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  • 1. Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Oreland, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neuro-psycho-pharmacology.
    Bladh, Marie
    Comasco, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neuro-psycho-pharmacology.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    A Biopsychosocial Approach to Risk and Resilience on Behavior in Children Followed from Birth to Age 122017In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 584-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing prevalence of mental health problems calls for more knowledge into factors associated with resilience. The present study used multiple statistical methodologies to examine a biopsychosocial model of risk and resilience on preadolescence behavior. Data from 889 children and mothers from a birth cohort were used. An adversity score was created by combining maternal symptoms of depression, psychosocial risk and children's experiences of life events. The proposed resilience factors investigated were candidate genetic polymorphisms, child temperament, social functioning, and maternal sense of coherence. The l/l genotype of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region was associated with lower internalizing scores, but not mainly related to the level of adversity. An easy temperament was associated with resilience for children exposed to high adversity. Social functioning was found to be promotive independent of the risk level. The results support a multiple-level model of resilience indicating effects, though small, of both biological and psychosocial factors.

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  • 2.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Oreland, Lars
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Comasco, Erika
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    A Biopsychosocial Approach to Risk and Resilience on Behavior in Children Followed from Birth to Age 122017In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 584-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing prevalence of mental health problems calls for more knowledge into factors associated with resilience. The present study used multiple statistical methodologies to examine a biopsychosocial model of risk and resilience on preadolescence behavior. Data from 889 children and mothers from a birth cohort were used. An adversity score was created by combining maternal symptoms of depression, psychosocial risk and childrens experiences of life events. The proposed resilience factors investigated were candidate genetic polymorphisms, child temperament, social functioning, and maternal sense of coherence. The l/ l genotype of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region was associated with lower internalizing scores, but not mainly related to the level of adversity. An easy temperament was associated with resilience for children exposed to high adversity. Social functioning was found to be promotive independent of the risk level. The results support a multiple-level model of resilience indicating effects, though small, of both biological and psychosocial factors.

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  • 3.
    Augustine, Lilly
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Bjereld, Y.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning (IBL), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Turner, R.
    Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Role of Disability in the Relationship Between Mental Health and Bullying: A Focused, Systematic Review of Longitudinal Studies2022In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Having both a disability and being bullied increases the risk of later mental health issues. Children with disabilities are at greater risk of being bullied and therefore at greater risk of adverse mental health outcomes. We conducted a limited systematic review of longitudinal studies focusing on the role of disability in relation to bullying and mental health problems. Twelve studies with an initial measure of mental health or disorder, measured no later than 10 years of age, were found. Ten of these twelve studies suggested that having a disability before victimisation increased the impact of mental health problems measured after bullying experiences. The conclusion is that children with a disability, such as behavioural problems, have an increased risk of later mental health problems through bullying victimization. Children with two risk factors had significantly worse mental health outcomes. These additional mental health problems may be alleviated through reduced bullying victimisation.

  • 4.
    Augustine, Lilly
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Bjereld, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Turner, Russell
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Role of Disability in the Relationship Between Mental Health and Bullying: A Focused, Systematic Review of Longitudinal Studies2022In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Having both a disability and being bullied increases the risk of later mental health issues. Children with disabilities are at greater risk of being bullied and therefore at greater risk of adverse mental health outcomes. We conducted a limited systematic review of longitudinal studies focusing on the role of disability in relation to bullying and mental health problems. Twelve studies with an initial measure of mental health or disorder, measured no later than 10 years of age, were found. Ten of these twelve studies suggested that having a disability before victimisation increased the impact of mental health problems measured after bullying experiences. The conclusion is that children with a disability, such as behavioural problems, have an increased risk of later mental health problems through bullying victimization. Children with two risk factors had significantly worse mental health outcomes. These additional mental health problems may be alleviated through reduced bullying victimisation.

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  • 5.
    Colins, Olivier
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Curium-Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hawes, Samuel W.
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh PA, USA.
    Bijttebier, Patricia
    Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Pardini, Dustin A.
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh PA, USA.
    Psychometric Properties of the Original and Short Form of the Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits in Detained Female Adolescents2016In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 679-690Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the psychometric properties of the self-report version of the Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits in 191 detained female adolescents (M = 15.76, SD = 1.02). Evidence supporting the validity of the ICU scores was generally weak, largely due to poor functioning of the Unemotional subscale. Results from confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated support for a recently proposed shortened version of the ICU consisting of two subscales (Callousness and Uncaring). Both subscales showed acceptable to good internal consistency. This short-form version also improved criterion validity, though some issues regarding its convergent validity need further consideration. In conclusion, this study suggests that a short-form version of the ICU that includes a subset of the original items may hold promise as an efficient and valid method for assessing CU traits.

  • 6.
    Dahlberg, Anton
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Karolinska Institute.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Salari, Raziye
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    SDQ in the Hands of Fathers and Preschool Teachers: Psychometric Properties in a Non-clinical Sample of 3-5-Year-Olds2019In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 132-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is a well-established instrument for measuring social and behavioural problems among children, with good psychometric properties for older children, but less validity reports on pre-schoolers. In addition, there is a knowledge gap concerning fathers as informants. The present work is one of the few validity studies to include preschool teachers and the first on preschool children where fathers are included as separate informants. In this study, SDQs were collected from a large community sample (n = 17,752) of children aged 3-5, rated by mothers, fathers, and preschool teachers and analysed using confirmatory factor analysis. Our results revealed acceptable fit for all informant groups and measurement invariance across child gender, child age, and parental education level. Our findings suggest good construct validity of the SDQ for a non-clinical preschool population and imply that it may be used for assessing child behaviour problems from different informant perspectives.

