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  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Editorial Material: Is surgery for the subacromial pain syndrome ever indicated? in ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA, vol 86, issue 6, pp 639-6402015In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 86, no 6, p. 639-640Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 2.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Hammer, R.
    Orthopaedic Surgery, Central Hospital, SE-291 85 Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Elbow hemiarthroplasty for acute reconstruction of intraarticular distal humerus fractures: A preliminary report involving 4 patients2006In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 77, no 5, p. 785-787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We treated 4 female patients (mean age 80) with complex intraarticular acute fracture of the distal humerus with a Kudo humeral component, i.e. a hemiarthroplasty. All fractures were considered impossible to treat with open reduction and internal fixation. At mean 10 (3-14) months, 3 patients had an excellent result and 1 a good result according to the Mayo elbow performance score. We conclude that a hemiarthroplasty may be a valuable alternative in eldery patients with complex fractures of the distal humerus. Copyright© Taylor & Francis 2006.

  • 3.
    Affas, Fatin
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Solna, Sweden.
    Nygårds, Eva-Britt
    Karolinska Inst, Solna, Sweden.
    Stiller, Carl-Olav
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Solna, Sweden.
    Wretenberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Solna, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Christina
    Karolinska Inst, Solna, Sweden.
    Pain control after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized trial comparing local infiltration anesthesia and continuous femoral block2011In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 82, no 4, p. 441-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is usually severe, and epidural analgesia or femoral nerve block has been considered to be an effective pain treatment. Recently, local infiltration analgesia (LIA) has become increasingly popular but the outcome of this method regarding the analgesic effect has not been fully evaluated. We compared local infiltration analgesia and femoral block with regard to analgesia and morphine demand during the first 24 h after TKA.

    METHODS: 40 patients undergoing TKA under spinal anesthesia were randomized to receive femoral nerve block (group F) or peri- and intraarticular infiltration analgesia (group LIA) with a mixture containing ropivacaine, ketorolac, and epinephrine. All patients had access to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with morphine postoperatively. Pain intensity at rest and upon movement was assessed on a numeric rating scale (0-10) on an hourly basis over 24 h if the patients were awake.

    RESULTS: The average pain at rest was marginally lower with LIA (1.6) than with femoral block (2.2). Total morphine consumption per kg was similar between the 2 groups. Ancillary analysis revealed that 1 of 20 patients in the LIA group reported a pain intensity of > 7 upon movement, as compared to 7 out of 19 in the femoral block group (p = 0.04).

    INTERPRETATION: Both LIA and femoral block provide good analgesia after TKA. LIA may be considered to be superior to femoral block since it is cheaper and easier to perform.

  • 4.
    Apelqvist, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Orthopedics, Hässleholm-Kristianstad, Hässleholm Hospital, .
    Waldén, Markus
    Hässleholm Hospital.
    Larsson, Gert-Uno
    Hässleholm Hospital.
    Atroshi, Isam
    Hässleholm Hospital.
    Pneumatic wound compression after hip fracture surgery did not reduce postoperative blood transfusion: A randomized controlled trial involving 292 fractures.2009In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 80, no 1, p. 26-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pneumatic wound compression does not reduce the need for transfusion after hip fracture surgery.

  • 5.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Alendronate-eluting polyglucose-lignol composite (POGLICO): A new biomaterial for fracture fixating implants2014In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 85, no 6, p. 687-690Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Due to the known drawbacks of metal implants, new biomaterials for internal fracture fixation are attracting increasing interest, among them poly(lactic-coglucolic) acids (PLGAs) and the recently developed silk-tenoin derived materials (STDMs). In accordance with the new philosophy of bio-derived biomaterials (BIODERIBIOs), I describe a novel innovative technology for use in fracture fixation. Patients and methods - Screws (2 mm dia.) were manufactured from cylindrical bars of polyglucose-lignol composite (POGLICO) in the form of birch toothpicks from the hospital canteen, dip-coated with alendronate (1 mg/mL, n = 6) or saline (n = 6), and inserted in the proximal tibias of rats for 4 weeks. Fixation was evaluated by mechanical pullout testing. POGLICO nails were inserted in the contralateral tibia for microCT and histology. Results - All POGLICO implants remained fixed in the bone (p less than 0.001) with a mean pullout force of 37 (SD 5.5) N. MicroCT showed that the control nails were surrounded by a thin layer of new bone, while all bisphosphonate-treated implants were surrounded by a thick layer of cancellous bone. Bisphosphonates more than doubled the bone density around the nails (p = 0.004). Interpretation - POGLICO is biocompatible, remains in situ, and appears to provide a higher resistance to pullout forces than bulk silk protein. The material is light, strong, and bio-derived. BIODERIBIO-POGLICO can be sterilized by autoclaving, and has a porous surface that can serve for slow release of drugs applied by simple dip-coating, as demonstrated by the effect of the alendronate treatment. As the raw material for the screws is readily available from the toothpick industry, I believe that the possibilities for commercial development of the material for fracture fixation are promising.

  • 6.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Black holes in bone - irresistible attractors of foreign materials?2009In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 80, no 1, p. 2-3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Drugs and fracture repair2005In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 76, no 6, p. 741-748Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 8.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Editorial: Bisphosphonate-induced fractures: Nature strikes back?2008In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 79, no 4, p. 459-460Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Editorial Material: Why do we operate proximal humeral fractures?2015In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 86, no 3, p. 279-279Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Editorial: Osteonecrosis: what does it mean? One condition partly caused by bisphosphonates - or another one, preferably treated with them?2006In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 77, no 5, p. 693-694Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Letter: Overtreatment of cruciate ligament injuries2011In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 122-122Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 12.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Mythbusting in Orthopedics challenges our desire for meaning2014In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 85, no 6, p. 547-547Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Overtreatment of cruciate ligament injuries2010In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 81, no 5, p. 524-525Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 14.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Parathyroid hormone and fracture healing2013In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 84, no 1, p. 4-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This annotation describes some early rat studies which conclude that parathyroid hormone (PTH) has more dramatic stimulatory effects on bone repair than on untraumatized bone. It also suggests, based on the effects of PTH on osteoblasts, that it is more likely to accelerate normal fracture healing than to prevent nonunion. The only 2 controlled clinical trials that have been published are critically discussed. Although both are encouraging and appear to show acceleration of normal fracture healing, they have methodological shortcomings that preclude definitive conclusions.

  • 15.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Pharmacological treatment of osteonecrosis2006In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 175-176Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 16.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Postoperative Cox inhibitors and late prosthetic loosening--suspicion increases!2005In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 76, no 6, p. 733-734Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Under-reported complications related to BMP use in spine surgery2011In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 82, no 5, p. 511-512Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 18.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Department of Orthopaedics, IKE, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping.
    Nilsson, Kjell G
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Fixed or loose?: Dichotomy in RSA data for cemented cups.2008In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 79, no 4, p. 467-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: Roentgen stereometric analysis (RSA) cannot discern whether a single prosthesis is fixed or migrating below the detection level. Samples of patients usually show migration values that appear to be continuously distributed. Is there such continuity, or is there a dichotomy between stable and migrating prostheses? The hypothesis of a dichotomy has, to our knowledge, not been tested. We present an exploratory evaluation of such a dichotomy using a mixture distribution algorithm.

    Methods: We analyzed the migration (as determined by RSA) of 147 cemented acetabular cups of 7 different designs by using a new set of algorithms for frequency distribution analysis called Rmix.

