chosen, and 10 women were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Two categories were identified: individual needs and absence of active promotion. "Non-personalized system" was the main theme that emerged from the analysis.

    Conclusion: The mammography screening does not adapt to the needs of each individual. This may be the reason why some women refrain from mammography screening. 

  • 19.
    Strand, Thomas
    et al.
    Linneus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Törnqvist, Erna
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linneus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linneus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Caring for patients with spinal metastasis during an MRI examination2018In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 79-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is without question the best tool used for diagnosing and evaluating spinal metastasis. An MRI examination is known to be of great value for the treatment planning and survival of these patients. Radiographers have an important role in how the quality of care is experienced by the patients during an MRI examination. The purpose of the study was to describe the radiographers’ perceptions of caring for patients with spinal metastasis during an examination with MRI.

    Methods: Phenomenography was used to analyze the data in this study. Ten radiographers, one male and nine females were interviewed about their perception of caring for patients with spinal metastasis during an MRI examination.

    Results: The findings showed that the radiographers’ caring perspective influenced their approach towards what they consider to be essential in the care of patients with spinal metastasis. This can impact the extent of the adjustment to the care needs of the patients. Furthermore, the findings showed that there was a strong connection between the radiographers’ care approach and preparedness to personalize the care.

    Conclusion: This study shows that it is important to be flexible when providing care for the patients. A person-centered care is achieved when the caring perspective is based on the patient’s view and adjustments are made in agreement with the patient. © 2017 The College of Radiographers.

  • 20.
    Strand, Thomas
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Törnqvist, Erna
    Lund University.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Caring for patients with spinal metastasis during an MRI examination2018In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 79-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is without question the best tool used for diagnosing and evaluating spinal metastasis. An MRI examination is known to be of great value for the treatment planning and survival of these patients. Radiographers have an important role in how the quality of care is experienced by the patients during an MRI examination. The purpose of the study was to describe the radiographers’ perceptions of caring for patients with spinal metastasis during an examination with MRI.

    Methods: Phenomenography was used to analyze the data in this study. Ten radiographers, one male and nine females were interviewed about their perception of caring for patients with spinal metastasis during an MRI examination.

    Results: The findings showed that the radiographers’ caring perspective influenced their approach towards what they consider to be essential in the care of patients with spinal metastasis. This can impact the extent of the adjustment to the care needs of the patients. Furthermore, the findings showed that there was a strong connection between the radiographers’ care approach and preparedness to personalize the care.

    Conclusion: This study shows that it is important to be flexible when providing care for the patients. A person-centered care is achieved when the caring perspective is based on the patient’s view and adjustments are made in agreement with the patient.

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