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    SDQ in the Hands of Fathers and Preschool Teachers—Psychometric Properties in a Non-clinical Sample of 3–5-Year-Olds
  • 7.
    Decuyper, Mieke
    et al.
    Department of Developmental, Personality and Social Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Colins, Olivier F.
    Curium-Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands .
    De Clercq, Barbara
    Department of Developmental, Personality and Social Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Vermeiren, Robert
    Curium-Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands; VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Broekaert, Eric
    Department of Orthopedagogy, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Bijttebier, Patricia
    Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium .
    Roose, Annelore
    Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium .
    De Fruyt, Filip
    Department of Developmental, Personality and Social Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Latent personality profiles and the relations with psychopathology and psychopathic traits in detained adolescents2013In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 217-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study constructed empirically derived subtypes of adolescent offenders based on general traits and examined their associations with psychopathology and psychopathic traits. The sample included 342 detained minors (172 boys and 170 girls; mean age 15.85 years, SD = 1.07) recruited in various Youth Detention Centers across the Flemish part of Belgium. All adolescents provided self-reports on the quick big five, the youth self report, and the youth psychopathic traits inventory to assess general traits, psychopathology, and psychopathic traits respectively. Latent class analyses based on general personality traits were performed and suggested three personality types, consisting of an emotionally labile, close-minded and goal-oriented class, an undercontrolled class, and an emotionally labile-careless class. These three personality types within detained minors showed particular constellations of general traits and differed meaningfully in terms of their mean-scores on externalizing psychopathology and psychopathy measures.

  • 8. Dekkers, Tycho J.
    et al.
    Flisar, Ajda
    Motaghi, Adrian Karami
    Karl, Alexandra
    Frick, Matilda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology. Uppsala University.
    Boyer, Bianca E.
    Does Mind-Wandering Explain ADHD-Related Impairment in Adolescents?2023In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, diagnostic criteria for ADHD mainly reflect behavioral symptoms, neglecting internal phenomena like mind-wandering. Recent studies found that mind-wandering explains impairment beyond ADHD symptoms in adults. To better capture ADHD-related impairment in adolescents, we aimed to elucidate whether mind-wandering is associated with impairments that are prevalent in adolescents (i.e., risk-taking behavior, homework problems, emotional dysregulation, and general impairment) beyond ADHD symptoms. Furthermore, we sought to validate the Dutch translation of the Mind Excessively Wandering Scale (MEWS). We assessed a community sample of 626 adolescents on ADHD symptoms, mind-wandering, and the impairment domains. The Dutch MEWS had good psychometric properties. Mind-wandering was linked to general impairment and emotional dysregulation beyond ADHD symptoms, but was not linked to risk-taking behavior and homework problems beyond ADHD symptoms. Internal psychological phenomena such as mind-wandering may add to the behavioral symptoms of ADHD in explaining part of the impairment that adolescents with ADHD characteristics experience.

  • 9.
    Filippi, Courtney A.
    et al.
    NIMH, Emot & Dev Branch, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.;Univ Maryland, Dept Human Dev & Quantitat Methodol, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Subar, Anni
    Univ Denver, Dept Psychol, Denver, CO 80208 USA..
    Ravi, Sanjana
    Univ Maryland, Dept Human Dev & Quantitat Methodol, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Haas, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Troller-Renfree, Sonya V.
    Columbia Univ, Teachers Coll, Dept Biobehav Sci, New York, NY 10027 USA..
    Fox, Nathan A.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Human Dev & Quantitat Methodol, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Leibenluft, Ellen
    NIMH, Emot & Dev Branch, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Pine, Daniel S.
    NIMH, Emot & Dev Branch, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Developmental Changes in the Association Between Cognitive Control and Anxiety2022In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 599-609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anxiety has been associated with reliance on reactive (stimulus-driven/reflexive) control strategies in response to conflict. However, this conclusion rests primarily on indirect evidence. Few studies utilize tasks that dissociate the use of reactive ('just in time') vs. proactive (anticipatory/preparatory) cognitive control strategies in response to conflict, and none examine children diagnosed with anxiety. The current study utilizes the AX-CPT, which dissociates these two types of cognitive control, to examine cognitive control in youth (ages 8-18) with and without an anxiety diagnosis (n = 56). Results illustrate that planful behavior, consistent with using a proactive strategy, varies by both age and anxiety symptoms. Young children (ages 8-12 years) with high anxiety exhibit significantly less planful behavior than similarly-aged children with low anxiety. These findings highlight the importance of considering how maturation influences relations between anxiety and performance on cognitive-control tasks and have implications for understanding the pathophysiology of anxiety in children.

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  • 10. Frey, Ariel
    et al.
    Ruchkin, Vladislav
    Yale Child Study Center.
    Martin, Andrés
    Schwab-Stone, Mary
    Adolescents in transition: school and family characteristics in the development of violent behaviors entering high school.2009In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescents are vulnerable to becoming involved in problematic behaviors, disengaging academically, and dropping out of school. This study was designed to evaluate the protective role of self-perceived school attachment and family involvement on the development of these negative behaviors during adolescence. The Social and Health Assessment (SAHA) survey was conducted among 652 predominantly minority, inner-city adolescents during their transition from middle to high school in order to examine school attachment, perceived teacher support, parental control, and exposure to community violence as predictors of engagement in violent activities, development of aggressive beliefs, perception of school climate, and academic motivation one year later. Family and school factors appeared to be differentially associated with the negative outcomes. School attachment was associated with lower levels of violent delinquency and aggressive beliefs, as well as with academic motivation. Perceived teacher support was associated with positive perceptions of school climate and with academic motivation. Parental control was associated with lower levels of violent activity and with higher levels of academic motivation. Violence exposure was related to violent delinquency and negative perception of school climate. School attachment, teacher support, parental control, and violence exposure must all be incorporated into school reform efforts intended to break the inner city cycle of violence.

  • 11.
    Frick, Matilda A.
    et al.
    Division of Emotion Psychology, Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Brocki, Karin C.
    Division of Emotion Psychology, Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Halldner, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kleberg, Johan Lundin
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm Health Care Services, Region Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Disrupted Attention to Other’s Eyes is Linked to Symptoms of ADHD in Childhood2023In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 973-984Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with impaired social interaction. Other’s eyes are important for understanding the social world. Here, we examined concurrent and longitudinal links between attention to other’s eyes and symptoms of ADHD and comorbid externalizing and internalizing symptoms. Eighty-two 8 to 13-year-old children (40% with ADHD) participated. The latency to a first gaze shift to and away from the eye region of human faces, when primed to look at either the eyes or the mouth, was recorded with eye tracking. Parents rated ADHD, externalizing and internalizing symptoms at the time of testing and at 2-year follow-up. The results show that longer looking at the eyes before reorienting was specifically associated with concurrent and future symptoms of inattention, even when accounting for comorbid symptoms. We conclude that the temporal microstructure of attention to other’s eyes is altered in children with symptoms of ADHD, which may contribute to social impairments.