    Results: We first analyzed a migration vector, regardless of direction. After 2 years there was a significant dichotomy between 2 lognormal subgroups within the sample. Although some types of cups were over‐represented in one of the subgroups, neither cup design, sex, nor operating department could explain the dichotomy into two groups, which appears to reflect the existence of two basically different types of behavior of the cups. We next analyzed the migration along the 3 axes in space, and found a similar dichotomy. During the second year, around 80% of the patients belonged to a distinct, normally distributed subgroup with a mean not different from 0 mm and a small variation. The remainder differed significantly from this subgroup and showed migration.

    Interpretation: There is a dichotomy in migration pattern. During the second postoperative year, most cups belonged to a subpopulation that appeared stable. The remainder is probably at risk of loosening. For a single type of prosthesis, the relative size of the stable subgroup may be a good index of the expected performance. The possibility of detecting subgroups within a seemingly continuous sample might be useful in many fields of medicine.

  • 19.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Distal radial fractures heal by direct woven bone formation2013In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 84, no 3, p. 297-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Descriptions of fracture healing almost exclusively deal with shaft fractures and they often emphasize endochondral bone formation. In reality, most fractures occur in metaphyseal cancellous bone. Apart from a study of vertebral fractures, we have not found any histological description of cancellous bone healing in humans.

    Patients and methods We studied histological biopsies from the central part of 12 distal radial fractures obtained during surgery 6–28 days after the injury, using routine hematoxylin and eosin staining.

    Results New bone formation was seen in 6 cases. It was always in the form of fetal-like, disorganized woven bone. It seldom had contact with old trabeculae and appeared to have formed directly in the marrow. Cartilage was scarce or absent. The samples without bone formation showed only necrosis, scar, or old cancellous bone.

    Interpretation The histology suggests that cells in the midst of the marrow respond to the trauma by direct formation of bone, independently of trabecular surfaces.

  • 20.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Schilcher, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Histology of an undisplaced femoral fatigue fracture in association with bisphosphonate treatment2010In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 81, no 4, p. 460-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 21.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Wagner, Philippe
    Swedish National Competence Center for Musculoskeletal Disorders Lund University Hospital.
    Nilsson, Kjell G.
    Department of Orthopedics Umeå University Hospital.
    Ranstam, Jonas
    Swedish National Competence Center for Musculoskeletal Disorders Lund University Hospital.
    Fixed or loose? Dichotomy in RSA data for cemented cups2008In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 79, no 4, p. 467-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Roentgen stereometric analysis (RSA) cannot discern whether a single prosthesis is fixed or migrating below the detection level. Samples of patients usually show migration values that appear to be continuously distributed. Is there such continuity, or is there a dichotomy between stable and migrating prostheses? The hypothesis of a dichotomy has, to our knowledge, not been tested. We present an exploratory evaluation of such a dichotomy using a mixture distribution algorithm. METHODS: We analyzed the migration (as determined by RSA) of 147 cemented acetabular cups of 7 different designs by using a new set of algorithms for frequency distribution analysis called Rmix. RESULTS: We first analyzed a migration vector, regardless of direction. After 2 years there was a significant dichotomy between 2 lognormal subgroups within the sample. Although some types of cups were over-represented in one of the subgroups, neither cup design, sex, nor operating department could explain the dichotomy into two groups, which appears to reflect the existence of two basically different types of behavior of the cups. We next analyzed the migration along the 3 axes in space, and found a similar dichotomy. During the second year, around 80% of the patients belonged to a distinct, normally distributed subgroup with a mean not different from 0 mm and a small variation. The remainder differed significantly from this subgroup and showed migration. INTERPRETATION: There is a dichotomy in migration pattern. During the second postoperative year, most cups belonged to a subpopulation that appeared stable. The remainder is probably at risk of loosening. For a single type of prosthesis, the relative size of the stable subgroup may be a good index of the expected performance. The possibility of detecting subgroups within a seemingly continuous sample might be useful in many fields of medicine.

  • 22.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Wermelin, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine .
    Tengwall, Pentti
    Laboratory of Applied Physics, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology Linköping University.
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine .
    Additive effects of PTH and bisphosphonates on the bone healing response to metaphyseal implants in rats2008In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 79, no 1, p. 111-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     BACKGROUND: When PTH is used to increase the amount of bone in osteoporotic patients, combination with bisphosphonates is known to attenuate the response. This might be explained by the reduced number of remodeling sites after bisphosphonate treatment, which reduces the number of cells able to respond to PTH. However, in a repair situation after trauma, a large number of osteoblasts reside in the wound site. If their activity is no longer coupled to osteoclasts, decreased resorption by bisphosphonates and stimulation of osteoblastic activity by PTH should both (independently) increase bone formation. Thus, we hypothesized that in contrast to the case in osteoporosis treatment, PTH and bisphosphonates have an additive effect in situations involving bone regeneration. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Stainless steel screws, either coated with biphosphonates or uncoated, were inserted in 46 rat tibias. This normally elicits a bone repair response, leading to a gradual increase in the strength of screw fixation. Half of the rats also received daily injections of teriparatide (PTH). Thus, there were 4 groups: control, bisphosphonate, PTH, and bisphosphonate plus PTH. Pull-out force and energy were measured after 2 weeks. RESULTS: The combined treatment had the strongest effect. It doubled the pull-out force and tripled the pull-out energy, compared to untreated controls. Also, bisphosphonate or PTH alone increased the pull-out force and energy, although less. No treatment cross-dependency was observed. INTERPRETATION: Because bisphosphonates mainly influence osteoclasts, and intermittent administration of PTH mainly influences osteoblasts, our findings indicate that to a large extent these cells work without coupling in this model. It appears that bisphosphonates are unlikely to attenuate the response to PTH during the formation of new bone.

  • 23.
    Atroshi, Isam
    et al.
    Department Orthoped, Sweden; Ystad Hospital, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Nordenskjold, Jesper
    Department Orthoped, Sweden; Ystad Hospital, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Lauritzson, Anna
    Department Orthoped, Sweden; Ystad Hospital, Sweden.
    Ahlgren, Eva
    Department Orthoped, Sweden; Ystad Hospital, Sweden.
    Waldau, Johanna
    Department Orthoped, Sweden; Ystad Hospital, Sweden.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department Orthoped, Sweden; Ystad Hospital, Sweden.
    Collagenase treatment of Dupuytrens contracture using a modified injection method2015In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 86, no 3, p. 310-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Treatment of Dupuytrens contracture (DC) with collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH) consists of injection followed by finger manipulation. We used a modified method, injecting a higher dose than recommended on the label into several parts of the cord, which allows treatment of multiple joint contractures in 1 session and may increase efficacy. We studied the occurrence of skin tears and short-term outcome with this procedure. Patients and methods - We studied 164 consecutive hands with DC, palpable cord, and extension deficit of greater than= 20 degrees in the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and/or proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint (mean patient age 70 years, 82% men). A hand surgeon injected all the content of 1 CCH vial (approximately 0.80 mg) into multiple spots in the cord and performed finger extension under local anesthesia after 1 or 2 days. A nurse recorded skin tears on a diagram and conducted a standard telephone follow-up within 4 weeks. A hand therapist measured joint contracture before injection and at a median of 23 (IQR: 7-34) days after finger extension. Results - A skin tear occurred in 66 hands (40%). The largest diameter of the tear was less than= 5 mm in 30 hands and greater than 10 mm in 14 hands. Hands with skin tear had greater mean pretreatment MCP extension deficit than those without tear: 59 degrees (SD 26) as opposed to 32 degrees (SD 23). Skin tear occurred in 21 of 24 hands with MCP contracture of greater than= 75 degrees. All tears healed with open-wound treatment. No infections occurred. Mean improvement in total (MCP + PIP) extension deficit was 55 degrees (SD 28). Interpretation - Skin tears occurred in 40% of hands treated with collagenase injections, but only a fifth of them were larger than 1 cm. Tears were more likely in hands with severe MCP joint contracture. All tears healed without complications. Short-term contracture reduction was good.

