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  • 1.
    Apel, Jan
    et al.
    Gotland University, School of Culture, Energy and Environment.
    Darmark, Kim
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Evolution and Material Culture2009In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 17, p. 11-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the authors argue that the renewed interestin cultural evolution in archaeology may have a fundamentaleffect on the taxonomies employed and the roleof archaeology as a discipline

  • 2.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The Social Qualia of Kuml: An Exploration of the Iconicity of Rune-stones with Kuml Inscriptions from the Scandinavian Late Viking Age2016In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 23, p. 157-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses qualitative experiences (qualia) of Scandinavian Late Viking Age runestones from a semiotically theorized perspective. Rune-stones with kuml inscriptions receive particular attention. Despite the fact that kuml referred to different material entities, such as rune-stone, other standing stones, and/or grave, it is suggested that they resembled one another on iconic grounds. The quality associated with the multiple qualia was a sensation of safety that resulted in shared experiences that had positive social values. The article demonstrates that the semiotics of Peirce can be of great value to archaeologists who want to delve deeper into the social analysis of things.

  • 3.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Johnny Karlsson: Spill: Om djur, hantverk och nätverk i mälarområdet under vikingatid och medeltid [[Waste: Osseous Materials, Craft and Networks in the Mälaren Region during the Middle Ages]2018In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 26, p. 254-261Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 4. Berglund, B
    et al.
    Welinder, Stig
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    The historical archaeology of the medieval crisis in Scandinavia2009In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 17, p. 55-78Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bolin, Hans
    Södertörn University College, Avdelning 3, Archaeology.
    Culture Moves Like an Octopus: Aspects on Archaeological Regions and Boundaries2002In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 10, p. 7-20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bolin, Hans
    Södertörn University College, School of Sociology and Contemporary History, Archaeology.
    The absence of gender: Iron age burials in the Lake Mälaren area2004In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 12, p. 169-186Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Boman, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    White light – white heat.: The use of fire as light and heat source in an atrium house in Roman Pompeii’2005In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 13, p. 59-75Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8. Bradley, Richard
    et al.
    Skoglund, Peter
    Wehlin, Joakim
    Gotland University, School of Culture, Energy and Environment.
    Imaginary vessels in the Late Bronze age of Gotland and south Scandinavia: Ship settings, rock carvings and decorated metalwork2010In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 18, p. 79-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper compares the Bronze Age ship settings of Gotland with the vessels portrayed in rock carvings on the Scandinavian mainland. It also makes comparisons with the drawings of vessels on decorated metalwork of the same period. It considers their interpretation in relation to two approaches taken to the depictions of ships in other media. One concerns the use of boats to transport the sun, while the other emphasises the close relationship between seagoing vessels and the dead. A third possibility concerns the distinctive organisation of prehistoric communities on Gotland. It seems possible that the largest of the ship settings were equivalent to the Bronze Age cult houses found on the mainland and that they may even have represented the island itself.

  • 9.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    If we are quiet, will things cry out?2012In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 20, p. 41-45Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Looking into the recent past.: Extending and exploring the field of archaeology.2009In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 15-16, p. 21-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The archaeology of the recent past is a growing field of research. Is this merely a chronological extension of the field of archaeology, or is it something more? What motivates an archaeological interest in a period of time for which there are so many other sources of information? Here it is argued that the archaeology of the recent past is important not only to bring to light other stories than those generally told, but also to bring to the fore theoretical issues of general relevance for archaeology. The latter concern what material remains can be more than just potential sources of information about the past.

  • 11.
    Burström, Mats
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, School of Culture and Communication, Archaeology.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Karlsson, Håkan
    The air torpedo of Bäckebo: local incident and world history2006In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 14, p. 7-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Cassel, Kerstin
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Archaeology.
    Good intentions are not enough: comment on "A Spectre is haunting swedish archaeology" from a danishc point of view2011In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 19, p. 45-48Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Engström, Mats
    et al.
    Gruber, Göran
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    But how do you go about it?: Mobilization processes in partnership building concerning the public face of contract archaeology2011In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 19, p. 203-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Partnership and dialogue are central concepts in national heritage management. This article problematizes the concepts on the basis of a theme project conducted in a high school, where the aim has been to give the pupils insight into history-making processes. The school project was carried out as part of the public activity in a major contract archaeology project. The text has a self-reflexive perspective, analysing mobilization processes in connection with the establishment and implementation of the theme project. The article shows the pragmatic attitude of the institutional actors to different educational ideals, with partnership as an instrument on its own in terms of market aspects. This raises ethical questions about the pupils and the conditions for the desired partnership.