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  • 12.
    Frick, Matilda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Brocki, Karin C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Henriksson, Linda Halldner
    Department of Clinical Science, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden;Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kleberg, Johan Lundin
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm Health Care Services, Region Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden;Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Disrupted Attention to Other’s Eyes is Linked to Symptoms of ADHD in Childhood2023In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 973-984Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with impaired social interaction. Other’s eyes are important for understanding the social world. Here, we examined concurrent and longitudinal links between attention to other’s eyes and symptoms of ADHD and comorbid externalizing and internalizing symptoms. Eighty-two 8 to 13-year-old children (40% with ADHD) participated. The latency to a first gaze shift to and away from the eye region of human faces, when primed to look at either the eyes or the mouth, was recorded with eye tracking. Parents rated ADHD, externalizing and internalizing symptoms at the time of testing and at 2-year follow-up. The results show that longer looking at the eyes before reorienting was specifically associated with concurrent and future symptoms of inattention, even when accounting for comorbid symptoms. We conclude that the temporal microstructure of attention to other’s eyes is altered in children with symptoms of ADHD, which may contribute to social impairments.

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    fulltext
  • 13.
    Frick, Matilda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Meyer, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Isaksson, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm Health Care Services, Region Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Role of Comorbid Symptoms in Perceived Stress and Sleep Problems in Adolescent ADHD2023In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 1141-1151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined perceived stress and sleep problems in adolescent ADHD and whether this varies as a function of ADHD presentation and sex. Further, we mapped structural associations between ADHD symptoms, comorbid symptoms, perceived stress, and sleep problems. Participants were 306 adolescents aged 13-19 years (66.8% females, 193 had an ADHD diagnosis, 113 were controls). Parents rated ADHD symptoms, all other constructs were self-rated. Adolescents with ADHD had elevated levels of perceived stress and sleep problems. Girls with ADHD reported the highest levels of perceived stress. Emotional symptoms mediated the effect of inattention whereas conduct problems mediated the effect of hyperactivity/impulsivity on stress and sleep. Perceived stress and sleep problems should be considered when mapping ADHD-related problems. Comorbid symptoms are potential intervention targets that may increase treatment response.

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  • 14.
    Georgsson, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg.
    Almqvist, Kjerstin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Psychology.
    Broberg, Anders G
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg.
    Dissimilarity in vulnerability: self-reported symptoms among children with experiences of intimate partner violence2011In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 539-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) are at risk. Not all children, however, display symptoms, and differences connected to gender and age have been demonstrated. In this exploratory study, children's own reports of symptoms were used. The 41 recruited children, between 7 and 19 years old, were entered into a group program specially directed toward children with experiences of IPV. These children reported experiencing more symptoms overall when compared with non-exposed children. The relationship to the abuser and children's symptoms related differently for boys and for girls. Girls who had continued contact with the abusive father described more mental health problems than did other girls exposed to IPV and more than did boys with continued contact. Among children with experiences of custody disputes or other judicial processes, age rather than gender was connected to differences in self-reported symptoms. Younger children with experiences of judicial processes reported more mental health problems than did those with no experience.

  • 15.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rydell, Ann-Margret
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The Prospective Links Between Hyperactive/Impulsive, Inattentive, and Oppositional-Defiant Behaviors in Childhood and Antisocial Behavior in Adolescence: The Moderating Influence of Gender and the Parent–Child Relationship Quality2016In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 857-870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We prospectively investigated the effect of child hyperactive/impulsive, inattentive, and oppositional/defiant behaviors on the development of youth antisocial behaviors, and the moderating influence of gender and the parent-child relationship quality in a normative sample. Participants (N = 673, 50 % girls) were assessed at 10 years of age (parent reports) and at age 15 (parent and adolescent reports). Using latent change models, we found that initial levels of, as well as increases in, hyperactivity/impulsivity and oppositional behaviors and initial levels of inattention behaviors predicted youth antisocial behaviors. The increase in oppositional behaviors was predictive of youth antisocial behaviors in girls only. Child hyperactive/impulsive behaviors predicted youth antisocial behaviors only in children for whom the quality of the parent-child relationship deteriorated from childhood to adolescence. Thus, both initial levels of and increases in disruptive behaviors as well as gender are important for understanding the development of antisocial behaviors in adolescence. We received partial support for the hypothesized, moderating role of a high-quality parent-child relationship.

  • 16.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ.
    Rydell, Ann-Margret
    Uppsala Univ.
    The Prospective Links Between Hyperactive/Impulsive, Inattentive, and Oppositional-Defiant Behaviors in Childhood and Antisocial Behavior in Adolescence: The Moderating Influence of Gender and the Parent-Child Relationship Quality.2016In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 857-870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We prospectively investigated the effect of child hyperactive/impulsive, inattentive, and oppositional/defiant behaviors on the development of youth antisocial behaviors, and the moderating influence of gender and the parent-child relationship quality in a normative sample. Participants (N = 673, 50 % girls) were assessed at 10 years of age (parent reports) and at age 15 (parent and adolescent reports). Using latent change models, we found that initial levels of, as well as increases in, hyperactivity/impulsivity and oppositional behaviors and initial levels of inattention behaviors predicted youth antisocial behaviors. The increase in oppositional behaviors was predictive of youth antisocial behaviors in girls only. Child hyperactive/impulsive behaviors predicted youth antisocial behaviors only in children for whom the quality of the parent-child relationship deteriorated from childhood to adolescence. Thus, both initial levels of and increases in disruptive behaviors as well as gender are important for understanding the development of antisocial behaviors in adolescence. We received partial support for the hypothesized, moderating role of a high-quality parent-child relationship.