  • 24.
    Ban, Ilija
    et al.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp Hvidovre, Dept Orthopaed Surg, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Copenhagen Univ Hosp Hvidovre, Clin Orthoped Res Hvidovre, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Nowak, Jan
    Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed Surg, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Virtanen, Kaisa
    Univ Helsinki, Cent Hosp, Dept Surg, Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland..
    Troelsen, Anders
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp Hvidovre, Dept Orthopaed Surg, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Copenhagen Univ Hosp Hvidovre, Clin Orthoped Res Hvidovre, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Overtreatment of displaced midshaft clavicle fractures: A survey of hospitals in Sweden, Denmark, and Finland2016In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 87, no 6, p. 541-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose The best treatment for displaced clavicle fractures has been debated for decades. Operative treatment has become more common. However, several randomized trials comparing non-operative and operative treatment have not shown any compelling evidence in favor of surgery. We identified the preferred treatment of displaced midshaft clavicle fractures at public hospitals in 3 countries in Scandinavia.Patients and methods A purpose-made multiple-choice questionnaire in English was sent to all public hospitals in Denmark, Sweden, and Finland. This was addressed to the orthopedic surgeon responsible for treatment of clavicle fractures, and completed questionnaires were obtained from 85 of 118 hospitals.Results In the 3 countries, 69 of the 85 hospitals that responded would treat displaced clavicle fractures operatively. Clear criteria for treatment allocation were used at 58 of the hospitals, with the remaining 27 using individual assessment in collaboration with the patient. Precontoured locking plates were mostly used, placed either superiorly (64/85) or anteriorly (10/85).Interpretation Displaced midshaft clavicle fractures are mainly treated operatively in Sweden, Denmark, and Finland. This treatment is not supported by compelling evidence.

  • 25.
    Benoni, Anna Clara
    et al.
    Research and Development Department, Halmstad Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Department of Orthopedics, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nilsdotter, Anna
    Department of Orthopedics, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Patient-reported outcome after rheumatoid arthritis-related surgery in the lower extremities: A report from the Swedish National Register of Rheuma Surgery (RAKIR)2012In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 83, no 2, p. 179-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although decreasing with the development of effective pharmacological regimes, joint surgery has improved the function and quality of life of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Few studies have assessed patient-reported outcomes after RA surgery to the lower extremities. Here we report patient-relevant outcome after RA-related surgery based on the first data from the Swedish National Register of Rheuma Surgery (RAKIR).

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: 258 RA patients (212 women) who had joint surgery performed at the Department of Orthopaedics, Spenshult Hospital between September 2007 and June 2009 were included. Mean age at surgery was 64 (20-86) years. The patients completed the SF-36 and HAQ questionnaires preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively, and 165 patients completed them after 12 months.

    RESULTS: Improvement was seen as early as at 6 months. At 12 months, 165 patients (141 women)-including hip (n = 15), knee (n = 27), foot (n = 102), and ankle (n = 21) patients-reported statistically significant improvements from preoperatively to 12 months postoperatively in HAQ (mean change: -0.11) and SF-36 subscales physical function (11), role physical (12), bodily pain (13), social functioning (6.4), and role emotional (9.4). Hip and knee patients reported the greatest improvements.

    INTERPRETATION: Orthopedic RA-related surgery of the lower extremities has a strong effect on pain and physical function. Improvement is evident as early as 6 months postoperatively and remains after 12 months. Copyright © 2011 Nordic Orthopaedic Federation.

  • 26.
    Bergström, Ulrica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Pettersson, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Svensson, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    The hip fracture incidence curve is shifting to the right: a forecast of the age-quake2009In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 80, no 5, p. 520-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The number of hip fractures has doubled in the last 30–40 years in many countries. Age-adjusted incidence has been reported to be decreasing in Europe and North America, but is there a decreasing trend in all age groups? Patients and methods This population-based study included all hip-fracture patients over 50 years of age (a total of 2,919 individuals, 31% of whom were men) admitted to Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, from 1993 through 2005. Results The incidence of hip fracture declined between the periods 1993–1996 and 2001–2005: from 706 to 625 hip fractures per 105 women and from 390 to 317 hip fractures per 105 men. However, there was a 114% increase in the number of fractures in women aged 90 or older (12 and 25 hip fractures/year, respectively, in the two time periods). For the period 2001–05, women ≥ 90 years of age accounted for almost the same numbers of hip fractures as women aged 75–79 (27 fractures/year). The rate increased during this period, from 2,700 per 105 women to 3,900 per 105 women > 90 years. In men there were declining trends for both relative and absolute numbers. Interpretation Although age-adjusted incidence declined in the population > 50 years of age, absolute fracture rate and incidence increased in the very old. Women over 90 now have the same absolute number of hip fractures every year as women aged 75–79 years. There was a right-shift in hip fracture distribution towards the oldest old, probably due to an increased number of octo/nonagenarians, a new population of particularly frail old people that hardly existed earlier. Better health among septuagenarians may also have delayed the age at which fractures occurred. This changing pattern will strain orthopedic and geriatric resources even more.

  • 27.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Abaloparatide versus teriparatide: a head to head comparison of effects on fracture healing in mouse models2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 6, p. 674-677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Teriparatide accelerates fracture healing in animals and probably in man. Abaloparatide is a new drug with similar although not identical effects on the teriparatide receptor. Given at 4 times the teriparatide dose in a human osteoporosis trial, abaloparatide increased bone density more than teriparatide, and both reduced fracture risk. We investigated in mice whether abaloparatide stimulates fracture healing, and if it does so with the suggested dose effect relation (4:1). Patients and methods - In a validated mouse model for metaphyseal healing (burr hole with screw pull-out), 96 mice were randomly allocated to 11 groups: control (saline), teriparatide or abaloparatide, where teriparatide and abaloparatide were given at 5 different doses each. In a femoral shaft osteotomy model, 24 mice were randomly allocated to 3 groups: control (saline), teriparatide (15 mu g/kg) or abaloparatide (60 mu g/kg). Each treatment was given daily via subcutaneous injections. Results were evaluated by mechanical testing and microCT. Results - In the metaphyseal model, a dose-dependent increase in screw pull-out force could be seen. In a linear regression analysis (r = 0.78) each increase in ln(dose) by 1 (regardless of drug type) was associated with an increase in pull-out force by 1.50 N (SE 0.18) (p amp;lt; 0.001). Changing drug from teriparatide to abaloparatide increased the force by 1.41 N (SE 0.60; p = 0.02). In the diaphyseal model, the callus density was 23% (SD 10), 38% (SD 10), and 47% (SD 2) for control, for teriparatide and abaloparatide respectively. Both drugs were significantly different from controls (p = 0.001 and p = 0.008), but not from each other. Interpretation - Both drugs improve fracture healing, but in these mouse models, the potency per mu g of abaloparatide seems only 2.5 times that of teriparatide, rather than the 4:1 relation chosen in the clinical abaloparatide-teriparatide comparison trial.