  • 14.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Are we there yet? Archaeology and the postmodern in the new millennium2013In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 20, p. 109-129Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present text discusses the significance of the postmodern condition in contemporary archaeology. Five themes associated with postmodernism are discussed (a) the relativization of truth, knowledge, and meaning, (b) the fragmentation of the grand narrative, (c) the relation between agency and discourse, (d) pluralism, multivocality, and heterogeneity, and (e) rhetoric and styles of writing. In contemporary debate it has been suggested that postmodernism is a past phase and that these contested issues have become less important. It is, however, argued here that these are by no means resolved, but rather bypassed by shifting focus to archaeology as a contemporary practice or, in theoretical terms, towards particularistic neo-materialist ontologies.

  • 15.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Recension av Åsa Berggrens avhandling 'Med kärret som källa. Om begreppen offer och ritual inom arkeologin'2012In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 19, p. 228-230Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    The materiality of the ancient dead: Post-burial practices and ontologies of death in southern sweden AD 800–12002016In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 24, p. 137-162Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This text discusses reuse and modications of older graves in southern Sweden during the Late Iron Age and early medieval period (c. 9th to 12th centuries AD). Post-burial practices in the Late Iron Age have in general been interpreted as means to negotiate status, identity and rights to land, while in the later part of the period they are comprehended as expressions of religious insecurity and syncretism. In this text, the continuity of post-burial practices during the whole period is stressed and instead of general top-down interpretative models, the ontological status and material aspects of death, dead bodies and their graves is emphasized. It is argued that the post-burial actions generally constituted ways of relating to a specific type of materiality, the bones of the ancient dead, which transgress binary categorizations such as living–dead, past–present, heathen–Christian, and human–nonhuman. The argument builds on recently excavated sites in southern Sweden: Bogla, Broby Bro, Lilla Ullevi, Valsta and Vittene.

  • 17. Fahlander, Fredrik
    et al.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Editorial2016In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 24, p. 8-10Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Fornander, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    A shattered tomb of scattered people: the Alvastra dolmen in light of stable isotopes2011In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 19, p. 113-141Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Fredengren, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Nature:Cultures: Heritage, Sustainability and Feminist Posthumanism2015In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 23, p. 109-130Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper makes use of feminist posthumanism to outline how a range of heritage policies, practices and strategies, partly through their base in social constructivism have a clear anthropocentric focus. Not only do they risk downplaying materiality, but also a number of human and non-human others, driving a wedge between nature and culture. This may in turn be an obstacle for the use of heritage in sustainable development as it deals with range of naturalized others as if they have no agency and leaves the stage open for appropriation and exploitation.

    This paper probes into what heritage could be in the wake of current climate and environmental challenges if approached differently. It explores how a selection of feminist posthumanisms challenge the distinction between nature:culture in a way that could shift the approach to sustainability in heritage making from a negative to an affirmative framing.

  • 20.
    Fredengren, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Personhood of Water: Depositions of Bodies and Things in Water Contexts as a Way of Observing Agential Relationships2018In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 26, p. 219-245Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper stems from a curiosity about relationships between water, depositions, life, death and sacrifice. It probes into how traditional binaries such as nature/culture, human/ animal, alive/dead and language/reality were addressed in Irish medieval place lore, using critical posthumanist theory to explore ways in which agential powers were not merely ascribed to the environment, but also observed and acknowledged by people in the past. It also considers how the agentialities of both artefacts and waters could have affected and made their way into human storytelling. In so doing, the paper presents a contribution from archaeology to the emerging field of environmental humanities, offering research that could entice us to sharpen our environmental sensibilities and respond to environmental change. Depositions of things and bodies in wet contexts are often understood as sacrifices made to deities located in the otherworld. However, there is plentiful evidence in archaeology and in medieval place-lore to suggest that waters were observed as being alive, as immanent beings, as more-than-human persons who could have received these depositions as gifts. This study explores how depositions would have added to and reconfigured such water-personhood in locally and regionally situated ways, and how they may also have worked as apparatuses for paying close attention to the water environment.

  • 21.
    Fredengren, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Posthumanism, the Transcorporeal and Biomolecular Archaeology2013In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 21, p. 53-71Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will discuss the tensions between the humanities and sciences within archaeology and examine how these tensions exist, both in how identity and personhood are understood, and in different views of epistemology and ontology. From a basis in critical posthumanism it is argued that unnecessary boundaries have been set up between the body and the environment. The concept of the transcorporeal allows for rethinking the connection between bodies and landscape, enabling us to discuss the environment inside. This approach can provide an alternative framing for the use of the sciences in archaeology, particularly for osteology and DNA and isotope analysis. Biomolecular mapping of body networks allows for a better understanding of the configuration of specific historic bodies as well as for discussing ethics. Furthermore, there may be a case for describing analysed bodies as figurations, rather than as identities.