  • 17. Helander, Maria
    et al.
    Asperholm, Martin
    Wetterborg, Dan
    Öst, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hellner, Clara
    Herlitz, Agneta
    Enebrink, Pia
    The Efficacy of Parent Management Training With or Without Involving the Child in the Treatment Among Children with Clinical Levels of Disruptive Behavior: A Meta-analysis2024In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 55, p. 164-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted where we evaluated the effects of Parent Management Training (PMT), Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) and PMT combined with child cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) using data from 25 RCTs on children with clinical levels of disruptive behavior (age range 2–13 years). Results showed that PMT (g = 0.64 [95% CI 0.42, 0.86]) and PCIT (g = 1.22 [95% CI 0.75, 1.69]) were more effective than waiting-list (WL) in reducing parent-rated disruptive behavior, and PMT also in improving parental skills (g = 0.83 [95% CI 0.67, 0.98]) and child social skills (g = 0.49 [95% CI 0.30, 0.68]). PCIT versus WL had larger effects in reducing disruptive behavior than PMT versus WL. In the few studies found, the addition of child CBT to PMT did not yield larger effects than PMT or WL. These results support offering PMT to children with clinical levels of disruptive behavior and highlight the additional benefits of PCIT for younger ages.  

  • 18. Horowitz, Laura
    et al.
    Westlund, Karolina
    Ljungberg, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centrum för klinisk forskning i D län (CKFD).
    Aggression and withdrawal related behavior within conflict management progression in preschool boys with language impairment2007In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 237-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective This study examined conflict behavior in naturalistic preschool settings to better understand the role of non-affiliative behavior and language in conflict management. Method Free-play at preschool was filmed among 20 boys with typically developing language (TL) and among 11 boys with Language Impairment (LI); the boys 4-7 years old. Conflict behavior was coded and analyzed with a validated system. Post-conflict non-affiliative behavior (aggression and withdrawal) displays, and the links between the displays and reconciliation (i.e., former opponents exchange friendly behavioral shortly after conflict termination) was examined. Results Group comparisons revealed boys with LI displayed aggression in a smaller share of conflicts, but exhibited 'active' withdrawal (left the room), in a larger conflict share. Boys with TL overcame aggression (more common TL behavior) and after reconciled, to a greater extent than the boys with LI after active withdrawal (more common LI behavior). Also, after reciprocal or only verbal aggression, boys with LI reconciled to a lesser extent than boys with TL. Conclusions The boys with LI demonstrated difficulties confronting conflict management, as well as concluding emotionally heightened and aggressive behavioral turns.

  • 19.
    Isaksson, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Isaksson, Martina
    Stickley, Andrew
    Vermeiren, Robert
    Koposov, Roman
    Schwab-Stone, Mary
    Ruchkin, Vladislav
    Community Violence Exposure and Eating Disorder Symptoms among Belgian, Russian and US Adolescents: Cross-Country and Gender Perspectives.2023In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community violence exposure (CVE) is one of the most common adverse childhood experiences worldwide. Despite this, its potential effect on disordered eating in adolescents from different cultures is underexplored. In the present cross-sectional study, self-reported data were collected from 9751 students (Mean age = 14.27) from Belgium, Russia and the US on CVE (witnessing violence and violence victimization), eating disorder (ED) symptoms (ED thoughts with associated compensatory behaviors), and comorbid symptoms of posttraumatic stress, depression and anxiety. Increased CVE (from no exposure to witnessing to victimization) was associated with more ED symptoms, and the associations remained significant after adjusting for comorbid conditions. The associations were similar for adolescents across the three countries. No gender differences were observed in the association between CVE and ED symptoms, even though girls in general reported more ED symptoms than boys. We conclude that CVE appears to be associated with ED symptoms in three culturally different samples of adolescents.

  • 20.
    Isaksson, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm Health Care Services, Region Stockholm, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Martina
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Japan.
    Vermeiren, Robert
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Koposov, Roman
    UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway; Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Russia.
    Schwab-Stone, Mary
    Yale University School of Medicine, USA.
    Ruchkin, Vladislav
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Yale University School of Medicine, USA; Sala Forensic Psychiatric Clinic, Sweden.
    Community Violence Exposure and Eating Disorder Symptoms among Belgian, Russian and US Adolescents: Cross-Country and Gender Perspectives2023In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Isaksson, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Schwab-Stone, Mary
    Stickley, Andrew
    Ruchkin, Vladislav
    Risk and Protective Factors for Problematic Drinking in Early Adolescence: A Systematic Approach2020In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 231-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alcohol use during early adolescence is associated with other risk behaviors as well as future health problems. Within the design of a larger prospective research program, a cohort of U.S. inner-city sixth-grade students (N = 1573, mean age = 12.10) were assessed and reassessed in the seventh-grade. Self-reported information was obtained on problems related to alcohol, fixed markers of risk (e.g. sex, age, SES), individual and interpersonal factors (e.g. internalizing and externalizing symptoms) and contextual factors (e.g. substance availability). Alcohol-related problems in seventh grade were foremost predicted by individual and interpersonal factors in the sixth grade including depressive symptoms, conduct problems, a decreased perception of wrongdoing, and affiliation with delinquent peers. In addition, alcohol use in the sixth grade and being of Hispanic or White ethnicity was also associated with subsequent alcohol-related problems. Interventions should be directed towards assessing and treating individual risk factors such as depression and externalizing symptoms.

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  • 22.
    Isaksson, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Schwab-Stone, Mary
    Yale University Medical School, New Haven, USA.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan.
    Ruchkin, Vladislav
    Uppsala University / Yale University Medical School, New Haven, USA / Säter Forensic Psychiatric Clinic.
    Risk and Protective Factors for Problematic Drinking in Early Adolescence: A Systematic Approach2020In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 231-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alcohol use during early adolescence is associated with other risk behaviors as well as future health problems. Within the design of a larger prospective research program, a cohort of U.S. inner-city sixth-grade students (N = 1573, mean age = 12.10) were assessed and reassessed in the seventh-grade. Self-reported information was obtained on problems related to alcohol, fixed markers of risk (e.g. sex, age, SES), individual and interpersonal factors (e.g. internalizing and externalizing symptoms) and contextual factors (e.g. substance availability). Alcohol-related problems in seventh grade were foremost predicted by individual and interpersonal factors in the sixth grade including depressive symptoms, conduct problems, a decreased perception of wrongdoing, and affiliation with delinquent peers. In addition, alcohol use in the sixth grade and being of Hispanic or White ethnicity was also associated with subsequent alcohol-related problems. Interventions should be directed towards assessing and treating individual risk factors such as depression and externalizing symptoms.