  • 28.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Osteoblast precursors and inflammatory cells arrive simultaneously to sites of a trabecular-bone injury2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 4, p. 457-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Fracture healing in the shaft is usually described as a sequence of events, starting with inflammation, which triggers mesenchymal tissue formation in successive steps. Most clinical fractures engage cancellous bone. We here describe fracture healing in cancellous bone, focusing on the timing of inflammatory and mesenchymal cell type appearance at the site of injury. Material and methods - Rats received a proximal tibial drill hole, A subgroup received clodronate-containing liposomes before or after surgery. The tibiae were analyzed with micro-CT and immunohistochemistry 1 to 7 days after injury. Results - Granulocytes (myeloperoxidase) appeared in moderate numbers within the hole at day 1 and then gradually disappeared. Macrophage expression (CD68) was seen on day 1, increased until day 3, and then decreased. Mesenchymal cells (vimentin) had already accumulated in the periphery of the hole on day 1. Mesenchymal cells dominated in the entire lesion on day 3, now producing extracellular matrix. A modest number of preosteoblasts (RUNX2) were seen on day 1 and peaked on day 4. Osteoid was seen on day 4 in the traumatized region, with a distinct border to the uninjured surrounding marrow. Clodronate liposomes given before the injury reduced the volume of bone formation at day 7, but no reduction in macrophage numbers could be detected. Interpretation - The typical sequence of events in shaft fractures was not seen. Mesenchymal cells appeared simultaneously with granulocyte and macrophage arrival. Clodronate liposomes, known to reduce macrophage numbers, seemed to be associated with the delineation of the volume of tissue to be replaced by bone.

  • 29.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Experimental models for cancellous bone healing in the rat Comparison of drill holes and implanted screws2015In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 86, no 6, p. 745-750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Cancellous bone appears to heal by mechanisms different from shaft fracture healing. There is a paucity of animal models for fractures in cancellous bone, especially with mechanical evaluation. One proposed model consists of a screw in the proximal tibia of rodents, evaluated by pull-out testing. We evaluated this model in rats by comparing it to the healing of empty drill holes, in order to explain its relevance for fracture healing in cancellous bone. To determine the sensitivity to external influences, we also compared the response to drugs that influence bone healing. Methods - Mechanical fixation of the screws was measured by pull-out test and related to the density of the new bone formed around similar, but radiolucent, PMMA screws. The pull-out force was also related to the bone density in drill holes at various time points, as measured by microCT. Results - The initial bone formation was similar in drill holes and around the screw, and appeared to be reflected by the pull-out force. Both models responded similarly to alendronate or teriparatide (PTH). Later, the models became different as the bone that initially filled the drill hole was resorbed to restore the bone marrow cavity, whereas on the implant surface a thin layer of bone remained, making it change gradually from a trauma-related model to an implant fixation model. Interpretation - The similar initial bone formation in the different models suggests that pull-out testing in the screw model is relevant for assessment of metaphyseal bone healing. The subsequent remodeling would not be of clinical relevance in either model.

  • 30.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Ressner, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Koziorowski, Jacek
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Malmqvist, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Shining dead bone-cause for cautious interpretation of [F-18]NaF PET scans2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 124-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose — [18F]Fluoride ([18F]NaF) PET scan is frequently used for estimation of bone healing rate and extent in cases of bone allografting and fracture healing. Some authors claim that [18F]NaF uptake is a measure of osteoblastic activity, calcium metabolism, or bone turnover. Based on the known affinity of fluoride to hydroxyapatite, we challenged this view.

    Methods — 10 male rats received crushed, frozen allogeneic cortical bone fragments in a pouch in the abdominal wall on the right side, and hydroxyapatite granules on left side. [18F]NaF was injected intravenously after 7 days. 60 minutes later, the rats were killed and [18F]NaF uptake was visualized in a PET/CT scanner. Specimens were retrieved for micro CT and histology.

    Results — MicroCT and histology showed no signs of new bone at the implant sites. Still, the implants showed a very high [18F]NaF uptake, on a par with the most actively growing and remodeling sites around the knee joint.

    Interpretation — [18F]NaF binds with high affinity to dead bone and calcium phosphate materials. Hence, an [18F]NaF PET/CT scan does not allow for sound conclusions about new bone ingrowth into bone allograft, healing activity in long bone shaft fractures with necrotic fragments, or remodeling around calcium phosphate coated prostheses

  • 31.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Tätting, Love
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Schilcher, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Marrow compartment contribution to cortical defect healing2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 119-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Healing of shaft fractures is commonly described as regards external callus. We wanted to clarify the role of the bone marrow compartment in the healing of stable shaft fractures. Patients and methods - A longitudinal furrow was milled along the longitudinal axis of the femoral shaft in mice. The exposed bone marrow under the furrow was scooped out. The mice were then randomized to no further treatment, or to receiving 2 silicone plugs in the medullary canal distal and proximal to the defect. The plugs isolated the remaining marrow from contact with the defect. Results were studied with histology and flow cytometry. Results - Without silicone plugs, the marrow defect was filled with new bone marrow-like tissue by day 5, and new bone was seen already on day 10. The new bone was seen only at the level of the cortical injury, where it seemed to form simultaneously in the entire region of the removed cortex. The new bone seemed not to invade the marrow compartment, and there was a sharp edge between new bone and marrow. The regenerated marrow was similar to uninjured marrow, but contained considerably more cells. In the specimens with plugs, the marrow compartment was either filled with loose scar tissue, or empty, and there was only minimal bone formation, mainly located around the edges of the cortical injury. Interpretation - Marrow regeneration in the defect seemed to be a prerequisite for normal cortical healing. Shaft fracture treatment should perhaps pay more attention to the local bone marrow.

  • 32. Bjornsson, Hanna C.
    et al.
    Norlin, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    Adolfsson, Lars E.
    The influence of age, delay of repair, and tendon involvement in acute rotator cuff tears Structural and clinical outcomes after repair of 42 shoulders2011In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 187-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose Few authors have considered the outcome after acute traumatic rotator cuff tears in previously asymptomatic patients. We investigated whether delay of surgery, age at repair, and the number of cuff tendons involved affect the structural and clinical outcome. Patients and methods 42 patients with pseudoparalysis after trauma and no previous history of shoulder symptoms were included. A full-thickness tear in at least 1 of the rotator cuff tendons was diagnosed in all patients. Mean time to surgery was 38 (6-91) days. Follow-up at a mean of 39 (12-108) months after surgery included ultrasound, plain radiographs, Constant-Murley score, DASH score, and western Ontario rotator cuff (WORC) score. Results At follow-up, 4 patients had a full-thickness tear and 9 had a partial-thickness tear in the repaired shoulder. No correlation between the structural or clinical outcome and the time to repair within 3 months was found. The patients with a tendon defect at follow-up had a statistically significantly lower Constant-Murley score and WORC index in the injured shoulder and were significantly older than those with intact tendons. The outcomes were similar irrespective of the number of tendons repaired. Interpretation A delay of 3 months to repair had no effect on outcome. The patients with cuff defects at follow-up were older and they had a worse clinical outcome. Multi-tendon injury did not generate worse outcomes than single-tendon tears at follow-up.