  • 22.
    Fredengren, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Re-wilding the Environmental Humanities: A Deep Time Comment2018In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 26, p. 50-60Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The reasoning around the Anthropocene starts with a sobering clarification – human agency has not only created high culture, such as buildings, tools or art, by its actions. What are left are also heritages of  species and gender inequalities, scarred landscapes, waste, toxicities, species extinctions, mono-cultures, layers at the beds of oceans, climate and environmental change. This is a mixed heritage (often unlabelled) that is the result of material interferences that change the textures of times, that territorialize futures to come, that shape the spaces and cartographies within which future (multispecies) generations can manoeuvre.

    I ask again, with Haraway (2016:100), what measures need to be taken to make the Anthropocene as thin as possible? What are the means with which the humanities, however loosely formed, can contribute with towards that end? Here I share the visions of Riede, but find the paper somewhat limiting. Does the present predicament not demand of us a more undisciplined academic encounter – and a rewilding of the humanities – to form these transversal modes of querying past, present, futures? Does it not need a lot of creativity to find a range of engagements, knowledges and inspirations to work elsewise? What interests me is how to expand on scientifically informed multi-species storytelling, with a base in archaeological materials that deals with how to tie human-animal knots and temporal relations in other ways. There are other ways to relate to and be related to by the environment (see Fredengren, this volume). For such it is very premature to set boundaries for what archaeology may bring to the Environmental Humanities table, as both subjects are on the move. 

    Likewise, I ask how heritage is captured as time elements, in presentisms, in merges of materialities and meaning, in troubled bodies, in how to deal with anthropocentrism in heritage making, how to capture heritages as process ontologies as human-animal relations (Fredengren 2015, 2018). I also ask what modes and models of stewardship (who cares for whom, according to what ethic and on what mandate) come with the heritage business? I am curious about people’s relationships with the more-than-human, with things, place and spaces, and with care and curatorship in a wider sense. However, I do not envisage the meeting between environmental humanities and archaeology to be limited to these matters, but to be developed through various creative and affirmative encounters. 

    And then I ask … for what causes do we do this? Is it to establish subject boundaries and to carve up academic terrain, or for forming new types of unexpected collaborations? And perhaps, at the end of the day … as many of us would say, don’t we do it … for the love of the world?

  • 23.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Engraved biographies: rock art and life-histories of Bronze Age objects2014In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 22, p. 97-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with engravings depicting sometimes life-sized Bronze Age metal objects from “closed” burial contexts and “open-air” sites in northern Europe. These rock art images have mainly been used for comparative dating with the purpose of establishing rock art chronologies, or interpreted as a poor man’s” substitute for real objects that were sacrificed to immaterial gods and goddesses. In this article, these rock art images are pictured from a perspective that highlights the mutual cultural biography of humans and objects. It is argued that the rare engravings of bronze objects at scale 1:1 are best explained as famous animated objects that could act as secondary agents, which sometimes allowed them to be depicted and remembered. Moreover, two different social settings are distinguished for such memory practice: maritime nodes or third spaces where Bronze Age Argonauts met before, during or after their journeys, e.g. places where novel technological and/or famous objects entered and re-entered the social realms, and burial contexts where animated objects sometimes was buried at the end of their life-course. 

  • 24.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Oscar Montelius – on the return of time and the drift of culture.: Review of Evert Baudou, Oscar Montelius – om tidens återkomst och kulturens vandringar. Stockholm: Atlantis Förlag 2012. 416 sidor. ISBN 978 9 173535 397.2012In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 20, p. 205-215Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    The key chain of archaeology is not stronger than its weakest link2011In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 2010, no 18, p. 35-40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Mesolithic skull depositions at Kanaljorden, Motala, Sweden2011In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 19, p. 244-246Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Hillerdal, Charlotta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Vikings, Rus, Varangians : : the "Varangian problem" in view of ethnicity in archaeology2006In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 14, p. 87-108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Holm, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    The Dating of Västerhus Cemetery: A Contribution to the Study of Christianization in Jämtland2006In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 14, p. 109-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the author uses different dating methods to try to show that the Västerhus cemetery was established between c. 1125 and 1250 and that it ceased to be used between c. 1375 and 1500. This time period is later than the dates proposed previously on the basis of 14C analyses of skeletons from the cemetery. In the author’s opinion, the 14C dates are probably misleading on account of reservoir effects.