  • 23.
    Isen, Joshua
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, USA.
    Tuvblad, Catherine
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Younan, Diana
    Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Ericson, Marissa
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Raine, Adrian
    Departments of Criminology, Psychiatry, and Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Baker, Laura A.
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Developmental Trajectories of Delinquent and Aggressive Behavior: Evidence for Differential Heritability2022In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 199-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The developmental course of antisocial behavior is often described in terms of qualitatively distinct trajectories. However, the genetic etiology of various trajectories is not well understood. We examined heterogeneity in the development of delinquent and aggressive behavior in 1532 twin youth using four waves of data collection, spanning ages 9-10 to 16-18. A latent class growth analysis was used to uncover relevant subgroups. For delinquent behavior, three latent classes emerged: Non-Delinquent, Low-Level Delinquent, and Persistent Delinquent. Liability for persistent delinquency had a substantial genetic origin (heritability = 67%), whereas genetic influences were negligible for lower-risk subgroups. Three classes of aggressive behavior were identified: Non-Aggressive, Moderate, and High. Moderate heritability spanned the entire continuum of risk for aggressive behavior. Thus, there are differences between aggressive behavior and non-aggressive delinquency with respect to heterogeneity of etiology. We conclude that persistent delinquency represents an etiologically distinct class of rule-breaking with strong genetic roots.

  • 24. Ivarsson, Tord
    et al.
    Saavedra, Fanny
    Granqvist, Pehr
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Broberg, Anders G.
    Traumatic and adverse attachment childhood experiences are not characteristic of OCD but of depression in adolescents2016In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 270-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated whether adverse attachment experience might contribute to the development of obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). We interviewed 100 adolescents, 25 each with primary OCD, depressive disorder (DD), OCD plus DD and general population controls (CTRs) using the adult attachment interview to assess attachment experiences (AEs), including traumatic and adverse AE (TAE). Adolescents with OCD, OCD+DD and DD had little evidence of secure base/safe haven parental behaviour and their childhood attachment needs judged to be rejected as compared to the controls. Overprotection was not characteristic of OCD, and parents using the child for their own needs (elevated levels of involving/role reversal) occurred only in DD, with low levels in OCD, OCD+DD and CTR. Traumatic experiences, often multiple, and/or attachment related were reported significantly more often in the DD group, and was less common in OCD+DD, CTR and particularly in the OCD group. In OCD, little TAE was reported and adverse AE were less serious and seem unlikely to contribute directly to OCD aetiology. In DD and to some degree in OCD+DD serious AE/TAE may have some etiological significance for the depressive states.

  • 25.
    Klingzell, Ida
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Fanti, Kostas
    Department of Psychology, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Colins, Olivier
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Curium-Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Frogner, Louise
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andershed, Anna-Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Early Childhood Trajectories of Conduct Problems and Callous-Unemotional Traits: The Role of Fearlessness and Psychopathic Personality Dimensions2016In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 236-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with early onset of conduct problems (CP) are at risk for long lasting psychosocial problems, especially if CP co-occurs with callous-unemotional (CU) traits. Joint trajectories of CP and CU traits during early childhood were identified using data from the SOFIA study, following 2031 children longitudinally from ages 3-5 to 5-7 years. The results showed that children exhibiting stable high CP and CU traits were characterized by high levels of fearlessness, and psychopathic traits, including grandiose-deceitfulness, and impulsivity, need for stimulation. Children with decreasing or increasing CP and CU traits were characterized by decreases and increases respectively in their levels of fearlessness and psychopathic traits. Children high on CP and low on CU traits exhibited lower levels of these dimensions. Thus, stability and change of fearlessness and psychopathic traits are associated with stability and change in CP and CU traits, making these temperamental and personality traits promising target candidates for early intervention.

  • 26.
    Lindeberg, S.
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Child and Family Health, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Tedgård, E.
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Kerstis, Birgitta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Tedgård, U.
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Taylor, A.
    Department of Health Sciences, Child and Family Health, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Jönsson, P.
    Department of Psychology, Faculty of Education, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Development of the Parent-to-Infant Bonding Scale: Validation in Swedish Mothers and Fathers in Community and Clinical Contexts2024In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Valid measurement instruments are needed to investigate the impact of parental bonding on child health development. The aim was to develop and validate a self-report questionnaire, the Parent-to-Infant Bonding Scale (PIBS) to measure bonding in both mothers and fathers. Internal consistency and construct validity were analysed using data from Swedish parents from both clinical (N = 182), and community (N = 122) population samples. Overall, good or acceptable internal consistency of the PIBS appeared. Convergent validity (against the Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire, analysed in the clinical sample) and discriminant validity (against the mental health constructs of depressive symptoms and anxiety) were demonstrated. The results support the PIBS as a measure of maternal and paternal bonding in community and clinical populations. Assessments of criterion validity in these populations are desirable. The similarities in PIBS measurement properties between the parent groups suggest its usefulness for comparisons between mothers and fathers, and for future investigations of unique and interactive impacts of maternal and paternal bonding on child outcomes using community and clinical cohorts.

  • 27.
    Lopez-Romero, Laura
    et al.
    Departamento de Psicología Clínica y Psicobiología, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychobiology, Univ Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Romero, Estrella
    Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychobiology, Univ of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Conduct problems in childhood and adolescence: developmental trajectories, predictors and outcomes in a six-year follow up2015In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 762-773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding youth conduct problems requires examination from a developmental perspective, analyzing distinctive pathways across childhood and adolescence, and identifying early predictors which will lead to specific adolescent outcomes. Bearing this in mind, developmental trajectories of conduct problems were identified from a person-oriented perspective, and using data collected from three waves over a six-year period, in a sample of Spanish children aged 6-11 at the onset of the study. Conduct problems showed five distinctive trajectories which were grouped into three major pathways in further analyses: Stable low, Stable high, and Decreasing. Associations with early personality and psychopathic traits, as well as with a wide range of adolescent behavioral and psychosocial outcomes were examined, revealing the Stable high group as exhibiting the highest risk profile. These results contribute to improving our knowledge about one of the most relevant problems in youth populations, and will help in refining interventions strategies by recognizing the developmental heterogeneity of the construct.