  • 33.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna C
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Adolfsson, Lars E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Petersson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Holmgren, Theresa M
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Specific exercises for subacromial pain: Good results maintained for 5 years2017In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 88, no 6, p. 600-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose — We have previously shown that specific exercises reduced the need for surgery in subacromial painpatients at 1-year follow-up. We have now investigated whetherthis result was maintained after 5 years and compared the outcomesof surgery and non-surgical treatment.Patients and methods — 97 patients were included in the previouslyreported randomized study of patients on a waiting list forsurgery. These patients were randomized to specifi c or unspecifi cexercises. After 3 months of exercises the patients were asked ifthey still wanted surgery and this was also assessed at the present5-year follow-up. The 1-year assessment included Constant–Murley score, DASH, VAS at night, rest and activity, EQ-5D, andEQ-VAS. All these outcome assessments were repeated after 5years in 91 of the patients.Results — At the 5-year follow-up more patients in the specifi cexercise group had declined surgery, 33 of 47 as compared with16 of 44 (p = 0.001) in the unspecifi c exercise group. The meanConstant–Murley score continued to improve between the 1- and5-year follow-ups in both surgically and non-surgically treatedgroups. On a group level there was no clinically relevant changebetween 1 and 5 years in any of the other outcome measuresregardless of treatment.Interpretation — This 5-year follow-up of a previously publishedrandomized controlled trial found that specifi c exercisesreduced the need for surgery in patients with subacromial pain.Patients not responding to specifi c exercises may achieve similargood results with surgery. These fi ndings emphasize that a specifi cexercise program may serve as a selection tool for surgery.

  • 34.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eliasson, Pernilla T
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Elevated plasma levels of TIMP-1 in patients with rotator cuff tear2012In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 83, no 5, p. 523-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose:Extracellular matrix remodelling is altered in rotator cuff tears,16partly due to altered expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors. It is unclear if this altered expression can be traced as changes in plasma protein levels.

    The purposes were to measure the plasma level of MMPs and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) inpatients with rotator cuff tears and to relate changes in the pattern of MMP and TIMP levels with the extent of the rotator cuff tear.

    Methods: Blood samples were collected from 17 patients, median 61 (range 39-77) years, with sonographically verified rotator cuff tears (partial- or full-thickness). These were compared with 16 gender and age matched control persons with sonographically intact rotator cuffs. Plasma levels of MMPs and TIMPs were measured simultaneously using Luminex technology and ELISA.

    Results: The plasma level of TIMP-1 was elevated in patients with rotator cuff tears, especially in those with full-thickness tears. The levels of TIMP-1, TIMP-3 and MMP-9 were higher in patients with full-thickness tears compared to those with partial-thickness tears, but only TIMP-1 was different from controls.

    Interpretation: The observed elevation of TIMP-1 in plasma might reflect local pathological processes in or around the rotator cuff, or a genetic predisposition in these patients. That levels of TIMP-1 and certain MMP´s was found to differ between partial and full thickness tears may reflect the extent of the lesion or different aetiology and pathomechanisms.

  • 35.
    Björnsson, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Norlin, Rolf
    Orebro University Hospital.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    The influence of age, delay of repair, and tendon involvement in acute rotator cuff tears Structural and clinical outcomes after repair of 42 shoulders2011In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 187-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose Few authors have considered the outcome after acute traumatic rotator cuff tears in previously asymptomatic patients. We investigated whether delay of surgery, age at repair, and the number of cuff tendons involved affect the structural and clinical outcome. Patients and methods 42 patients with pseudoparalysis after trauma and no previous history of shoulder symptoms were included. A full-thickness tear in at least 1 of the rotator cuff tendons was diagnosed in all patients. Mean time to surgery was 38 (6-91) days. Follow-up at a mean of 39 (12-108) months after surgery included ultrasound, plain radiographs, Constant-Murley score, DASH score, and western Ontario rotator cuff (WORC) score. Results At follow-up, 4 patients had a full-thickness tear and 9 had a partial-thickness tear in the repaired shoulder. No correlation between the structural or clinical outcome and the time to repair within 3 months was found. The patients with a tendon defect at follow-up had a statistically significantly lower Constant-Murley score and WORC index in the injured shoulder and were significantly older than those with intact tendons. The outcomes were similar irrespective of the number of tendons repaired. Interpretation A delay of 3 months to repair had no effect on outcome. The patients with cuff defects at follow-up were older and they had a worse clinical outcome. Multi-tendon injury did not generate worse outcomes than single-tendon tears at follow-up.

  • 36.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Orthopedic surgery in ancient Egypt2014In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 85, no 6, p. 670-676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Ancient Egypt might be considered the cradle of medicine. The modern literature is, however, sometimes rather too enthusiastic regarding the procedures that are attributed an Egyptian origin. I briefly present and analyze the claims regarding orthopedic surgery in Egypt, what was actually done by the Egyptians, and what may have been incorrectly ascribed to them.

    METHODS: I reviewed the original sources and also the modern literature regarding surgery in ancient Egypt, concentrating especially on orthopedic surgery.

    RESULTS: As is well known, both literary sources and the archaeological/osteological material bear witness to treatment of various fractures. The Egyptian painting, often claimed to depict the reduction of a dislocated shoulder according to Kocher's method, is, however, open to interpretation. Therapeutic amputations are never depicted or mentioned in the literary sources, while the specimens suggested to demonstrate such amputations are not convincing.

    INTERPRETATION: The ancient Egyptians certainly treated fractures of various kinds, and with varying degrees of success. Concerning the reductions of dislocated joints and therapeutic amputations, there is no clear evidence for the existence of such procedures. It would, however, be surprising if dislocations were not treated, even though they have not left traces in the surviving sources. Concerning amputations, the general level of Egyptian surgery makes it unlikely that limb amputations were done, even if they may possibly have been performed under extraordinary circumstances.

  • 37.
    Borgquist, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    W-Dahl, Annette
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Dale, Havard
    Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway..
    Lidgren, Lars
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Stefansdottir, Anna
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Prosthetic joint infections - a need for health economy studies2014In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 218-220Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Bremander, Ann B
    et al.
    Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden.
    Dunbar, Michael
    Division of Orthopedics, London Health Sciences Center, London, Ontario, Canada.
    Knutson, Kaj
    Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden.
    Petersson, Ingemar F
    Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden.
    Robertsson, Otto
    Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden.
    Revision in previously satisfied knee arthroplasty patients is the result of their call on the physician, not on pre-planned follow-up: a retrospective study of 181 patients who underwent revision within 2 years2005In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 76, no 6, p. 785-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Degree of satisfaction with a knee arthroplasty is said to be correlated to reduced pain and better function. During a validation of the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register in 1997, previously operated patients were asked how satisfied they were with their knee. A subgroup of "satisfied" patients was identified who underwent revision within 2 years of having expressed satisfaction. Our aim was to study the revision diagnosis, to determine whether the problem leading to revision had been discovered as a result of routine follow-up, and also to find out when the symptoms leading to revision had started.