    The Västerhus church and cemetery – which yielded one of the best preserved and most well-studied medieval skeletal materials in northern Europe – were thus not established at the time of Jämtland’s official Christianization, as earlier claimed, but instead one or a few generations later. The author points out that several other early churches and cemeteries in Jämtland are just as late. Similar gaps in time between the official Christianization and the widespread building of churches are also known from other parts of Scandinavia.

  • 29.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    No Farewell to Interpretation2012In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 20, p. 57-60Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Academic publishing in Sweden threatened by withdrawal of support2013In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 21, p. 168-170Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Högberg, Anders
    Malmö Heritage.
    Production Sites on the Beach Ridge of Järavallen: Aspects on Tool Preforms, Action, Technology, Ritual and the Continuity of Place2002In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 10, p. 137-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Järavallen is the name of a beach ridge along the south and south-west coasts of Scania in the southern part of Sweden. Large amounts of flinttool preforms, particularly for square-sectioned Neolithic axes, have been found on three sites along this beach ridge. The several thousand preforms represent tool types from the Early Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age. The three sites have not been given much attention in recent archaeological research. With a basis in a discussion of action, technology, ritual and the continuity of place, these three sites are analysed and interpreted as representing traditions involving repeated actions over a long period of time. The production and deposition of the preforms are seen as an investment for the future.

  • 32.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The Swedish government first withdrew support for the Mediterranean Institutes, then changed its mind2014In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 22, p. 209-210Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The Voice of the Authorized Heritage Discourse: A critical analysis of signs at ancient monuments in SKåne, southern Sweden2013In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 20, p. 131-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study presents an investigation of a regionalauthorized heritage discourse, represented by theCounty Administrative Board on signs set up at ancientmonuments and sites in the province of Skånein southern Sweden. The starting point is a criticalanalysis of layout, texts and illustrations to ascertainthe narratives conveyed by the signs. The results showthat slightly less than half of the studied signs workwell according to the criteria set up for the study. Theresult also demonstrates that more than half of thestudied signs do not work well according to these criteria.Those that work well give detailed informationabout the ancient monument or site. The signs that donot work well give inadequate information and riskexcluding a majority of the people who read them.The latter signs confirm what so many other discourseanalyses have shown, that the authorized heritage discourseto a large extent still privileges the perspectivesof a white, middle-class male. The former signs, thatis, those that are judged to work well in terms of thecriteria applied in this study, show that the authorizedheritage discourse does not only offer something thatprivileges the perspectives of that white, middle classmale, but also has the ability to offer narratives withother perspectives.

  • 34. Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    The changing roles of archaeology in Swedish museums2017In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 25, p. 13-19Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last few decades archaeology in Swedish museums have undergone major changes. From being a recognizable part of museum activities, archeology has more and more disappeared from the local museums. In a competitive market, a transparent economy is required. No grants, subventions or contribution founded money allowed. All work must be financed by the market. In many regions, the consequence of this has been that earlier archaeological departments at museums have been cut of from the rest of the museum organization. Instead of being run by a museum, contract archaeology is now run by companies. As a result museums have lost their connection to research-based knowledge production within archaeology, and contract archaeology has lost its link to the many skills a museum holds. 

  • 35.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    The Changing Roles of Archaeology in Swedish Museums2017In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 25, p. 13-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Isaksson, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Vessels of change: A long-term perspective on prehistoric pottery-use in southern and eastern middle Sweden based on lipid residue analyses.2009In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The analysis of lipid residues in prehistoric potter has quite recently become an integrated tool in Swedish archeology. As such it is an approach that has been adopted also in large rescue archaeology projects. This paper present an attempt to compile the results from two such projects and shows how this new knowledge have contributed to research archaeology especially in the form of new research projects. Suggestions for further future research is also suggested.

  • 37.
    Kilger, Christoph
    Gotland University, School of Culture, Energy and Environment.
    The Slavs Yesterday and Today: Different Perspectives on Slavic Ethnicity in German Archaeology1998In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 6, p. 99-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the numerous images of the Slavic tribes between the Elbe and the Oder in archaeological interpretations. The position taken by East German archaeologists was to integrate the Slavs explicitly into the theoretical constructions of historical-materialism; in the ideological struggle between East and West the Slavs, as victims of medieval feudal developments politically supported the picture of a common socialist identity and history. In contrast West German arcgaeologists on the basis of rigid source criticism placed the Slavs behind the scens of the historical Stage.