  • 28.
    López-Romero, Laura
    et al.
    Departamento de Psicología Clínica y Psicobiología, Facultad de Psicología, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Rua Xose María Suárez Núñez S/N, Campus Sur, 15782, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Romero, Estrella
    Departamento de Psicología Clínica y Psicobiología, Facultad de Psicología, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Rua Xose María Suárez Núñez S/N, Campus Sur, 15782, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Cervin, Matti
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    In Search of Conceptual Clarity About the Structure of Psychopathic Traits in Children: A Network-Based Proposal2024In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychopathic traits in childhood have been revealed as potential identifiers of risk, being predictive of later forms of behavioral maladjustment. Yet, it is still under debate how psychopathic traits in children should be best conceptualized and which are the core dimensions for construct definition and prediction. The present study aims to examine the structure of psychopathic traits in childhood, and its predictive value, by using a combination of traditional factor analysis and more recent network-based methods. Data on psychopathic traits, as measured by the Child Problematic Traits Inventory (CPTI), were collected in a large sample of children (n = 2454; 48.2% girls), aged 3 to 6 at the onset of the study (Mage = 4.26; SD = 0.91), who were followed-up one and two years later using parent- and teacher-reports. Results showed that psychopathic traits measured via CPTI are best conceptualized as five latent factors encompassing grandiosity, deceitfulness, callousness, impulsivity and need of stimulation, a result that converged across informants and time. Callousness and grandiosity emerged as central traits using network analysis of parent-reports, while deceitfulness was most central using teacher-reports. Finally, callousness, impulsivity and deceitfulness emerged as the best predictors of concurrent, prospective and stable conduct problems. These results provide a refined structure of psychopathic traits in children that better accounts for the core elements of the construct. Additional theoretical and practical implications will be discussed in terms of assessment, diagnostic classification and tailored prevention/intervention.

  • 29.
    Marinopoulou, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Region Värmland, Sweden.
    Billstedt, Eva
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Wessman, Catrin
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, USA.
    Unenge Hallerbäck, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Örebro University, Sweden.
    Association Between Intellectual Functioning and Autistic Traits in the General Population of Children2023In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autistic traits are continuously distributed in the general population. The associations between autistic traits and intellectual functioning and/or behavioural difficulties, and the impact of intellectual functioning on behavioural difficulties are unclear. The study aims to describe the distribution of autistic traits in a population-based cross-sectional sample of children. Further aims are to examine the association between intellectual functioning and autistic traits, and between autistic traits and behavioural difficulties. Wechsler scales and ratings of autistic traits and behavioural problems in 874 children aged 7-9 years in the Swedish Environmental Longitudinal Mother and Child, Asthma and Allergy (SELMA) study were assessed. We found a continuous distribution of autistic traits. Intellectual functioning was negatively associated with autistic traits but not with behavioural difficulties. Behavioural difficulties were associated with autistic traits.

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  • 30.
    Marinopoulou, Maria
    et al.
    Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Child and Adolescent Habilitation, Region Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Billstedt, Eva
    Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Child Neuropsychiatric Clinic, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wessman, Catrin
    School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
    Unenge Hallerbäck, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Association Between Intellectual Functioning and Autistic Traits in the General Population of Children2023In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autistic traits are continuously distributed in the general population. The associations between autistic traits and intellectual functioning and/or behavioural difficulties, and the impact of intellectual functioning on behavioural difficulties are unclear. The study aims to describe the distribution of autistic traits in a population-based cross-sectional sample of children. Further aims are to examine the association between intellectual functioning and autistic traits, and between autistic traits and behavioural difficulties. Wechsler scales and ratings of autistic traits and behavioural problems in 874 children aged 7-9 years in the Swedish Environmental Longitudinal Mother and Child, Asthma and Allergy (SELMA) study were assessed. We found a continuous distribution of autistic traits. Intellectual functioning was negatively associated with autistic traits but not with behavioural difficulties. Behavioural difficulties were associated with autistic traits.

  • 31. Riise, Eili N.
    et al.
    Kvale, Gerd
    Öst, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. The Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Skjold, Solvei Harila
    Hansen, Bjarne
    Does Family Accommodation Predict Outcome of Concentrated Exposure and Response Prevention for Adolescents?2019In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 975-986Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Findings suggest that increased levels of family accommodation are associated with a poorer treatment outcome in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). A concentrated treatment format, the Bergen 4-day treatment (B4DT), has previously demonstrated promising results in the treatment of adolescents with OCD. The present paper examined changes in family accommodation and investigated whether family accommodation predicted outcome, in a sample of 63 adolescents (age range 11-18) participating in the B4DT. There were significant reductions on CY-BOCS and FAS from pre- to post-treatment and from pre-treatment to follow-up (p < 0.001), with large within-group effect sizes on both measures. Pre-treatment levels of symptom severity or family accommodation was not found to predict outcome at post-treatment or at follow-up. Less OCD-related functional impairment at pre-treatment predicted a better outcome at both post-treatment and follow-up. The findings suggest that the B4DT significantly reduces OCD-symptoms regardless of pre-treatment levels of family accommodation or OCD severity.