    METHODS: We retrospectively studied the medical records of 181 patients (181 knees), with a median age of 74 (31-88) years. 68% were women and the median time between primary operation and revision was 8 (3-21) years.

    RESULTS: Aseptic loosening (74/181) was the most common diagnosis. 2 cases were revised as a result of routine follow-up. 44% of the medical records included reports of pain in the replaced knee prior to answering the satisfaction questionnaire.

    INTERPRETATION: Few patients were admitted to knee revision surgery due to medical findings discovered during routine follow-up. The term "satisfaction" must be interpreted with care, as it seems to have a more complex meaning for the patients than absence of knee pain.

  • 39. Brodén, Cyrus
    et al.
    Mukka, Sebastian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics. Department of Orthopedics, Sundsvall Hospital, Sundsvall.
    Muren, Olle
    Eisler, Thomas
    Boden, Henrik
    Stark, André
    Sköldenberg, Olof
    High risk of early periprosthetic fractures after primary hip arthroplasty in elderly patients using a cemented, tapered, polished stem: an observational, prospective cohort study on 1,403 hips with 47 fractures after mean follow-up time of 4 years2015In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 86, no 2, p. 169-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Postoperative periprosthetic femoral fracture (PPF) after hip arthroplasty is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. We assessed the incidence and characteristics of periprosthetic fractures in a consecutive cohort of elderly patients treated with a cemented, collarless, polished and tapered femoral stem (CPT). Patients and methods - In this single-center prospective cohort study, we included 1,403 hips in 1,357 patients (mean age 82 (range 52-102) years, 72% women) with primary osteoarthritis (OA) or a femoral neck fracture (FNF) as indication for surgery (367 hips and 1,036 hips, respectively). 64% of patients were ASA class 3 or 4. Hip-related complications and need for repeat surgery were assessed at a mean follow-up time of 4 (1-7) years. A Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate risk factors associated with PPF. Results - 47 hips (3.3%) sustained a periprosthetic fracture at median 7 (2-79) months postoperatively; 41 were comminute Vancouver B2 or complex C-type fractures. The fracture rate was 3.8% for FNF patients and 2.2% for OA patients (hazard ratio (HR) = 4; 95% CI: 1.3-12). Patients > 80 years of age also had a higher risk of fracture (HR = 2; 95% CI: 1.1-4.5). Interpretation - We found a high incidence of early PPF associated with the CPT stem in this old and frail patient group. A possible explanation may be that the polished tapered stem acts as a wedge, splitting the femur after a direct hip contusion. Our results should be confirmed in larger, registry-based studies, but we advise caution when using this stem for this particular patient group.

  • 40. Brodén, Cyrus
    et al.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Sköldenberg, Olof
    Stigbrand, Hampus
    Hänni, Mari
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Giles, Joshua W
    Emery, Roger
    Lazarinis, Stergios
    Nyström, Andreas
    Olivecrona, Henrik
    Low-dose CT-based implant motion analysis is a precise tool for early migration measurements of hip cups: a clinical study of 24 patients.2020In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Early implant migration is known to be a predictive factor of clinical loosening in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) is the gold standard used to measure early migration in patients. However, RSA requires costly, specialized imaging equipment and the image process is complex. We determined the precision of an alternative, commercially available, CT method in 3 ongoing clinical THA studies, comprising 3 different cups.Materials and methods - 24 CT double examinations of 24 hip cups were selected consecutively from 3 ongoing prospective studies: 2 primary THA (1 cemented and 1 uncemented) and 1 THA (cemented) revision study. Precision of the CT-based implant motion analysis (CTMA) system was calculated separately for each study, using both the surface anatomy of the pelvis and metal beads placed in the pelvis.Results - For the CTMA analysis using the surface anatomy of the pelvis, the precision ranged between 0.07 and 0.31 mm in translation and 0.20° and 0.39° for rotation, respectively. For the CTMA analysis using beads the precision ranged between 0.08 and 0.20 mm in translation and between 0.20° and 0.43° for rotations. The radiation dose ranged between 0.2 and 2.3 mSv.Interpretation - CTMA achieved a clinically relevant and consistent precision between the 3 different hip cups studied. The use of different hip cup types, different CT scanners, or registration method (beads or surface anatomy) had no discernible effect on precision. Therefore, CTMA without the use of bone markers could potentially be an alternative to RSA to measure early migration.

  • 41.
    Brüggemann, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Fredlund, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Mallmin, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Hailer, Nils P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Are porous tantalum cups superior to conventional reinforcement rings?: A retrospective cohort study of 207 acetabular revisions2017In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 35-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Porous tantalum cups have been introduced as an alternative to various reinforcement rings in revision hip surgery. We hypothesized that porous tantalum cups would be superior to muller acetabular roof reinforcement rings (MARRs) in revision hip surgery with re-revision for aseptic loosening as the primary outcome measure. Patients and methods - 207 hips operated with either a porous tantalum cup (TM cup, n = 111) or a MARR (n = 96) at index procedure were identified in our local arthroplasty register. Acetabular defects were classified according to Paprosky. There were 96 men and 111 women with a median age of 71 (35-95) years, presenting acetabular defect size type I in 39 cases, IIA in 22, IIB in 27, IIC in 43, IIIA in 32, and IIIB in 37 cases. Analysis of medical records identified all patients with subsequent re-revision and reasons for re-revisions. Kaplan-Meier survival functions were used to estimate implant survival. Results - With re-revision for aseptic loosening as the end-point, the 6-year unadjusted cumulative survival was 97% (95% CI: 94-100) for TM cups and 96% (CI: 92-100) for MARR (p = 0.6). Using re-revision for any reason as the endpoint, 6-year survival was 87% (CI: 81-94) for TM cups and 95% (CI: 90-99) for MARR (p = 0.06). The main reason for re-revision in the TM group was dislocation (n = 10), followed by loosening (n = 3), whereas the main reason for re-revision in the MARR group was aseptic loosening (n = 8). Duration of the index procedure and perioperative blood loss were lower in the TM group. Interpretation - Both TM and MARR lead to good 6-year results in acetabular revision surgery. The methods differ in their respective failure mechanisms. We conclude that TM cups are a valuable treatment option in acetabular revision surgery, but the reasons underlying dislocations after the use of TM cups must be analyzed further.

  • 42.
    Brüggemann, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Mallmin, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Hailer, Nils P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Do dual-mobility cups cemented into porous tantalum shells reduce the risk of dislocation after revision surgery?: A retrospective cohort study on 184 patients2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 156-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose Dual-mobility cups (DMCs) reduce the risk of dislocation and porous tantalum (TM) shells show favorable osseointegration after acetabular revision surgery, yet the combination of these implants has not been studied. We hypothesized that (1) cementing a DMC into a TM shell decreases the risk of dislocation; (2) DMCs cemented into TM shells are not at greater risk of re-revision; (3) liberation of tantalum ions is marginal after use of this combined technique.Patients and methods We investigated the outcome in 184 hips (184 patients) after acetabular revision surgery with TM shells, fitted either with DMCs (n = 69), or with standard polyethylene (PE) liners (n = 115). Chart follow-up was complete for all patients, and the occurrence of dislocations and re-revisions was recorded. 20 were deceased, 50 were unable to attend follow-up, leaving 114 for assessment of hip function after 4.9 (0.5-8.9) years, radiographs were obtained in 99, and tantalum concentrations in 84 patients.Results 1 patient with a DMC had a dislocation, whereas 14 patients with PE liners experienced at least 1 dislocation. 11 of 15 re-revisions in the PE group were necessitated by dislocations, whereas none of the 2 re-revisions in the DMC group was performed for this reason. Hence, dislocation-free survival after 4 years was 99% (95% CI 96-100) in the DMC group, whereas it was 88% (CI 82-94, p = 0.01) in the PE group. We found no radiographic signs of implant failure in any patient. Mean tantalum concentrations were 0.1 mu l/L (CI 0.05-0.2) in the DMC group and 0.1 mu g/L (CI 0.05-0.2) in the PE group.Interpretation Cementing DMCs into TM shells reduces the risk of dislocation after acetabular revision surgery without jeopardizing overall cup survival, and without enhancing tantalum release.