  • 38.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Tangible Traces of Devotion: The Post-mortem Life of Relics2017In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 25, p. 151-175Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Though relics have attracted immense interest from a variety of scholars, not much attention has been paid to the practical handling of the holy corporal remains. Here, with the aim of better understanding the treatment of the bodies and relics as physical objects in Sweden during the Middle Ages, osseous materials from three different contexts were osteologically analysed. The investigation offers detailed insight into the treatment of the bones and makes it possible to distinguish three physical phases of the cult of relics. The three phases demonstrate the utilitarian administration of the bones and the fortitude of belief.

  • 39.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Deaths matter2016In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 24, p. 49-56Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Kobiałka, Dawid
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Adam Mickiewicz University.
    The mask(s) and transformers of historical re-enactment: material culture and contemporary Vikings2013In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 21, p. 141-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper discusses the role of material culture for historical re-enactors of the Viking Age. Three issues are analysed: (a) the clothing and accessories worn by a typical contemporary warrior, craftsman and woman of the Viking times and the range of goods available for purchase at historical re-enactment markets, (b) the active and transformative aspect of material culture for present-day Vikings, (c) the paradox of how mirroring the material past by historical re-enactors is actually a deeply ahistorical category. The main conclusion of this study is that historical re-enactment of the Viking Age is essentially about material culture. The paper is based on observations made during the Viking Week that took place at the Museum of Foteviken (Sweden) on 24–30 June 2013.

  • 41.
    Källén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    A Plea for Critique2012In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 20, p. 61-66Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Källén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Jakobsson, Mikael
    A Hobbling Marriage: On the relationship between the collections and the societal mission of the Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm2009In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 17, p. 149-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late 19th century, the new Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm was a cutting-edge institution for the presentation of ideas of a universal human development from primitive to modern – ideas that were at the heart of the European colonial project. We argue that the archaeological collections with their unaltered 19th-century structures still represent a narrative that reproduces a colonial understanding of the world, a linear arrangement of essential cultural groups according to a teleological development model. Contrary to this, the contemporary mission of the Museum, inspired by the late 20th-century postcolonial thinking, is directed towards questioning this particular narrative. This problematic relationship is thus present deep within the structure of the Museum of National Antiquities as an institution, and it points to the need for long-term strategic changes to make the collections useful for vital museum activity in accordance with the Museum’s mission.

  • 43.
    Lidström Holmberg, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Prehistoric Grinding Tools as Metaphorical Traces of the Past1998In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 6, p. 123-142Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Archaeology vs. archaeological science: Do we have a case?2013In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 21, p. 11-20Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Response to comments: Archaeology vs. Archaeological Science2013In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 21, p. 49-50Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Lindström, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    Göran Gruber. Medeltider: Samtida mobiliseringsprocesser kring det förflutnas värden2011In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 19, p. 225-227Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Martinsson-Wallin, Helene
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Wehlin, Joakim
    Dalarnas museum.
    Stones in the South: Decoding Bronze Age Ritual Practices on Gotland2017In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 25, p. 227-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we discuss the ritual practices and ritualization in the Bronze Age society on Gotland based on archaeological investigations of cairn milieus and stone ship contexts. We explore whether erected stones and demarcations on the south to south-west side of the Bronze Age cairns are the norm and whether this phenomenon occurred during the Bronze Age. We also discuss whether our archaeological research can support long-term use of cairn milieus for ritual purposes.

  • 48.
    Nilsson, Björn
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Maritime Archaeological Research Institute. Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Archaeology.
    Review: Carl Persson; Den hemliga sjön: en resa till det småländska inlandet för 9000 år sedan2012In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 20, p. 216-219Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Lund University.
    Archaeology, Identity, and the Right to Culture: Anthropological perspectives on repatriation2008In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 15-16, p. 157-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The debate concerning repatriation and reburial is attracting increasing attention in Sweden. While most archaeologists today understand the importance of repatriation and the arguments underlying the claim, the process is not completely unproblematic and certainly not in all cases. This article explores some tendencies within the international debate about repatriation, and frames them within a more general discussion about human rights, the right to culture, and the role of cultural heritage within this debate. Through a critical approach to the debate, it is argued that archaeology needs to be a more active party in the negotiations.

  • 50.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    Building Bridges Between Burial Archaeology and the Archaeology of Death: Where is the Archaeological Study of the Dead Going?2016In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 24, p. 13-35Article in journal (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 61
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