  • 32.
    Rothenberg, W Andrew
    et al.
    Duke University Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham (USA); University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E
    Duke University Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham (USA).
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellín (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M
    Hashemite University, Zarqa (JOR).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples "Federico II,", Naple (ITA).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Macau (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma "La Sapienza,", Rome (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A
    Duke University Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Liu, Qin
    Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Kisumu (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma "La Sapienza,", Rome (ITA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham (USA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia (USA); King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (SAU).
    Bornstein, Marc H
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda (USA); UNICEF, New York (USA); Institute for Fiscal Studies, London (GBR).
    The Intergenerational Transmission of Maladaptive Parenting and its Impact on Child Mental Health: Examining Cross-Cultural Mediating Pathways and Moderating Protective Factors2023In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 54, p. 870-890Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a sample of 1338 families from 12 cultural groups in 9 nations, we examined whether retrospectively remembered Generation 1 (G1) parent rejecting behaviors were passed to Generation 2 (G2 parents), whether such intergenerational transmission led to higher Generation 3 (G3 child) externalizing and internalizing behavior at age 13, and whether such intergenerational transmission could be interrupted by parent participation in parenting programs or family income increases of > 5%. Utilizing structural equation modeling, we found that the intergenerational transmission of parent rejection that is linked with higher child externalizing and internalizing problems occurs across cultural contexts. However, the magnitude of transmission is greater in cultures with higher normative levels of parent rejection. Parenting program participation broke this intergenerational cycle in fathers from cultures high in normative parent rejection. Income increases appear to break this intergenerational cycle in mothers from most cultures, regardless of normative levels of parent rejection. These results tentatively suggest that bolstering protective factors such as parenting program participation, income supplementation, and (in cultures high in normative parent rejection) legislative changes and other population-wide positive parenting information campaigns aimed at changing cultural parenting norms may be effective in breaking intergenerational cycles of maladaptive parenting and improving child mental health across multiple generations.

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    Springer
  • 33.
    Ruchkin, V.
    et al.
    Uppsala University / Yale University Medical School, New Haven, USA / Säter Forensic Psychiatric Clinic.
    Koposov, R. A.
    UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Universitat de Barcelona, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona, Spain / CIBERSAM, Madrid, Spain.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Centre for Neurology and Psychiatry (NCNP), Tokyo, Japan / University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Suicidal Behavior in Juvenile Delinquents: The Role of ADHD and Other Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders2017In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 691-698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated the role of psychiatric morbidity in relation to a history of suicidal behavior, with a particular focus on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Suicidality and psychiatric diagnoses were assessed in 370 incarcerated male juvenile delinquents from Northern Russia using the semi-structured K-SADS-PL psychiatric interview. A lifetime history of suicidal ideation only (24.7 %) and suicidal ideation with suicide attempts (15.7 %) was common. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to assess the role of ADHD and other psychiatric disorders in suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. A history of suicidal ideation and of suicide attempts were associated with higher rates of psychiatric morbidity and with the number of comorbid psychiatric disorders. An ADHD diagnosis was associated with an increased risk for both suicidal ideation and for suicide attempts. The comorbidity of ADHD with drug dependence further increased the risk for suicidal ideation, while ADHD and alcohol dependence comorbidity increased the risk for suicide attempts. Our findings highlight the importance of adequately detecting and treating psychiatric disorders in vulnerable youths, especially when they are comorbid with ADHD.

  • 34. Ruchkin, Vladislav
    et al.
    Gilliam, Walter S
    Mayes, Linda
    Developmental pathway modeling in considering behavior problems in young Russian children.2008In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 49-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In planning interventions it is essential to understand how adverse risk factors in early childhood are associated with child mental health problems, whether some types of problems can be better explained by the specific risk factors, and whether early risk factors are differently related to different types of child behavior problems. A community sample of 692 1.5-3.5-year-old children from Northern Russia was assessed by means of maternal reports. The study compared two models for the development of internalizing (withdrawn, anxious/depressed) and externalizing (aggressive, destructive) behavior problems in relation to the same early risk factors using structural equation modeling. Findings suggested that the development of these problems is related to maternal psychological problems and alcohol use during pregnancy, and mediated by the continuing maternal and family dysfunction and compromised postnatal condition of the child. Results indicated good model fit for both internalizing and externalizing problems, and neither of the models fit significantly better than the other. Findings are discussed in terms of understanding developmental risk and informing intervention and prevention efforts.

  • 35.
    Ruchkin, Vladislav V.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Yale Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Child Study, 333 Cedar St, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.;Sater Forens Psychiat Clin, S-78327 Sater, Sweden..
    Koposov, Roman A.
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Reg Ctr Child & Youth Mental Hlth & Welf, Tromso, Norway..
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Univ Barcelona, Fundacio St Joan de Deu, Parc Sanitari St Joan de Deu,Dr Antoni Pujades 42, Barcelona 08830, Spain.;Inst Salud Carlos III, Ctr Invest Biomed Red Salud Mental, CIBERSAM, Monforte Lemos 3-5 Pabellon 11, Madrid 28029, Spain..
    Stickley, Andrew
    Natl Inst Mental Hlth, Dept Child & Adolescent Mental Hlth, NCNP, 4-1-1 Ogawahigashi, Kodaira, Tokyo 1878553, Japan.;Sodertorn Univ, Stockholm Ctr Hlth & Social Change SCOHOST, S-14189 Huddinge, Sweden.;Univ Tokyo, Grad Sch Med, Dept Human Ecol, Bunkyo Ku, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 1130033, Japan..
    Suicidal Behavior in Juvenile Delinquents: The Role of ADHD and Other Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders2017In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 691-698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated the role of psychiatric morbidity in relation to a history of suicidal behavior, with a particular focus on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Suicidality and psychiatric diagnoses were assessed in 370 incarcerated male juvenile delinquents from Northern Russia using the semi-structured K-SADS-PL psychiatric interview. A lifetime history of suicidal ideation only (24.7 %) and suicidal ideation with suicide attempts (15.7 %) was common. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to assess the role of ADHD and other psychiatric disorders in suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. A history of suicidal ideation and of suicide attempts were associated with higher rates of psychiatric morbidity and with the number of comorbid psychiatric disorders. An ADHD diagnosis was associated with an increased risk for both suicidal ideation and for suicide attempts. The comorbidity of ADHD with drug dependence further increased the risk for suicidal ideation, while ADHD and alcohol dependence comorbidity increased the risk for suicide attempts. Our findings highlight the importance of adequately detecting and treating psychiatric disorders in vulnerable youths, especially when they are comorbid with ADHD.