  • 43.
    Buciuto, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Uhlin, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammarby, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammer, Richard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    RAB-plate vs Richards CHS plate for unstable trochanteric hip fractures: A randomized study of 233 patients with 1-year follow-up1998In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 25-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We prospectively randomized 233 patients with unstable trochanteric hip fractures for treatment with a 120° fixed angle blade-plate having a buttress rod (group A, n 111) or a 135° compression hip screw (group B, n 122). the minimum follow-up time was 1 year. the ratio of technical failure was 9% in group A and 19% in group B (p = 0.06). 79 (87%) fractures in group A and 65 (68%) fractures in group B healed without any complication (p = 0.003). Malunion occurred in 2 cases in group A and in 15 cases in group B (p = 0.002).

  • 44.
    Cnudde, Peter
    et al.
    Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register, Gothenburg, Sweden;Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Orthopaed, Gothenburg, Sweden;Hywel Dda Univ Healthboard, Prince Philip Hosp, Dept Orthopaed, Llanelli, Wales.
    Bulow, Erik
    Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register, Gothenburg, Sweden;Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Orthopaed, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nemes, Szilard
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Orthopaed, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tyson, Yosef
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mohaddes, Maziar
    Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register, Gothenburg, Sweden;Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Orthopaed, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rolfson, Ola
    Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register, Gothenburg, Sweden;Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Orthopaed, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Association between patient survival following reoperation after total hip replacement and the reason for reoperation: an analysis of 9,926 patients in the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register2019In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 90, no 3, p. 226-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose

    The association between long-term patient survival and elective primary total hip replacement (THR) has been described extensively. The long-term survival following reoperation of THR is less well understood. We investigated the relative survival of patients undergoing reoperation following elective THR and explored an association between the indication for the reoperation and relative survival.

    Patients and methods

    In this observational cohort study we selected the patients who received an elective primary THR and subsequent reoperations during 1999-2017 as recorded in the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register. The selected cohort was followed until the end of the study period, censoring or death. The indications for 1st- and eventual 2nd-time reoperations were analyzed and the relative survival ratio of the observed survival and the expected survival was determined.

    Results

    There were 9,926 1st-time reoperations and of these 2,558 underwent further reoperations. At 5 years after the latest reoperation, relative survival following 1st-time reoperations was 0.94% (95% CI 0.93-0.96) and 0.90% (CI 0.87-0.92) following 2nd-time reoperations. At 5 years patients with a 1st-time reoperation for aseptic loosening had higher survival than expected; however, reoperations performed for periprosthetic fracture, dislocation, and infection had lower survival.

    Interpretation

    The relative survival following 1st- and 2nd-time reoperations in elective THR patients differs by reason for reoperation. The impact of reoperation on life expectancy is more obvious for infection/dislocation and periprosthetic fracture.

  • 45.
    Coster, Maria C.
    et al.
    SUS Malmö, Sweden.
    Nilsdotter, Anna
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Hospital, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Lund University, Sweden; Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Minimally important change, measurement error, and responsiveness for the Self-Reported Foot and Ankle Score2017In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 88, no 3, p. 300-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are increasingly used to evaluate results in orthopedic surgery. To enhance good responsiveness with a PROM, the minimally important change (MIC) should be established. MIC reflects the smallest measured change in score that is perceived as being relevant by the patients. We assessed MIC for the Self-reported Foot and Ankle Score (SEFAS) used in Swedish national registries. Patients and methods - Patients with forefoot disorders (n = 83) or hindfoot/ankle disorders (n = 80) completed the SEFAS before surgery and 6 months after surgery. At 6 months also, a patient global assessment (PGA) scaleas external criterionwas completed. Measurement error was expressed as the standard error of a single determination. MIC was calculated by (1) median change scores in improved patients on the PGA scale, and (2) the best cutoff point (BCP) and area under the curve (AUC) using analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves (ROCs). Results - The change in mean summary score was the same, 9 (SD 9), in patients with forefoot disorders and in patients with hindfoot/ankle disorders. MIC for SEFAS in the total sample was 5 score points (IQR: 2-8) and the measurement error was 2.4. BCP was 5 and AUC was 0.8 (95% CI: 0.7-0.9). Interpretation - As previously shown, SEFAS has good responsiveness. The score change in SEFAS 6 months after surgery should exceed 5 score points in both forefoot patients and hindfoot/ankle patients to be considered as being clinically relevant.

  • 46.
    Crnalic, Sead
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Hildingsson, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Löfvenberg, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Outcome after surgery for metastatic spinal cord compression in 54 patients with prostate cancer2012In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 80-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose The criteria for selecting patients who may benefit from surgery of spinal cord compression in metastatic prostate cancer are poorly defined. We therefore studied patients operated for metastatic spinal cord compression in order to evaluate outcome of surgery and to find predictors of survival. Patients and methods We reviewed the records of 54 consecutive patients with metastatic prostate cancer who were operated for spinal cord compression at Umeå University Hospital. The indication for surgery was neurological deficit due to spinal cord compression. 41 patients had hormone-refractory cancer and 13 patients had previously untreated, hormone-naïve prostate cancer. 29 patients were operated with posterior decompression only, and in 25 patients posterior decompression and stabilization was performed. Results Preoperatively, 6/54 of patients were able to walk. 1 month after surgery, 33 patients were walking, 15 were non-ambulatory, and 6 had died. Mortality rate was 11% at 1 month, 41% at 6 months, and 59% at 1 year. In the hormone-naïve group, 8/13 patients were still alive with a median postoperative follow-up of 26 months. In the hormone-refractory group, median survival was 5 months. Patients with hormone-refractory disease and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) of ≤ 60% had median survival of 2.5 months, whereas those with KPS of 70% and KPS of ≥ 80% had a median survival of 7 months and 18 months, respectively (p < 0.001). Visceral metastases were present in 12/41 patients with hormone-refractory tumor at the time of spinal surgery, and their median survival was 4 months-as compared to 10 months in patients without visceral metastases (p = 0.003). Complications within 30 days of surgery occurred in 19/54 patients. Interpretation Our results indicate that patients with hormone-naive disease, and those with hormone-refractory disease with good performance status and lacking visceral metastases, may be helped by surgery for metastatic spinal cord compression.