  • 36.
    Salari, Raziye
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Division of Psychology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Stockholm Brain Institute, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bohlin, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rydell, Ann-Margret
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Thorell, Lisa
    Division of Psychology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Stockholm Brain Institute, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Neuropsychological functioning and attachment representations in early school age as predictors of ADHD symptoms in late adolescence2017In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 370-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to examine relations between parent and child attachment representations and neuropsychological functions at age 8, as well as relations between these constructs and ADHD symptoms over a 10-year period. A community-based sample of 105 children (52 boys) participated. Measures of attachment representations and a range of neuropsychological functions were collected at age 8. Parents rated emotion dysregulation and ADHD symptoms at age 8 and ADHD symptoms again at age 18. Significant, although modest, relations were found between disorganized attachment and some aspects of neuropsychological functioning in childhood. When studying outcomes in late adolescence and controlling for early ADHD symptom levels, spatial working memory and disorganized attachment remained significant in relation to both ADHD symptom domains, and one measure of inhibition remained significant for hyperactivity/impulsivity. When examining independent effects, spatial working memory and disorganized attachment were related to inattention, whereas spatial working memory and dysregulation of happiness/exuberance were related to hyperactivity/impulsivity. Our findings showing that disorganized attachment is longitudinally related to ADHD symptoms over and above the influence of both neuropsychological functioning and early ADHD symptom levels highlights the importance of including measures of attachment representations when trying to understand the development of ADHD symptoms. If replicated in more “at-risk” samples, these findings could also suggest that parent–child attachment should be taken into consideration when children are referred for assessment and treatment of ADHD.

  • 37. Schwab-Stone, Mary
    et al.
    Koposov, Roman
    Vermeiren, Robert
    Ruchkin, Vladislav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Cross-Cultural Findings on Community Violence Exposure and Internalizing Psychopathology: Comparing Adolescents in the United States, Russia, and Belgium2013In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 516-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aimed to investigate cross-cultural differences in the relation between community violence and psychopathology. A self-report survey was conducted in a representative sample of 3,309 14-17 year old adolescents from urban communities in the US (N = 1,343), Belgium (N = 946) and Russia (N = 1,009). In all three countries, boys reported higher prevalences of violence exposure and more victimization by community violence than girls. Controlling for involvement in antisocial behavior, levels of psychopathology increased along with severity of exposure to community violence (from no exposure to witnessing to victimization). The associations between community violence and internalizing problems were similar across countries and gender. Current findings suggest that the relationships between community violence and adolescent mental health are not culture bound and that they follow similar dynamics in different populations. Clinical implications and directions are discussed.

  • 38.
    Telman, Machteld D.
    et al.
    Univ Oxford, Dept Expt Psychol, Oxford OX1 4AU, England;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Fac Psychol & Educ, Dept Clin Child & Family Studies, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Holmes, Emily A.
    MRC Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge, England.
    Lau, Jennifer Y. F.
    Univ Oxford, Dept Expt Psychol, Oxford OX1 4AU, England.
    Modifying Adolescent Interpretation Biases Through Cognitive Training: Effects on Negative Affect and Stress Appraisals2013In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 602-611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescent anxiety is common, impairing and costly. Given the scale of adolescent anxiety and its impact, fresh innovations for therapy are in demand. Cognitive Bias Modification of Interpretations (CBM-I) studies of adults show that by training individuals to endorse benign interpretations of ambiguous situations can improve anxious mood-states particularly in response towards stress. While, these investigations have been partially extended to adolescents with success, inconsistent training effects on anxious mood-states have been found. The present study investigated whether positive versus negative CBM-I training influenced appraisals of stress, in forty-nine adolescents, aged 15-18. Data supported the plasticity of interpretational styles, with positively-trained adolescents selecting more benign resolutions of new ambiguous situations, than negatively-trained adolescents. Positively-trained adolescents also rated recent stressors as having less impact on their lives than negatively-trained adolescents. Thus, while negative styles may increase negative responses towards stress, positive styles may boost resilience.

  • 39.
    van Zalk, Nejra
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Social Work and Counselling, University of Greenwich, London, UK.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Trost, Kari
    Department of Child and Youth Studies, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mothers’ and Fathers’ Worry and Over-Control: One Step Closer to Understanding Early Adolescent Social Anxiety2018In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 921-927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the links between parental worry, parental over-control and adolescent social anxiety in parent-adolescent dyads. Using a longitudinal sample of adolescents (Mage = 14.28) and their parents (224 mother–daughter, 234 mother–son, 51 father–daughter, and 47 father–son dyads), comparisons were conducted using cross-lagged path models across two time points. We used adolescent reports of social anxiety and feelings of being overly controlled by parents, and mother and father self-reports of worries. Our results show that boys’ social anxiety predicted higher perceived parental overcontrol, whereas girls’ social anxiety predicted higher paternal worry over time. In addition, girls’ reports of feeling overly controlled by parents predicted higher maternal worry but lower paternal worry over time. For boys, feeling overly controlled predicted less social anxiety instead. The study illustrates how mothers and fathers might differ in their behaviors and concerns regarding their children’s social anxiety and feelings of overcontrol.

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  • 40. Van Zalk, Nejra
    et al.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Trost, Kari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Mothers' and Fathers' Worry and Over-Control: One Step Closer to Understanding Early Adolescent Social Anxiety2018In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 917-927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the links between parental worry, parental over-control and adolescent social anxiety in parent-adolescent dyads. Using a longitudinal sample of adolescents (M-age=14.28) and their parents (224 mother-daughter, 234 mother-son, 51 father-daughter, and 47 father-son dyads), comparisons were conducted using cross-lagged path models across two time points. We used adolescent reports of social anxiety and feelings of being overly controlled by parents, and mother and father self-reports of worries. Our results show that boys' social anxiety predicted higher perceived parental overcontrol, whereas girls' social anxiety predicted higher paternal worry over time. In addition, girls' reports of feeling overly controlled by parents predicted higher maternal worry but lower paternal worry over time. For boys, feeling overly controlled predicted less social anxiety instead. The study illustrates how mothers and fathers might differ in their behaviors and concerns regarding their children's social anxiety and feelings of overcontrol.

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