  • 47.
    Cöster, Maria C.
    et al.
    Department of Orthopedics and Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Department of Rheumatology, Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rosengren, Björn E.
    Department of Orthopedics and Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Håkan
    Department of Orthopedics and Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Åke
    Department of Orthopedics and Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Magnus K.
    Department of Orthopedics and Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Validity, reliability, and responsiveness of the Self-reported Foot and Ankle Score (SEFAS) in forefoot, hindfoot, and ankle disorders2014In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 85, no 2, p. 187-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The self-reported foot and ankle score (SEFAS) is a questionnaire designed to evaluate disorders of the foot and ankle, but it is only validated for arthritis in the ankle. We validated SEFAS in patients with forefoot, midfoot, hindfoot, and ankle disorders.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: 118 patients with forefoot disorders and 106 patients with hindfoot or ankle disorders completed the SEFAS, the foot and ankle outcome score (FAOS), SF-36, and EQ-5D before surgery. We evaluated construct validity for SEFAS versus FAOS, SF-36, and EQ-5D; floor and ceiling effects; test-retest reliability (ICC); internal consistency; and agreement. Responsiveness was evaluated by effect size (ES) and standardized response mean (SRM) 6 months after surgery. The analyses were done separately in patients with forefoot disorders and hindfoot/ankle disorders.

    RESULTS: Comparing SEFAS to the other scores, convergent validity (when correlating foot-specific questions) and divergent validity (when correlating foot-specific and general questions) were confirmed. SEFAS had no floor and ceiling effects. In patients with forefoot disorders, ICC was 0.92 (CI: 0.85-0.96), Cronbach's α was 0.84, ES was 1.29, and SRM was 1.27. In patients with hindfoot or ankle disorders, ICC was 0.93 (CI: 0.88-0.96), Cronbach's α was 0.86, ES was 1.05, and SRM was 0.99.

    INTERPRETATION: SEFAS has acceptable validity, reliability, and responsiveness in patients with various forefoot, hindfoot, and ankle disorders. SEFAS is therefore an appropriate patient- reported outcome measure (PROM) for these patients, even in national registries.

  • 48.
    Cöster, Maria C.
    et al.
    Department of Orthopedics and Clinical Sciences, SUS Malmö, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nilsdotter, Anna
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Kalmar Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden & Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Section of Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Minimally important change, measurement error, and responsiveness for the Self-Reported Foot and Ankle Score2017In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 88, no 3, p. 300-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are increasingly used to evaluate results in orthopedic surgery. To enhance good responsiveness with a PROM, the minimally important change (MIC) should be established. MIC reflects the smallest measured change in score that is perceived as being relevant by the patients. We assessed MIC for the Self-reported Foot and Ankle Score (SEFAS) used in Swedish national registries.

    Patients and methods: Patients with forefoot disorders (n = 83) or hindfoot/ankle disorders (n = 80) completed the SEFAS before surgery and 6 months after surgery. At 6 months also, a patient global assessment (PGA) scaleas external criterionwas completed. Measurement error was expressed as the standard error of a single determination. MIC was calculated by (1) median change scores in improved patients on the PGA scale, and (2) the best cutoff point (BCP) and area under the curve (AUC) using analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves (ROCs).

    Results: The change in mean summary score was the same, 9 (SD 9), in patients with forefoot disorders and in patients with hindfoot/ankle disorders. MIC for SEFAS in the total sample was 5 score points (IQR: 2-8) and the measurement error was 2.4. BCP was 5 and AUC was 0.8 (95% CI: 0.7-0.9).

    Interpretation: As previously shown, SEFAS has good responsiveness. The score change in SEFAS 6 months after surgery should exceed 5 score points in both forefoot patients and hindfoot/ankle patients to be considered as being clinically relevant.

    © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Taylor & Francis on behalf of the Nordic Orthopedic Federation.

  • 49.
    Dahlqvist, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Orlén, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Matsson, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Lönnerholm, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Gustavson, Karl-Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia: A clinical and genetic study of 12 cases in a Swedish 6-generation family2009In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 80, no 6, p. 711-715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is a common genetically and clinically heterogeneous skeletal dysplasia characterized by early-onset osteoarthritis, mainly in the hip and knee, and mild-to-moderate short stature. Here we report on a 6-generation MED family with 17 affected members. METHOD: The clinical and radiographic data on the 12 affected members still living were scrutinized. A structured inquiry comprising state of health and MED-related symptoms since birth up to the present time and the osteoarthritis outcome (KOOS) questionnaire were sent to all living family members with MED. The 5 known gene loci for autosomal dominant MED were analyzed for linkage, using fluorescence-labeled microsatellite markers. Linkage was ascertained with markers close to the COL9A2 gene, which was analyzed for mutations by sequencing. RESULTS: We identified an exon 3 donor splice mutation in the COL9A2 gene in all affected family members. Clinical, radiographic, and questionnaire data from affected family members suggested that MED caused by COL9A2 mutations starts in early childhood with knee pain accompanied by delayed ossification of femoral epiphyses. The disease then either stabilizes during puberty or progresses with additional joints becoming affected; joint surgery might be necessary. The progression of the disease also affects muscles, with increasing atrophy, resulting in muscle fatigue and pain. Muscular atrophy has not been reported earlier in cases with COL9A2 mutations. INTERPRETATION: In a patient with clinically suspected or verified MED, it is important to perform DNA-based analysis to identify a possible disease-causing mutation. This information can be used to carry out genetic risk assessment of other family members and to achieve an early and correct diagnosis in the children.

  • 50.
    Dahlstrand, Henrik
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Sect Orthopaed & Sports Med, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stark, Andre
    Karolinska Inst, Danderyd Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wick, Marius C.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst Stockholm, Funct Unit Musculoskeletal Radiol Funct Imaging &, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Anissian, Lucas
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Dept Orthopaed Surg, Portland, OR USA..
    Hailer, Nils
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Weiss, Rudiger J.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Sect Orthopaed & Sports Med, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Comparison of metal ion concentrations and implant survival after total hip arthroplasty with metal-on-metal versus metal-on-polyethylene articulations: a 16-year follow-up of a prospective randomized study2017In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 88, no 5, p. 490-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Large metal-on-metal (MoM) articulations are associated with metal wear and corrosion, leading to increased metal ion concentrations and unacceptable revision rates. There are few comparative studies of 28-mm MoM articulations with conventional metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) couplings. We present a long-term follow-up of a randomized controlled trial comparing MoM versus MoP 28-mm articulations, focused on metal ions and implant survival. Patients and methods - 85 patients with a mean age of 65 years at surgery were randomized to a MoM (Metasul) or a MoP (Protasul) bearing. After 16 years, 38 patients had died and 4 had undergone revision surgery. 13 patients were unavailable for clinical follow-up, leaving 30 patients (n = 14 MoM and n = 16 MoP) for analysis of metal ion concentrations and clinical outcome. Results - 15-year implant survival was similar in both groups (MoM 96% [95% CI 88-100] versus MoP 97% [95% CI 91-100]). The mean serum cobalt concentration was 4-fold higher in the MoM (1.5 mu g/L) compared with the MoP cohort (0.4 mu g/L, p < 0.001) and the mean chromium concentration was double in the MoM (2.2 mu g/L) compared with the MoP cohort (1.0 mu g/L, p = 0.05). Mean creatinine levels were similar in both groups (MoM 93 mu mol/L versus MoP 92 mu mol/L). Harris hip scores differed only marginally between the MoM and MoP cohorts. Interpretation - This is the longest follow-up of a randomized trial on 28-mm MoM articulations, and although implant survival in the 2 groups was similar, metal ion concentrations remained elevated in the MoM cohort even in the long term.

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